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ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 134 of 134 Journals sorted alphabetically
AACE Clinical Case Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AJP Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BMC Endocrine Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Nutrition Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Dermato-Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Diabesity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 261)
Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Discover Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Dubai Diabetes and Endocrinology Journal     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Endocrine and Metabolic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine Connections     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Endocrine Disruptors     Open Access  
Endocrine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Endocrine Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Endocrine Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Endocrine Regulations     Open Access  
Endocrine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Endocrine Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Endocrine-Related Cancer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism     Open Access  
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports     Open Access  
Endocrinology, Obesity and Metabolic Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Endokrynologia Polska     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
European Thyroid Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers in Clinical Diabetes and Healthcare     Open Access  
Frontiers in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Neuroendocrine Science     Open Access  
Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
General and Comparative Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Growth Hormone & IGF Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Gynakologische Endokrinologie     Hybrid Journal  
Gynecological Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Hormone and Metabolic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Hormone Research in Paediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Hormones : International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Hormones and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International journal of endocrine oncology     Open Access  
International Journal of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
International Journal of Osteoporosis and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
JIMD Reports     Open Access  
Journal für Gynäkologische Endokrinologie/Österreich     Hybrid Journal  
Journal für Klinische Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel : Austrian Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology     Open Access  
Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Assocation of Nepal     Open Access  
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Endocrinological Investigation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Endocrinology and Reproduction     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Screening     Open Access  
Journal of Molecular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Neuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Pineal Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Renal and Hepatic Disorders     Open Access  
Journal of Restorative Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the ASEAN Federation of Endocrine Societies     Open Access  
Kidney International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Kidney Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
L'Endocrinologo     Hybrid Journal  
Metabolic Brain Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Molecular Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Nature Reviews Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Neuroendocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nutrition in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Open Journal of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Reproductive Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Argentina de Endocrinología y Metabolismo     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Endocrinología     Open Access  
Revista Venezolana de Endocrinología y Metabolismo     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access  
The Endocrinologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 167)
Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thyroid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Thyroid Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Thyroid Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Vitamins & Hormones     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.313
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2042-0188 - ISSN (Online) 2042-0196
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Impact of teriparatide therapy in Indian postmenopausal women with
           osteoporosis with regard to DXA-derived parameters

    • Authors: Nandipati Venkata Sandeep, Aneez Joseph, Kripa Elizabeth Cherian, Nitin Kapoor, Thomas V Paul
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:There is paucity of literature on the impact of teriparatide on hip geometry and bone microarchitecture globally and none from the Indian subcontinent. This study examined the outcome of teriparatide therapy on vertebral fractures, bone mineral density (BMD), hip structural analysis (HSA), and trabecular bone score (TBS) in Indian postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis.Methodology:Ambulatory postmenopausal women above the age of 50 years with either severe osteoporosis or vertebral fractures, or both, were recruited. All patients received cholecalciferol (2000 IU/day), calcium carbonate (elemental calcium 1 g/day), and teriparatide (20 mcg subcutaneously/day) for 24 months. Baseline bone biochemistry, BMD, TBS, and HSA were assessed and repeated after 24 months of therapy. Incident vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were also studied.Results:A total of 51 postmenopausal women with mean (SD) age of 65.7(8.6) years, and mean (SD) body mass index of 22.7 (3.5) kg/m2 were recruited in this study. Vertebral fractures were present in 74.5% (38/51) at baseline. Following teriparatide therapy, significant improvement was observed in the BMD (g/cm2) at both the lumbar spine (0.706–0.758: p 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T11:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221112903
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Timing of osteoporosis therapies following fracture: the current status

    • Authors: Rajan Palui, Harsh Durgia, Jayaprakash Sahoo, Dukhabandhu Naik, Sadishkumar Kamalanathan
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      In most patients, osteoporosis is diagnosed only after the occurrence of the first fragility fracture. It is of utmost importance to start osteoporosis medications immediately in these patients to prevent future fractures and also to reduce associated mortality and morbidity. There remains a hesitancy over initiating osteoporotic medications, specifically for antiresorptive agents like bisphosphonates following an acute fracture due to concern over their effect on fracture healing. The purpose of this review is to study the effect of the timing of initiation of different osteoporosis medications on healing after an acute fracture. Most of the human studies, including randomized control trials (RCTs), did not find any significant negative effect on fracture healing with early use of bisphosphonate after an acute fracture. Anabolic agents like teriparatide have shown either neutral or beneficial effects on fracture healing and thus can be started very early following any osteoporotic fracture. Although human studies on the early use of other osteoporosis medications like denosumab or strontium ranelate are very sparse in the literature, none of these medications have shown any evidence of delay in fracture healing. To summarize, among the commonly used anti-osteoporosis agents, both bisphosphonates and teriparatide are safe to be initiated in the early acute post-fracture period. Moreover, teriparatide has shown some evidence in favor of reducing fracture healing time.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T12:14:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221112904
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • The potential of GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes and chronic
           kidney disease: from randomised trials to clinical practice

    • Authors: Bernt Johan von Scholten, Frederik Flindt Kreiner, Søren Rasmussen, Peter Rossing, Thomas Idorn
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects around 10% of the global population and is most often caused by diabetes. Diabetes with CKD (diabetic kidney disease, DKD) is a progressive condition that may cause kidney failure and which contributes significantly to the excess morbidity and mortality in these patients. DKD is treated with direct disease-targeting therapies like blockers of the renin–angiotensin system, sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors and non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as well as indirect therapies impacting hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia, obesity and hypertension, which all together reduce disease progression. While no glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are currently indicated to improve kidney outcomes, accumulating evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials (CVOTs) corroborates a kidney-protective effect in people with T2D and CKD, and GLP-1 RAs are now mentioned in international treatment guidelines for type 2 diabetes (T2D) with CKD. GLP-1 RAs are indicated to improve glycaemia in people with T2D; certain GLP-1 RAs are also approved for weight management and to reduce cardiovascular risk in T2D. Ongoing pivotal trials are assessing additional indications, including T2D with CKD. In this article, we review and discuss kidney outcomes from a multitude of completed clinical trials as well as real-world evidence and ongoing clinical trials.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T07:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221112490
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Characterizing skeletal muscle dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary
           syndrome

