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HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 151 of 151 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 290)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Blood Pressure     Open Access  
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 404)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 462)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access  
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
eJHaem     Open Access  
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access  
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free  
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Peritoneal Dialysis International
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0896-8608 - ISSN (Online) 1718-4304
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Dual therapy with an angiotensin receptor blocker and a JAK1/2 inhibitor
           attenuates dialysate-induced angiogenesis and preserves peritoneal
           membrane structure and function in an experimental CKD rat model

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      Authors: Pei Zhang, Kana N Miyata, Cynthia C Nast, Janine A LaPage, Madisyn Mahoney, Sonny Nguyen, Kamran Khan, Qiaoyuan Wu, Sharon G Adler, Tiane Dai
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is limited by reduced efficacy over time. We previously showed that a Janus kinase 1/2 inhibitor (JAK1/2i) reduced inflammation, hypervascularity and fibrosis induced by 4.25% dextrose dialysate (4.25%D) intraperitoneally (IP) infused for 10 days in rats with normal kidney function. JAK/STAT signalling mediates inflammatory pathways, including angiotensin signalling. We now tested the effect of long-term JAK1/2i and/or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on peritoneal membrane (PM) in polycystic kidneys (PCK) rats infused with 4.25%D.Methods:Except for controls, all PCK rats had a tunnelled PD catheter: (1) no infusions; (2) 4.25%D; (3) 4.25%D + JAK1/2i (5 mg/kg); (4) 4.25%D +losartan (5 mg/kg); and (5) 4.25%D + losartan +JAK1/2i (5 mg/kg each) IP BID × 16 weeks (N = 5/group). PM VEGFR2 staining areas and submesothelial compact zone (SMCZ) width were morphometrically measured. Peritoneal equilibration testing measured peritoneal ultrafiltration (UF) by calculating dialysate glucose at time 0 and 90 min (D/D0 glucose).Results:4.25%D caused hypervascularity, SMCZ widening, fibrosis and UF functional decline in PCK rats. Angiogenesis was significantly attenuated by JAK1/2i ± ARB but not by ARB monotherapy. Both treatments reduced SMCZ area. UF was preserved consistently by dual therapy (p < 0.05) but with inconsistent responses by monotherapies.Conclusion:Long-term JAK1/2i ± ARB reduced angiogenesis and fibrosis, and the combination consistently maintained UF. In clinical practice, angiotensin inhibition has been advocated to maintain residual kidney function. Our study suggests that adding JAK1/2i to angiotensin inhibition may preserve PM structure and UF.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T05:39:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221116956
       
  • Are salvage techniques safe and effective in the treatment of peritoneal
           dialysis catheter-related exit-site and tunnel infections' A
           systematic review and description of the authors’ preferred technique

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      Authors: Joel Jia Yi Soon, Nick Zhi Peng Ng, Shaun Qing-Wei Lee, Seck Guan Tan
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC)-related infections account for significant morbidity, PD disruptions and costs. Patients with refractory exit-site or tunnel track infections without peritonitis may need catheter removal and reinsertion which can be complicated by bleeding, organ injury, catheter failure or malposition. Some patients may need to switch to haemodialysis in such a setting. An alternative is a salvage procedure. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of salvage techniques.Methods:A comprehensive search of PubMed, Medline and Scopus databases was performed from inception to December 2021 in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. After a broad search, articles were stratified into two main categories for assessment: (1) cuff-shaving (CS) techniques and its variations of en-bloc resection (BR) and/or catheter diversion (CD) and (2) partial reimplantation with CD.Results:A total of 409 patients (445 salvage procedures) from 20 studies were included in analysis. Of 409 patients, 234 patients (57.2%) underwent 251 (56.4%) CS procedures and its variations, 163 patients (39.9%) underwent 182 (40.9%) partial PDC reimplantations with CD and 12 patients (2.7%) underwent local curettage. Overall PDC salvage rate after intervention was 73.2%. Overall PDC removal rate attributable to infection was 26.8%. Overall complication rate attributable to the procedures was 2.7%, with the most common complication being dialysate leakage (n = 10) followed by PDC laceration (n = 1) and subcutaneous haematoma (n = 1). We also included a description of our technique of BR of infected tissue, CS and CD. In a series of six patients, the PDC salvage rate was 83.3% and median PDC survival after intervention was 10 months.Conclusion:PDC salvage techniques are relatively safe and provide reasonable catheter salvage rates in selected patients. Results of this review should lend weight to consideration of a salvage-first approach as an option in selected patients.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T05:37:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221116689
       
