Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
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    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (266 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (162 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
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    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (177 journals)
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    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2241 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (331 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (199 journals)
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    - SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)
    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 134 of 134 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACE Clinical Case Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BMC Endocrine Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Dermato-Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Diabesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 261)
Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Discover Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Dubai Diabetes and Endocrinology Journal     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Endocrine and Metabolic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine Connections     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Endocrine Disruptors     Open Access  
Endocrine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Endocrine Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Endocrine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Endocrine Regulations     Open Access  
Endocrine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Endocrine Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine-Related Cancer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism     Open Access  
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports     Open Access  
Endocrinology, Obesity and Metabolic Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endokrynologia Polska     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
European Thyroid Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers in Clinical Diabetes and Healthcare     Open Access  
Frontiers in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Neuroendocrine Science     Open Access  
Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
General and Comparative Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Growth Hormone & IGF Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Gynakologische Endokrinologie     Hybrid Journal  
Gynecological Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Hormone and Metabolic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Hormone Research in Paediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Hormones : International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Hormones and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International journal of endocrine oncology     Open Access  
International Journal of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Osteoporosis and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
JIMD Reports     Open Access  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal für Klinische Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel : Austrian Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Assocation of Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Endocrinological Investigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endocrinology and Reproduction     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Screening     Open Access  
Journal of Molecular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Neuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Pineal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Renal and Hepatic Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Restorative Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies     Open Access  
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
L'Endocrinologo     Hybrid Journal  
Metabolic Brain Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Molecular Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nature Reviews Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Neuroendocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Open Journal of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Argentina de Endocrinología y Metabolismo     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Endocrinología     Open Access  
Revista Venezolana de Endocrinología y Metabolismo     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access  
The Endocrinologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 167)
Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thyroid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Thyroid Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Thyroid Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Vitamins & Hormones     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.112
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 37  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1715-5312 - ISSN (Online) 1715-5320
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [19 journals]
  • Correction: The quality of physical activity guidelines, but not the
           specificity of their recommendations, has improved over time: a systematic
           review and critical appraisal

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Madelin R. Siedler, Priscila Lamadrid, Megan N. Humphries, Reem A. Mustafa, Yngve Falck-Ytter, Philipp Dahm, Shahnaz Sultan, M. Hassan Murad, Rebecca L. Morgan
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0236
       
  • Prenatal Exercise and Cardiovascular Health (PEACH) Study: impact of
           pregnancy and exercise on rating of perceived exertion during
           non-weight-bearing exercise

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Áine Brislane, Brittany A. Matenchuck, Rachel J. Skow, Craig D. Steinback, Margie H. Davenport
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to determine if rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during non-weight-bearing exercise is influenced by gestational age and exercise training. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the influence of gestational age and exercise training (three to four times per week for 25–40 minutes at 50%–70% of heart rate reserve) on RPE during an exhaustive cycling exercise test. We observed no influence of gestational age, or exercise training status on RPE responses to non-weight-bearing exercise during pregnancy. Trial registration number: NCT02948439. Novelty: Gestational age and/or exercise training does not influence rate of perceived exertion during non-weight-bearing exercise.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0691
       
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness and fat oxidation during exercise in Chinese,
           Indian, and Malay men with elevated body mass index

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      Authors: Mayada Demashkieh, Rinkoo Dalan, Stephen Francis Burns
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      A cross-sectional pilot investigation was performed in Chinese, Indian, and Malay men (15 each) with elevated body mass index to compare (i) cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and (ii) fat oxidation at rest and maximal fat oxidation during exercise. Predicted CRF (Chinese: 37.0 (5.1) mL·kg–1·min–1; Indian: 34.8 (5.6) mL·kg–1·min–1; Malay: 33.0 (7.1) mL·kg–1·min–1; P = 0.208) and resting fat oxidation were similar among groups. Maximal fat oxidation during exercise was lower in Indian (3.81 (1.02) mg·kg–1·min–1, P = 0.004) and Malay (3.36 (0.95) mg·kg–1·min–1, P 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0106
       
