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DENTISTRY (266 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 256 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access  
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Odontologica Turcica     Open Access  
Acta Stomatologica Marisiensis Journal     Open Access  
Actas Odontológicas     Open Access  
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access  
AJO-DO Clinical Companion : An International Journal Dedicated to Excellence in Clinical Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aktuel Nordisk Odontologi     Full-text available via subscription  
Al-Rafidain Dental Journal     Open Access  
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Diş Hekimliği Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Australasian Orthodontic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BDJ Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biomaterial Investigations in Dentistry     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Caspian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
CES Odontología     Open Access  
Chiang Mai Dental Journal     Open Access  
Ciencia Odontológica     Open Access  
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Dentistry Reviewed     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cumhuriyet Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Dental Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Journal of Advance Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Dental Update     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry 3000     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dentistry Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Endodontology     Open Access  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Dental Research and Biomaterials Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access  
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Future Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Insisiva Dental Journal     Open Access  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Contemporary Dental and Medical Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forensic Odontology     Open Access  
International Journal of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Medical and Dental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Oral Care and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Preventive and Clinical Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JDR Clinical & Translational Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Advanced Oral Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Baghdad College of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Problems and Solutions     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dentistry Defense Section     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal Of International Dental And Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of International Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nepalese Association of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nepalese Prosthodontic Society (JNPS)     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalese Society of Periodontology and Oral Implantology     Open Access  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oral Biology     Open Access  
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Primary Care Dentistry and Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Journal Of Syiah Kuala Dentistry Society     Open Access  
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Kesehatan Gigi     Open Access  
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
Kiru : Revista de la Facultad de Odontología - Universidad de San Martín de Porres     Open Access  
Lasers in Dental Science     Hybrid Journal  
Majalah Kedokteran Gigi Indonesia     Open Access  
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0301-5742 - ISSN (Online) 0974-9098
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Equity in Research Dissemination

    • Authors: Puneet Batra
      Pages: 109 - 110
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Volume 56, Issue 2, Page 109-110, April 2022.

      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T07:30:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221095308
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • An Umbrella Review of Systematic Reviews With or Without Meta-Analysis
           Assessing Treatment Outcomes and Efficiency of Self-Ligating Brackets

    • Authors: Meghna Mukhopadhyay, Shubhnita Verma, Prasad Chitra
      Pages: 111 - 123
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Volume 56, Issue 2, Page 111-123, April 2022.
      IntroductionSelf-ligating bracket systems are popular and seem to demonstrate lesser friction, allowing tooth movement without exerting unwanted forces on surrounding structures. This umbrella review aimed to compare self-ligating and conventional bracket systems for treatment efficiency.MethodsAn electronic search in 8 databases was performed for literature published between January 1, 1990, and October 1, 2021, with manual hand-searching of references of retrieved articles. Quality assessment was performed using the risk of bias in a systematic tool by 2 independent reviewers. Data were extracted using a prepiloted form (Joanna Briggs Institute) for evidence synthesis. Corrected covered area was calculated to quantify study overlaps across systematic reviews with or without meta-analysis.Results605 articles were retrieved, of which 16 were selected. Most included studies had a low risk of bias, except for 6 that showed an unclear risk of bias. Data analysis revealed a reduction in lower incisor proclination, bacterial accumulation, and oral malodor using self-ligating appliances.ConclusionsSelf-ligating systems reduce mandibular incisor proclination, bacterial accumulation, external apical root resorption, chairside time, and oral malodor. No other differences could be demonstrated in comparison with conventional appliance systems.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T07:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221095296
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Management of Severe Proclination and Crowding Using Mini-Screw Anchorage:
           An IBO Case Report

    • Authors: Abhishek Jain
      Pages: 171 - 178
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Volume 56, Issue 2, Page 171-178, April 2022.
      This case report was presented at the Indian Board of Orthodontics examination under category I in September 2021. It demonstrates fixed orthodontic treatment of a 13-year-old female presenting with Angle’s Class I malocclusion on Class I skeletal base with an average growth pattern. This was complicated by a 7 mm overjet with proclination and crowding of the upper and lower labial segments. She also presented a reduced overbite and a centerline discrepancy of 1.5 mm. Lips were protruded and incompetent at rest with decreased nasolabial angle. Treatment involved extraction of all first premolars followed by fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy with preadjusted edgewise appliance (0.022 × 0.028” slot with MBT–McLaughlin Bennett and Trevisi prescription). Anchorage reinforcement in the upper arch was provided with mini-screw implants.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T07:23:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221093113
      Issue No: Vol. 56, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of White Spot Lesion and Enamel Demineralization in Orthodontic
           Patients With Fixed Brackets—A Clinical Appraisal Using Fluoride Mouth
           Rinse, Fluoride Varnish Containing CPP-ACP, and CPP-ACFP

    • Authors: Sumeet Mishra, Shubhangi Mani, Aishwarya Sonawane, Prashant Viragi, N. G. Toshniwal, Ravindra Manerikar
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Efficacy evaluation of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP), casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate complex (CPP-ACFP), fluoride mouthrinse, and fluoride containing toothpaste as compared to control group for the remineralization of white spot lesions (WSLs) in orthodontic patients with fixed brackets in an in vivo study.Methods:Seventy-five subjects with WSL determined by DIAGNOdent were randomly divided into 5 groups. The WSLs DIAGNOdent values for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis.Results:Among the groups, the remineralizing potential of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride containing toothpaste, and CPP-ACP were similar; however, CPP-ACFP value was superior in comparison to all other groups.Conclusion:The CPP-ACFP technique is highly beneficial for the remineralization of WSL in an orthodontic patient when compared to fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride-containing toothpaste, and CPP-ACP paste.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T03:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221076915
       
  • Effectiveness of Surgical Mandibular Advancement in Improving Airway
           Dimensions in Nongrowing Skeletal Class II Patients With Obstructive Sleep
           Apnea—A CBCT Study

    • Authors: Saurabh S. Waghchaure, Wasundhara A. Bhad, Santosh J. Chavan, Niyati Mehta, Nikita Baheti
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Skeletal nongrowing class II patients with retrognathic mandible are often at risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This skeletal discrepancy, when severe enough, is often addressed by surgical mandibular advancement which not only achieves aesthetics, structural balance, and functional efficiency but also improves the airway function.Objective:The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of surgical mandibular advancement on airway dimensions, in nongrowing skeletal class II patients with mandibular retrognathism associated with OSA.Materials and Methods:The sample consisted of 8 patients with skeletal class II due to retrognathic mandible associated with OSA. Screening was done with functional outcomes of sleep questionnaire (FOSQ) score and confirmed with polysomnography. Pretreatment and posttreatment airway dimensions/volume were assessed and calculated on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three months post surgery, oxygen saturation was recorded.Results:A statistically significant improvement in mean oxygen saturation level was observed from 87.62 ± 7.70 to 97.75 ± 0.46 and mean increase in airway volume was from 48.60 ± 7.17 to 69.48 ± 26.22. The smallest cross section increased from 137 ± 74.37 to 253.75 ± 76.67. Anteroposterior dimensions increased significantly from 6.17 ± 1.78 to 9.33 ± 2.07 and transversed from 24.56 ± 6.41 to 30.14 ± 3.35. FOSQ score improved from 9.37 ± 2.61 to 15.25 ± 0.88.Conclusion:Surgical mandibular advancement is an effective treatment option in improving airway dimensions in nongrowing skeletal class II patients with mandibular retrognathism associated with OSA.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T08:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221076914
       
  • Ramanujan’s Equation as an Aid to Predict Arch Perimeter Changes with
           Precision: A Retrospective Study