  • Outcomes following peritoneal dialysis for COVID-19-induced AKI: A
           literature review

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      Authors: Mahendra Kumar Atlani, Rakesh Kumar Pilania, Girish Chandra Bhatt
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been shown to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with severe COVID-19 disease. Due to increasing number of cases in pandemic, there is a significant shortage of medical facilities and equipment in relation to patient load. In low resource settings where access to intermittent haemodialysis (HD) or continuous kidney replacement therapy (CKRT) is limited, peritoneal dialysis (PD) may play a vital role in the management of COVID-19-induced AKI. A literature search using Medline/PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar and Cochrane register was performed using following search strategy: (((COVID 19) OR (SARS-CoV-2)) AND (((acute kidney injury) OR (acute renal failure)) OR (acute renal dysfunction))) AND (peritoneal dialysis). Search strategy yielded total 79 articles. After going through titles and abstracts, full text of 15 articles was obtained. Finally, six studies were included in the review after exclusion of 10 studies. Five studies were single centre and one study was multicentric; four studies were conducted in the United States and one in the United Kingdom; PD catheter placement was done by surgeons in three studies and by nephrologist in one study. The mortality reported in the studies varied from 43% to as high as 63%.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:47:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221115000
       
  • Peritoneal dialysis in the modern era

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      Authors: Ayman Karkar, Martin Wilkie
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      The practice and clinical outcomes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) have demonstrated significant improvement over the past 20 years. The aim of this review is to increase awareness and update healthcare professionals on current PD practice, especially with respect to patient and technique survival, patient modality selection, pathways onto PD, understanding patient experience of care and use prior to kidney transplantation. These improvements have been impacted, at least in part, by greater emphasis on shared decision-making in dialysis modality selection, the use of advanced laparoscopic techniques for PD catheter implantation, developments in PD connecting systems, glucose-sparing strategies, and modernising technology in managing automated PD patients remotely. Evidence-based clinical guidelines such as those prepared by national and international societies such as the International Society of PD have contributed to improved PD practice underpinned by a recognition of the place of continuous quality improvement processes.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T05:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221114211
       
  • TINKER-ing with neonatal acute kidney injury

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      Authors: A Iyengar, R Shroff
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T02:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221103750
       
  • A novel programme of supportive two-exchange assisted continuous
           ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for frail patients with end-stage kidney
           disease

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      Authors: Edwina A Brown, Louise Ryan, Richard W Corbett
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      We have developed a supportive two-exchange assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (asCAPD) programme for the older frail person who cannot do autonomous PD and do not want or are considered to be too high risk for haemodialysis (HD). Evaluation of the programme was determined by data collected retrospectively from patient records. Primary outcome was comparison of symptoms at start of dialysis and 3 months following dialysis start. Secondary outcomes were survival and peritonitis rate. Over a 4-year period (2016–2020), 49 patients with mean age 79.6 years (range 47–90) enrolled in the programme with eGFR 7.7 ± 2.6 ml/min (mean ± SD) at dialysis start. Forty-one patients had been on asCAPD for>3 months. There was an improvement in all symptoms at 3 months compared to baseline: anorexia (46% to 15%), fatigue (46% to 15%), shortness of breath (27% to 2%) and oedema (51% to 32%). One-year survival was 55%. Peritonitis rate was 0.52 episodes per patient year. The novel supportive two-exchange asCAPD programme shows potential improvement of symptoms after 3 months and may provide an acceptable dialysis modality for the frail co-morbid person with established kidney failure. More detailed study and evaluation are needed.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T05:38:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221111276
       
  • Predictors and prognostic significance of persistent fluid overload: A
           longitudinal study in Chinese peritoneal dialysis patients

