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DENTISTRY (266 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 256 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ação Odonto     Open Access  
Acta Odontologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Odontologica Turcica     Open Access  
Acta Stomatologica Marisiensis Journal     Open Access  
Actas Odontológicas     Open Access  
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access  
AJO-DO Clinical Companion : An International Journal Dedicated to Excellence in Clinical Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aktuel Nordisk Odontologi     Full-text available via subscription  
Al-Rafidain Dental Journal     Open Access  
Annals of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Atatürk Üniversitesi Diş Hekimliği Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Australasian Orthodontic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access  
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Avicenna Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Balkan Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BDJ Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biomaterial Investigations in Dentistry     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Caries Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Caspian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
CES Odontología     Open Access  
Chiang Mai Dental Journal     Open Access  
Ciencia Odontológica     Open Access  
City Dental College Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Advances in Periodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical and Laboratorial Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Dentistry Reviewed     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Oral Implants Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Oral Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Reviews in Oral Biology Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cumhuriyet Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Oral Health Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Dental Abstracts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Dental Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Dental Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dental Journal (Majalah Kedokteran Gigi)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Journal of Advance Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dental Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dental Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dental Traumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Dental Update     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry 3000     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Dentistry Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dentistry Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Der Freie Zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
der junge zahnarzt     Hybrid Journal  
Die Quintessenz     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disease-a-Month     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ENDO     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Endodontic Topics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Endodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Endodontology     Open Access  
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Dental Research and Biomaterials Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Dentistry and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Oral Implantology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Oral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access  
Evidence-Based Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Faculty Dental Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Future Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Giornale Italiano di Endodonzia     Open Access  
Implantologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Informationen aus Orthodontie & Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal  
Insisiva Dental Journal     Open Access  
International Dental Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Endodontic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Computerized Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Contemporary Dental and Medical Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Dental Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Forensic Odontology     Open Access  
International Journal of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
International Journal of Implant Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Medical and Dental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Odontostomatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Oral Care and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Oral Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Preventive and Clinical Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Prosthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Stomatological Research     Open Access  
International Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Dental Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JDR Clinical & Translational Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Academy of Dental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Advanced Oral Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Applied Oral Science     Open Access  
Journal of Baghdad College of Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical Periodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Craniomandibular Function     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dental Problems and Solutions     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Dental Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Dentistry Defense Section     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Dentistry for Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Dentofacial Anomalies and Orthodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dentomaxillofacial Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Endodontics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Indian Academy of Dental Specialist Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal Of International Dental And Medical Research     Open Access  
Journal of International Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Nepalese Association of Pediatric Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalese Prosthodontic Society (JNPS)     Open Access  
Journal of Nepalese Society of Periodontology and Oral Implantology     Open Access  
Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Oral Biology     Open Access  
Journal of Oral Biosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Oral Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Oral Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Oral Research and Review     Open Access  
Journal of Orthodontic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Periodontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Pierre Fauchard Academy (India Section)     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Primary Care Dentistry and Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public Health Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Restorative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Journal Of Syiah Kuala Dentistry Society     Open Access  
Journal of the American Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the International Clinical Dental Research Organization     Open Access  
Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Kesehatan Gigi     Open Access  
Kieferorthopädie     Full-text available via subscription  
Kiru : Revista de la Facultad de Odontología - Universidad de San Martín de Porres     Open Access  
Lasers in Dental Science     Hybrid Journal  
Majalah Kedokteran Gigi Indonesia     Open Access  
Médecine Buccale Chirurgie Buccale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicina Oral, patología oral y cirugía bucal     Open Access  

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Current Oral Health Reports
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2196-3002
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Periodontal Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: New
           Microbiome-Targeted Therapy Based on the Oral–Gut–Liver Axis Concept

