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ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 152 of 152 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Orthopaedica     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Orthopedics     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Arthroplasty Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone & Joint 360     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Bone Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Burns & Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Orthopedic Research     Open Access  
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chinese Journal of Traumatology     Open Access  
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Concussion     Open Access  
Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Orthopaedic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Der Orthopäde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Die Wirbelsäule     Hybrid Journal  
Duke Orthopedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
East African Orthopaedic Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
EFORT Open Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EMC - Técnicas Quirúrgicas - Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
EMC - Tecniche Chirurgiche - Chirurgia Ortopedica     Full-text available via subscription  
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Podiatry / Revista Europea de Podología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Foot & Ankle International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Spine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Research in Orthopaedics     Open Access  
International Musculoskeletal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
JAAOS : Global Research & Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants     Hybrid Journal  
JBJS Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
JOR Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal de Traumatologie du Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Joint Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Children's Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Musculoskeletal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Orthopaedic Association of South Indian States     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Diseases and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Orthopaedic Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Orthopaedic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Orthopaedic Translation     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Orthopaedics, Trauma and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology     Open Access  
Journal of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Musculoskeletal Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma     Open Access  
North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
OA Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Obere Extremität     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Orthopedics and Rheumatology     Open Access  
Open Journal of Trauma     Open Access  
Open Orthopaedics Journal     Open Access  
Operative Orthopädie und Traumatologie     Hybrid Journal  
Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopädie & Rheuma     Full-text available via subscription  
Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Orthopaedic Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Orthopaedic Proceedings     Partially Free  
Orthopaedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthopaedics and Trauma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Orthopedic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Orthopedic Research and Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orthopedic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Orthoplastic Surgery     Open Access  
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open     Open Access  
Osteologie     Hybrid Journal  
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia     Open Access  
OTA International     Open Access  
Paediatric Orthopaedics and Related Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Prosthetics and Orthotics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Chilena de Ortopedia y Traumatología / Chilean Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access  
Revista de la Asociación Argentina de Ortopedia y Traumatología     Open Access  
Revista Española de Cirugía Ortopédica y Traumatología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Portuguesa de Ortopedia e Traumatologia     Open Access  
Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Romanian Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology     Open Access  
SA Orthopaedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SICOT-J     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Spine Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Sport-Orthopädie - Sport-Traumatologie - Sports Orthopaedics and Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Techniques in Orthopaedics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Trauma (Travma)     Open Access  
Trauma und Berufskrankheit     Hybrid Journal  
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology and Orthopedics of Russia     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ортопедия, травматология и протезирование     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.146
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1434-3916 - ISSN (Online) 0936-8051
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Diabesity: a superadded effect contributing to worse total primary hip
           replacement operative outcomes for patients with diabetes and obesity

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      Abstract: Introduction Although the independent effects of diabetes mellitus and obesity on total hip replacement (THR) outcomes have been widely studied, their combined effect remains uncharacterised. This study aimed to assess the influence of diabesity on primary THR operative outcomes. Materials and methods A retrospective study was performed comparing the outcomes of patients with diabesity (diabetes mellitus and obesity [BMI ≥ 30]) with a control cohort after primary THR using an established arthroplasty database. Data were collected pre-operatively and 12 months post-operatively, including Oxford Hip Score (OHS), EuroQol 5-dimensions (EQ5D), post-operative satisfaction and complication rates. Results 2323 THRs were analysed, of which 94 (4%) had diabesity. Diabesity was independently associated with significantly worse OHS improvement post-operatively (− 1.85 points, 95% CI − 2.93 to − 0.76, p = 0.001). This reduction in addition to the independent effect of obesity (− 0.69 points, 95% CI − 1.18 to − 0.21, p = 0.005) resulted in an overall 2.54 point OHS reduction for patients with diabesity. Diabesity was not associated with EQ5D score change or post-operative satisfaction. Diabesity was independently associated with a worse pre-operative EQ5D score (−0.08 points, 95% CI −0.12 to −0.03, p = 0.002). When combining the associated risk of obesity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.71, 95% CI 1.15–2.54, p = 0.008) with the superadded effect of diabesity (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.19–4.71, p = 0.014) the rate of superficial wound infection post-operatively was significantly increased (OR 4.05, 95% CI 1.38–11.95). Obesity was associated with a significantly increased risk of deep infection (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.55–8.68, p = 0.003), but no additive effect of diabetes was found. Conclusions Diabesity confers a superadded effect over established associations between THR outcomes and obesity and diabetes individually. Patients with diabesity experience worse improvement in hip-specific functional outcome, worse post-operative quality of life, and an increased risk of superficial and deep wound infection following THR.
      PubDate: 2022-08-13
       