    • Authors: Kishan Antala, Shreya Iyengar, Hina Desai, Pranav Chandarana
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of Ramanujan’s equation in measuring arch perimeter on untreated natural dentition models and their orthodontically corrected posttreatment models. The secondary objective was to apply the equation to predict the arch perimeter gained by the expansion of the molar teeth or proclination of the incisor teeth and compare it with the actual posttreatment arch perimeter changes.Methods32 maxillary and mandibular (16 pretreatment and 16 posttreatment each) fairly aligned diagnostic casts of orthodontically treated nonextraction patients with class I molar relationships were used. The arch perimeter was measured using 0.012 mm stainless steel wire and was compared with the calculated arch perimeter obtained using Ramanujan’s equation. Pearson correlations were used to determine the correlation between the measured and predicted values. Paired t-tests were used to assess changes in different variables in the pre- and posttreatment study casts of maxilla and mandible.ResultsPositive correlation of 0.06 (90% CI) between predicted and measured values was found. In maxillary (P = .04) study models, predicted arch perimeter by use of Ramanujan’s equation was more reliable than mandibular (P = .74) study models.ConclusionRamanujan’s equation can be an important aid to calculate the arch perimeter change by the expansion of molar teeth and proclination of incisor teeth 0.06 (90% CI). It is helpful for more accurate nonextraction treatment planning before the start of orthodontic treatment. In maxillary (P = .04) study models, calculated arch perimeter using Ramanujan’s equation is even more reliable than mandibular study models (P = .74).
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T08:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221088634
       
  • Comparison of Biomechanical Properties of Surface-Treated and Untreated
           Machined Orthodontic Mini-Implants: An In Vitro Study

    • Authors: Shristy Jain, Swaroopa Ponnada, Gandikota Chandrasekhar
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Objectives:The use of mini-implants has become more popular, and there has been a heightened focus on factors that contribute to their success. The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of various surface treatment methods of mini-implants on their bone cutting capacity, insertion torque required, and fracture resistance when compared with the untreated machined mini-implants.Materials and Methods:The study included 4 groups. Each group consisted of 10 orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs). The first experimental group contains titanium oxide coated mini-implants, the second group contains grit-blasted implants with aluminum oxide, the third group consists of mini-implants coated with hydroxyapatite crystals, and the control group is formed by untreated machined mini-implants. Each group is evaluated for cutting efficiency, maximum insertion torque, and fracture resistance using a customized torque testing gauge.Results:The results showed that surface treating OMIs with hydroxyapatite particles increases the surface roughness, thereby enhancing their stability without decreasing the bone cutting ability compared with OMIs without surface treatment.Conclusion:Roughened surface of OMIs with hydroxyapatite particles exhibited maximum fracture resistance without decreased corresponding bone cutting efficiency.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221088628
       
  • Multipurpose Bracket Holder—Tucker, NiTi Bender, and Open-Coil
           Spring Placer

    • Authors: Vaibhav Ram Ambashikar, Suresh Kangane, Anand Ambekar
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Fixed orthodontic treatment is predominantly governed by the use of nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires for alignment and leveling due to its shape memory properties.Engaging NiTi wires in the misaligned dentition for initial alignment and leveling is an inconvenient procedure and requires the use of wire tucker for engaging in the slot of the bracket. Similarly, cinching NiTi wire at the ends of the tube is a tedious process and requires the use of a wire cincher. Intraoral placement of an open coil spring sometimes becomes tricky due to its springiness, thus making its ligation time-consuming and may also require assistance or else might cause injury.Moreover, since the introduction of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its spread throughout the world, dentists, in general, are at higher risk of contracting the disease for their close contact with saliva. The need for sterilization is of utmost importance and thus an instrument that serves the purpose of three instruments is a major boon for the practitioner in terms of user-friendliness and maintaining its sterility.A multipurpose bracket holder is thus presented, which can be used easily as a NiTi bender, archwire tucker, and an open-coil spring placer.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221088351
       
  • High-Intensity Light-Emitting Diode and Reduced Curing Times—An In
           Vitro Study

    • Authors: T. Saritha, C. Sunitha, S. Sai Chanikya, P. Kiran Kumar, R. Naveen
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To evaluate and compare the effect of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit at different curing times on the shear bond strength (SBS), surface enamel loss, and degree of polymerization of a light-cure and dual-cure adhesive system.Materials and Methods:One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into 2 groups— group 1 (light cure) and group 2 (dual cure), depending on the adhesive system used. These groups were further subdivided into 3 subgroups with 20 teeth each, depending on the duration of curing. A high-intensity LED curing unit was used to bond metal brackets onto the teeth. The samples were tested on a universal testing machine to measure the SBS. The samples were then observed under a simple microscope and modified adhesive remnant index scores were assigned. The bracket bases were mapped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry to evaluate the amount of enamel present. Cured adhesive was scraped and was subjected to Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to assess the degree of cure (%DC).Results:An increase in curing durations increased mean SBS values, %DC, and calcium-phosphorous ratios (Ca:P). Similarly, these parameters were higher for dual-cure subgroups when compared to light-cure subgroups.Conclusion:High-intensity LEDs can be used successfully for bonding orthodontic brackets with reduced curing duration. These LEDs help to reduce chairside time and can minimize damage to enamel without compromising bond strength.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:24:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221080386
       
  • Comparison of Infrazygomatic Crest Dimension Above Mesiobuccal Roots of
           Maxillary Molars in South Indian Subjects: A Retrospective Cone Beam
           Computed Tomography Study

    • Authors: Arathi Murugesan, Ravindra Kumar Jain
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Aim and Objective:The aim of the study was to compare the full-depth bone thickness and the cortical bone thickness in the infrazygomatic crest (IZC) region above the mesiobuccal (MB) root of maxillary first molar and second molar and thus find the ideal site for the placement of IZC screw.Materials and Methods:Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography images of 30 orthodontic patients were collected and IZC bone thickness and cortical bone thickness were measured above the MB root of maxillary first and second molar at an angle of 70° to the molar occlusal plane. Measurements were done on both right and left sides. Independent sample t test was done to compare the bone thickness between the right and left sides and also to compare the bone thickness above the first and the second molar.Results:Mean bone thickness at the IZC region of 5.48 ± 2.2 mm and 7.78 ± 2.35 mm and a cortical bone thickness of 2.24 ± 0.46 mm and 2.13 ± 0.46 mm was obtained above the MB root of maxillary first molar and second molar, respectively. IZC bone thickness was significantly higher above the second molar than above the first molar (P < .001), whereas there was no significant difference in the cortical bone thickness measured on both the sites (P = .22).Conclusion:Significantly higher IZC bone thickness was noted above the MB root of the maxillary second molar, which may ensure better stability and safety of the miniscrew.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221088637
       
  • A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Mini-Implant supported
           K-Loop for Maxillary Molar Distalization

    • Authors: Pawankumar Dnyandeo Tekale, Harshal Ashok Patil, Kamlesh Garg, Veerendra V. Kerudi, Sameer M Parhad, Jitendra S. Sharan, Ratnadip A. Lohakpure, Sakshi Raina
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The study was conducted to assess the stress and displacement effects of a mini-implant supported k-loop on the maxillary dentition for distalization with 3-dimensional (3D) finite element stress analysis.Materials and Methods:A 3D model of the maxilla with all teeth, periodontal ligament, bone, mini-implants, brackets, and archwire was used in this study. The analytic model used in this study like brackets, wire, K-loop, and mini-implants was developed using a reverse engineering technique extracting the dimensional details of the physical parts using precision measuring instruments.Results:The distobuccal movement on the first molar and second molar were 0.26864 mm and 0.00833 mm, respectively. A total of 0.25 mm intrusion movement was seen on distal cusp of the first molar and 0.14 mm extrusion movement seen on mesial cusp of the first molar. A total of 0.25 mm and 0.00260 mm intrusion movement was seen on the distal cusp of the first molar and second molar, respectively. A total of 0.14 mm and 0.00324 mm extrusion movement was seen on the mesial cusp of the first molar and second molar, respectively.Conclusions:There was a large amount of distal displacement of the first molar, also negligible amount of tipping of the first molar and mesial movement of first premolar.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T10:30:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211044873
       