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review There has been emerging data and a growing appreciation of the negative effects of periodontal disease on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is currently the most prevalent chronic liver disease worldwide. A subgroup of these NAFLD patients develops more severe and progressive forms of liver disease, namely, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which are a risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we will summarize the recent epidemiological, basic, and clinical research findings on the relationship between periodontal disease and NAFLD/NASH and discuss the pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH and potential new treatment options with a particular focus on the gut microbiota. Recent Findings In terms of the mechanism by which harmful factors are transported from diseased periodontal tissue to the liver, two routes of transmission have been proposed based on the unique anatomical characteristics of the liver, namely, through a hematogenous diffusion via the systemic circulation and through a gut–liver axis via the gastrointestinal tract. In particular, with respect to enteral diffusion, gut microbiome dysbiosis induced by enteral translocation of periodontopathic bacteria may be involved in NAFLD. In terms of a gut–liver axis, one mechanism assumed to link the gut microbiome to NAFLD is the disruption of the gut epithelial barrier, which may allow leakage of microbial products and metabolites into the portal circulation. Namely, changes in lipopolysaccharide and bacterial metabolites due to gut dysbiosis can induce intestinal inflammation and increase permeability, thereby promoting hepatic exposure to these components, which can directly cause NAFLD and liver fibrosis. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a common periodontopathic bacteria, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both the gut dysbiosis and NAFLD via several different pathways. Therefore, diverse strategies for manipulating the gut microbiome in the management of NAFLD related to periodontal disease have been proposed, including the use of antibiotics, probiotics, and prebiotics. Summary Despite research limitations, there is a large body of evidence supporting the relationship between periodontal disease and NAFLD/NASH. The importance of the oral–gut–liver axis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is increasing, and future research on microbiome-targeted therapy to improve periodontal disease-related gut dysbiosis is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
       
  • Deterioration of Oral Functions and Nutrition in Older Individuals

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Oral functions, which are responsible for feeding and swallowing, play a very important role in obtaining proper nutrition. Therefore, their deterioration could interfere with nutritional ingestion. This review investigated previous reports on the relationship between oral function deterioration and malnutrition. Recent Findings Reduced occlusal force, decreased tongue–lip motor function, decreased tongue pressure, decreased masticatory function, and deterioration of swallowing function have been found to be associated with malnutrition. On the other hand, consensus does not exist on whether oral dryness is associated with malnutrition. Prosthetic rehabilitation and oral function training are effective interventions for improving oral functions. However, malnutrition could not be addressed by prosthetic rehabilitation alone; it requires simultaneous management with prosthetic rehabilitation and nutritional guidance. Furthermore, it has been reported that data on whether oral function training, such as tongue strengthening training, could improve malnutrition are limited. Summary Partial deterioration of oral functions can cause malnutrition. Prosthetic rehabilitation and oral function training could be considered interventions for improving malnutrition, but numerous unclarified points about these methods remain. In the future, detailed research should be conducted to elucidate the causal relationship between deterioration of oral functions and malnutrition and to establish oral function interventions for improving malnutrition.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
       
  • Graphene for Zirconia and Titanium Composites in Dental Implants:
           Significance and Predictions

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Graphene is introduced in dentistry as a material to be used in the fabrication or coating of dental implants due to its biocompatibility, ability to physically interact with biomolecules and very high surface area. This review highlights the current knowledge on the general properties of graphene, potential benefits especially when used in zirconia-based implants, as composite materials and coatings. Recent Findings The literature reviewed showed a growing body of evidence supporting the use of graphene-based material, associated with titanium or zirconia as a coating or composite material that helps in cell viability, differentiation and proliferation, improving the bioactivity, osseointegration, physical, chemical and mechanical properties particularly zirconia. Graphene-based materials present great potential for biomedical applications especially when used in the form of nanostructured biological coatings that can be obtained through reproducible and economical processes. Summary The use of graphene as a composite implant material or coating may have great potential for osseointegration and bone regeneration, providing that, features including hydrophilicity, protein adsorption capacity, oxygen content and effect of external parameters such as temperature, pH and ionic strength need further elucidations before they can be implemented as a coating or composite material for dental implants.
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
       