    • Authors: Tara McDonnell, Leanne Cussen, Marie McIlroy, Michael W. O’Reilly
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine condition affecting women. It has traditionally been viewed as a primarily reproductive disorder; however, it is increasingly recognized as a lifelong metabolic disease. Women with PCOS are at increased risk of insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease. Although not currently a diagnostic criterion, IR is a cardinal pathophysiological feature and highly prevalent in women with PCOS. Androgens play a bidirectional role in the pathogenesis of IR, and there is a complex interplay between IR and androgen excess in women with PCOS. Skeletal muscle has a key role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and is also a metabolic target organ of androgen action. Skeletal muscle is the organ responsible for the majority of insulin-mediated glucose disposal. There is growing interest in the relationship between skeletal muscle, androgen excess and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease in PCOS. Molecular mechanisms underpinning defects in skeletal muscle dysfunction in PCOS remain to be elucidated, but may represent promising targets for future therapeutic intervention. In this review, we aim to explore the role of skeletal muscle in metabolism, focusing particularly on perturbations in skeletal muscle specific to PCOS as observed in recent molecular and in vivo human studies. We review the possible role of androgens in the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle abnormalities in PCOS, and identify knowledge gaps, areas for future research and potential therapeutic implications. Despite increasing interest in the area of skeletal muscle dysfunction in women with PCOS, significant challenges and unanswered questions remain, and going forward, novel innovative approaches will be required to dissect the underlying mechanisms.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-18T12:31:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221113140
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Retraction notice

    • Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.

      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T11:28:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221109732
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 and the hidden threat of diabetic microvascular complications

    • Authors: Hadeel Zaghloul, Rayaz A. Malik
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected at least 200 million individuals worldwide and resulted in nearly 5 million deaths as of October 2021. According to the latest data from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2021, the diabetes pandemic has affected 537 million people and is associated with 6.7 million deaths. Given the high prevalence of both diabetes and COVID-19 and common pathological outcomes, a bidirectional relationship could have a catastrophic outcome. The increased risk of COVID-19 in those with obesity and diabetes and higher morbidity and mortality has received considerable attention. However, little attention has been given to the relationship between COVID-19 and microvascular complications. Indeed, microvascular complications are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in diabetes. This review assesses the evidence for an association between diabetic microvascular complications (neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy) and COVID-19. It draws parallels between the pathological changes occurring in the microvasculature in both diseases and assesses whether microvascular disease is a prognostic factor for COVID-19 outcomes in diabetes.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221110708
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Relationship between sleep pattern and bone mineral density in patients
           with osteoporotic fracture

    • Authors: Haobin Zeng, Likang Li, Bo Zhang, Xu Xu, Guowei Li, Maoshui Chen
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Evidence investigating sleep pattern in relation to bone health in elderly participants with osteoporosis remains sparse. We aimed to assess the relationship between sleep pattern incorporating five sleep characteristics (snoring, midnight waking up, insomnia, sleep duration, and daytime napping) and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly participants with osteoporotic fracture.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted to include eligible elderly patients from the Department of Orthopedics who were admitted to hospital due to an osteoporotic fracture. Sleep pattern was constructed based on total sleep scores and categorized into healthy, intermediate, and poor pattern groups. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess sleep pattern in relation to risk of low BMD.Results:A total of 169 elderly patients with osteoporotic fracture were included in this study (mean age: 71.91 years; 87.57% females). There were 36 (21.30%), 107 (63.31%), and 26 (15.38%) patients with healthy, intermediate, and poor sleep pattern, respectively. Compared with healthy sleep pattern, no significant relationship between intermediate sleep pattern and BMD was detected [odds ratio (OR) = 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74, 3.97, p = 0.21), while poor pattern was significantly associated with decreased BMD (OR = 3.50, 95% CI: 1.10, 11.14, p = 0.034).Conclusion:The majority of elderly patients with osteoporotic fracture had unhealthy sleep pattern; poor sleep pattern was significantly related to reduced BMD when compared with healthy pattern. Further high-quality evidence is needed to assess and validate the relationship between sleep pattern and risk of low BMD in the elderly.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T11:59:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221106884
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Relationship between total testosterone, sex hormone–binding globulin
           levels and the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males: a
           meta-analysis

    • Authors: Man-Qiu Mo, Zi-Chun Huang, Zhen-Hua Yang, Yun-Hua Liao, Ning Xia, Ling Pan
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:In recent years, many studies have reported the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and sex hormones, especially total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG). However, the relationship between sex hormones and the severity of NAFLD is still unclear.Methods:PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, WanFang, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and VIP databases were searched for relevant studies from inception to 31 August 2021. Values of weighted mean differences (WMDs) and odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were combined by Stata 12.0 software to evaluate the relationship between TT, SHBG and the severity of NAFLD in males.Results:A total of 2995 patients with NAFLD from 10 published cross-sectional studies were included for further analysis. The meta-analysis indicated that the moderate-severe group had a lower TT than the mild group in males with NAFLD (WMD: −0.35 ng/ml, 95% CI = −0.50 to −0.20). TT and SHBG were important risk factors of moderate-severe NAFLD in males (ORTT = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.86; ORSHBG = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.39; p 27 kg/m2, moderate-severe NAFLD had higher SHBG levels than those with mild disease (WMD: 1.20 nmol/l, 95% CI = −2.01 to 4.42).Conclusion:The present meta-analysis shows that lower TT is associated with the severity of NAFLD in males, while the relationship between SHBG and severity of NAFLD is still to be further verified.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T11:57:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221106879
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Serum vitamin B12 levels and glycemic fluctuation in patients with type 2
           diabetes mellitus