  • High-risk ankle fractures in high-risk older patients: to fix or nail'

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      Abstract: Introduction Optimal treatment of high-risk ankle fractures in older, comorbid patients is unknown. Results of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) versus tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC) fusion nailing for the treatment of high-risk geriatric ankle fractures were investigated. Materials and methods Results of ORIF versus TTC fusion nailing were evaluated via retrospective case–control cohort study of 60 patients over age 50 with an open ankle fracture or one with at least 50% talar subluxation and at least 1 high-risk comorbidity: diabetes mellitus (DM), peripheral vascular disease, immunosuppression, active smoking, or a BMI > 35. The primary outcome was reoperation rate within 1-year post-surgery. Secondary outcomes include infection, peri-implant fracture, malunion/nonunion, mortality, length of stay, disposition, and hospital acquired complications. Results Mean age was 71 (ORIF) and 68 (TTC). 12/47 (25.5%) ORIF cases were open fractures versus 4/14 (28.6%) with TTC. There were no significant differences between ORIF and TTC in 1-year reoperation rates (17% vs 21.4%), infection rates (12.8% vs 14.3%), or union rates (76.% vs 85.7%), respectively. One TTC patient sustained a peri-implant fracture treated nonoperatively. There were no significant differences in medical risk factors between groups other than a higher rate of DM in the TTC group, 42.6% vs 78.6%, p = 0.02. Incomplete functional outcome data in this challenging patient cohort precluded drawing conclusions. Conclusion ORIF and TTC fusion nailing result in comparable and acceptable reoperation, infection, and union rates in treating high-risk ankle fractures in patients over 50 with at least 1 major comorbidity for increased complications; further study is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-08-10
       
  • Acetabular orientation in triple pelvic osteotomy: is intraoperative
           fluoroscopy reliable'

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      Abstract: Purpose In pelvic osteotomies, unfavorable balancing of the anterior and posterior acetabular wall can affect the longevity of the natural joint. This raises the question, whether intraoperative fluoroscopy is sufficiently accurate. The objective was to assess the correlation between acetabular parameters [lateral center edge angle (LCEA), acetabular index (AI), anterior wall index (AWI), posterior wall index (PWI)] acquired on intraoperative fluoroscopic images and postoperative pelvic radiographs and to analyze intra- and interobserver reliability of these parameters. Methods A retrospective examination was conducted on 206 consecutive cases (176 patients) after triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO). Every patient received a pre- and postoperative pelvic radiograph in supine position in exactly the same technique. A highly standardized surgical sequence allowed consistent intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging. LCAE, AI, PWI and AWI were measured by an experienced orthopedic surgeon and an orthopedic surgeon in training. Statistics comprised a priori power analysis, Bland–Altman analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results A total of 165 cases were included. ICC between the parameters of the fluoroscopic images and postoperative radiographs was for LCEA: 0.935, AI: 0.936, AWI: 0.725 and PWI: 0.878. Intraobserver ICC for all parameters ranged from 0.953 to 0.989, interobserver ICC from 0.798 to 0.968, respectively. Conclusion In the surgical treatment of hip dysplasia by means of TPO, intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging has proven to be reliable and accurate. Intraobserver correlation was excellent for all parameters. The correlation between the intraoperative fluoroscopic images and postoperative radiographs ranged from good to excellent, with the lowest values for the acetabular wall indices (AWI and PWI).
      PubDate: 2022-08-10
       
  • C-reactive protein during the first 6 postoperative days after total hip
           arthroplasty cannot predict early periprosthetic infection