  • A need for multi-sector and multi-pronged solutions to address the many
           barriers inhibiting change from unhealthy food environments in publicly
           funded recreation facilities: a mixed-method study

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      Authors: Melanie Warken, Tracy Sanden, Naomi Shanks, Rachel Engler-Stringer, Hassan Vatanparast
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Public recreation facilities are preferred gathering places for families to participate in physical, social, intellectual, and creative pursuits, and the importance of food environments in these facilities is gaining recognition. Evidence from other Canadian jurisdictions describes such food environments as unsupportive of health, which contradicts national recreation priorities to have healthy choices as the easy choices. This study aimed to characterize food environments in a convenient sample of Saskatchewan public recreation facilities. A convergent/parallel mixed methods study design used quantitative methods to determine the healthfulness of concession stands and vending machines and qualitative methods to examine barriers and facilitators to healthy eating in facilities. The results found that 5% of concession main dishes were defined as healthy and packaged foods/beverages in concession stands and vending machines were defined as Offer Most Often 6% and 8% of the time, respectively, according to Saskatchewan Nutrition Standards. Reported barriers to healthy eating were more than twice as prevalent as facilitators. To align with population health recommendations in Saskatchewan, food environments in public recreation facilities require immediate attention. The results and recommendations can be used to build collective action to address the problem and as a benchmark to measure change. Novelty: Only 5% of concession main dishes were defined as healthy. Only 6% of packaged foods and beverages in concessions, and 8% in vending, were defined as Offer Most Often. Reported barriers to healthy eating were more than twice as prevalent as facilitators, resulting in a current state that is difficult to change.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0770
       
  • Plant-based food patterns to stimulate muscle protein synthesis and
           support muscle mass in humans: a narrative review

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      Authors: Sarah Nichele, Stuart M. Phillips, Brunna C.B. Boaventura
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The interest in a diet with a higher proportion of plant-based foods to animal-based foods is a global food pattern trend. However, there are concerns regarding adopting plants as the main dietary protein source to support muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle mass. These concerns are centered on three issues: lower protein bioavailability due to antinutritional compounds in plants, lower per-serve scores of protein at similar energy intake, and amino acid scores of plants being lower than optimal. We aimed here to synthesize and discuss evidence around plant protein in human nutrition focusing on the capacity of these proteins to stimulate MPS as a key part of gaining or maintaining muscle mass. In this review, we addressed the issues of plant protein quality and provided evidence for how plant proteins can be made more effective to stimulate MPS and support muscle mass in partial or total replacement of consumption of products of animal origin. Novelty: Plant proteins are known, in general, to have lower protein quality scores than animal proteins, and this may have important implications, especially for those aiming to increase their skeletal muscle mass through exercise. A plant-based diet has been postulated to have lower protein quality limiting MPS responses and potentially compromising exercise-induced gains in muscle mass. Current evidence shows that plant proteins can stimulate MPS, as can whole foods, especially when combining food groups, increasing portion sizes, and optimizing amino acid bioavailability through processing or common preparation methods.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0806
       
  • Learning circles: an adaptive strategy to support food sovereignty among
           First Nations communities in Canada

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      Authors: Louise W. McEachern, Jennifer Yessis, Barbara Zupko, Joanne Yovanovich, Renata Valaitis, Rhona M. Hanning
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Indigenous communities in Canada are concerned about the health of their youth and the reclamation of traditional food-related skills amongst their people. Food sovereignty has an integral role in food and nutrition security, and the path to Indigenous self-determination. Learning Circles: Local Healthy Food to School (LC:LHF2S) was a community engagement model that aimed to enhance access to local, healthy, and traditional foods for youth. In each of four First Nations communities, a Learning Circle Evaluation Facilitator worked to plan and implement activities, build on community strengths, and promote partnerships. This paper describes how the model was perceived to support food sovereignty. Data included interviews, process reporting, and school surveys, and was analyzed according to pillars effective for the development of food sovereignty in Indigenous communities. Goals set by two communities incorporated food sovereignty principles, and in each community capacity-building work furthered the development of a more autonomous food system. There were many examples of a transition to greater food sovereignty, local food production, and consumption. Indigenous governance was an important theme and was influential in a community’s success. The model appears to be an adaptable strategy to support the development of food sovereignty in First Nations communities. Novelty: LC:LHF2S was a community engagement model that aimed to enhance access to local, healthy, and traditional foods for youth. The model is an adaptable strategy to support the development of food sovereignty in First Nations communities. There were many examples of a transition to greater food sovereignty, local food production, and consumption.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0776
       