  • An Update on Universal Adhesives: Indications and Limitations

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      Abstract: Purpose of the review This article presents an overview of the so-called “Universal Adhesives”, which theoretically have the potential to simplify and expedite adhesive protocols, by providing flexibility about the etching approach and type of substrate, thus representing the state-of-the-art in adhesive dentistry. However, despite the claimed advantages of having a single adhesive for all uses, there is still controversial information about the most convenient techniques and indications for this type of adhesives. This review aimed to summarize the historic background and clinical indications of Universal Adhesives. Also, commercially available products and their compositions will be presented, and the most relevant results from laboratorial research and clinical trials using Universal Adhesives will be discussed. Recent Findings The 10-MDP monomer has become the standard reference for acid phosphate functional monomers, providing a high reactivity with metallic, ceramic, and mineral substrates. Nonetheless, manufacturers have developed several other functional monomers to provide “universal” bonding capabilities to their adhesives. In general, recent studies suggest that Universal Adhesives present acceptable survival rates on restorations of non-carious cervical lesions, for up to 5 years. However, there is a high incidence of marginal discoloration, which is even higher when the Universal Adhesives are applied with a self-etch technique. Thus, to reduce the problems associated with marginal discoloration, etching of enamel with phosphoric acid is recommended. Despite the advance in the study of Universal Adhesives, most clinical trials present limitations such as the application of low-sensitivity evaluation criteria and the use of non-carious cervical lesions as the main substrate for evaluation of the longevity of the restorations. However, analysis of the available in vitro and clinical evidence suggests that the acidic monomers on Universal Adhesives can produce adequate demineralization of the superficial dentin and may be applied safely to dentin with a self-etch technique, resulting in a predictable long-term performance. Summary The performance of Universal Adhesives to dental hard tissues and indirect restorative materials is material dependent because some of adhesives are not indicated for bonding to all types of restorative materials. Regarding adhesion to dental substrates, selective enamel etching with phosphoric acid prior to the application of Universal Adhesives can improve the bond strength and marginal sealing; however, laboratorial and clinical evidence suggest that using a self-etch technique in dentin is preferable because it is a simpler application technique and reduces the risk of sensitivity for the patient, without a significant prejudice to the long-term success rates of the restoration.
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
       
  • Role of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in Oral Health of Disabled Individuals

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review In recent years, research regarding the effects and mechanism of action of probiotics has been actively conducted. Lactobacillus rhamnosus L8020 is a bacterial strain often detected in healthy individuals with no dental caries or periodontal disease, and its effects have been reported in recent years. The purpose of this review is to summarize findings related to the discovery, effects, and mechanism of action of L. rhamnosus L8020, as well as examine the possibility of its use for maintaining the oral health of individuals with disabilities. Recent Findings Recent findings have confirmed that L. rhamnosus L8020 has inhibitory effects on periodontal pathogens in vivo and also improves periodontal disease conditions in the oral cavity of individuals with an intellectual disability. Regarding the bacterial mechanism, an in vivo investigation revealed that an L. rhamnosus L8020 oral isolate may help to maintain mucosal homeostasis by induction of transient epithelial cell activation. Furthermore, the probiotic potential of the bacterial strain was investigated by means of transcriptional profiling analyses using mouse gingival epithelial-like GE1 cells and regulation of immunomodulatory gene expression was noted; thus, induction of transient epithelial cell activation may also aid in maintenance for patients with mucosal homeostasis. Other research findings demonstrated that oral administration of L. rhamnosus L8020 resulted in disappearance of pseudomembranous regions in Candida albicans-infected mice. Summary Evidence has been presented suggesting that continuous intake of L. rhamnosus L8020 has inhibitory effects on bacteria that lead to caries and periodontal disease, as well as candidiasis. Furthermore, reduced symptoms related to periodontal disease in intellectually disabled individuals were found after 90 days of continuous intake. In conclusion, L. rhamnosus L8020 may be a useful probiotic organism when included in products that are ingested daily.
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-022-00305-0
       
  • Clinical performance of resin composite restorations

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This article reviews recent evidence and provides a general overview on the clinical performance of resin composite restorations. Four electronic databases were searched for articles that investigated factors associated with the long-term performance and failure of resin composites placed in anterior and posterior teeth. Signs that could be observed in aging restorations were also addressed. Recent Findings Resin composite restorations fail due to the same reasons that lead to restoration of teeth, namely: caries, esthetics, fractures, and wear. Variables influencing failure rates include tooth-related factors (e.g., loss of dental tissue, quality of remaining structure, tooth position, endodontic treatment) and patient-related risk factors (e.g., caries, parafunctional habits, sex, age, socioeconomic variables). State of the art restorative techniques and materials have limited influence on the durability of resin composite restorations. Dentists and their clinical decisions also play a significant role in longevity, including their approach to aging restorations that are in service. Aging restorations may show surface and marginal staining, loss of anatomical shape and translucency, wear, chipping, fractures, and other minor defects that do not need intervention. Summary The clinical service of resin composite restorations is a challenging aspect of their longevity, but posterior and anterior composites can achieve long-lasting clinical durability. Patients’ risks appear to be the most predominant factors affecting longevity. In general, the longevity of restorations would be longer if dentists were to use a more conservative approach when dealing with aging restorations in service.
      PubDate: 2022-02-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-022-00308-x
       