  • A Clinical Audit of Cross-Infection Control Practices in Orthodontic
           Setups During the COVID-19 Scenario

    • Authors: Agrima Thakur, Jangam Sowmya, Prasad Chitra
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many changes in the practice of orthodontics, with the main focus being prevention of cross-infection. Clinical audits can help assess the extent to which practices/practitioners adhere to standard cross-infection control protocols, thereby providing scope for improvement resulting in better treatment outcomes.Objective:Phase 1—to investigate the type of cross-infection control procedures being followed by orthodontic residents of 5 dental institutes in Hyderabad city and compare them to recommended guidelines. Phase 2—after identification of the shortcomings, analyzing how re-education and revision of guidelines can lead to improvements in cross-infection prevention protocols.Methodology:Orthodontic residents of 5 dental institutes were observed with regard to their routine infection control practices, which were compared to a set standard. A second audit cycle was conducted on the same clinicians after a seminar where they were encouraged to work on shortcomings at their workplace. The results from the 2 audit cycles were then compared to assess differences.Results and Conclusion:While most clinicians were aware of the recommended cross-infection control guidelines, few steps were neglected while in practice. Comparisons between the 2 audit cycles revealed definite improvements.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T11:28:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211073755
       
  • Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage Under APC Plus, APC Flash-Free and
           Conventional Stainless Steel Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    • Authors: Somasekhar Majji, Revathi Peddu, M. Kalyani, Devikanth, Aruna Dokku, Bhargavi Nuvusetty
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:The aim of the study was to compare and evaluate the microleakage under the Adhesive Precoated Plus (APCP), APC Flash-Free (APCF), and conventional stainless steel (SLS) brackets on the occlusal and gingival sides of the bracket base.Materials and Methods:66 extracted premolar teeth were collected and divided equally into 3 groups. Bonding was done with APCP, APCF, and conventional SLS brackets using Transbond XT. After bonding, the samples were stored in a distilled water and thermocycled for 3000 cycles, followed by immersion in a 2% methylene blue for 24 h. After cleaning, the teeth were mounted in acrylic and sectioned longitudinally at about the center of the bracket in a buccolingual direction. Microleakage was recorded using a stereomicroscope.Results:Kruskal–Wallis H test showed a significant difference (P < .005) in the microleakage scores between the 3 groups. Mann–Whitney U test showed a significant difference between group 1 to group 2 and group 1 to group 3 (P < .005) and an insignificant difference between group 2 and group 3 on the occlusal side (P = .116) and on the gingival side (P = .063).Conclusion:Conventional SLS bracket group exhibited greater microleakage scores at both occlusal and gingival sides, when compared with APCP and APCF groups.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T04:09:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221084015
       
  • Orthodontic Management of Severe Dentoalveolar Collapse with
           Miniscrew-Assisted TMA Cantilever Springs and Bite Blocks

    • Authors: Pallavi Venkatesh, Pooja Harish, Anjuna Madakkuni, Sumitra Reddy
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Management of mutilated cases is challenging, and adult patients often require orthodontic correction of occlusion before prosthetic replacement of missing teeth.Objective:To highlight the novel, simple, hygienic, and efficient miniscrew-supported Beta titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) cantilever spring for uprighting severe mesially tipped molars for interdisciplinary treatment.Diagnosis and Treatment:A 23-year-old male patient presented with skeletal Class I relation, average growth pattern, Class II Div 1 malocclusion with dentoalveolar collapse, crowding, multiple missing, supraerupted teeth, and severe mesially tipped mandibular third molars. MBT appliance with 0.022˝ slot was used to achieve the objectives. 38 and 48 were uprighted and protracted with miniscrew implant-supported TMA cantilever springs to substitute 37 and 47. Mild intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth was done with acrylic bite blocks and transpalatal arch (TPA), followed by prosthetic replacement of missing teeth.Results:The patient had a consonant smile arc and a pleasing soft tissue profile. Mandibular third molars were uprighted and protracted with good vertical control, and the mesial pockets were eliminated. The supraerupted maxillary molars were intruded, and group function occlusion was established. Class I canine relationship, normal overjet, and overbite were achieved.Conclusion:Miniscrew supported TMA cantilevers are efficient for uprighting of severely tipped third molars without extrusion, unlike the conventional mechanics. The third molars with good root forms can be protracted and substituted as second molars to minimize prosthetic rehabilitation.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T04:08:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221086348
       
  • Effectiveness of an Essential Oil Mouthwash in Maintaining Proper Oral
           Health in Orthodontic Patients—an In Vivo Study

    • Authors: Kunal Bhaskar Patil, Nitin D. Gulve, Rashmi K. Patil
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Patients undergoing orthodontic therapy face greater difficulties in maintaining good oral hygiene. To improve mechanical plaque removal, a common strategy is to incorporate a chemotherapeutic agent. Thus, the effects of adding essential oil mouthwash to a standard oral hygiene regimen to maintain oral health were evaluated.Material and Method:Two groups were created with 25 patients each. Gingival index and orthodontic plaque index were calculated as initial reading. Gingival index and orthodontic plaque index were calculated again after 6 months.Result:In the control group, the mean score of gingival index and orthodontic plaque index were significantly increased from baseline reading (T1) to after 6 months reading (T2). In the experimental group, increase in the mean score of gingival index and orthodontic plaque index was not statistically significant.Conclusion:When an essential oil mouthwash is added to the daily oral hygiene regimen (conventional manual toothbrushing + brushing with monotufted brush), it maintained the gingival health and amount of plaque accumulation in orthodontic patients over a period of 6 months.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T03:51:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221083060
       
  • Evaluation and Correlation Between Pharyngeal Space, Mandible, and Tongue
           in Two Different Facial Patterns

    • Authors: Safiya Sana, Rony T. Kondody, Karthik Swamy, Asma Fatima
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Respiratory function has a direct relationship with the pharyngeal airway dimension and mandibular morphology. The objective of the present study was to compare and correlate pharyngeal airway, mandibular morphology, and tongue position in hyperdivergent and normodivergent patterns using standard cephalometric radiographs.Materials and Methods:A total of 130 individuals with age 13 to 19 years, with no craniofacial skeletal abnormalities, were taken. The individuals were divided into 2 groups based on their Frankfort mandibular angle (FMA). Group I consist of 65 hyperdivergent individuals (34 males, 31 females) with FMA>28. Group II consisted of 65 normodivergent individuals (28 males, 37 females) with FMA>25 to
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T03:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221083065
       
  • Formulating a New Orthodontic Index: An Indian Board of Orthodontics
           Initiative—Part 2

    • Authors: Ashwin Mathew George, Ketan Vakil, Aravinthrajkumar Govindaraj, Vadivel Kumar Marimuthu, Rajaganesh Gautam, Salil Nene
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      A new orthodontic index was proposed by the College of Diplomates to assess the degree of difficulty of cases submitted for the Indian Board of Orthodontics Phase III clinical examinations. This article is the continuation of the part 1 article which gave a brief insight into the need and the methodology undertaken to formulate this index. A weightage score grading the degree of severity of a case was obtained for dental, cephalometric, and miscellaneous components based on the results of a survey taken from the Diplomates of the Indian Board of Orthodontics. An aesthetic component was also developed using photographs and the relative aesthetic score for every photograph was graded. This index would help to categorize the malocclusion based on the severity, in a single, linear, and transparent manner.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T06:58:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211068212
       