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      Abstract: Introduction Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains a serious complication in orthopaedic surgery. C-reactive protein (CRP) is widely used as a marker to screen for inflammatory complications. The early postoperative course is well known, but knowledge about the predictive value of CRP in the first 6 postoperative days for detecting an acute postoperative PJI is lacking. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the inpatient course of CRP of all primary THA and THA with acute PJI within 28 days in our hospital from 2013 to 2021. A receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis was performed and the best CRP threshold for detecting an acute PJI based on Youden’s-index was calculated and an area-under-the curve (AUC) analysis of the threshold was performed. Results 33 of 7042 patients included had an acute PJI within 28 days. Patients with acute PJI were older, had a higher BMI and longer operation time and suffered more often from diabetes mellitus. A preoperatively elevated CRP was a risk factor for PJI. CRP was significantly higher in the PJI group on postoperative days 3 and 5. Threshold values were calculated to be 152 mg/l on day 3 and 73 mg/l on day 5. However, these values had a low sensitivity (75%, 76%) and specificity (67%, 61%). Conclusion Especially considering the decreasing length of stay after THA, the question of the usefulness of regular inpatient CRP checks arises. AUC analysis of the ROC showed a poor diagnostic accuracy in almost all cases. Only the dynamic analysis of the maximum CRP value to the lowest CRP value with a decrease of 102.7 mg/l showed a fair accuracy. This calls into question the clinical relevance of CRP in the first postoperative week for detection of acute postoperative PJI.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
       
  • The benefits of a percutaneous supplemental screw to reinforce the hinge
           of a medial open wedge tibial osteotomy

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      Abstract: Introduction Our earlier studies reported that an additional lag screw placed from the opposite side increases the stability of the fixation construct in medial open wedge high tibia osteotomy (MOWHTO). The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of the use of a supplemental screw with immediate post-operative full weight-bearing and its benefits in terms of functional outcome, radiographic outcome and complications. Materials and methods A retrospective study was performed comparing the historical cohort (MOWHTO without opposite screw) (group A) with the current cohort (MOWHTO with opposite screw) (group B). The patients underwent clinical and radiological assessments. We evaluated the WOMAC (The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) score, IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) scores, and Lysholm knee score. Patients’ return to sports and work were also recorded. Results We included 123 knees receiving MOWHTO alone (group A) with 114 knees (group B) receiving MOWHTO with an opposite screw. A shorter bone union time (18.3 ± 2.1 weeks v.s. 11.5 ± 2.6 weeks, p < 0.001), earlier return to sports (6.1 months vs. 4.6 months, p < 0.001) and return to works (3.2 months vs. 2.3 months, p < 0.001) and better 6-month functional outcomes were found in group B (p < 0.001). The complications were similar in both groups. One patient experienced irritation at the site of the screw entrance and the screw was removed after union. Conclusion The current study evaluated the clinical efficacy of a supplemental lag screw placed from the opposite side in MOWHTO. Comparing to the plate alone, the additional opposite screw improved the implant and fixation stability under immediate weight-bearing without causing complications. A shorter time for returning to sports and work was noted, and a better functional outcome at 6-month follow-up was registered.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
       
  • The utilization of artificial neural networks for the prediction of 90-day
           unplanned readmissions following total knee arthroplasty

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      Abstract: Background A reliable predictive tool to predict unplanned readmissions has the potential to lower readmission rates through targeted pre-operative counseling and intervention with respect to modifiable risk factors. This study aimed to develop and internally validate machine learning models for the prediction of 90-day unplanned readmissions following total knee arthroplasty. Methods A total of 10,021 consecutive patients underwent total knee arthroplasty. Patient charts were manually reviewed to identify patient demographics and surgical variables that may be associated with 90-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Four machine learning algorithms (artificial neural networks, support vector machine, k-nearest neighbor, and elastic-net penalized logistic regression) were developed to predict 90-day unplanned readmissions following total knee arthroplasty and these models were evaluated using ROC AUC statistics as well as calibration and decision curve analysis. Results Within the study cohort, 644 patients (6.4%) were readmitted within 90 days. The factors most significantly associated with 90-day unplanned hospital readmissions included drug abuse, surgical operative time, and American Society of Anaesthesiologist Physical Status (ASA) score. The machine learning models all achieved excellent performance across discrimination (AUC > 0.82), calibration, and decision curve analysis. Conclusion This study developed four machine learning models for the prediction of 90-day unplanned hospital readmissions in patients following total knee arthroplasty. The strongest predictors for unplanned hospital readmissions were drug abuse, surgical operative time, and ASA score. The study findings show excellent model performance across all four models, highlighting the potential of these models for the identification of high-risk patients prior to surgery for whom coordinated care efforts may decrease the risk of subsequent hospital readmission. Level of evidence Level III, case–control retrospective analysis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-07
       