  • Healthy Dietary Patterns on Clinical Periodontal Parameters: A GRADE
           Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Purpose of review To evaluate the impact of healthy dietary patterns compared to the Western diet on periodontal indices in adults, used in the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases. Recent findings Four RCTs and seven case–control studies were included on a critical appraisal of the evidence using GRADE, based on random effects meta-analysis by methodological subgroups for periodontal indices, and a narrative synthesis. There is a clinically significant reduction on bleeding on probing, Gingival Index and periodontal inflamed surface area, Calculus and Debris Index and incidence of tooth loss on healthy dietary patterns group, with a very low to moderate certainty of the evidence. Methodological complementation between included studies allows to consider “real-world data” that RCTs ignore, which have a significant effect on this association. Although biological plausibility is reported, more studies are required to clarify these results. Summary healthy dietary patterns could impact on periodontal health–disease status, reducing the global burden of periodontal diseases by improving the results of the standard care actions, such as toothbrushing, interdental cleaning and periodontal therapy. Further research is required to improve the quality of the evidence.
      PubDate: 2022-02-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-022-00307-y
       
  • Insight Into Corrosion of Dental Implants: From Biochemical Mechanisms to
           Designing Corrosion-Resistant Materials

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Despite advanced technologies to avoid corrosion of dental implants, the mechanisms toward the release of metals and their role in the onset of peri-implant diseases are still under-investigated. Effective knowledge on the etiopathogenesis of corrosive products and preventive strategies mitigating the risks for surface degradation are thus in dire need. This review aimed to summarize evidence toward biocorrosion in the oral environment and discuss the current strategies targeting the improvement of dental implants and focusing on the methodological and electrochemical aspects of surface treatments and titanium-based alloys. Recent Findings Recent studies suggest the existence of wear/corrosion products may correlate with peri-implantitis progress by triggering microbial dysbiosis, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and animal bone resorption. Furthermore, current clinical evidence demonstrating the presence of metal-like particles in diseased tissues supports their possible role as a risk factor for peri-implantitis. For instance, to overcome the drawback of titanium corrosion, researchers are primarily focusing on developing corrosion-resistant alloys and coatings for dental implants by changing their physicochemical features. Summary The current state-of-art discussed in this review found corrosion products effective in affecting biofilm virulence and inflammatory factors in vitro. Controversial and unstandardized data are limitations, making the premise of corrosion products being essential for peri-implantitis onset. On the other hand, when it comes to the strategies toward reducing implant corrosion rate, it is evident that the chemical and physical properties are crucial for the in vitro electrochemical behavior of the implant material. For instance, it is foreseeable that the formation of films/coatings and the incorporation of some functional compounds into the substrate may enhance the material’s corrosion resistance and biological response. Nevertheless, the utmost challenge of research in this field is to achieve adequate stimulation of the biological tissues without weakening its protective behavior against corrosion. In addition, the translatability from in vitro findings to clinical studies is still in its infancy. Therefore, further accumulation of high-level evidence on the role of corrosion products on peri-implant tissues is expected to confirm the findings of the present review besides the development of better methods to improve the corrosion resistance of dental implants. Furthermore, such knowledge could further develop safe and long-term implant rehabilitation therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-01-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-022-00306-z
       
  • Sjögren Syndrome and Periodontal Disease: State of the Art and Narrative
           Review of Current Literature

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review and Recent Findings Sjögren syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by exocrine gland dysfunction: xerostomia and xerophthalmia are the main symptoms. The reduction of salivary flow rate causes a dysbiosis of oral environment that may increase the risk of periodontal disease. The purpose of this narrative review was to analyze the current evidence of scientific literature on the relationship between periodontal disease and the Sjögren syndrome. Material and Methods A search on MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases was conducted to find all pertinent articles published. The searches were confined to full-text articles with no restriction of language or publication date. The selected studies and relevant articles were checked for cross-references. The remaining articles were evaluated by reading the full text independently. Results In total, 21 studies were included in the present literature review (8 previous reviews, 2 systematic reviews, 11 in vivo clinical studies). Some of these studies claimed a strong association between SS and increased risk of periodontal disease; furthermore, periodontal treatment seems to improve SS oral symptoms. Pilocarpine and other systemic drugs for SS increase SFR, by modifying oral microbiome of SS patients, versus normal. Summary and Conclusions A high level of evidence on the effects of SS on periodontal disease is missing; at present, there is not a state of the art on relationship between SS and incidence of periodontal disease.
      PubDate: 2022-01-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00303-8
       