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      Authors: Jack Kit-Chung Ng, Bonnie Ching-Ha Kwan, Gordon Chun-Kau Chan, Kai Ming Chow, Wing Fai Pang, Phyllis Mei-Shan Cheng, Chi Bon Leung, Philip Kam-Tao Li, Cheuk Chun Szeto
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Cross-sectional studies showed that fluid overload (FO) measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) predicted adverse outcomes in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). We aimed to describe the longitudinal change in volume status in Chinese PD patients and determine its relation with clinical outcomes.Methods:We performed a single-centre, retrospective analysis of all PD patients who underwent repeated BIS from 2010 to 2015. FO was defined by relative hydration index (RHI; volume of overhydration adjusted by extracellular water>7%). Variability of volume status (VVS) was denoted by the standard deviation of all RHI. The association of time-averaged RHI and VVS on patient and technique survival was explored by a competing risk model.Results:A total of 269 patients were followed for a median of 47.1 months. Mean time-averaged RHI was 17.6 ± 10.2%. Multivariable mixed linear regression revealed that RHI was significantly associated with diabetes, time-varying systolic blood pressure, and inversely with time-varying albumin level, lean tissue index and fat tissue index (p
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T05:42:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221110491
       
  • The peritoneal dialysis catheter: Urine trouble

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      Authors: Kavita Jintanapramote, Kewalee Sasiwimonphan, Somkanya Tungsanga, Jeffrey Perl, Talerngsak Kanjanabuch
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T05:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221101708
       
  • Risk factors and outcomes of neonates with acute kidney injury needing
           peritoneal dialysis: Results from the prospective TINKER (The Indian
           PCRRT-ICONIC Neonatal Kidney Educational Registry) study

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      Authors: Sidharth Kumar Sethi, Sanjay Wazir, Jagdish Sahoo, Gopal Agrawal, Naveen Bajaj, Naveen Parkash Gupta, Shishir Mirgunde, Binesh Balachandran, Kamran Afzal, Anubha Shrivastava, Jyoti Bagla, Sushma Krishnegowda, Ananth Konapur, Azmeri Sultana, Kritika Soni, Nikhil Nair, Divya Sharma, Prajit Khooblall, Avisha Pandey, Khalid Alhasan, Mignon McCulloch, Timothy Bunchman, Abhishek Tibrewal, Rupesh Raina
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There is a need to have prospective data on the risk factors and outcomes of acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) in neonates. The use of kidney replacement therapy in this population compared to older populations has been associated with worse outcomes (mortality rates 17–24%) along with a longer stay in the NICU and/or hospital.Methods:The following multicentre, prospective study was derived from the TINKER (The Indian PCRRT-ICONIC Neonatal Kidney Educational Registry) database, assessing all admitted neonates ≤28 days who received intravenous fluids for at least 48 h. The following neonates were excluded: death within 48 h, presence of any lethal chromosomal anomaly, requirement of congenital heart surgery within the first 7 days of life and those receiving only routine care in nursery. Demographic data (maternal and neonatal) and daily clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded. AKI was defined according to the Neonatal Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria.Results:Of the included 1600 neonates, a total of 491 (30.7%) had AKI. Of these 491 neonates with AKI, 44 (9%) required PD. Among neonates with AKI, the odds of needing PD was significantly higher among those with significant cardiac disease (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 4.95 (2.39–10.27); p < 0.001), inotropes usage (4.77 (1.98–11.51); p < 0.001), severe peripartum event (4.37 (1.31–14.57); p = 0.02), requirement of respiratory support in NICU (4.17 (1.00–17.59); p = 0.04), necrotising enterocolitis (3.96 (1.21–13.02); p = 0.03), any grade of intraventricular haemorrhage (3.71 (1.63–8.45); p = 0.001), evidence of fluid overload during the first 12 h in NICU (3.69 (1.27–10.70); p = 0.02) and requirement of resuscitation in the delivery room (2.72 (1.45–5.12); p = 0.001). AKI neonates with PD as compared to those without PD had a significantly lower median (interquartile range) duration of stay in NICU (7 (4–14) vs. 11 (6–21) days; p = 0.004), but significantly higher mortality (31 (70.5%) vs. 50 (3.2%); p < 0.001). This discrepancy is likely attributable to the critical state of the neonates with AKI.Conclusions:This is the largest prospective, multicentre study specifically looking at neonatal AKI and need for dialysis in neonates. AKI was seen in 30.7% of neonates (with the need for acute PD in 9% of the AKI group). The odds of needing acute PD were significantly higher among those with significant cardiac disease, inotropes usage, severe peripartum event, requirement of respiratory support in NICU, necrotising enterocolitis, any grade of intraventricular haemorrhage, evidence of fluid overload more than 10% during the first 12 h in NICU and requirement of resuscitation in the delivery room. AKI neonates with PD as compared to AKI neonates without PD had a significantly higher mortality. There is a need to keep a vigilant watch in neonates with risk factors for the development of AKI and need for PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T08:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221091023
       