  • Percutaneous kyphoplasty combined with zoledronic acid for the treatment
           of primary osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture: a prospective,
           multicenter study

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      Abstract: Introduction To explore the therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) combined with zoledronic acid (ZOL) in postmenopausal women and adult men with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF). Materials and methods A total of 238 patients with OVCF were randomly assigned to the control or ZOL group: 119 patients were treated with only PKP (control group), and 119 were treated with ZOL infusion after PKP (ZOL group). Clinical, radiological and laboratory indices were evaluated at follow-up. Results The visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were significantly higher in both groups post-treatment than at baseline (all p < 0.01). The bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femoral neck and height of the injured vertebra were significantly increased after treatment compared with before treatment, and the Cobb angle of the injured vertebra was significantly decreased in both groups (all p < 0.01). However, the bone metabolism indices (type I procollagen amino-terminal peptide (PINP), beta type I collagen carboxy-terminal peptide (β-CTX), and osteocalcin in the N-terminal molecular fragment (NMID)) were significantly lower post-treatment than at baseline in only the ZOL group (all p < 0.01). The VAS score, ODI, BMD, PINP level, β-CTX level, NMID level, vertebral height and Cobb angle of the injured vertebra were significantly higher in the ZOL group than in the control group (all p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the postoperative bone cement leakage rate between the two groups. At follow-up, new OVCFs were experienced by 16 patients in the control group and 2 patients in the ZOL group (p < 0.01). Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of PKP combined with ZOL for primary OVCF is clinically beneficial and warrants further study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Correction to: The impact of the COVID-19 associated shutdown on
           orthopedic patient care

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      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Impact of stem profile on the revisability and the need for osteotomy in
           well-fixed cemented revision total knee arthroplasty implants

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      Abstract: Introduction While re-revision total knee arthroplasty (ReRTKA) steadily increases, the ease and bone-sparing removal of RTKA implants is gaining more and more in importance. Biomechanical data suggest that cemented conical stems can be removed significantly easier than cylindrical stems. However, no clinical evidence exists supporting this observation. Aim of this study was to compare the revisability and need for osteotomy (OT) between removals of well-fixed cemented conical vs. cylindrical RTKA stems. Materials and methods 55 removals of well-fixed full-cemented RTKA stems (29 knees) performed between 2016 and 2018 were retrospectively analyzed. Main outcome variables were: bone loss, fractures, osteotomy incidence, surgery duration, early postoperative complications (EPC), hemoglobin drop and blood transfusion. SPSS was used for the statistical analysis. Results 44.8% were conical, 48.3% cylindrical, and 6.9% combined stem designs. Causes for re-revision were PJI (75.9%), malposition (17.2%) and persistent pain (6.9%). 10 stem removals (18.2%) required an OT (four femoral, six tibial): eight stems (14.5%) had cylindrical and two (3.6%) conical designs (P = 0.041). Fractures were noted solely in removals without OT (11.1% vs. 0%,). There was a tendency to more bone loss in cylindrical stem revisions (53.8% vs. 32%, P = 0.24). A longer overall surgery time was observed in revisions of cylindrical stems (+ 37 min, P = 0.05). There was higher hemoglobin drop and need for blood transfusion in revisions of cylindrical stems or after OT but without reaching statistical significance. The EPC rates were slightly higher in ReRTKA on cylindrical stems (P = 0.28). Conclusion Well-fixed cemented conical stems may be revision friendlier with less demands on OT and shorter overall surgery time than cemented cylindrical stems.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Less improvement in knee function and higher rates of dissatisfaction in
           the short-term following total knee arthroplasty in people with mild
           radiographic arthritis