  • Correction to: Nutrition and Periodontal Health in the Patients with
           Diabetes Mellitus: a Review from the Viewpoint of Endothelial Function

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      PubDate: 2021-12-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00304-7
       
  • Periodontal Health and Blood Disorders

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review The hematopoietic tissue is highly susceptible to stimuli, and inflammation is a major modulator. One particular source for this inflammatory burden is periodontitis. We revisit how periodontal infection may modulate the activity of the bone marrow, the fate of hematopoietic stem cells, and its systemic consequences. We also examine periodontal manifestations of particular blood disorders. Herein, we provide a glimpse of the available knowledge and discuss gaps that may be explored in the future. Recent Findings Recent studies have demonstrated that Porphyromonas gingivalis governs osteoclastogenic differentiation by regulating nuclear factor-kappa B ligand and inhibiting noncommitted osteoclasts precursors. This governed cell population exhibits an antigen-specific T cell immune-suppressive activity benefiting the persistence of periodontal infection and compromising the host immune response. The persistence of this low-grade inflammation together with this particular cell population enhances osteoclastogenic precursors from myeloid-derived suppressor cells, increasing the age-associated bone loss in mice. Periodontitis patients exhibit serum biomarkers of anemia, attributed to a state of anemia of inflammation. In other words, the production of hepcidin through the action of cytokines results in higher iron trapping inside macrophages and liver cells ant his may shorten erythrocyte survival. Another possible hypothesis to explain this link is the inflammatory suppression of erythropoietic activity, through the levels of erythropoietin. Periodontal therapy is effective in reducing leukocytosis, but evidence is to scarce regarding red and platelet lineages. Furthermore, periodontitis patients suffering from white blood cells disorders seem more prone to severe periodontal destruction given the pathophysiology of periodontitis and the immune role of leukocyte cells. Summary The systemic inflammatory burden of periodontitis modulates the fate of differentiation of particular bone marrow and interferes with the erythropoietic activity. The impact of periodontal therapy on leukocytosis is robust and based on high quality evidence-based estimates, though its influence on erythrocytic and platelet levels is still limited. The existence of a greater predisposition to periodontal disease in blood disorders is not consensual.
      PubDate: 2021-11-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00301-w
       
  • Can Periodontitis Affect the Health and Disease of the Digestive
           System' A Comprehensive Review of Epidemiological Evidence and
           Biological Mechanisms

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review There is increasing evidence on the connections between chronic oral inflammation/infection and the pathophysiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs of digestion. The aim of this review is to provide a critical synthesis regarding the epidemiological, clinical, and in vivo associations between periodontitis and the most relevant diseases of the digestive system. Recent Findings An increasing body of dental and medical literature is supporting the gum-gut axis as a relevant mechanism to explain the associations between periodontitis and systemic diseases. Indeed, shared microbiological and immunological pathways have been identified between periodontitis and gut diseases, and translocation of oral bacteria to the lower parts of the digestive system has been postulated as a driver for peptic ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, and ultimately digestive cancers. Summary For the upper digestive tract, epidemiologic association between periodontitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease or squamous cell carcinoma remains conflicting, despite oral keystone pathogens having been consistently found in esophageal and gastric cancer tissue biopsies. The oral cavity represents a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori, with periodontal therapy increasing the eradication and the non-recurrence rate of the infection. Regarding bowel diseases, gut dysbiosis is being progressively ascertained in close relation to periodontal infection, and periodontitis is being investigated among the risk indicators for colorectal cancer. Lastly, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cirrhosis were epidemiologically linked to periodontitis, while its association with pancreatic tumors represents one of the most intriguing fields of research in periomedicine.
      PubDate: 2021-11-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00302-9
       
  • Nutrition and Periodontal Health in the Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: a
           Review from the Viewpoint of Endothelial Function