  • Development of the Get Active Questionnaire for Pregnancy: breaking down
           barriers to prenatal exercise

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      Authors: Margie H. Davenport, Sarah Neil-Sztramko, Bridget Lett, Mary Duggan, Michelle F. Mottola, Stephanie-May Ruchat, Kristi B. Adamo, Kate Andrews, Raul Artal, Nicole Beamish, Radha Chari, Milena Forte, Kirstin N. Lane, Linda May, Kaleigh Maclaren, Ashley Zahavich
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence-based guidelines represent the highest level of scientific evidence to identify best practices for clinical/public health. However, the availability of guidelines do not guarantee their use, targeted knowledge translation strategies and tools are necessary to help promote uptake. Following publication of the 2019 Canadian Guideline for Physical Activity throughout Pregnancy, the Get Active Questionnaire for Pregnancy, and an associated Health Care Provider Consultation Form for Prenatal Physical Activity were developed to promote guideline adoption and use amongst pregnant individuals and health care providers. This paper describes the process of developing these tools. First, a survey was administered to qualified exercise professionals to identify the barriers and facilitators in using existing prenatal exercise screening tools. A Working Group of researchers and stakeholders then convened to develop an evidence-informed exercise pre-participation screening tool for pregnant individuals, building from previous tool and survey findings. Finally, end-user feedback was solicited through a survey and key informant interviews to ensure tools are feasible and acceptable to use in practice. The uptake and use of these documents by pregnant individuals, exercise, and health care professionals will be assessed in future studies. Novelty: Evidence supports the safety/benefits of exercise for most pregnant individuals; however, exercise is not recommended for a small number of individuals with specific medical conditions. The Get Active Questionnaire for Pregnancy and Health Care Provider Consultation Form for Physical Activity during Pregnancy identify individuals where prenatal exercise may pose a risk, while reducing barriers to physical activity participation for the majority of pregnant individuals.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0655
       
  • Effect of different types of muscle activity on the gene and protein
           expression of ALDH family members in C57BL/6J mouse skeletal muscle

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      Authors: Eunbin Jee, Yuki Tamura, Karina Kouzaki, Takaya Kotani, Koichi Nakazato
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is an enzyme that detoxifies aldehydes and is primarily involved in alcohol metabolism. Recently, we have shown that ALDH also plays an important role in skeletal muscle homeostasis. To better understand the role of ALDH in skeletal muscle, it is necessary to clarify the adaptability of ALDH. In this study, we examined the effects of endurance training, compensatory hypertrophy by synergist ablation (SA), and denervation-induced atrophy on gene expression and protein levels of selected ALDH isoforms in skeletal muscle. Ten-week-old C57BL/6J mice were subjected to each intervention, and the plantaris muscle was collected. Gene expression levels of Aldh1a1 were decreased by SA and denervation, but ALDH1A1 protein levels were not affected. Protein levels of ALDH1B1 increased after chronic endurance training, SA, and denervation interventions. However, the increase in Aldh1b1 gene expression was observed only after SA. The gene expression of Aldh2 was decreased after SA, but ALDH2 protein levels remained unchanged. Denervation increased both the Aldh2 gene and ALDH2 protein levels. Taken together, each isoform of ALDH undergoes unique quantitative adaptations in skeletal muscle under different conditions.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0005
       