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      Abstract: Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess if severity of radiographic changes of knee arthritis was associated with patient improvement after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesised that patients with mild arthritis were more likely to report lower satisfaction, improvement in knee function and Oxford knee score (OKS) compared to patients with moderate or severe arthritis. Materials and methods Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from TKA patients of two arthroplasty centres with knee radiographs available for assessment of disease severity. Patients completed the Oxford knee score (OKS) and were asked to rate the global improvement in knee condition and their satisfaction at 6 months post-TKA. Bivariable analysis and multivariable regression models were used to test the association between disease severity and each outcome. Results 2226 patients underwent primary TKA and 3.6% had mild arthritis. Mean OKS improved from 17.0 (SD 18.0) to 38.0 (SD 8.1) 6 months after TKA. Two hundred and twenty-two patients (10%) reported ‘Poor’ or ‘Fair’ satisfaction, and 173 (8%) reported knee function was ‘Much worse’, ‘A little worse’ or ‘About the same’ 6 months post-TKA. Patients with mild arthritis showed improvement in OKS [mean improvement in OKS = 19 (SD 15)], but were significantly more likely to report dissatisfaction (OR = 3.10, 95% CI 1.62 to 5.91, p = 0.006), lack of improvement (OR = 4.49, 95% CI 2.38 to 8.47, p < 0.001) and lower OKS scores (− 3 points, 95% CI − 5.39 to − 0.85, p = 0.008) compared to patients with moderate to severe arthritis. Conclusions While patients with mild radiographic arthritic changes improve after TKA, they were significantly more likely to report higher rates of dissatisfaction, less improvement in knee function and OKS compared to patients with moderate-severe grades of arthritis.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Popliteomeniscal fascicles tears with lateral meniscus instability:
           outcomes of arthroscopic surgical technique at mid-term follow-up

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      Abstract: Purpose The popliteomeniscal fascicles (PMFs) are a crucial part of the posterolateral corner of the knee. They provide stability to the lateral meniscus and stabilize the joint during tibial internal rotation. The clinical diagnosis of a torn PMFs is difficult, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be inconclusive as well. The aim of the present study was to report the outcomes of a continuous series of patients affected by PMF lesions and treated with an arthroscopic repair. Methods Seventeen patients (average age of 22 ± 3.6 years) with PMF lesions and lateral meniscus instability were prospectively enrolled. All patients were evaluated with clinical examination, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm and Tegner scores and 1.5 T MRI. All patients had the same arthroscopic procedure consisting of meniscal repair with an all-inside meniscal repair system (mean 2.2 ± 0.77 anchors) and followed with the same postoperative protocol. Results All patients were available at a mean follow-up of 68 ± 24 months (range 49–84 months). Mean IKDC increased from 60.2 ± 13.5 to 83.1 ± 12, mean Lysholm score improved from 56.7 ± 8.2 to 89.8 ± 3.2, and mean Tegner score improved from 2.9 ± 1.3 to 6.5 ± 2. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were reported. MRI evaluation at 6-month follow-up showed successful healing of the menisco-popliteal fascicles in all cases. Conclusions The diagnosis and treatment of tears of the PMFs is still debated. Diagnostic confirmation of tearing of the PMFs is usually determined at the time of arthroscopy. Meniscal repair with an all-inside meniscal repair system appears to be an excellent treatment option, since it yields good functional results at mid-term follow-up, no local complications, and complete radiographic healing at 6-month follow-up MRI. Further studies are needed to confirm these promising early results. Level of evidence Case series, 4.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • Failure modes in malrotated total knee replacement