  • Evaluation of Accuracy of Tanaka-Johnston Mixed Dentition Analysis in
           North Karnataka Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Sayeeda Laeque Bangi, Rony T. Kondody, Safiya Sana, Asma Fatima, Arshad Hussain
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Estimating the mesiodistal dimensions of unerupted canines and premolars in early mixed dentition is a critical tool in space management. According to previous studies, tooth size varies by ethnicity which could affect diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of the study was to know whether the Tanaka-Johnston method is valid for the North Karnataka population.Materials and Methods:A total of 4,600 school children (2,300 boys and 2,300 girls) (age 11-16 years) with no craniofacial skeletal abnormalities, with no history of orthodontic and orthopedic treatment or maxillofacial surgeries, from 2013 June to 2019 June were taken for mixed dentition analysis by the Tanaka-Johnston method. Pearson correlation test was used to identify the correlation between various variables.Results:The findings revealed a sexual dimorphism in the widths of canine and premolar widths in the maxillary and mandibular teeth. A statistically significant difference was found between the width of the sum of incisor widths and the actual widths of canine and premolars for maxillary and mandibular arches, regardless of gender.Conclusion:The Tanaka-Johnston analysis was not precise enough to be used for the North Karnataka population in its original form, so new regression equations were developed.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T10:37:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742221076913
       
  • Technique for Cephalometric Analysis Using Keynote

    • Authors: Dr Al Imran Shahrul
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Digital software developed specifically for cephalometric analysis is costly, creating a need for low-cost alternative methods for performing these analyses. One such alternative is Keynote, a freely available software package that can be a cost-effective way to trace and analyze cephalometric radiographs; this article describes a technique for cephalometric analysis using Keynote.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T05:02:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211064826
       
  • To Compare the Stress Magnitude on Roots of Mandibular Incisors at
           Different Inclinations With Different Arch Wires During Intrusion
           Mechanics—A Fem Study

    • Authors: Munaza Rashid, Anil Singla, Vivek Mahajan, Harupinder Singh Jaj, Indu Dhiman, Shikha Thakur
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Force is applied through brackets in fixed mechanotherapy which generates stress in periodontal ligament and root of the teeth and is difficult to measure directly. Finite element analysis is used as a solution for understanding this biomechanical response. So the aims and objectives of this study were to evaluate the stress magnitude induced in the labial and lingual surface of mandibular incisors using superelastic NiTi arch wires of different cross-section at different inclination through finite element analysis.Materials and Methods:Finite element model of all mandibular teeth including periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, buccal tubes, brackets, and arch wire were constructed using mechanical elastic properties of the materials. Three different NiTi arch wires, round (0.016″), square (0.016″ × 0.016″), and rectangular (0.016″ × 0.022″), were placed into the bracket slots and models were constructed which were analyzed for stress distribution on root surface and periodontal ligament with 3 different cross-sections at 90°, 100°, and 110° with Ansys Version 14 software.Conclusion:Labial stress was found highest in round arch wire as compared to square and rectangular wire. Lingual stress was found to be slightly more in rectangular wire as compared to round and square arch wire.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T04:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211064830
       
  • A New Jig for Making Posted Archwires

    • Authors: Wasu Patil, Juhi Joshi, Ajit Kalia, Salil Nene, Ashwith Hegde, Nasim Mirdehghan
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Orthodontic treatment commonly requires posted archwires for en-masse retraction, for attaching headgear and elastics. Prefabricated brass-posted archwires are popular, the main disadvantages being extended inventory and cost. Considering all these challenges, this new V-Jig has been introduced. The innovation of this jig allows freehand operation, with more precision of placement of posts on the archwire and reduces chances of loss of original wire properties. Soldering technique with jig is convenient and easy. It is a chairside apparatus to make posted archwire and other appliances with ease.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T03:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211068211
       
  • Quantification of Titanium Release From Titanium Dioxide Impregnated
           Composites in Orthodontic Bonding—An In Vitro Study

    • Authors: Santosh Rahul Tavva, Suresh Gorantla, Vizia Muddada, Tivanani V D Mahendra, Ramoji Rao Lenka, Sushila Sah, Ratnavati Prasad, Priyanka Duvvada
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo evaluate the quantity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles released into the artificial salivary medium from orthodontic composite impregnated with 1% weight/weight (w/w) and 5% w/w titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) used for bonding metal brackets, thereby eventually comprehending the permissible levels.Materials and MethodEighty freshly extracted teeth for orthodontic treatment were divided into 2 groups of 40 teeth each and were bonded with brackets containing 1% w/w and 5% w/w composite containing titanium dioxide nanoparticles and placed in an artificial salivary medium. Quantification of 1% w/w and 5% w/w composite containing titanium nanoparticles was done using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy for 4 timely periods 24 h, 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months.ResultsIn the teeth that received 1% TiO2, the amount of titanium released was greatest in 2 months with no significant release at later intervals. In the second group that received 5%, there was a significant release of titanium at all intervals, with highest release at second month.On comparing the 2 concentrations at 4 different time intervals, the quantities were significantly greater in the 5% group at all time frames, thus implying a significant increase in titanium released with an increase in concentration from 1% to 5%.ConclusionTitanium release was higher in 5% w/w composite containing nanoparticles than 1% w/w composite containing nanoparticles, and 1% and 5% concentrations can be used safely and are within the permissible limits.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T10:03:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211056244
       
  • Mini-Implant-Assisted Simultaneous Torquing Extrusion Retraction Spring
           for Ectopic Canines

    • Authors: Arun Kumar Dasari, Madhukar Reddy Rachala, Kaladhar Reddy Aileni
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Orthodontic management of ectopic canines is quite challenging and time consuming due to the presence of thin buccal cortical bone. Sectional mechanics provide distal and extrusive force on canine but without any torque control. So, palatal root torquing during canine retraction is needed to increase the buccal cortical bone thickness and to avoid bone dehiscence and gingival recession. This article describes an innovative spring which provides 3-dimensional control by simultaneous retraction, extrusion, and torquing of ectopic canine.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T04:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211060761
       
  • Modified Hyrax for Microimplant-Assisted Rapid Palatal Expansion

    • Authors: Harshikkumar Parekh, Rahul Trivedi, Falguni Mehta, Renuka Patel, Niyanta Joshi
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Temporary anchorage device-assisted rapid maxillary expansion has widened the horizon to treat adults having maxillary transverse deficiency without any surgical procedure. Three-dimensional custom modifications have also been developed, but they can be expensive. A modification of Hyrax screw with the use of lingual sheaths is suggested for microimplant-assisted rapid palatal expansion, which can be an easy to fabricate in-office and economical option.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T03:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211056245
       