  • The influence of ultrasound image depth and gain on skeletal muscle echo
           intensity

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      Authors: Ryan M. Girts, Kylie K. Harmon, Jason I. Pagan, Ariel Alberto, Manuel G. Hernandez, Matt S. Stock
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Echo intensity may associate with indicators of skeletal muscle quality, but investigators often use different methodological approaches that may alter echo intensity when acquiring B-mode ultrasound images. We examined the influence of image depth and gain settings on the interpretation of echo intensity. Thirty-six college-aged males and females participated. Ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis were captured in the sagittal plane. Images were captured at depths of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 cm and gain settings of 50 and 60 dB in random order. For both gain settings, echo intensity values were similar between 4.0 and 6.0 cm. At a gain of 50 dB, 7.0 cm demonstrated greater values than all other depths. At a gain of 60 dB, 7.0 cm displayed greater values compared to all other depths, but 3.0 cm displayed lower echo intensity values than other depths. Echo intensity was substantially higher when using a gain of 60 dB compared to 50 dB (mean difference ≥ 21.7 arbitrary units, d ≥ 3.47). When planning investigations in new research areas, researchers should carefully consider their study-specific image depth. Echo intensity values are stable between depths of 4.0 and 6.0 cm, suggesting that changing image depth may not be problematic. Image gain must be kept constant. Novelty: Optimal approaches for B-mode ultrasound image acquisition of skeletal muscles remain unclear. Echo intensity is similar between depths of 4.0 and 6.0 cm, regardless of image gain. Investigators should seek to utilize a constant depth setting, but small deviations may be acceptable.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0810
       
  • Rice protein suppresses 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-induced inflammation owing to
           methionine availability

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      Authors: Zhengxuan Wang, Mingcai Liang, Hui Li, Bingxiao Liu, Lin Yang
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most important products of lipid peroxidation, which induces inflammation. To investigate the effects of rice protein (RP) on suppressing HNE-induced inflammation and the role of methionine in regulating the anti-inflammatory function of RP, Wistar rats (male, weighing 180–200 g) were either ad libitum fed a pellet diet with oral administration of methionine or ad libitum fed RP for 2 weeks. RP and methionine significantly reduced HNE levels and effectively suppressed the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The anti-inflammatory action of RP was evident from the upregulation of IL-10 and glutathione S-transferase (GST), which played a role in the detoxification of HNE. The results show that the molecular mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory function of RP is the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation by the downregulation of protein kinase B/phosphoinositide 3 kinase. Further, this study demonstrates that Met availability contributes to the suppression of HNE-induced inflammation through upregulating IL-10 and GST in rats fed RP. Novelty: RP suppresses HNE-induced inflammation. Methionine plays a role in upregulating IL-10 and GST. Methionine availability regulates the inhibition of NF-κB by RP.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0575
       
  • A single dose of dietary nitrate supplementation protects against
           endothelial ischemia–reperfusion injury in early postmenopausal women

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      Authors: Y.B. Somani, R.N. Soares, J. Gosalia, J.M. Delgado, M. Flanagan, S. Basu, D.B. Kim-Shapiro, J.M. Murias, D.N. Proctor
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The onset of menopause and accompanying changes to ovarian hormones often precedes endothelial dysfunction in women. In particular, accelerated impairments in macrovascular and microvascular function coincide with the loss of estrogen, as does impaired endothelial responses to ischemia–reperfusion (IR) injury. In healthy, early postmenopausal women (n = 12; 3.9 ± 1.5 years since menopause) we tested the hypothesis that acute dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation would improve endothelial function and attenuate the magnitude of endothelial dysfunction following whole-arm IR in comparison with placebo. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we tested participants before and after NO3−-rich (BRnitrate) and NO3−-depleted (BRplacebo) beetroot juice (BR) consumption, as well as following IR injury, and 15 min after IR to assess recovery. Analyses with repeated-measures general linear models revealed a condition × time interaction for brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD; P = 0.04), and no interaction effect was found for the near-infrared spectroscopy-derived reperfusion slope (P = 0.86). Follow-up analysis showed a significant decline in FMD following IR injury with BRplacebo in comparison with all other timepoints (all, P  0.05). Our findings demonstrate that a single dose of dietary NO3− minimizes IR-induced macrovascular endothelial dysfunction in healthy, early postmenopausal women, but does not improve resting macrovascular and microvascular function. Trial registration number: NCT03644472. Novelty: In healthy, early postmenopausal women, a single dose of NO3−-rich BR can protect against IR-induced endothelial dysfunction. This protection may be due to nitric oxide bioactivity during IR rather than improved endothelial function prior to the IR protocol per se.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0693
       