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      Abstract: Purpose Achieving normal rotational alignment of both components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is essential for improved knee survivorship and function. However, malrotation is a known complication resulting in higher revision rates. Understanding malrotation of the components and its concomitant clinical and functional outcomes are important for early diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of malrotation on clinical outcomes and failure modes in both single and combined rotational malalignment. Methods From our hospital database of 364 revisions, a cohort of 76 knees with patellar maltracking, stiffness, reduced range of motion and early aseptic failure were reviewed and investigated for component malrotation using computed tomography following Berger protocol. CT findings confirmed component malrotation in 70 of these patients. Investigations included (1) measurement of femoral component malrotation using surgical transepicondylar axis, (2) measurement of tibial component malrotation using anteroposterior axis and (3) measurement of combined component rotational errors. Results The correlation of CT analysis and clinical outcomes after primary TKA revealed association of patellar maltracking with femoral internal rotation, pain and instability with tibial internal rotation and knee stiffness in patients with combined component malrotation as the commonest mode of presentation. Our study showed that patients with isolated femoral, tibial and combined malrotation presented at a mean period of 3.4 ± 1.34, 1.7 ± 0.8 and 2.3 ± 0.69 years, respectively, after the index surgery. Post-revision, the mean Knee Society Score and Oxford Knee Score improved from 29.1 to 78.7, and 10.5 to 32.8, respectively, and the mean range of motion improved from 74.9 ± 24.8 to 97.1 ± 12.7 degrees at a mean follow-up of 42 months. Conclusion Early detection of malrotation in TKA and its management with revision of both components can lead to better clinical and functional outcomes. Level of evidence: III.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Bone filling decreases donor site morbidity after anterior cruciate
           ligament reconstruction with bone–patellar tendon–bone autografts

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      Abstract: Purpose Bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) autograft remains the most widely used graft source for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The drawback associated with BTB is increased donor-site morbidity, such as anterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare anterior knee pain after refilling the patella bony defect with bone substitute. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent BTB ACLR at a single institution between January 2015 and December 2020. The cohort was divided into two groups; one in which the patellar bony defect was refilled with bone substitute (Bone Graft group) and another in which this the bony defects were not treated (No Bone Graft group). Demographic variables, reported anterior knee pain, visual analog scale (VAS) score, complications, re-operation, and patient reported outcome measures, such as the IKDC, LYSHOLM and SF-12 scores, were compared between groups. Results A total of 286 patients who underwent BTB ACLR were included. The No Bone Graft group included 88 (30.7%) patients and the Bone Graft group included 198 (69.3%) patients. The Bone Graft group had less anterior knee pain at last clinic follow up (33.3% vs. 51.1% p = 0.004) as well as lower VAS anterior knee pain scores (2.18 vs. 3.13, p = 0.004). The Bone Graft group had lower complications rates (21.7% vs 34.1, p = 0.027). No differences were found in the LYSHOLM, IKDC, and SF-12 scores. Conclusion Bone refilling in BTB ACLR significantly reduces prevalence and severity of anterior knee pain. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm the benefits of bone refilling in ACLR patients. Level of evidence Retrospective study—III.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Correction to: Periprosthetic fractures after medial unicompartmental knee
           arthroplasty: a narrative review

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      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Changes in the femoral osteotomy level coefficient and neck shaft angle
           during limb lengthening with an intramedullary magnetic nail

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      Abstract: Background The intramedullary magnetic IM nail enables bone graduated distraction. Proximal femur osteotomies for ante grade IM lengthening nails have a tendency towards varus-procurvatum malalignment. We examined the effect of the level of the osteotomy and of trochanteric versus piriformis entry points on the neck shaft angle (NSA) during lengthening with the PRECICE IM magnetic nail. Methods A novel parameter, the osteotomy level coefficient (OLC), was introduced as a guide to determine the level of an osteotomy at the proximal femur. The OLC was defined as the ratio between the distances from the tip of the greater trochanter to the osteotomy divided by the full length of the femur. A retrospective review of all femoral lengthening procedures with the PRECICE ante grade IM lengthening nail between 2013 and 2018 was carried out. Results 31 femurs were lengthened in 30 patients (16 males and 14 females, mean age at surgery years 17.1. The average amount of lengthening was 4.4 cm. Trochanteric entry points were used in 24 femurs, and piriformis entry points in seven femurs. The OLC values ranged from 0.16 to 0.34 (average 0.25). The average follow-up period was 10.15 months. The distraction index average 10.5 days/cm (Range 8.6–11.9), Consolidation index 32.1 days/cm (14.3–51.9). The average post-operative NSA was significantly reduced from 133.5º to 128.5º [t (31) = 5.57, p = 0.000]. There was no correlation between the OLC and the change in the NSAs. The trochanteric entry point showed a greater tendency to reduce the NSA (Mdif = − 6, SD = 4.8) compared to the piriformis entry point (Mdif =  − 0.86, SD = 2.27) [t (31) = -3.96, p = 0.001]. Conclusion Proximal femur lengthening with the PRECICE IM nail significantly reduced the NSA and might cause Varus deformity. The level of osteotomy by OLC did not influence the amount of NSA reduction. The trochanteric entry points have a greater tendency to reduce the NSA compared to the piriformis entry points.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Substantial changes in fracture rates in German hospitals in 2018 compared
           with 2002: an epidemiological study