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This review aims to summarize the literature on periodontal disease and nutrition, focusing on endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients, and their impact on oral health. Recent Findings Environmental factors, including smoking, obesity, and diabetes are well-known risk factors for the onset and progression of the periodontal disease. Indeed, dietary factors show an association with periodontal health through local and systemic environments. In addition, systemic factors, such as insulin resistance and diabetes, may have an important role in the periodontal health. Although molecular mechanisms underlying this are not fully understood, endothelial dysfunction mainly by hyperglycemia and/or chronic inflammation may explain the association between periodontal status and nutrition. In this paper, we reviewed recent progress in this field and propose the potential impact of nutritional intervention in the oral health from the viewpoint of endothelial function. Summary It is expected to become increasingly important to understand the pathology of diabetes-related periodontal disease and consider nutritional approaches with vascular dysfunction in mind for its prevention and treatment. Further accumulation of evidence is anticipated for the future.
      PubDate: 2021-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00297-3
       
  • Esthetic Rehabilitation in a Fully Edentulous Patient with
           Implant-Supported Overdentures Using Novel Digital Techniques and CAD/CAM
           Materials

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      Abstract: Abstract The application of well-documented treatment concepts and improvements in digital technologies have changed modern prosthodontics, specifically for the design and manufacturing of fixed implant-supported prosthesis in edentulous patients to restore their quality of life. However, important factors such as inter-arch occlusal relationships, the need for a buccal flange, and the ability to perform a proper oral hygiene make the fixed restoration not the best treatment option for some edentulous patients, especially for the elderly. The treatment of old population with implant-supported prosthesis has become increasingly common, since life expectancy has been generally growing over time. This clinical report describes in a systematic sequence the diagnosis, treatment planning, and surgical-prosthetic management of an elderly systemically compromised patient who receives both maxillary and mandibular implant-supported rehabilitation following an innovative digital working method using novel CAD CAM millable materials.
      PubDate: 2021-10-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00300-x
       
  • Digital Removable Complete Denture—an Overview

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review During the last few years, the interest in fabrication of computer-engineered removable complete dentures has grown intensively. Innovative clinical and technological advances are driving forces. They allow (i) the creation of new and more efficient workflows, (ii) an emergence of modified and easier procedures, and (iii) the use of alternative biomaterials with improved properties. The results are a better fit and retention of the digital complete dentures, as well as a generally high satisfaction of patient and clinician, while reducing the number of appointments and the technical input. The purpose of this narrative review is to present the historical, clinical, and technological developments in the field of digital removable complete dentures and to evaluate the future potential of this technology. Recent Findings The fabrication of a digital complete denture either by milling separately the base and the denture teeth set-up or by milling a monolithic denture is well investigated. Concurrently the trend for fabricating complete denture bases by using the 3D print technology is growing. There is plenty of research showing that milling dentures from standardized pre-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate pucks guarantee the fabrication of homogenous objects with excellent biomaterial properties. The results indicate a better base adaptation, a higher flexural strength, an improved resistance to denture staining, and no polymerization distortion while milling. Furthermore, a sophisticated milling strategy allows to obtain a detailed and accurate intaglio and cameo surface, which is even exceeded when 3D printing. The clinical and technological freedom, to either combine selectively analog and digital steps or to take a totally digital workflow ending with milling or 3D printing, opens countless opportunities in the field of removable complete dentures. Whatever steps are taken, whatever sophisticated technology is chosen, still only the professional and individual know-how of the dentist in combination with the manual skills and the experience of the dental technologist—including especially the finish of the final product—will lead to a superior teamwork result. Limitations inherent to the milling process are the waste of raw material, the wear of milling tools, and the challenge to access undercut areas; the reasons are the milling bur size, the number of milling axes, and the limited movements of the machining axes. The advantages of additive manufacturing lay in a high resolution of complex geometries and a reduced waste of the biomaterial. As a limitation, the accuracy of the object, i.e. deformation, may be affected by several fabrication parameters, such as the polymerization light intensity, the build direction and angle, the layer thickness and numbers, the amount of supporting structures, and the post-processing procedures. However, with improved materials and techniques, printing may also become a primary method for fabricating digital complete dentures. Summary The available clinical and technical information and multiple research demonstrate that the integration of digital steps into the workflow for fabricating removable complete dentures opens countless options, leading to the achievement of an esthetically, functionally, biologically, and technically high-quality end product. However, a longer learning curve must be considered. To simplify the fabrication methods of complete dentures in specific clinical situations, with the aim to increase efficiency and to save resources, is indicated. However, the use of conventional step-by-step approaches may still be valid for complex clinical situations. It is foreseeable that for treating edentulous patients, the evolution of new biomaterials, the introduction of sophisticated digital methods, and the development of improved software will follow attractive workflows with more standardized, easier, achievable, and predictable results. It challenges the clinician to have a more direct impact on denture construction and to provide the patient with the opportunity to participate in the esthetic designing. A generally higher efficiency and satisfaction for all partners involved in the fabrication process of removable complete dentures—patient, dental technologist, and dentist/prosthodontist—is the result. For a dental technologist, it is a great challenge to set up esthetic and functional denture teeth in an edentulous 3D space defined by the maxilla, the mandible, and the oral soft tissues. It is a question of time and partly already existing that machine learning—a branch of artificial intelligence—has the capacity to recognize specific intramaxillary and intermaxillary situations and to deliver an acceptable functional and esthetic denture teeth set-up, at least as a working base. Furthermore, with the introduction of a face scanner, the patient becomes virtually present anytime. Transferring the virtual situation in a physical articulator makes judgments and changes possible in both worlds simultaneously. Innovations such as robot technology still are in their infancy; however, there are aspirations to automatically place denture teeth into a dental arch. There is a great responsibility for a dentist and a dental technologist for fabricating high-quality removable complete dentures. Factors, such as a meticulous diagnosis and treatment planning, a personal communication between the involved persons, and a profound knowledge of the clinical a...
      PubDate: 2021-10-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00299-1
       