  • Effects of sex and wet-bulb globe temperature on heart rate variability
           during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise: a secondary analysis

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      Authors: Jordan A. De Barros, Michael J. Macartney, Gregory E. Peoples, Sean R. Notley, Christophe L. Herry, Glen P. Kenny
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Sex differences in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV), a surrogate of cardiac autonomic modulation, are evident during rest and exercise in young healthy individuals. However, it remains unclear whether sex impacts HRV during prolonged exercise at differing levels of environmental heat stress. Therefore, we completed a secondary analysis upon the effects of sex and wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) on HR and HRV during prolonged exercise. To achieve this, HR and HRV were assessed in non-endurance-trained and non-heat-acclimatised healthy men (n = 19) and women (n = 15) aged 18–45 years during 180 min of treadmill walking at a moderate metabolic rate (200 W/m2: equivalent to ∼35% peak aerobic power) in 16, 24, 28, and 32 °C WBGT. In the final 5 min prior to exercise termination, HR was observed to be higher in women relative to men in all but the 32 °C WBGT. Although no sex differences were observed for the HRV metric of root-mean-square of successive differences, high-frequency power was higher in women relative to men across WBGT conditions. These findings indicate that, in healthy non-heat-acclimatised individuals, women respond to prolonged exercise-heat stress with a greater increase in HR despite cardiac vagal autonomic modulation remaining equal or increasing compared to men. Novelty: Prior to exercise termination, females respond with a greater increase in HR under all WBGTs except the hottest (32 °C). Sex influenced  HRV metrics during all WBGTs, but results were mixed. Further characterisation of HRV sex differences remains an important area of research.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0004
       
  • Heat tolerance and the validity of occupational heat exposure limits in
           women during moderate-intensity work

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      Authors: Sean R. Notley, Ashley P. Akerman, Brian J. Friesen, Martin P. Poirier, Emma McCourt, Andreas D. Flouris, Glen P. Kenny
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      To mitigate excessive rises in core temperature (>1 °C) in non-heat acclimatized workers, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) provides heat stress limits (Action Limit Values; ALV), defined by the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and a worker’s metabolic rate. However, since these limits are based on data from men, their suitability for women remains unclear. We therefore assessed core temperature and heart rate in men (n = 19; body surface area-to-mass ratio: 250 (SD 17) cm2/kg) and women (n = 15; body surface area-to-mass ratio: 268 (SD 24) cm2/kg) aged 18–45 years during 180 min of walking at a moderate metabolic rate (200 W/m2) in WBGTs below (16 and 24 °C) and above (28 and 32 °C) ACGIH ALV. Sex did not significantly influence (i) rises in core temperature, irrespective of WBGT, (ii) the proportion of participants with rises in core temperature >1 °C in environments below ACGIH limits, and (iii) work duration before rises in core temperature exceeded 1 °C or volitional termination in environments above ACGIH limits. Although further studies are needed, these findings indicate that for the purpose of mitigating rises in core temperature exceeding recommended limits (>1 °C), ACGIH guidelines have comparable effectiveness in non-heat acclimatized men and women during moderate-intensity work. Novelty: Sex did not appreciably influence thermal strain nor the proportion of participants with core temperatures exceeding recommended limits. Sex did not significantly influence tolerance to uncompensable heat stress. Despite originating from data obtained in only men, current occupational heat stress guidance offered comparable effectiveness in men and women.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2022-0003
       
  • Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant supplementation does not affect muscle
           soreness or recovery of maximal voluntary isometric contraction force
           following muscle-damaging exercise in untrained men: a randomized clinical
           trial

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      Authors: S.C. Broome, R.D. Atiola, A.J. Braakhuis, C.J. Mitchell, T.L. Merry
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Unaccustomed exercise causes muscle damage resulting in loss of muscle function, which may be attributable to exercise-induced increases in skeletal muscle reactive oxygen species. This study examined the effect of mitochondria-targeted antioxidant supplementation on recovery of muscle function following exercise. Thirty-two untrained men received MitoQ (20 mg/day) or a placebo for 14 days before performing  300 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensor muscles of 1 leg. Muscle function was assessed using isokinetic dynamometry before, immediately after, and 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after exercise. Muscle soreness was assessed using a visual analogue scale 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after exercise. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 2, 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after exercise and urine samples were collected before and during the 48 hours after exercise. The reduction in maximal voluntary isometric contraction force and peak concentric torque following exercise was unaffected by MitoQ while recovery of peak eccentric torque was delayed in the MitoQ group. Exercise-induced increases in urine F2-isoprostanes were unaffected by MitoQ. MitoQ augmented exercise-induced increases in plasma creatine kinase levels, while plasma IL-6 was similar between groups. Muscle soreness was not affected by MitoQ. These results indicate that MitoQ does not attenuate post-exercise muscle soreness and may delay recovery of muscle function following eccentric exercise. Trial registration number: ACTRN12620001089921. Novelty: Post-exercise recovery of maximal voluntary isometric contraction force and peak concentric torque were unaffected by MitoQ. MitoQ delayed post-exercise recovery of peak eccentric torque. Post-exercise muscle soreness was unaffected by MitoQ.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0767
       
  • Social-emotional functioning and dietary intake among children born with a
           very low birth weight

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      Authors: Kathryn Walton, Meghan McGee, Julie Sato, Nicole Law, Kathryn E. Hopperton, Nicole Bando, Alex Kiss, Sharon L. Unger, Deborah L. O'Connor
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Very low birth weight (VLBW,
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0434
       
  • Effects of caffeinated energy drinks on cardiovascuclar responses during
           exercise in healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of
           randomized controlled trials

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      Authors: Nancy Grinberg, Karima Benkhedda, Jennifer Barber, Andrew D. Krahn, Sébastien La Vieille
      First page: 618
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of caffeinated energy drinks (CEDs) on the cardiovascular (CV) response to exercise has not been well described. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on the acute effects of CEDs on CV responses during dynamic, aerobic exercise in 296 healthy adult males (224) and females (72) in 21 randomized controlled trials. During exercise, there was an increase in heart rate (HR) (mean difference (MD), 2.86 bpm, 95% CI, 2.39–3.34 bpm, I 2 = 0%, p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0807
       
  • The effects of pain induced by blood flow occlusion in one leg on exercise
           tolerance and corticospinal excitability and inhibition of the
           contralateral leg in males

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      Authors: Rafael A. Azevedo, Delbar Jazayeri, Samuel T. Yeung, Rojan Khoshreza, Guillaume Y. Millet, Juan Murias, Saied J. Aboodarda
      First page: 632
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      Experiencing pain in one leg can alter exercise tolerance and neuromuscular fatigue (NMF) responses in the contralateral leg; however, the corticospinal modulations to nonlocal experimental pain induced by blood flow occlusion remain unknown. In three randomized visits, 13 male participants performed 25% of isometric maximal voluntary contraction (25%IMVC) to task failure with one leg preceded by (i) 6-min rest (CON), (ii) cycling at 80% of peak power output until task failure with the contralateral leg (CYCL), or (iii) CYCL followed by blood flow occlusion (OCCL) during 25%IMVC. NMF assessments (IMVC, voluntary activation [VA], and potentiated twitch [Qtw]) were performed at baseline and task failure. During the 25%IMVC, transcranial magnetic stimulations were performed to obtain motor-evoked potential (MEP), silent period (SP), and short intracortical inhibition (SICI). 25%IMVC was the shortest in OCCL (105 ± 50s) and shorter in CYCL (154 ± 68 s) than CON (219 ± 105 s) (p 
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0597
       