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      Abstract: Introduction The aim of this study was to present recent epidemiological data on extremity and axial skeletal fractures in German hospitals and to compare them with older data to detect time trends. Materials and methods Inpatient data from the German National Hospital Discharge Registry were used. The absolute number and age-standardized incidence of fractures in 2002 and 2018 were analysed by fracture location according to the International Classification of Disease. Data were analysed according to age group. Male: female ratios (MFRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated to compare the 2018 and 2002 data. Results The absolute number of fractures of the nine analysed locations was 15.2% higher in 2018 than in 2002. By fracture location, the changes were as follows (absolute change + IRR): “neck” (S12): + 172%, IRR = 2.6; “rib(s), sternum, thoracic spine” (S22): + 57%, IRR = 1.3; “lumbar spine and pelvis” (S32): + 66%, IRR = 1.3; “shoulder and upper arm” (S42): + 36%, IRR = 1.2; “forearm” (S52): + 13%, IRR = 1.0; “wrist and hand level” (S62): − 32%, IRR = 0.7; “femur” (S72): + 24%, IRR = 0.9; “lower leg, including ankle” (S82): − 24%, IRR = 0.7; “foot, except ankle” (S92): − 4%, IRR = 0.9. The overall MFR changed from 0.7 in 2002 to 0.6 in 2018. The age group of 45–54 years represented a turning point, males were more often affected than females in the younger age groups, and the opposite trend was observed in the older age groups. Conclusions The increase in the absolute fracture rates was due to increased rates of femur, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and axial skeletal fractures, with elderly women being the main contributors. Femur fractures were found to be the most common fractures treated in German hospitals.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • The subjective knee value is a valid single-item survey to assess knee
           function in common knee disorders

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      Abstract: Introduction The patient’s perspective plays a key role in judging the effect of knee disorders on physical function. We have introduced the Subjective Knee Value (SKV) to simplify the evaluation of individual’s knee function by providing one simple question. The purpose of this prospective study was to validate the SKV with accepted multiple-item knee surveys across patients with orthopaedic knee disorders. Materials and methods Between January through March 2020, consecutive patients (n = 160; mean age 51 ± 18 years, range from 18 to 85 years, 54% women) attending the outpatient clinic for knee complaints caused by osteoarthritis (n = 69), meniscal lesion (n = 45), tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (n = 23) and focal chondral defect (n = 23) were invited to complete a knee-specific survey including the SKV along with the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective knee form (IKDC-S). The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate external validity between the SKV and each patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) separately. Furthermore, patient’s compliance was assessed by comparing responding rates. Results Overall, the SKV highly correlated with both the KOOS (R = 0.758, p < 0.05) and the IKDC-S (R = 0.802, p < 0.05). This was also demonstrated across all investigated diagnosis- and demographic-specific (gender, age) subgroups (range 0.509–0.936). No relevant floor/ceiling effects were noticed. The responding rate for the SKV (96%) was significantly higher when compared with those for the KOOS (81%) and the IKDC-S (83%) (p < 0.05). Conclusion At baseline, the SKV exhibits acceptable validity across all investigated knee-specific PROMs in a broad patient population with a wide array of knee disorders. The simplified survey format without compromising the precision to evaluate individual’s knee function justifies implementation in daily clinical practice. Level of evidence II, cohort study (diagnosis).
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Double plating is associated with higher fixation strength than single
           plating in osteoporotic fractures of the scapular spine: a biomechanical
           study