    • Authors: Wei Li, Jing Zhao, Ling-Ling Zhu, You-Fan Peng
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Purpose:The aim of the study was to explore the correlation between serum vitamin B12 levels and glycemic fluctuation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).Methods:This study included 202 T2DM patients in whom blood glucose levels were recorded using a continuous glucose monitoring system retrospectively. Glycemic fluctuation was determined using the average daily risk range (ADRR), a diabetes-specific measure of the risk for hyper- and hypoglycemia.Results:Serum vitamin B12 levels were higher in T2DM patients with wider glycemic fluctuations than in those with minor glycemic fluctuations (p 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T06:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221102800
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Bone health in transgender people: a narrative review

    • Authors: Giulia Giacomelli, Maria Cristina Meriggiola
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Bone health in transmen and transwomen is an important issue that needs to be evaluated by clinicians. Prior to gender-affirming hormone treatment (GAHT), transwomen have lower bone mineral density (BMD) and a higher prevalence of osteopenia than cismen probably related to external factors, such as hypovitaminosis D and less physical activities. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues in transgender youth may cause bone loss; however, the addition of GAHT restores or at least improves BMD in both transboys and transgirls. The maintenance or increase in BMD shown in short-term longitudinal studies emphasizes that GAHT does not have a negative effect on BMD in adult transwomen and transmen. Gonadectomy is not a risk factor if GAHT is taken correctly. The prevalence of fractures in the transgender population seems to be the same as in the general population but more studies are required on this aspect. To evaluate the risk of osteoporosis, it is mandatory to define the most appropriate reference group not only taking into consideration the medical aspects but also in respect of the selected gender identity of each person.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T05:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221099346
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Calcitonin: current concepts and differential diagnosis

    • Authors: Andreas Kiriakopoulos, Periklis Giannakis, Evangelos Menenakos
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Calcitonin (CT) is most effectively produced by the parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. It acts through the calcitonin receptor (CTR), a seven-transmembrane class II G-protein-coupled receptor linked to multiple signal transduction pathways with its main secretagogues being calcium and gastrin. It is clinically used mostly in the diagnosis and follow-up of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Hypercalcitoninemia can be attributed to primary (e.g. CT-secreting tumor) or secondary (e.g. due to hypercalcemia) overproduction, underexcretion (e.g. renal insufficiency), drug reaction (e.g. β-blockers), or false-positive results. In clinical practice, elevated basal calcitonin (bCT) is indicative, but not pathognomonic, of MTC. Current literature leans toward an age as well as gender-specific cutoff approach. bCT>100 pg/ml has up to 100% positive prognostic value (PPV) for MTC, whereas bCT between 8 and 100 pg/ml for adult males and 6 and 80 pg/ml for adult females should be possibly further investigated with stimulation calcitonin (sCT) tests. Calcium is showing similar efficacy with pentagastrin (Pg) sCT; however, the real value of these provocative tests has been disputed given the availability of new, highly sensitive CT immunoassays. Anyhow, evidence concludes that sCT
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T08:24:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221099344
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Perioperative glycemic status is linked to postoperative complications in
           non-intensive care unit patients with type-2 diabetes: a retrospective
           study

    • Authors: Takeshi Oba, Mototsugu Nagao, Shunsuke Kobayashi, Yuji Yamaguchi, Tomoko Nagamine, Kyoko Tanimura-Inagaki, Izumi Fukuda, Hitoshi Sugihara
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Perioperative hyperglycemia is a risk factor for postoperative complications in the general population. However, it has not been clarified whether perioperative hyperglycemia increases postoperative complications in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Therefore, we aimed to analyze the relationship between perioperative glycemic status and postoperative complications in non-intensive care unit (non-ICU) hospitalized patients with T2D.Materials and Methods:Medical records of 1217 patients with T2D who were admitted to the non-ICU in our hospital were analyzed retrospectively. Relationships between clinical characteristics including perioperative glycemic status and postoperative complications were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Perioperative glycemic status was evaluated by calculating the mean, standard deviation (SD), and coefficient of variation (CV) of blood glucose (BG) measurements in preoperative and postoperative periods for three contiguous days before and after surgery, respectively. Postoperative complications were defined as infections, delayed wound healing, postoperative bleeding, and/or thrombosis.Results:Postoperative complications occurred in 139 patients (11.4%). These patients showed a lower BG immediately before surgery (P = 0.04) and a higher mean postoperative BG (P = 0.009) than those without postoperative complications. There were no differences in the other perioperative BG parameters including BG variability and the frequency of hypoglycemia. The multivariate analysis showed that BG immediately before surgery (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]), 0.91 (0.85–0.98), P = 0.01) and mean postoperative BG (1.11 (1.05–1.18), P 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T12:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221099349
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Association of continuous glucose monitoring-derived time in range with
           major amputation risk in diabetic foot osteomyelitis patients undergoing
           amputation

    • Authors: Xueyao Yin, WeiFen Zhu, Chao Liu, Huilan Yao, Jiaxing You, Yixin Chen, Xiaofang Ying, Lin Li
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Objective:The metrics generated from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), such as time in range (TIR), are strongly correlated with diabetes complications. This study explored the association of perioperative CGM-derived metrics with major amputation risk in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO).Methods:This study recruited 55 DFO patients with grade 3–4 wounds according to the Wagner Diabetic Foot Ulcer Classification System, all of whom underwent CGM for 5 days during the perioperative period. The CGM-derived metrics were defined in accordance with the most recent international consensus recommendations.Results:Patients with major amputation had significantly less TIR and higher time below range (TBR) (all p 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T12:49:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221099337
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Exploring the weight bias of professionals working in the field of obesity
           with a mobile IAT: a pilot study