  • Establishing a core outcome measure for life participation in patients
           receiving peritoneal dialysis: A Standardised Outcomes in
           Nephrology–Peritoneal Dialysis consensus workshop report

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      Authors: Melissa S Cheetham, Martin Wilkie, Fiona Loud, Karine E Manera, Angela Ju, Ana Figueiredo, Janine Farragher, Helen Hurst, Sarbjit V Jassal, Rajnish Mehrotra, Rachael L Morton, Daniel Schwartz, Jenny I Shen, Rachael Walker, Yeoungjee Cho, David W Johnson, Jonathan C Craig, Samaya Anumudu, Amanda Baumgart, Andrea Matus Gonzalez, Nicole Scholes-Robertson, Andrea K Viecelli, Allison Tong
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Life participation is an outcome of critical importance to patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, there is no widely accepted or validated tool for measuring life participation in patients receiving PD.Methods:Online consensus workshop to identify the essential characteristics of life participation as a core outcome, with the goal of establishing a patient-reported outcome measure for use in all trials in patients receiving PD. Thematic analysis of transcripts was performed.Results:Fifty-five participants, including 17 patients and caregivers, from 15 countries convened via online videoconference. Four themes were identified: reconfiguring expectations of daily living (accepting day-to-day fluctuation as the norm, shifting thresholds of acceptability, preserving gains in flexibility and freedom), ensuring broad applicability and interpretability (establishing cross-cultural relevance, incorporating valued activities, distinguishing unmodifiable barriers to life participation), capturing transitions between modalities and how they affect life participation (responsive to trajectory towards stable, reflecting changes with dialysis transitions) and maximising feasibility of implementation (reducing completion burden, administrable with ease and flexibility).Conclusions:There is a need for a validated, generalisable outcome measure for life participation in patients receiving PD. Feasibility, including length of time to complete and flexible mode of delivery, are important to allow implementation in all trials that include patients receiving PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T06:03:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221096560
       
  • Compatibility and stability of non-ionic iodinated contrast media in
           peritoneal dialysis solution and safe practice considerations for CT
           peritoneography

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      Authors: Jayan Rappai, John H Crabtree, Ann Mancini, Sudheer Kumar Badugu, Anuj Kaushal, Mary E Gellens
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Computerised tomographic (CT) peritoneography is performed on peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients to identify peritoneal boundary defects, dialysate maldistributions and loculated fluid collections. Iodinated contrast media are added to dialysate and infused through the dialysis catheter, and CT images are obtained. Chemical compatibility of contrast media with dialysis solutions has not been studied. In some institutions, pharmacists charged with oversight of compounded sterile preparations have placed a moratorium on the use of contrast media-dialysate mixtures until compatibility data become available. This study was undertaken to examine the compatibility of non-ionic iodinated contrast agents added to PD solution for the performance of CT peritoneography.Methods:100 mL of three non-ionic iodinated contrast agents, iopamidol 370 mgI/mL, iohexol 300 mgI/mL and iodixanol 320 mgI/mL, were mixed with 2 L 1.5% dextrose PD solution and stored at 2–8°C, 25°C and 40°C. Observations at predefined intervals were made over 5 days for visual appearance, turbidity, pH, drug concentration and chemical degradation.Results:Iopamidol, iohexol and iodixanol were stable for 5 days under study conditions. The contrast-dialysate mixture remained clear and colourless, no turbidity changes observed, pH and drug concentrations were stable and no increase in existing impurities or new impurities were detected.Conclusions:The addition of commonly used non-ionic iodinated contrast agents to 1.5% dextrose dialysis solution is chemically stable, meeting the criteria set forth in the standards and guidelines of the US Pharmacopeia and the Institute of Safe Medication Practices. A protocol for performing CT peritoneography is recommended herein to facilitate patient safety and diagnostic reliability of the imaging study.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:34:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221096562
       