  • Standardization of Cephalograms Obtained From Various Imaging Systems

    • Authors: Rajiv Balachandran, Karthik Sennimalai, Ritu Duggal
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo propose and validate a method for standardizing and printing cephalograms acquired from different imaging systems.MethodsValidation of the proposed method was done using digital cephalograms, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-derived cephalograms, and direct measurements obtained from 3 dry human skulls. Each cephalogram was analyzed as-received and after standardization, using both manual and digital methods. 3-dimensional (3D) measurements were also computed from the CBCT images. After adequate blinding, 2 observers independently carried out all these measurements at 2 different times. Finally, the different cephalometric measurements of each skull were compared with the corresponding direct measurements (gold standard).ResultsThe as-received digital cephalogram showed an inherent magnification of 33%, as determined from the calibration ruler. Compared to direct skull measurements, the as-received conventional and CBCT-derived cephalograms printed without standardization showed a reduction in measures of around 14% and 28%, respectively, whereas measurements obtained from cephalograms, which were standardized and printed by the proposed method, were comparable to direct measurements.ConclusionsThe findings of the validation study demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method in standardizing different cephalograms before printing.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-12-23T04:09:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211044864
       
  • Comparison of AdvanSync2® and Twin Block Appliances in Treatment of Class
           II Malocclusion With Retrognathic Mandible—An Observational
           Retrospective Study

    • Authors: Ankit Kumar Shahi, Payal Sharma, Achint Juneja, Divya Shetty, Rishibha Bhardwaj, Shubhangi Jain
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To evaluate the treatment outcomes between Twin Block and AdvanSync2® appliances by comparing the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes.Materials and Methods:Radiographic data of 20 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Data were selected from patients in their skeletal growth spurt as evaluated by the cervical vertebral maturation method (CVMI 2, 3, and 4), with class II malocclusion characterized with retrognathic mandible (ANB> 4°, SNB < 77°, FMA = 25 ± 5°, overjet> 5 mm). There were 10 patients in each group that underwent orthodontic correction for class II malocclusion: either using Twin Block or AdvanSync2®. Independent t test and Paired t test and chi-square tests were used for the data analysis. The level of statistical significance was set at P value ≤.05.Results:The chronological and skeletal age were similar in both the groups. Records were taken for the functional treatment with mean treatment span of 8 ± 1 month. Changes in SNB (group I = 1.59°, group II = 3.11°) (P < .01), Co-Gn (group I = 2.89 mm, group II = 5.34 mm), and U1-L1° (group I = −1.51°, group II = 2.97°) showed statistically different outcome between the groups, when the pre-post data were studied. Rest of the variables—cranial base, maxillary skeletal, mandibular skeletal, intermaxillary, vertical skeletal, maxillary dentoalveolar, mandibular dentoalveolar, and soft tissue—showed similar outcome (P> .05).Conclusion:Both appliances lead to desirable outcomes in the correction of class II malocclusion. AdvanSync2® resulted in inducing more of changes in SNB and effective mandibular length as compared to Twin Block. Overjet and molar relation improved significantly with both the appliances. Both the appliances resulted in similar skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-12-17T05:40:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211057241
       
  • A Cross-Sectional Evaluation of Self-Perceived Orthodontic Treatment Needs
           Amongst Tribal Adolescent With Remote Access to Orthodontic Treatment
           Using a Simplified Malocclusion Index

    • Authors: Uday Kumar Digumarthi, R. Prakash
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Self-perceived orthodontic treatment need is strongly influenced by what is perceived to be the esthetic norm amongst a community, and reluctance toward treatment amongst adolescents with clinically ascertained malocclusion may often be due to readily remediable factors. Of particular interest is the prevalence of malocclusion amongst such communities as a probable indicator of the role of diet and genetics in establishing a predominant clinical phenotype that may also play a role in the construct of what is perceived as the esthetic norm amongst the community, thereby influencing the self-perceived need for treatment. Studies aimed at evaluating the association between self-perceived esthetics, and self-perceived treatment need have not been performed amongst a population with no prior exposure to orthodontic treatmentObjectives:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-perceived orthodontic treatment need amongst the tribal adolescents belonging to regions with remote access to orthodontic treatment by way of a verbally assigned index and to also identify the reasons of reluctance toward treatment to better understand how to make orthodontic treatment readily accessible to such populations.Participants, Materials, and Methods:The agency areas of Paderu located at 18.0833°N 82.667°E and Parvathipuram located at 18°46'N 83°25'E are 2 revenue districts of Visakhapatnam and Vizianagaram, respectively, in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India, that are home to various tribal populations with remote access to orthodontic treatment. A total of 2,016 school-going tribal adolescents of the Paderu revenue division and 819 tribal adolescents of the Parvathipuram revenue division were examined to ascertain the prevalence of malocclusion. Necessary consent and permissions were obtained from the tribal authorities, the school authorities, parents, and the institutional ethical clearance committee. The screening was done utilizing natural daylight in compliance with infection prevention and control protocol. Clinical examination aimed at categorizing the observed occlusion into either ideal occlusion or one of the three classes of Angle’s class I, II, and III malocclusions. The Simplified Malocclusion Index For Layperson Evaluation (SMILE) was verbally assigned in the vernacular language while interacting with each child and the findings made note of for calculation of relevant scores related to their orthodontic awareness, self-esteem as related to self-perceived esthetics, and their self-perceived need for treatment. Reasons for reluctance to undergo treatment were noted down if expressed. An initial group of 31 adolescents categorized as presenting with clinical malocclusion were randomly picked up and assigned the SMILE index a second time to assess the reliability of the index by way of Cohen’s kappa statistic.Results:The initial test group of 31 individuals assigned the SMILE twice showed a Cohen’s kappa of 0.93 validating almost perfect intraoperator agreement. The SMILE index revealed that 80.95% of the adolescents of Paderu revenue division had orthodontic awareness and 79.51% had self-perceived esthetics but only 15.97% felt a need for orthodontic treatment. Pearson’s Chi squared statistical analysis indicated a gender bias related to the self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment (X [1, N = 1,371] = 19.71, P < .001). The Index assigned to the Parvathipuram division revealed that 77.04% had orthodontic awareness and 78.38 had self-perceived esthetics but only 6.95% felt the need for orthodontic treatment. Pearson’s Chi squared statistical analysis indicated a gender bias related to the self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment (X [1, N = 764] = 4.95, P = .02).Conclusion:The self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment is often based on the self-perceived esthetics of an individual or the self-esteem as influenced by the perceived esthetic norm of the community. Orthodontic treatment of adolescents with borderline malocclusion derangements requires careful ascertaining of the actual perceived need of the patient to enable the rendering of a justifiable orthodontic treatment with the complete trust of the young patient. This helps build community trust in regions where orthodontic treatment has not yet made in roads and may help ensure higher end of treatment satisfaction levels.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-12-17T05:36:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211056251
       
  • Maximum Voluntary Molar and Incisor Biting Force and Morphological
           Variables in Subjects With Different Vertical Skeletal Patterns

    • Authors: Ankita Singh, Pradeep Tandon, Dipti Shastri
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To estimate the maximum voluntary molar biting force (MBF) and incisor biting force (IBF) and their relationship to morphological variables in subjects with different vertical skeletal patterns.Materials and Methods:Maximum voluntary MBF, IBF, and morphological variables were recorded in 120 subjects (60 males and 60 females) with skeletal class I pattern in the age range of 14 to 24 years. All subjects were divided into 3 groups: Normodivergent, hypodivergent, and hyperdivergent, according to the maxillomandibular plane angle and Jarabak ratio. Bite force measurements were undertaken using a custom-made portable digital gnathodynamometer on the left and the right sides of the jaw in the molar and incisor regions during maximal clenching. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test, chi-square test, and ANOVA test using SPSS version 22.0.0.0 software.Results:MBF and IBF are influenced by gender with higher values obtained for male subjects in all groups in the following order: hypodivergent> normodivergent> hyperdivergent. No significant changes were seen with morphological variables in different groups.Conclusion:Molar and incisor biting forces are highest in hypodivergent subjects and least in hyperdivergent subjects as a reflection of jaw morphology and muscular efficiency. In all groups, males exhibit higher force values than females, underlining a strong gender influence on biting force and facial pattern.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-11-12T03:17:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211044856
       