    • Authors: Tobias Jungnickel, Ute von Jan, Stefan Engeli, Urs-Vito Albrecht
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Obesity is common in many industrialized nations and often accompanied by related health issues. Furthermore, individuals living with overweight or obesity are often confronted with stigmatization in their daily lives. These problems may be aggravated if the objectivity of health care professionals is compromised due to (unconscious) prejudices. If pharmaceutical companies, regulatory agencies, and health insurers are also susceptible to these biases, decisions related to the development, approval, and reimbursement of obesity-related therapies may be negatively impacted.Materials and Methods:The ‘Implicit Association Test’ (IAT) is a psychometric test allowing to measure these attitudes and could therefore assist to reveal unconscious preferences. A self-developed mobile version, in the form of a ResearchKit-based IAT app was employed in the presented study. The objective was to determine (potential) weight bias and its characteristics for professionals attending a national obesity-related conference in Germany (G1), compared to a control group (without stated interest in the topic, G2) – both using the mobile app – and a historical control (G3) based on data provided by Project Implicit acquired by a web app.Results:Explicit evaluations of G1 were neutral at a higher percentage compared with G2 and G3, while implicit preference toward lean individuals did not differ significantly between G2 and G3, and G1.Conclusion:The greater discrepancy between the (more neutral) explicit attitude and the unconscious preference pointing in the anti-obesity direction could indicate an underestimated bias for the professional participants in G1. Implicit preference is often ingrained from childhood on, and difficult to overcome. Thus, even for professionals, it may unconsciously influence decisions made in the care they provide. Professionals in any given health care sector directed at obesity care should thus be made aware of this inconsistency to enable them to consciously counteract this potential effect.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T07:22:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221098881
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • The management of acute and chronic hyponatraemia

    • Authors: Sarah Jean Lawless, Chris Thompson, Aoife Garrahy
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte abnormality encountered in clinical practice; despite this, the work-up and management of hyponatraemia remain suboptimal and varies among different specialist groups. The majority of data comparing hyponatraemia treatments have been observational, up until recently. The past two years have seen the publication of several randomised control trials investigating hyponatraemia treatments, both for chronic and acute hyponatraemia. In this article, we aim to provide a background to the physiology, cause and impact of hyponatraemia and summarise the most recent data on treatments for acute and chronic hyponatraemia, highlighting their efficacy, tolerability and adverse effects.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T07:20:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221097343
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • In-person and virtual multidisciplinary intensive lifestyle interventions
           are equally effective in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity

    • Authors: Marwa Al-Badri, Cara L. Kilroy, Jacqueline Ifat Shahar, Shaheen Tomah, Hannah Gardner, Mallory Sin, Jennie Votta, Aliza Phillips-Stoll, Aaron Price, Joan Beaton, Chandra Davis, Jo-Anne Rizzotto, Shilton Dhaver, Osama Hamdy
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) is essential for diabetes management. The Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program is a 12-week multidisciplinary weight management program that has been implemented in real-world clinical practice since 2005 and has shown long-term maintenance of weight reduction for 5 and 10 years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the program went virtual using telemedicine and mobile health applications.Aims:This retrospective pilot study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a virtual model of an already established and successful in-person program for diabetes and weight management since 2005.Methods:We evaluated 38 patients with diabetes and obesity enrolled in the Why WAIT program between February 2019 and December 2020. Sixteen participants were enrolled in virtual program (VP) and were compared with 22 participants who completed the latest two physical programs (PPs) before COVID-19. We evaluated changes in body weight, A1C, blood pressure (BP), and lipid profile after 12 weeks of ILI.Results:Body weight decreased by −7.4 ± 3.6 kg from baseline in VP compared with −6.8 ± 3.5 kg in PP (p = 0.6 between groups). A1C decreased by −1.03% ± 1.1% from baseline in VP, and by −1.0% ± 1.2% in PP (p = 0.9 between groups). BP, lipid profile, and all other parameters improved in both groups with no significant difference between them.Conclusion:Virtual multidisciplinary ILI is as effective as the in-person intervention program in improving body weight, A1C, BP, and lipid profile, and in reducing the number of anti-hyperglycemic medications. Results from our study suggest that scaling the Why WAIT program in a virtual format to a larger population of patients with diabetes and obesity is feasible and is potentially as successful as the in-person program.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T07:01:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221093220
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • The association between diabetes mellitus and incidence of depressive
           episodes is different based on sex: insights from ELSA-Brasil

    • Authors: Elizabeth Leite Barbosa, Arlinda B. Moreno, Eelco Van Duinkerken, Paulo Lotufo, Sandhi Maria Barreto, Luana Giatti, Maria Angélica Nunes, Maria Carmen Viana, Roberta Figueiredo, Dóra Chor, Rosane Harter Griep
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Objective:To investigate the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and incidence of depressive episodes among men and women.Methods:Data were used from 12,730 participants (5866 men and 6864 women) at baseline (2008–2010) and follow-up 1 (2012–2014) of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a multicenter cohort of Brazilian civil servants. Participants were classified for diabetes using self-reported and clinical information, and evaluated for presence of depressive episodes by the Clinical Interview Schedule–Revised (CIS-R). Associations were estimated by means of logistic regression models (crude and adjusted for socio-demographic variables).Results:Women classified as with DM prior to the baseline were at 48% greater risk (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03–2.07) of depressive episodes in the crude model and 54% greater risk (95% CI = 1.06–2.19) in the final adjusted model compared to women classified as non-DM. No significant associations were observed for men. The regression models for duration of DM and incidence of depressive episodes (n = 2143 participants; 1160 men and 983 women) returned no significant associations.Conclusion:In women classified as with prior DM, the greater risk of depressive episodes suggests that more frequent screening for depression may be beneficial as part of a multi-factorial approach to care for DM.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T06:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221093212
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • The global burden of thyroid cancer in high-income Asia-Pacific: a
           systematic analysis of the Global Burden of Disease study