  • Significance and Application of Light Therapy Based on Photoreceptors to
           the Regulation of Fat Metabolism

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissues and increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Reducing the volume of white adipose tissue (WAT) and activating the function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) are potential therapeutic approaches to treating and preventing obesity. This review aims to investigate the efficacy of photoreceptor-dependent light therapy targeting adipose tissues. Recent Findings To reduce the volume of WAT, phototherapy is performed for cosmetic purposes via low-level laser-assisted lipoplasty. However, the underlying mechanisms of such therapy have not been evaluated. Recently, photoreceptor opsins have been found to be expressed in both WAT and BAT. Opsins expressed in adipose tissues are capable of sensing light, and molecular signaling induced by this photoreception modulates the metabolic functions of adipose tissues. Light stimulation via opsins initiates G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, increases the rate of lipolysis in WAT, and activates thermogenesis in BAT. These functional changes in adipose tissues upregulate whole-body energy expenditure. Summary Photoreceptor opsins expressed in WAT and BAT respond to light to initiate GPCR-related signaling and increase metabolic activity. Opsins in adipose tissues are thus potential targets for phototherapy in the treatment and prevention of obesity and associated disorders. These findings offer a potential molecular foundation for the further development of light-based therapy.
      PubDate: 2021-10-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00298-2
       
  • The Link Between Periodontal Inflammation and Obesity

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Obesity is a trigger for multiple diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity may be a risk factor for periodontal disease. Recently, there have been reports of presumed mechanisms of the associations between periodontitis and lipid metabolism or thermogenesis. This review aims to discuss the link between periodontal disease and energy regulatory function based on recent findings. Recent Findings It has been demonstrated that activation of the C–C motif chemokine ligand/C–C chemokine receptor 7 pathway in adipose tissue induces inflammation and impairment of lipid metabolism and energy regulation in mice. Porphyromonas gingivalis administration has been shown to induce further weight gain and increased adipose tissue in diet-induced obese mice. Additionally, it has been reported that Porphyromonas gingivalis–induced endotoxemia potentially affect obesity by altering endocrine functions in brown adipose tissue in mice. Several cohort studies have shown that obesity is associated with tooth loss 5 years later, and periodontal conditions of obese individuals are significantly worse 2 and 6 months after the treatment compared with those of non-obese individuals. It has also been reported that body mass index is positively associated with the periodontal inflamed surface area index, a measure of periodontal inflammation. These results suggest that not only the enhancement of inflammation due to obesity but also the activation of inflammatory signaling may affect energy regulation. Summary Loss of adipose tissue homeostasis induces increase and activation of immune cells in adipose tissue, leading to impaired immune function in obesity. Various cytokines and chemokines are secreted from obese adipose tissue and promote inflammatory signaling. Some of these signaling pathways have been suggested to affect energy regulation. The combination of obesity and periodontitis amplifies inflammation to levels that affect the whole body through the adipose tissue. Obesity, in turn, accelerates the exacerbation of periodontitis.
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00296-4
       