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      Abstract: Introduction The number of atraumatic stress fractures of the scapular spine associated with reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing. At present, there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment strategy. Due to the already weakened bone, fractures of the scapular spine require a high fixation stability. Higher fixation strength may be achieved by double plating. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical principles of double plating in comparison to single plating for scapular spine fractures. Methods In this study, eight pairs (n = 16) of human shoulders were randomised pairwise into two groups. After an osteotomy at the level of the spinoglenoid notch, one side of each pair received fracture fixation with a single 3.5 LCP (Locking Compression Plate) plate. The contralateral scapular spine was fixed with a 3.5 LCP and an additional 2.7 LCP plate in 90–90 configuration. The biomechanical test protocol consisted of 700 cycles of dynamic loading and a load-to-failure test with a servohydraulic testing machine. Failure was defined as macroscopic catastrophic failure (screw cut-out, plate breakage). The focus was set on the results of specimens with osteoporotic bone quality. Results In specimens with an osteoporotic bone mineral density (BMD; n = 12), the mean failure load was significantly higher for the double plate group compared to single plating (471 N vs. 328 N; p = 0.029). Analysis of all specimens (n = 16) including four specimens without osteoporotic BMD revealed no significant differences regarding stiffness and failure load (p > 0.05). Conclusion Double plating may provide higher fixation strength in osteoporotic bone in comparison to a single plate alone. This finding is of particular relevance for fixation of scapular spine fractures following reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Level of evidence Controlled laboratory study.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Two positioned MRI can visualize and detect the location of peripheral rim
           instability with snapping knee in the no-shift-type of complete discoid
           lateral meniscus

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      Abstract: Introduction We evaluated the efficacy of two positioned magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for visualizing the snapping phenomenon and detecting peripheral rim instability (PRI) in no-shift-type complete discoid lateral meniscus (CDLM). Materials and methods The records of 39 patients diagnosed with no-shift-type CDLM under routine MRI who underwent arthroscopic surgery were reviewed. The snapping phenomenon and meniscal shift on two positioned MRI in full extension and deep flexion were evaluated and calculated the agreement between these findings. The positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, and specificity of meniscal shift on two positioned MRI for predicting PRI were calculated; PRI was further investigated according to anterior and posterior location. The hypotheses of this study were asfollows: (1) Two positioned MRI can visualize the snapping phenomenon and (2) Meniscal shift on two positioned MRI is an important predictive sign of detecting the instability site in no-shift-type CDLM. Results The κ values between the snapping phenomenon and meniscal shift on two positioned MRI were 0.84. The snapping and two positioned MRI findings had high PPV (1.0, 0.96), sensitivity (0.82, 0.85), and specificity (1.0, 0.91) for predicting overall PRI. For anterior PRI, the snapping and posterior shift on two positioned MRI had moderate and high PPV (0.78, 0.9), high sensitivity (0.9, 0.9), and specificity (0.8, 0.89). The anterior shift on two positioned MRI findings predicted posterior PRI with high PPV (1.0) and specificity (1.0). Conclusions Two positioned MRI visualized the snapping phenomenon. Meniscal shift on two positioned MRI was an important predictive sign of overall PRI, anterior PRI, and posterior PRI in no-shift-type CDLM.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Periprosthetic fractures after medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty:
           a narrative review

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      Abstract: Introduction On rare occasions, fractures of the tibial plateau may occur after uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and account for 2% of total UKA failures. The purpose of this narrative review is to identify and discuss potential risk factors that might lead to prevention of this invalidating complication. Materials and methods Electronic database of Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane and Google Scholar were searched. A total of 457 articles related to the topic were found. Of those, 86 references were included in this narrative review. Results UKA implantation acts as a stress riser in the medial compartment. To avoid fractures, surgeons need to balance load and bone stock. Post-operative lower limb alignment, implant positioning, level of resection and sizing of the tibial tray have a strong influence on load distribution of the tibial bone. Pain on weight-bearing signals bone-load imbalance and acts as an indicator of bone remodeling and should be a trigger for unloading. The first three months after surgery are critical because of transient post-operative osteoporosis and local biomechanical changes. Acquired osteoporosis is a growing concern in the arthroplasty population. Split fractures require internal fixation, while subsidence fractures differ in their management depending of the amount of bone impaction. Loose implants require revision knee arthroplasty. Conclusion Peri-prosthetic fracture is a rare, but troublesome event, which can lead to implant failure and revision surgery. Better knowledge of the multifactorial risk factors in association with a thorough surgical technique is key for prevention.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
 
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