  • The rationale for the need to study sodium-glucose co-transport 2
           inhibitor usage in peritoneal dialysis patients

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      Authors: Megan Borkum, Abeed Jamal, Rajinder Suneet Singh, Adeera Levin
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      The wave of kidney and heart outcome trials, showing multiple potential benefits for sodium-glucose co-transport 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, have excluded patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 25 ml/min/1.73 m2. However, dialysis patients are at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease and would benefit most from effective cardioprotective therapies. There is emerging evidence from experimental studies and post hoc analyses of randomised clinical trials that SGLT2 inhibitors are well tolerated and may also be effective in preventing cardiovascular and mortality outcomes in patients with severe chronic kidney disease, including patients receiving dialysis. As such, extending the usage of SGLT2 inhibitors to dialysis patients could provide a major advancement in their care. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients have an additional unmet need for effective pharmacotherapy to preserve their residual kidney function (RKF), with its associated mortality benefits, and for treatment options that help reduce the risk of transfer to haemodialysis. Experimental data suggest that SGLT2 inhibitors, via various mechanisms, may preserve RKF and protect the peritoneal membrane. There is sound physiological rationale and an urgent clinical need to execute robust randomised control trials to study the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in PD patients to answer important questions of relevance to patients and healthcare systems.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T09:16:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221096556
       
  • Exercise or physical activity-related adverse events in people receiving
           peritoneal dialysis: A systematic review

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      Authors: Brett Tarca, Shilpanjali Jesudason, Paul N Bennett, Daiki Kasai, Thomas P Wycherley, Katia E Ferrar
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      People receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) may benefit from participation in exercise or physical activity. However, exercise therapy for people receiving PD is not typically included in routine care, in part, due to ongoing uncertainties about risk. The aim of this review was to systematically collate and explore data on adverse events experienced by people receiving PD while undertaking an exercise or physical activity intervention. Searches yielded 25 exercise or physical activity intervention studies involving people receiving PD. Of these 25 studies, 17 studies provided adverse event data and were included in the final review. No serious adverse events (e.g. death, hospitalisation) were found attributable to the intervention. From 50 reported adverse events during the intervention period, 32 were attributable to the exercise or physical activity intervention with most being musculoskeletal (e.g. muscle/joint pain, etc.) followed by fatigue. Most events were mild to moderate in severity and resolved by exercise programme modification, education, rest or medication. The results from this review did not uncover signals of harm for people receiving PD who engage in exercise with risk of adverse events appearing to be low, however, improved adverse events reporting and further interventional studies are required before robust guidelines can be produced.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T09:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221094423
       
  • Peritoneal dialysis catheter exit via rectum

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      Authors: Talha H Imam, Frank J Yamanishi, Sunal S Patel, Jesse J Chuang
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T09:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221091024
       
  • Survival study and factors associated with mortality in Chilean patients
           on peritoneal dialysis infected with SARS-CoV-2