    • Authors: Yike Li, Yinqiong Huang, Xue He, Cheng Han, Wei Wu, Hui Shen, Yanbing Xu, Yazhuo Liu, Zizhao Zhu
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Thyroid cancer has become increasingly prevalent and threatens human health. Few studies have explored the incidence of thyroid cancer in Asia and its relationship with social-progress factors.Methods:We analyzed Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2019 data specific to thyroid cancer. Incidence, prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life year (DALY) rates were used to evaluate the burden of thyroid cancer.Results:The age-standardized incidence, prevalence, and DALY rates per 100,000 population were 1.34% (95% UI, 2.44–3.07), 2.79% (95% UI, 18.82–23.77) and 16.49% (95% UI, 14.6–18), respectively, for all of Asia in 2019. In 2019, the DALY rate of thyroid cancer in the High-income Asia-Pacific region was the highest and mortality due to thyroid cancer in the High-income Asia-Pacific region was also the highest. The growth trend of DALYs in the High-income Asia-Pacific region was much steeper than those in other Asian regions. In all Asian regions and in the High-income Asia-Pacific region, the incidence, prevalence, mortality and DALY rates of thyroid cancer in female patients were drastically higher than those in male patients. Among Asian patients with thyroid cancer, the DALY rate was higher in men aged 80–89 years than in women. The DALY rate gradually increased with age. In the High-income Asia-Pacific region, the mortality rate of patients with thyroid cancer decreased with age. The prevalence was highest in those aged 40–79 years.Conclusion:The disease burden of thyroid cancer in the High-income Asia-Pacific region was significantly higher than those in other regions, which may be due to overdiagnosis. The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer seems to indicate that thyroid cancer is still a public health problem in Asia. Therefore, some health policy adjustments will be meaningful.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T06:38:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221090012
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Is eNAMPT/visfatin a potential serum marker of papillary thyroid
           cancer'

    • Authors: Nadia Sawicka-Gutaj, Paulina Ziółkowska, Aleksandra Derwich, Paweł Gut, Agata Czarnywojtek, Michał Kloska, Marek Ruchała
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Purpose:The role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT)/visfatin in a more aggressive course of many malignancies has been proven. Previous studies have noticed the importance of visfatin in thyroid neoplastic tissue, but the diagnostic and prognostic value of its serum concentration has not been investigated so far. Our study aimed to consider whether extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) could be a potential serum marker in recurrent papillary thyroid cancer (PTC).Methods:It was a prospective observational study with consecutive enrolment. We recruited 100 patients with PTC after thyroidectomy with postoperative 131I ablation and 100 healthy controls. Also, 50 randomly selected patients underwent laboratory assessment (including eNAMPT serum concentration by ELISA Assay Kit, TSH, free thyroid hormones, TSH-stimulated thyroglobulin Tg, antibodies – TgAbs, TPOAb) and body composition analysis twice: at admission and 6 months after being on suppressive levothyroxine doses. TSH-stimulated Tg of 1 ng/ml was defined as the cutoff value for predicting disease status as complete remission (n = 55) and recurrent or persistent structural disease (n = 45).Results:The visfatin serum concentrations in patients diagnosed with PTC and in healthy subjects were not statistically significantly different (p = 0.9425). The eNAMPT levels were also similar in disease-free patients and the ones with tumour relapse. Besides, ROC curve analysis did not detect eNAMPT as a biomarker of PTC.Conclusion:We have not found visfatin as a potential serum marker of papillary thyroid cancer. Also, eNAMPT has no prognostic value in assessing the risk of disease recurrence or metastasis in PTC management.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T01:27:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221090005
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) in kidney transplant
           recipients: what is the evidence'

    • Authors: Aditi Ujjawal, Brittany Schreiber, Ashish Verma
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Several recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the wide clinical application of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) in improving kidney and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with native kidney disease. In April 2021, Dapagliflozin became the first SGLT2 inhibitor to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) regardless of diabetic status. However, while these agents have drawn much acclaim for their cardiovascular and nephroprotective effects among patients with native kidney disease, little is known about the safety and efficacy of SGLT2i in the kidney transplant setting. Many of the mechanisms by which SGLT2i exert their benefit stand to prove equally as efficacious or more so among kidney transplant recipients as they have in patients with CKD. However, safety concerns have excluded transplant recipients from all large RCTs, and clinicians and patients alike are left to wonder if the benefits of these amazing drugs outweigh the risks. In this review, we will discuss the known mechanisms SGLT2i exploit to provide their beneficial effects, the potential benefits, and risks of these agents in the context of kidney transplantation, and finally, we will discuss current findings of the published literature for SGLT2i use in kidney transplant recipients and propose potential directions for future research.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T01:13:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221090001
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Anti-obesity medication prescriptions by race/ethnicity and use of an
           interpreter in a pediatric weight management clinic