  • Andy’s Facial Growth Indicator

    • Authors: Anand Ambekar, Smita Raosaheb Warpe, Sujit Navnath Zadake
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Facial growth indicator line was originally developed by Dr John RC Mew. Dr Mew discloses a facial growth indicator in his textbook, Bioblock Therapy published in Great Britain by Dr Mew. The indicator line—this is defined as the distance from the tip of the nose to the incisal edge of the lowest upper central incisor. Andy’s facial growth indicator is a modification of facial growth indicator, which was originally developed by Dr Mew.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-10-07T06:14:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211044877
       
  • In Vivo Evaluation of Micronucleus Frequencies in Buccal Mucosal Cells of
           Orthodontic Patients with and Without Fluoride Use

    • Authors: Prasad Chitra, GS Prashantha, Arun Rao, Harshvardhan S Jois
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Fluoride agents to prevent white spot lesions are used often during orthodontic treatment. The beneficial effects of fluoride, when consumed within permissible limits on dental structures, are well known. Their implications on underlying biological tissues, however, are unknown. Mouthwashes and dentifrices with fluorides are associated with metal ion release into the mouth with possible cell genotoxicity. Since these cariostatic agents are frequently used during orthodontic therapy, a deeper understanding of the effects of fluoride on oral tissues was considered necessary.Methodology:Three groups of patients (30 each)—group 1 (untreated controls), group 2 (non-fluoridated), and group 3 (Fluoridated) were analyzed. Patients in groups 2 and 3 were bonded with the same bracket prescription and treated with similar archwire sequences. Buccal mucosal cells at 4 specific time periods (before treatment, 1 week, 30 days, and 6 months) were collected, using a wooden tongue depressor, and assessed for any nuclear abnormalities. Comparisons of changes were made with an untreated control group and also between the non-fluoridated and fluoridated groups. Relevant conclusions were drawn after analysis of the results.Results:Greater number of nuclei were observed at the 30-day time interval in the fluoridated group, which was statistically significant at P < .001.Conclusion:Use of fluoridated oral hygiene products in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment with NiTi archwires could increase the risk of micronuclei formation in buccal mucosal cells.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T07:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211037307
       
  • In-vitro Comparative Assessment of Antibacterial and Anti-adherent Effect
           of Two Types of Surface Modificants on Stainless Steel Orthodontic
           Brackets Against Streptococcus mutans

    • Authors: Mrunmaye Math, Alok G. Shah, Parag Gangurde, Anita G. Karandikar, Anjali Gheware, Bhagyashree S. Jadhav
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Comparative evaluation of antibacterial and anti-adherent properties of surface-modified stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans).Materials and Methods:The study was conducted on 120 SS orthodontic McLaughlin, Bennett, Trevisi (MBT) 0.022″ slot by Leone, Italy. Orthodontic brackets that constituted the sample size were divided into 6 groups, consisting of 20 samples each in two control (non-surface coated) and four experimental groups. The experimental group’s surface coatings were photocatalytic zinc oxide (ZnO) and photocatalytic titanium oxide (TiO2), which were carried out by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method for surface modification. Brackets were subjected to microbiological tests against S. mutans. For anti-adherence, weight change, pre- and postexposure, was evaluated to gauge the adherence of bacteria and colony-forming units/milliliter (CFU/mL) count measuring the survival rate of bacterial cells for antibacterial activity.Results:The TiO2-coated group showed statistically significant anti-adherence (P-value < .05) against S. mutans than control and ZnO groups. The CFU count of TiO2 group was lower than control as well as ZnO group.Conclusion:TiO2 is superior to ZnO and should be continued to be considered for surface modification of orthodontic brackets against White Spot Lesions (WSLs) and gingivitis.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T07:18:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211037298
       
  • A Cephalometric Evaluation and Comparison of Skeletal, Dentoalveolar, and
           Soft Tissue Changes Brought about by the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device
           and PowerScope Fixed Functional Appliance

    • Authors: Gabbie Jasmine Kaur, Geetanjali Gandhi, Mannu Khanna, Anju Loomba, Atul Sharma
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Though studies have been conducted on the PowerScope, not many researches are available in the literature which compare its effects with other fixed functional appliances. Therefore, the aim of our study was cephalometric evaluation and comparison of the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes brought about by the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device and PowerScope appliance.Materials and Methods:Pre and Posttreatment cephalometric records of 20 patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with fixed functional appliances (Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device and PowerScope) were compared. Values of various cephalometric parameters were used to evaluate the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue changes. Wilcoxon signed-rank test (intragroup comparison) and Mann–Whitney U test (intergroup) were used to see significant differences in the parameters (P ≤ .05).Results:Both the appliances were successful in correcting the Class II discrepancy. Skeletal changes were seen significantly in both the groups, though they were more in the Forsus patients. Dentoalveolar changes were predominantly seen in PowerScope patients. Also, an improvement in soft tissue profile was seen in both the groups.Conclusion:From our study, we concluded that the PowerScope and the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device are equally good options for the correction of skeletal Class II malocclusion due to a retrognathic mandible, as they achieve changes in all the three aspects: skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T06:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211004435
       
  • Comparison of the Treatment Effectiveness between Labial and Lingual Fixed
           Mechanotherapy and Patients’ Response toward Lingual Fixed
           Mechanotherapy: A Prospective Clinical Study

    • Authors: Vagdevi Hosur Kantharaju, Mala Ram Manohar, G Shivaprakash
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The present study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment outcome using American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) scoring and total treatment time between labial and lingual appliance and also to assess patients’ perception of the lingual appliance system.Materials and Methods:Twenty patients requiring first premolar extraction were selected; 10 patients were treated with a lingual and 10 with a labial appliance. The treatment duration and ABO scores were recorded from the posttreatment dental casts and orthopantomogram (OPG). A questionnaire was used to evaluate the perception of patients on lingual treatment using a visual analogue scale (VAS).Results:The total ABO scores of the 2 groups were not statistically significant. The lingual- and labial-appliance treatments were completed in 19.30 ± 7.50 and 22.40 ± 6.35 months, respectively. The VAS showed that lingual-appliance patients experienced a moderate amount of pain and discomfort to the tongue and soft tissues. Patients did not have considerable difficulty with speech and in maintaining oral hygiene.Conclusion:Lingual appliance cases finished with a comparable quality of orthodontic treatment precision well within the normal treatment time frame. These patients had moderate difficulties with speech, tongue irritation, and pain. They did not have difficulty in maintaining their oral hygiene and were satisfied with their smile and treatment outcome.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T04:00:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211029624
       
  • En-Masse Distalization of Class I Bimaxillary Protrusion Treated with
           Damon System Using Infrazygomatic and Buccal Shelf Bone Screw: A Case
           Report

    • Authors: Analhaq Anvarhushen Shaikh, Arun Kumar G., Ramesh GC, Ganesh Chinthan
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Here is a case report of a 20-year-old female patient with skeletal Class I malocclusion, with Angle’s Class I molar relation on the right and super Class I molar relation on the left side. The patient was diagnosed with hyperdivergent face pattern, proclined upper and lower anteriors, convex profile, potentially competent lips, short upper lip, average nasolabial angle, and anterior facial divergence. Treatment was organized by Damon System and En-masse distalization using the Infrazygomatic Crest and buccal shelf bone screws. The facial changes produced as a result of treatment were directly related to skeletal and dentoalveolar modifications that were designed as goals for patient treatment. It provided a minimal friction environment for the full-arch distalization. In this borderline bimaxillary protrusion case with a good profile, en-masse distalization turned out to be a better option than extracting the premolars and retracting incisors. It also stands out to be an example for the management of the same.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211029625
       