  • What Are the Clinical and Systemic Results of Periodontitis Treatment in
           Obese Individuals'

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Periodontitis and obesity are characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory state. Obese individuals have a higher chance of presenting periodontitis. Clinical studies in different populations demonstrate that individuals with obesity have worse periodontal conditions. This current review aims to explore recent literature to understand what the impacts of obesity on periodontal treatment outcomes are and to learn whether periodontal treatment can improve systemic biomarkers in obese individuals. Recent Findings Short- and long-term evaluations demonstrated that non-surgical periodontal treatment could improve clinical parameters in obese individuals, represented as the reduction in mean probing depth, sites with probing depth ≥ 4 mm, and extension of bleeding on probing. However, obese individuals may have less clinical improvement when compared to normal-weight individuals with a similar periodontal profile. Additionally, periodontal treatment may contribute to a reduction in systemic levels of retinol-binding protein 4 and leptin, while promoting an increase in systemic levels of adiponectin. Summary Overall, obese individuals with periodontitis can significantly benefit from non-surgical periodontal treatment. However, clinical improvements seem to be less prominent in obese individuals with periodontitis compared to non-obese individuals with similar periodontal status. Nevertheless, periodontal treatment may impact significantly on the reduction of several biochemical biomarkers of obesity with or without weight reduction. Further investigations are needed to improve our comprehension of the mechanisms underlying those findings.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00295-5
       
  • Oral Rehabilitation and Management of the Patient with Terminal Dentition:
           Clinical and Laboratory Case After 3 Years of Follow-up

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review This article describes the clinical management of a patient who had a severely damaged dentition due to periodontal disease for several years. Recent Findings The following clinical case is developed from the integral and global aspect, including surgical conditioning, implant placement and the elaboration of a prosthetic prototype that can give a successful outcome for the definitive restoration. A full series of a diagnostic workup was made, and a treatment plan specific to the needs of the patient was laid out, with an emphasis on the difficulty of the management of these types of patients in which a dental practice is familiar with. Summary There are complications on these rehabilitations due to the severe damage of the dentition with extensive osseous atrophies that make a challenging situation in order to provide a comfortable, esthetic and functional rehabilitation. Implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis is a well-accepted treatment option for edentulism. Loss of teeth due to extensive caries or severe periodontitis presents a challenge to the clinicians.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00294-6
       
  • Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics—State of the Art

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      Abstract: Purpose of Review Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality with high-resolution diagnostic value that provides accurate and high-quality three-dimensional information on the elements of the maxillofacial complex. Therefore, this study aimed to present an up-to-date status of the main indications for the use of CBCT in endodontics, and to discuss its main limitations relative to diagnosis in endodontics. Recent Findings The data captured by CBCT devices and processed by a specific software programs create a reconstruction of the scanned volume. Thus, they allow dynamic and interactive analysis of the information, by means of simultaneously scanning the object in different anatomical planes of imaging: axial, coronal, or sagittal, and their subsequent reconstruction thereby revealing structures that are not visible in periapical radiographs. Although periapical radiographs continue to be the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic treatment, a significant leap has occurred in the growth of CBCT use Endodontics in recent years. However, the importance of recognizing the different types of artifacts generated during the image acquisition and reconstruction process is emphasized, especially in the presence of high-density endodontic materials that can compromise the quality of the diagnosis. Summary Considering the findings of this study, and based on international guidelines, it was concluded that the possibilities of using CBCT during endodontic treatment were mainly focused on diagnosis, assessment [of existent dental conditions], and preoperative treatment; establishing the morphology, diagnosis, and treatment planning of root canal systems; evaluation of root resorption; planning and evaluation of the treatment of traumatic dental injuries, perforations, fractures, and for the preparation of endodontic guides.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40496-021-00292-8
       
 
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