    • Authors: Eric M. Bomberg, Elise F. Palzer, Kyle D. Rudser, Aaron S. Kelly, Carolyn T. Bramante, Hilary K. Seligman, Favour Noni, Claudia K. Fox
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Race/ethnicity and low English proficiency healthcare disparities are well established in the United States. We sought to determine if there are race/ethnicity differences in anti-obesity medication (AOM) prescription rates among youth with severe obesity treated in a pediatric weight management clinic and if, among youth from non-primary English speaking families, there are differences in prescriptions between those using interpreters during visits versus not.Methods:We reviewed electronic health records of 2- to 18-year-olds with severe obesity seen from 2012 to 2021. Race/ethnicity was self-report, and AOMs included topiramate, stimulants (e.g. phentermine, lisdexamfetamine), naltrexone (±bupropion), glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, and orlistat. We used general linear regression models with log-link to compare incidence rate ratios (IRRs) within the first 1 and 3 years of being followed, controlling for age, percent of the 95th BMI percentile (%BMIp95), number of obesity-related comorbidities (e.g. insulin resistance, hypertension), median household income, and interpreter use. We repeated similar analyses among youth from non-primary English speaking families, comparing those using interpreters versus not.Results:1,725 youth (mean age 11.5 years; %BMIp95 142%; 53% non-Hispanic White, 20% Hispanic/Latino, 16% non-Hispanic black; 6% used interpreters) were seen, of which 15% were prescribed AOMs within 1 year. The IRR for prescriptions was lower among Hispanic/Latino compared to non-Hispanic White youth at one (IRR 0.70; CI: 0.49–1.00; p = 0.047) but not 3 years. No other statistically significant differences by race/ethnicity were found. Among non-primary English speaking families, the IRR for prescriptions was higher at 1 year (IRR 2.49; CI: 1.32–4.70; p = 0.005) in those using interpreters versus not.Conclusions:Among youth seen in a pediatric weight management clinic, AOM prescription incidence rates were lower in Hispanics/Latinos compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Interpreter use was associated with higher prescription incidence rates among non-primary English speakers. Interventions to achieve equity in AOM prescriptions may help mitigate disparities in pediatric obesity.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T11:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221090009
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Factors influencing height gain in children born small for gestational age
           treated with recombinant growth hormone: what extent is puberty
           involved'

    • Authors: Ramón Arroyo Ruiz, Aránzazu Ballester Pérez, Isabel Leiva-Gea, MªJosé Martínez-Aedo, Juan Pedro López-Siguero
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Objective:The objective was to analyze the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment in children born small for gestational age (SGA) without catch-up growth treated before the onset of puberty, with follow-up until adult height. The influence of demographic and auxological factors on the final response evaluated as adult height and height gain was assessed.Patients and methods:A prospective longitudinal observational study performed in a tertiary hospital, involving SGA patients, who started treatment with rhGH between October 2003 and April 2015. Potential response predictors were evaluated by multiple regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves.Results:Of the initial 96 patients included, 61 patients (28 boys and 33 girls) reached adult height. Adult height gain in standard deviation (SDS) was 0.99 (0.8) and 1.49 (0.94), respectively (p 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T12:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221083534
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Examining the factors contributing to the association between
           

    • Authors: Oyunchimeg Buyadaa, Agus Salim, Jedidiah I. Morton, Karin Jandeleit-Dahm, Dianna J. Magliano, Jonathan E. Shaw
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Studies have shown that among people with diabetes, those with non-albuminuric chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a slower rate of reduction in renal function than do those with normal renal function. This suggests the presence of protective factors, the identification of which may open up targets for intervention. The aim of this study was to identify protective clinical factors and nonclinical biomarkers that contribute to the association between non-albuminuric CKD and the low rate of progression of CKD.Methods:We tested for significant associations of several clinical factors and 33 nonclinical biomarkers with (1) normoalbuminuria and (2) a low rate of CKD progression among participants with diabetes and CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study in the United States. Factors significantly associated with both normoalbuminuria and a low rate of CKD progression were assessed in linear regression to estimate their potential contributions to the association between non-albuminuric CKD and rate of CKD progression.Results:Systolic blood pressure (SBP), glycated A1c (HbA1c), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and six biomarkers [β-trace protein (BTP), kidney injury molecule (KIM-1), fibrinogen, fractalkine, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitivity troponin-T (hsTnT)] were associated with both normoalbuminuria and a low rate of eGFR decline. The univariate β-coefficient for normoalbuminuria was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82, 1.05]. When all associated factors and biomarkers were included, the regression coefficient decreased to 0.54 (95% CI: 0.40, 0.67). The factors that contributed to the association between non-albuminuric CKD and low rate of eGFR were lower levels of SBP, HbA1c, BTP, KIM-1, hsTnT, BNP, fibrinogen and fractalkine.Conclusion:Lower levels of SBP and biomarkers that have pro-inflammatory and vascular modulating features may explain up to 40% of the association between non-albuminuric CKD and low rate of CKD progression. Further investigation of these biomarkers may lead to therapeutic interventions.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T02:06:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221083518
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Prediction of cardiac autonomic neuropathy using a machine learning model
           in patients with diabetes

    • Authors: Ahmad Shaker Abdalrada, Jemal Abawajy, Tahsien Al-Quraishi, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a diabetes-related complication with increasing prevalence and remains challenging to detect in clinical settings. Machine learning (ML) approaches have the potential to predict CAN using clinical data. In this study, we aimed to develop and evaluate the performance of an ML model to predict early CAN occurrence in patients with diabetes.Methods:We used the diabetes complications screening research initiative data set containing 200 CAN-related tests on more than 2000 participants with type 2 diabetes in Australia. Data were collected on peripheral nerve functions, Ewing’s tests, blood biochemistry, demographics, and medical history. The ML model was validated using 10-fold cross-validation, of which 90% were used in training the model and the remaining 10% was used in evaluating the performance of the model. Predictive accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value.Results:Of the 237 patients included, 105 were diagnosed with an early stage of CAN while the remaining 132 were healthy. The ML model showed outstanding performance for CAN prediction with receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.962 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.939–0.984], 87.34% accuracy, and 87.12% sensitivity. There was a significant and positive association between the ML model and CAN occurrence (p 
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-22T11:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221086693
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Role of inflammation in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    • Authors: Pranav Ramesh, Jian L. Yeo, Emer M. Brady, Gerry P. McCann
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has reached a pandemic scale. Systemic chronic inflammation dominates the diabetes pathophysiology and has been implicated as a causal factor for the development of vascular complications. Heart failure (HF) is regarded as the most common cardiovascular complication of T2D and the diabetic diagnosis is an independent risk factor for HF development. Key molecular mechanisms pivotal to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy include the NF-κB pathway and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, in addition to advanced glycation end product accumulation and inflammatory interleukin overexpression. Chronic myocardial inflammation in T2D mediates structural and metabolic changes, including cardiomyocyte apoptosis, impaired calcium handling, myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis, all of which contribute to the diabetic HF phenotype. Advanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has emerged as a gold standard non-invasive tool to delineate myocardial structural and functional changes. This review explores the role of chronic inflammation in diabetic cardiomyopathy and the ability of CMR to identify inflammation-mediated myocardial sequelae, such as oedema and diffuse fibrosis.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T11:42:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221083530
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Testosterone concentrations and prescription patterns of 1% testosterone
           gel in transgender and gender diverse individuals