  • In response to the article “Soft-tissue Cephalometric Norms of Kashmiri
           Population with Normal Occlusion and Well-balanced Faces”

    • Authors: Akshay Gupta, Tanika Gupta
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T04:36:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211004432
       
  • Laser Conditioning: A Preferred Option over Conventional Acid Etching for
           Orthodontic Bonding

    • Authors: Mukesh Kumar, Manish Goyal, Madhur Sharma
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T03:26:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211005415
       
  • Measurement and Comparison of Bracket Transfer Accuracy With Different
           Indirect Bonding Techniques: An In Vitro Study

    • Authors: Sonam Rastogi, Manish Goyal, Mukesh Kumar, Kalpit Shitalkumar Shaha, Ekta Yadav, Amandeep Kaur
      First page: 124
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To measure and compare bracket transfer accuracy of 3 indirect bonding (IDB) techniques.Material and Methods:Three IDB techniques were studied using polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) putty, vacuum-form (VF), and glue gun (GG). A total of 120 orthodontic stone models were fabricated with die stone, out of which bonding was done on 60 working models and transferred to other 60 patient models. One quadrant was selected for each technique. Digital photography was used to measure the mesiodistal (X-axis), occlusogingival (Y-axis), and faciolingual (Z-axis) position of each bracket on the working and patient models.Results:All the 3 IDB techniques have a very good bracket transfer accuracy. On comparing individual planes, greatest accuracy was seen in GG on X-axis, VF on Y-axis, and VF/PVS on Z-axis. Points A and B were compared for bracket rotation and the mean differences were insignificant indicating that there was no significant amount of rotation in 3 IDB techniques.Conclusions:We can say that all 3 IDB techniques had a very high bracket transfer accuracy.Out of the 3 IDB techniques VF was the most accurate, whereas PVS was the least accurate technique. The selection of technique should be based on tray cost and fabrication time.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-05-08T08:18:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211011691
       
  • Correlation of Infrazygomatic Bone Thickness With Cervical Vertebrae
           Maturation Stages

    • Authors: Mahalakshmi Krishnakumaran, Balaji Krishnan, Rajesh Raman, Sumanth Rangarajan, G. Preethi, Anandadevi Chinnasamy
      First page: 132
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Anchorage is one of the most important consideration in the field of orthodontics to achieve a desired tooth movement. In order to eliminate the undesirable side effects such as anchorage loss, skeletal anchorage systems such as mini-implants have been introduced in orthodontics.Aim:To evaluate the bone thickness of the infrazygomatic crest in different cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI) and to compare it between male and female subjects, by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging.Materials and Methods:A retrospective study was conducted using CBCT images of 60 patients in the age group of 8–25 years. Cervical vertebra maturation was analyzed using Hassel–Farmann index and divided into 6 groups (n = 10/group). The infrazygomatic crest was divided into horizontal and vertical planes. The horizontal plane passed through the most inferior border of the zygomatic process of maxilla and the vertical plane passed through the most anterior point of the infratemporal fossa parallel to midsagittal plane. Five parallel lines were drawn at 2 mm interval in both horizontal and vertical planes (HB+2, HB+4, HB+6, HB+8, and HB+10) (V-2, V-4, V-6, V-8, and V-10). The bone thickness was measured at the point of intersection of these lines.Results:According to Kruskal–Wallis analysis, statistically significant difference in infrazygomatic crest (IZC) bone thickness was seen in various CVMI stages (P = .001). Maximum bone thickness was 11 mm and minimum bone thickness was 1 mm. No significant difference was observed between male and female populations.Conclusion:Thus, the superolateral area in infrazygomatic crest is the most appropriate site for miniscrew insertion in all age groups.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T03:33:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211016595
       
  • Determining Orthodontic Knowledge and Awareness in Young Adults

    • Authors: Jyoti Mishra, Sudhir Kapoor, Jitendra Bhagchandani, Sonahita Agarwal, Vaibhav Vashishta, Amit Kumar Singh
      First page: 140
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Aim and Objective:To assess the level of awareness among local adult population (orthodontically untreated) regarding orthodontic treatment and procedures.Materials and Methods:A cross-sectional study was planned by accessing 100 subjects comprising of 2 groups (50 male and 50 female). After due ethical clearance, a self-structured questionnaire consisting of 17 questions was given to a group of randomly selected 100 individuals with an age range of 20 to 30 years.Results:The overall awareness of orthodontics as a speciality among both the groups was only 52% to 56%. Statistically insignificant difference was found in the knowledge and awareness of orthodontic treatment among both male and female subjects, that is, Group I and II. Also, those who knew about the orthodontic treatment did not opt for it because of high cost and longer duration involved.Conclusion:More than half of the population is unaware of the scope of orthodontic treatment, and thus, they do not seek any assistance. Hence, more efforts are needed to create awareness about orthodontics and the associated benefits.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T05:34:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211022157
       
  • Correlation of Growth Pattern and Palatal Rugae Pattern in South Indian
           Population

    • Authors: Shetty Suhani Sudhakar, K. Mithun, Abhinay Sorake, K. Nillan Shetty, Thankam C. Susan
      First page: 144
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:To determine the correlation between palatal rugae (PR) pattern and subjects with vertical, average, and horizontal growth pattern and to determine gender variation if any.Material and Methods:One hundred and twenty study models were divided into horizontal, vertical, and average growth patterns with 40 (20 males and 20 females) samples in each group. The pattern of PR was assessed in each group using a template.Result:Type B (wavy type) PR occurs more often in horizontal and average growth pattern (80% and 72.5% respectively), whereas its occurrence in vertical growth pattern subject is the least among other growth patterns, that is, 42.5% of the total subjects. Type E (curved type) PR has appeared highest in 27.5% of average growth pattern patient followed by 12.5% of vertical growth pattern subjects. The occurrence of type E PR is least in horizontal growth pattern which is just 5% of the total subjects.Conclusion:Curved-type PR was more prevalent in vertical and average growth patterns. Diverging PR pattern was mainly seen in vertical growth pattern. PR also shows sexual dimorphism. The association is clinically significant as it will lead to determination of facial vertical growth pattern at early age; thus, it serves as a diagnostic adjunct for different malocclusions very early in life and aids in preventive or interceptive orthodontic measures to alleviate forthcoming growth pattern.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T04:04:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211015934
       
  • Pharyngeal Airway Space Dimensions and Hyoid Bone Position in Various
           Craniofacial Morphologies

    • Authors: Asal Acharya, Praveen Mishra, Rabindra Man Shrestha
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To assess the relationship of pharyngeal airway dimensions and the position of the hyoid bone in several craniofacial morphologies among Nepali adults. To assess the relationship between dimensions of the pharyngeal airway and position of the hyoid bone and compare gender dimorphism.Materials and Methods:The cross-sectional observational research comprised lateral cephalograms of 150 subjects aged 16 to 30 years. Samples were separated into three sagittal craniofacial morphological groups based on the ANB (A point, nasion, B point) angle and into gender groups. Different parameters (linear and angular) for measuring dimensions of the pharyngeal airway and position of the hyoid bone were assessed. An ANOVA test and a Pearson correlation test were performed.Results:Dimensions of the pharyngeal airway were largest in skeletal Class III when compared to skeletal Class I and Class II subjects, with a lower pharyngeal airway space and the length of the nasal fossa being significantly larger. The hyoid bone was anteriorly and inferiorly placed in Class III skeletal subjects. Males had greater pharyngeal airway dimensions and a hyoid bone positioned more inferiorly and anteriorly. The nasal fossa length had a strong positive correlation with the hyoid bone position vertically.Conclusion:There were differences in the dimensions of the pharyngeal airway and position of the hyoid bone in various craniofacial morphologies among Nepali adults. Gender dimorphism was observed in both dimensions of the pharyngeal airway and the position of the hyoid bone.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:26:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211007621
       