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      Authors: Ana M Ortiz, Rodrigo A Sepúlveda, Rubén Torres, René Clavero, Luis Toro, Miguel Albornoz, Tatiana Aldunate, Ingrid Arce, Juan Arévalo, Andrés Arriagada, Julieta Becker, Sonia C González, Waldo Bernales, Eduardo Briones, Álvaro Castillo, Agustín Fuentes, Esteban Gómez, Hernán Jaramillo, Mario Lillo, Eduardo Lorca, Eduardo Machuca, Rodrigo Mansilla, Serwin Menéndez, Carlos Moya, Carolina Muñoz, William Neilson, Rodrigo Orozco, María Padrino, Edgard Pais, Gonzalo Ramírez, María E Sanhueza, Herman Schneider, Ruth Solís, Jaime Troncoso, Marcela Ursu, Marcela Valenzuela
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      The Covid-19 pandemic has been responsible for millions of deaths worldwide. Patients with comorbidities– such as those on peritoneal dialysis (PD)– present higher morbidity and mortality than the general population. We prospectively evaluated all Chilean patients on PD (48 centres) and followed those who had Covid-19 from the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic in Chile (March 2020) to January 2021 (start of vaccination campaign). We described demographic history, comorbidities, factors related to infection, need for hospitalisation and death due to Covid-19. During the study period, 106 adults on PD were infected by SARS-CoV-2, with a mean age of 53.1 (±16.3) and of which 53.9% were female. From that group, 54.8% required hospitalisation and 24.5% (n = 26) died due to Covid-19. Most of the patients (63.4%) were infected at home and 22.8% during hospitalisation for other reasons. There was a significant association for Covid-19 mortality with: being ≥60 years old, diabetes, time on PD ≥5 years, need for hospitalisation and hospital-acquired infection. At 90 days of follow-up, all deaths associated to Covid-19 occurred before 40 days. We conclude that patients on PD without Covid-19 vaccination have a high mortality and need for hospitalisation associated to Covid-19. To avoid this negative outcome, it is necessary to intensify strategies to avoid contagion, especially in those ≥60 years old, with diabetes and/or ≥5 years spent on PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T10:11:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221087794
       
  • Device-assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: A single-centre
           experience

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      Authors: Wai Lun Will Pak, Ka Lok Chan, Zi Chan, Yick Hei Wong, Wai Ping Law, Chi Kwan Lam, Sze Ho Sunny Wong
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with impaired hand–eye function require helper assistance. Our centre developed a connection device that assists patients with impaired hand–eye function to perform PD exchange themselves, but the clinical outcomes in these patients have not been investigated.Methods:We retrospectively reviewed patients who had device-assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) during 2007–2016 and compared their clinical outcomes with age- and sex-matched patients receiving helper-assisted CAPD.Results:One hundred seventy-two patients (86 each in the device- and helper-assisted CAPD groups) were followed for 29.9 (19.4–43.3) months. The device- and helper-assisted groups had comparable peritonitis rates (0.489 and 0.504 episode per patient-year, respectively, p = 0.814), with no difference in the distribution of causative organisms and the organism-specific peritonitis rates. The device-assisted group showed similar peritonitis-free survival compared with the helper-assisted group (2.58 (1.85–3.31) vs. 1.78 (0.68–2.88) years, p = 0.363) and time-to-PD discontinuation (6.27 (3.65–8.90) vs. 4.35 (3.48–5.22) years, p = 0.677). The median patient survival was similar between the two groups (3.89 (2.22–5.55) vs. 3.81 (3.27–4.36) years in the device- and helper-assisted groups, respectively, p = 0.505).Conclusion:Device-assisted CAPD confers comparable outcomes as helper-assisted CAPD and is a viable option in PD patients with impaired hand–eye function.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T09:25:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221085430
       
  • Comparison of frailty, sarcopenia and protein energy wasting in a
           contemporary peritoneal dialysis cohort