    • Authors: Brendan J. Nolan, Sav Zwickl, Alex F. Q. Wong, Peter Locke, Satu Simpson, Ling Li, Jeffrey D. Zajac, Ada S. Cheung
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Masculinising hormone therapy with testosterone is used to align an individual’s physical characteristics with their gender identity. Standard testosterone doses and formulations recommended for hypogonadal cisgender men are typically administered, although there are currently limited data evaluating the use of 1% testosterone gel in gender-affirming hormone therapy regimens.Objectives:The objective of the study was to assess the prescription patterns and serum total testosterone concentrations achieved with 1% testosterone gel in trans and gender diverse individuals.Materials and Methods:A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was undertaken of trans individuals at a primary and secondary care clinic in Melbourne, Australia. Sixty-seven individuals treated with 1% testosterone gel were included. Primary outcomes were testosterone dose and serum total testosterone concentration achieved.Results:Median age was 25 (22–30) years and median duration of testosterone therapy was 12 (7–40) months. Thirty-five (52%) individuals had a nonbinary gender identity. Initial median testosterone dose was 25 mg (12.5–31.3) daily. Fifty-two (78%) individuals commenced doses 0.5) was documented in eight of 138 (6%) laboratory results in six individuals.Discussion and Conclusions:One percent testosterone gel achieves serum total testosterone concentrations in the cisgender male reference range. A high proportion of individuals had a nonbinary gender identity and most individuals commenced a lower dose than that typically administered to hypogonadal cisgender men, potentially related to slow or ‘partial’ masculinisation goals.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T12:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221083512
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Pharmacotherapy to delay the progression of diabetic kidney disease in
           people with type 2 diabetes: past, present and future

    • Authors: Ritwika Mallik, Tahseen A. Chowdhury
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among people living with diabetes, and is one of the most important causes of end stage renal disease worldwide. In order to reduce progression of DKD, important management goals include treatment of hypertension, glycaemia and control of cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids, diet, smoking and exercise. Use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers has an established role in prevention of progression of DKD. A number of other agents such as endothelin-1 receptor antagonists and bardoxolone have had disappointing results. Recent studies have, however, suggested that newer antidiabetic agents such as sodium-glucose transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2i) and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have specific beneficial effects in patients with DKD. Indeed most recent guidance suggest that SGLT-2i drugs should be used early in DKD, irrespective of glucose control. A number of pathways are hypothesised for the development and progression of DKD, and have opened up a number of newer potential therapeutic targets. This article aims to discuss management of DKD with respect to seminal trials from the past, more recent trials informing the present and potential new therapeutic options that may be available in the future.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T12:00:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188221081601
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Pharmacological management of severe Cushing’s syndrome: the role of
           etomidate

    • Authors: Andrea Pence, Megan McGrath, Stephanie L. Lee, Douglas E. Raines
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is an endocrine disease characterized by excessive adrenocortical steroid production. One of the mainstay pharmacological treatments for CS are steroidogenesis enzyme inhibitors, including the antifungal agent ketoconazole along with metyrapone, mitotane, and aminoglutethimide. Recently, osilodrostat was added to this drug class and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Cushing’s Disease. Steroidogenesis enzyme inhibitors inhibit various enzymes along the cortisol biosynthetic pathway and may be used preoperatively to lower cortisol levels and reduce surgical risk associated with tumor resection or postoperatively when surgery and/or radiation therapies are not curative. Because their selectivities for steroidogenic enzymes vary, they may even be administered in combination to achieve relatively rapid control of severe hypercortisolemia. Unfortunately, all currently available inhibitors are accompanied by serious adverse side effects that limit dosing and often result in treatment failures. Although more commonly known as a general anesthetic induction agent, etomidate is another member of the steroidogenesis enzyme inhibitor drug class. It suppresses cortisol production primarily by inhibiting 11β-hydroxylase and is the only inhibitor that may be given parenterally. However, the sedative-hypnotic actions of etomidate limit its use as an acute management option for CS. Thus, some have recommended that it be used only in intensive care settings. In this review, we discuss the initial development of etomidate as an anesthetic agent, its subsequent development as a treatment for CS, and the recent advances in dosing and drug development that dissociate sedative-hypnotic and adrenostatic drug actions to facilitate CS treatment in non-critical care settings.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T12:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188211058583
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Real-world evidence of the use of glucocorticoids for severe COVID-19