  • Importance of skeletal muscle lipid levels for muscle function and
           physical function in older individuals

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      Authors: Akito Yoshiko, Hisashi Maeda, Hideyuki Takahashi, Teruhiko Koike, Noriko Tanaka, Hiroshi Akima
      First page: 649
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The skeletal muscle contains lipids inside (intramyocellular lipids, IMCL) or outside (extramyocellular lipids, EMCL) its cells. The muscle lipid content increases with age; however, the characteristics of IMCL and EMCL in older individuals are not well known. We aimed to examine the characteristics of skeletal muscle lipids by investigating their relationship with muscle function and physical functions. Seven elderly men and 16 elderly women participated. The skeletal muscle lipid content, including IMCL and EMCL, was measured in the vastus lateralis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Isometric knee extension with maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and time-to-task failure for knee extension with 50% MVC were measured as muscle functions. The participants performed six physical function tests: preferred gait speed, maximal gait speed, Timed Up and Go, chair sit-to-stand, handgrip strength, and stand from the floor. The time to knee extension task failure had a significant relationship with the IMCL (rs = −0.43, P
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0685
       
  • Brave spaces: Indigenous children in Canada plan for a different tomorrow

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      Authors: Elizabeth Cooper
      First page: 659
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      When considering the impacts of historical trauma and colonization on the lived realities of Indigenous young people within Canada, it is essential that research uses strength-based, capacity-building approaches to ensure that the voices are heard and that their perspectives and advice can be actioned. A series of participatory workshops with adults and children were conducted within urban geographies to explore health-seeking behaviours, health knowledge, and community resiliency. Research took place in Manitoba, Canada (2015–2016, n = 36 girls and 24 adults) with First Nations and Métis community members and British Columbia, Canada (2017, n = 11 children and 15 adults) with Métis community members. Children participated in community transect walks, photo elicitation activities, discussion circles (with adult participant contribution), and projected community mapping exercises where they drew their ideal, imagined community. Community consensus processes were used for member checking as well as initial evaluation of research findings, including the establishment of key themes. Field notes, discussion transcripts, and images were analyzed for similarities and differences between ages, genders, cultural identifiers, and geographies. A key finding was the need for safe spaces that can also be brave spaces, or moments when the community can be free to push for change without reprimand. Children were particularly concerned with sustainable, appropriate housing, safe methods of transportation, access to green spaces, and environmental stewardship within their day-to-day lives. Novelty: Brave spaces are essential for achieving/maintaining wellness within Indigenous communities. This article responds to a need to shift to a determinants of life focus.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0470
       
  • Influence of menstrual cycle on muscle glycogen utilization during
           high-intensity intermittent exercise until exhaustion in healthy women

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      Authors: Tomoka Matsuda, Hideyuki Takahashi, Mariko Nakamura, Moe Kanno, Hazuki Ogata, Akira Ishikawa, Mizuki Yamada, Kayoko Kamemoto, Mikako Sakamaki-Sunaga
      First page: 671
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated the effects of the menstrual cycle on muscle glycogen and circulating substrates during high-intensity intermittent exercise until exhaustion in healthy women who habitually exercised. In total, 11 women with regular menstrual cycles completed three tests, which comprised the early follicular phase (E-FP), late follicular phase (L-FP), and luteal phase (LP) of the menstrual cycle. High-intensity intermittent exercise until exhaustion was performed on each test day. Evaluation of muscle glycogen concentration by 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and measurement of estradiol, progesterone, blood glucose, lactate, free fatty acids (FFA), and insulin concentrations were conducted before exercise (Pre) and immediately after exercise (Post). Muscle glycogen concentrations from thigh muscles at Pre and Post were not significantly different between menstrual cycle phases (P = 0.57). Muscle glycogen decreases by exercise were significantly greater in L-FP (59.0 ± 12.4 mM) than in E-FP (48.3 ± 14.4 mM, P
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0532
       