  • Influence of Social Media on the Indian Population’s Perception of
           Orthodontic-Related Posts: A Mixed Method Analysis

    • Authors: Tarulatha R Shyagali, Ayesha Rathore, Abhishek Gupta, Anil Tiwari, Shanya Kapoor, Payal Goyal
      First page: 158
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:In little more than a decade, social media has gone from being an entertainment source to a fully integrated part of nearly every aspect of daily life. This study aimed to provide an insight into how orthodontics-related social media posts are looked upon by the Indian population.Material and Methods:Orthodontics-related social media posts were analyzed for the number of likes, shares, and comments. Comments were also scrutinized for determining whether they were appreciation comments or enquiries related to orthodontic treatment and procedure. Posts were collected from 3 platforms: Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. A mixed-methods approach was applied. First, all posts were structured according to a quantitative content analysis. Subsequently, qualitative analysis was performed to detect potential differences between the quality of response to posts on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Using one-way ANOVA test, differences in the data were tabulated. A Chi- Square test was used to analyze the qualitative differences in the comments, which were scrutinized to check if they were appreciation comments or enquiries/doubts related to the posts.Results:There was a significant difference between the numbers of likes, shares, and comments. Appreciation comments were more in number than enquiries. Instagram had the maximum number of likes, followed by Facebook and Twitter (P < .00001). Facebook had more shares in comparison to Twitter. Upon an analysis done on the number of comments, Facebook was found to have the highest number of comments, followed by Instagram and Twitter. All the results were significant, with P < .00001.Conclusion:It can be concluded that social media awareness related to orthodontics posts among Indians is gaining pace, and a lot can be achieved using these social media platforms to spread awareness related to orthodontic treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:43:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211026249
       
  • Torque Comparison Between Two Passive Self-Ligating Brackets with Respect
           to Interbracket Wire Dimensions and Types: A Finite Element Analysis

    • Authors: Balan K Thushar, Anirudh K Mathur, Rajasri Diddige, Shubhnita Verma, Prasad Chitra
      First page: 164
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study aimed to analyze the expression of torque between 2 passive self-ligating brackets by simulating different clinical situations using finite element analysis.Material and Methods:Two passive self-ligating brackets, that is, Damon Q (Ormco, Glendora, California) and Smart Clip (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California), were 3D modeled using micro-computed tomography. ANSYS V14.5 software was used for analysis. Archwire and bracket interactions were simulated to measure torque expression by changing wire alloys (stainless steel [SS] and titanium molybdenum [TMA]) and interbracket dimensions.Results:Damon Q brackets generated higher torque values compared to Smart Clip brackets with both SS and TMA wires. Damon Q brackets generated the highest torquing moment of 25.72 Nmm and 7.45 Nmm, while Smart Clip brackets generated 22.25 Nmm and 7.31 Nmm with 0.019 × 0.025″ SS and TMA wires, respectively, at an interbracket distance of 12 mm. Torquing moments decreased for Damon Q and Smart Clip brackets when wire length increased from 12 mm to 16 mm.Conclusion:Damon Q with 0.019 × 0.025″wires exhibited superior torquing characteristics as compared to Smart Clip brackets with similar archwires.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211029610
       
  • Steering the Mandible in the Right Direction : Forsus Case Series

    • Authors: Prachi Gohil, Sonali Mahadevi, Bhavya Trivedi, Neha Assudani, Arth Patel, Mauli Shah
      First page: 179
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      We are in the process of discovery of new vistas for technological advances in terms of various appliances with a vision of making orthodontic treatment compliance free as well as successful. Due to improved technology, the enigma of treating the Class II syndrome is palliated. “Out of the box” thinking has become a norm to treat certain situations that were not corrected in noncompliant patients. Fixed functional appliances are valuable tools introduced to assist the correction of skeletal Class II malocclusion with mandibular retrognathia at the deceleration stage of growth for achieving stable results. In this direction a case series is reported of patients having the above conditions and undergoing orthodontic treatment using a Forsus FFA. Joining hands with technology is a win-win situation for both the patient and the orthodontist.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T06:38:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211005404
       
  • Multipurpose Bracket Positioning Tool: A Modified Probe for Accurate
           Bracket Placement

    • Authors: Susmita Bala Shenoi, Sumedh Deshpande, Rohan S. Hattarki
      First page: 186
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      There is no single bracket gauge that can be used universally for all teeth to orient brackets in the vertical and axial planes simultaneously.To overcome the increased armamentarium and steps involved in accurately positioning brackets, we have modified a UNC-15 probe to fabricate a multipurpose bracket positioning tool (MBP tool).Thus, one single instrument can be used not only to position brackets (both anterior and posterior) in all planes but also for the quick verification of positioned brackets just before curing.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T05:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211013754
       
  • Comparison of Roll and Pitch Among Patients with Vertical and Horizontal
           Skeletal Patterns Using Cant-O-Meter: A New Gyroscopic Device for
           Measuring Occlusal Cant

    • Authors: Janani Ravi, Poornima Jnaneshwar, R. Krishnaraj, K. Ravi
      First page: 189
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      In Orthodontics, initial classification of malocclusions was based on planar malocclusions in the anteroposterior, transverse and vertical planes that were based only on translation of the jaws in space. In 2007, Ackermann and Proffit introduced rotational components—roll, pitch, and yaw—analogous to the position of the airplane in space. These rotations can result in canting of the occlusal plane.There are no quantitative methods available in the literature for a precise estimation of the occlusal cant.Qualitative evaluation of occlusal cant is subjective and is associated with inter-individual variations. This article describes an indigenously devised simple chairside device that can quantify cant of the occlusal plane in terms of the roll and pitch in degrees. There is accurate quantification of cant, which can be used effectively in many clinical scenarios.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T03:14:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211023382
       
  • Spring for Correction of Severely Malposed Canine

    • Authors: Achint Devendra Chachada, Nehal Saraf, Piyush Khandelwal, Megha Jain
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T07:21:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211037301
       
  • A Device to Measure Profile Angle Clinically: Profilometer

    • Authors: Pavankumar R Singh, Anand S Ambekar, Suresh K Kangane
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      In orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, soft tissue profile assessment is of prime importance. Due to the emerging soft tissue paradigm, greater emphasis has been given to the clinical examination of soft tissue function and esthetics. Various cephalometric and photographic methods were introduced in the past to assess and measure profile angle and other facial angles. Our new device, that is, profilometer, helps to measure profile angle clinically.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:47:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211018070
       
  • Mini-implant Supported Lip Bumper

    • Authors: Aravinthrajkumar Govindaraj, Ashwin Mathew George
      First page: 200
      Abstract: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society, Ahead of Print.
      Patients with a skeletal class II malocclusion are usually associated with a prognathic maxilla with orthognathic mandible or a retrognathic mandible with orthognathic maxilla or a combination of both. Patients with severe prognathic maxilla are usually associated with increased overjet which results in a lower lip trap. The lip trap should be managed the earliest as it will lead to further proclination of the upper anterior teeth and also hinder the normal growth of the mandible. To overcome the limitations of a conventional lip bumper, we arrived at an idea of fixed lip bumper supported using mini-implants.
      Citation: Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03015742211022133
       
 
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