    • Authors: Alejandra Albarrán-Sánchez, Claudia Ramírez-Rentería, Moisés Mercado, Miriam Sánchez-García, Corazón de Jesús Barrientos-Flores, Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Introduction:Currently, only glucocorticoids have proved to impact adverse outcomes in COVID-19. However, their risk/benefit balance remains inconclusive and populations’ characteristics should be considered.Objective:The objective was to evaluate the real-life use of glucocorticoids in patients with severe COVID-19 hospitalized in a third-level referral center and to determine the type, accumulated doses, and the in-hospital outcomes related with their use.Methods:We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 737 patients with criteria for severe COVID-19 and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for SARS-CoV-2. We extracted data for epidemiological analysis, medical history, and medications, as well as baseline laboratory tests. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 and nonparametric tests, medians, and interquartile ranges (IQR). A p 675 mg of prednisolone).Conclusion:The use of steroids in severe COVID-19 reduces mortality only at the dose proposed in the RECOVERY study in the younger population. No benefit of the use of steroids was observed in patients with older age or higher number of comorbidities.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T04:57:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188211072704
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Lipid ratios and obesity indices are effective predictors of metabolic
           syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    • Authors: Małgorzata Kałużna, Magdalena Czlapka-Matyasik, Pola Kompf, Jerzy Moczko, Katarzyna Wachowiak-Ochmańska, Adam Janicki, Karolina Samarzewska, Marek Ruchała, Katarzyna Ziemnicka
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Insulin resistance (IR) is common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metabolic syndrome (MS) involves IR, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and visceral fat accumulation. Therefore, fatness indices and blood lipid ratios can be considered as screening markers for MS. Our study aimed to evaluate the predictive potential of selected indirect metabolic risk parameters to identify MS in PCOS.Methods:This cross-sectional study involved 596 women aged 18–40 years, including 404 PCOS patients diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria and 192 eumenorrheic controls (CON). Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were taken, and blood samples were collected to assess glucose metabolism, lipid parameters, and selected hormone levels. Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), visceral adiposity index (VAI), lipid accumulation product (LAP), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), and triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) were calculated. MS was assessed using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) criteria.Results:MS prevalence was significantly higher in PCOS versus CON. Patients with both MS and PCOS had more unfavorable anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic profiles versus those with neither MS nor PCOS and versus CON with MS. LAP, TG/HDL-C, VAI, and WHtR were the best markers and strongest indicators of MS in PCOS, and their cut-off values could be useful for early MS detection. MS risk in PCOS increased with elevated levels of these markers and was the highest when TG/HDL-C was used.Conclusions:LAP, TG/HDL-C, VAI, and WHtR are representative markers for MS assessment in PCOS. Their predictive power makes them excellent screening tools for internists and enables acquiring accurate diagnoses using fewer MS markers.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T05:25:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188211066699
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Qualitative evaluation of the symptoms and quality of life impacts of
           long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders

    • Authors: Rebecca Williams-Hall, Katie Tinsley, Eliza Kruger, Chloe Johnson, Alexandra Bowden, Tricia Cimms, Adam Gater
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Background:Long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (LC-FAOD) are a group of rare autosomal-recessive genetic disorders characterized by metabolic deficiencies in which the body is unable to convert long-chain fatty acids into energy. To date, however, there is limited understanding of the patient experience of LC-FAOD.Methods:The symptoms, observable signs, and quality of life (QoL) impacts associated with LC-FAOD were explored via a focus group (n = 8) and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) with patients and caregivers of patients with LC-FAOD, and interviews (n = 4) with expert clinicians. Data were analyzed via thematic analysis and summarized in a conceptual model.Results:Participants reported a wide range of signs and symptoms associated with LC-FAOD, broadly categorized as musculoskeletal, endocrine/nutritional/metabolic, neurological, gastrointestinal/digestive, sensory, cardiovascular, respiratory, urological, and constitutional. LC-FAOD were reported to have a significant impact on various aspects of patients’ lives including physical functioning, participation in daily activities, emotional/psychological wellbeing, and social functioning. Lifestyle modifications (such as diet and exercise restrictions) were necessary because of the condition. Symptoms were typically episodic in presentation often arising or exacerbated during catabolic conditions such as prolonged exercise, fasting, physiological stress, and illness/infection. Symptoms were also commonly reported to lead to emergency room visits, hospitalization, and clinical complications.Conclusion:LC-FAOD have a considerable impact on patients’ lives. There is a high degree of concordance in the signs, symptoms, and impacts of LC-FAOD reported by patients, caregivers, and clinicians; however, there were many symptoms and impacts that were only reported by patients and caregivers, thus demonstrating that insights from patient/caregiver experience data are integral for informing medical product development and facilitating patient-centered care.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T05:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188211065655
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
  • Recent advancement in the treatment of boys and adolescents with
           hypogonadism

    • Authors: Rodolfo A. Rey
      Abstract: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 13, Issue , January-December 2022.
      Clinical manifestations and the need for treatment varies according to age in males with hypogonadism. Early foetal-onset hypogonadism results in disorders of sex development (DSD) presenting with undervirilised genitalia whereas hypogonadism established later in foetal life presents with micropenis, cryptorchidism and/or micro-orchidism. After the period of neonatal activation of the gonadal axis has waned, the diagnosis of hypogonadism is challenging because androgen deficiency is not apparent until the age of puberty. Then, the differential diagnosis between constitutional delay of puberty and central hypogonadism may be difficult. During infancy and childhood, treatment is usually sought because of micropenis and/or cryptorchidism, whereas lack of pubertal development and relative short stature are the main complaints in teenagers. Testosterone therapy has been the standard, although off-label, in the vast majority of cases. However, more recently alternative therapies have been tested: aromatase inhibitors to induce the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in boys with constitutional delay of puberty and replacement with GnRH or gonadotrophins in those with central hypogonadism. Furthermore, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) priming prior to hCG or luteinizing hormone (LH) treatment seems effective to induce an enhanced testicular enlargement. Although the rationale for gonadotrophin or GnRH treatment is based on mimicking normal physiology, long-term results are still needed to assess their impact on adult fertility.
      Citation: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T08:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20420188211065660
      Issue No: Vol. 13 (2022)
       
 
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