  • Prior arm-crank exercise has no effect on postprandial lipaemia in
           nondisabled adults

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      Authors: Matthew T. Farrow, Jennifer Maher, Jack R. Oaten, Saskia Kreutzfeldt, Dylan Thompson, James L.J. Bilzon
      First page: 681
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      A single bout of cycling or running performed in the evening can reduce postprandial lipaemia (PPL) the following morning, although this is currently unknown for upper-body exercise. The aim of this study was to determine if a bout of arm-crank exercise (high-intensity interval [HIIE] or moderate-intensity continuous [MICE]), can attenuate PPL in noninjured individuals. Eleven healthy and recreationally active participants (eight males, three females; age: 27 ± 7 years; body mass index: 23.5 ± 2.5 kg·m–2) volunteered to participate in three trials: HIIE (10 × 60 s at 80% peak power output), MICE (50% peak power output of isocaloric duration), and a no-exercise control condition. Each exercise bout was performed at 18:00, and participants consumed a standardised evening meal at 20:00. Following an overnight fast, a 5-h mixed-macronutrient tolerance test was performed at 08:00. There were no significant differences in triglyceride incremental area under the curve between HIIE (192 ± 94 mmol·L–1 per 300 min), MICE (184 ± 111 mmol·L–1 per 300 min), and the no-exercise condition (175 ± 90 mmol·L–1 per 300 min) (P = 0.46). There were no significant differences in incremental area under the curve for glucose (P = 0.91) or insulin (P = 0.59) between conditions. Upper-body MICE and HIIE performed in the evening do not influence PPL the following morning, in normotriglyceridemic individuals. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT04277091. Novelty: Arm-crank exercise has no effect on PPL when performed the evening prior to a mixed-macronutrient meal test. Upper-body sprint interval exercise should be investigated as a potential solution to reduce PPL.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0748
       
  • Prevalence and correlates of meeting physical activity, screen time, and
           sleep duration guidelines among Brazilian adolescents: findings from ERICA
           

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      Authors: Camila Wohlgemuth Schaan, Beatriz D. Schaan, Felipe Vogt Cureau
      First page: 690
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Ahead of Print.
      The prevalence of meeting movement guidelines is low in developed countries; however, there is a lack of data among medium-income countries, including Brazil. We evaluated the prevalence and correlates of meeting physical activity, screen time, and sleep guidelines in Brazilian adolescents. Employing a cross-sectional design, Brazilian adolescents (aged 12–17 years) were surveyed about their physical activity levels, sleep, and screen time. Data were collected at schools through a self-administered questionnaire using a personal digital assistant for entering the data. Poisson regression models were used to examine the associations between correlates (sex, age, socioeconomic status, region, skin colour, and shift of school) and meeting movement guidelines. A total of 58 535 adolescents were included. Although only 8.7% of the adolescents met all three movement guidelines, the prevalence of those who met physical activity, screen time, and sleep duration guidelines was 46.4%, 42.5%, and 40%, respectively. Moreover, male sex, age 14–15 years, black or brown skin colour, afternoon shift of school, and living in the Northern and Northeastern regions were associated with a higher prevalence of meeting all movement guidelines. The prevalence of adolescents who met all three movement guidelines was low among Brazilian adolescents. Adolescents living in less developed regions showed greater adherence to movement guidelines, suggesting a possible impact of the urbanization process on these behaviours. Novelty: The prevalence of Brazilian adolescents who met all three movement behaviour guidelines was around 9%. Among all adolescents, 40% met only one movement guideline.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2021-0447
       
 
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