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      Authors: Andrew Davenport
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:More elderly frail patients are now treated by peritoneal dialysis (PD). Frailty, sarcopenia and protein energy wasting (PEW) are all associated with increased mortality. Simple screening tools are required to identify patients to allow for interventions. As such, we wished to review the prevalence of frailty and compare frailty with sarcopenia and PEW in a contemporary PD population.Patients and methods:We used the Clinical Frailty Score (CFS) to determine frailty, bio-impedance body composition and hand grip strength (HGS) to determine sarcopenia and combining laboratory, body composition and protein nitrogen appearance rate (PNA) to assess PEW.Results:Records of 368 PD patients, 61% male, mean age 60.9 ± 16.1 years, body mass index (BMI) 26.2 ± 5.1 kg/m2 were reviewed, with 71 classified as frail (19.3%; CFS > 4), and frailty associated with age (odds ratio (OR) 1.047, 95% confidence interval (CL) 1.01–1.085, p = 0.012), Stoke-Davies co-morbidity (OR 1.808, 95%CL 1.129–2.895, p = 0.014) and negatively with HGS (OR 0.906, 95% CL 0.897–0.992, p = 0.033); 17.7% met muscle loss and HGS criteria for sarcopenia, with fair agreement with frailty (kappa 0.24 (CL 0.09–0.38)). Only two patients (0.5%) met all four criteria for PEW, 26.1% met the reduced BMI criteria, 4.6% the serum albumin, 32.9% the PNA and 39.4% the reduced muscle mass. HGS correlated with lean muscle mass (r 2 = 0.42, p < 0.001).Conclusion:Using the CFS, 19.3% of patients were classified as frail, compared to 17.7% with sarcopenia and
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T09:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221077462
       
  • Urgent-start peritoneal dialysis: Association with outcomes

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      Authors: Steph Karpinski, Scott Sibbel, Dena E Cohen, Carey Colson, David B Van Wyck, Arshia Ghaffari, Martin J Schreiber, Steven M. Brunelli, Francesca Tentori
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      The majority of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients start dialysis without adequate pre-dialysis planning. Of these patients, the vast majority initiate in-centre haemodialysis using a central venous catheter (ICHD-CVC). A minority utilise urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD), whereby a peritoneal dialysis catheter is placed and used for dialysis without the usual 2–4-week waiting period. In this multicentre, retrospective study of adult patients initiating dialysis during 2018, we compared outcomes among patients utilising these two dialysis initiation routes. Patients who initiated dialysis via ICHD-CVC were matched 1:1 to patients who utilised USPD on the basis of aetiology of ESKD, race, diabetes status and insurance type. Hospitalisation and mortality were evaluated from dialysis initiation through the first of death, transplant, loss to follow-up or study end (30 June 2019). Outcomes were compared using models adjusted for age and sex. A total of 717 USPD patients were matched to ICHD-CVC patients. During follow-up, USPD patients were hospitalised at a rate of 1.21 admissions/patient-year (pt-yr) versus 1.51 admissions/pt-yr for ICHD-CVC. This corresponded to a 24% lower rate of hospitalisation among USPD patients (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65–0.88). Mortality rates were 0.08 and 0.11 deaths/pt-yr among USPD patients and ICHD-CVC patients, respectively (adjusted hazard ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.62, 1.15). These findings suggest that more widespread adoption of USPD may be beneficial among patients with limited pre-dialysis planning.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T09:03:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221083781
       
  • A case of severe bleeding and deep inferior epigastric pseudoaneurysm
           after peritoneal dialysis catheter removal

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      Authors: Nicola Matthews, Tamara Glavinovic, Elizabeth David, Bourne Auguste
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      We present an unusual but severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter removal resulting in significant haemorrhage and hospitalisation. A patient presented for PD catheter removal under local anaesthesia in the interventional radiology suite and was noted to have a heavily calcified deep Dacron cuff. This cuff was intimately associated with a deep inferior epigastric perforating (DIEP) vessel. Removal of the catheter resulted in shearing of DIEP vessel and pseudoaneurysm formation. Despite attempted surgical management with ligation haemorrhage continued, requiring urgent angiographic embolisation to stop the bleeding. Intimate relationship between DIEP vessel and Dacron cuff due to calcification was the cause of this complication. This case report represents a rare but important complication associated with PD catheter removal, highlighting that when calcification is seen at the deep cuff, caution should be exercised and there should be access to angiography suite in case of complication.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T09:10:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221075106
       
  • Time-dependent incidence rates and risk factors for technique failure in
           patients on peritoneal dialysis under the Thai PD First policy

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      Authors: Pornpen Sangthawan, Thammasin Ingviya, Nintita Sripaiboonkit Thokanit, Jirayut Janma, Siribha Changsirikulchai
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Haemodialysis (HD) transfer (HDT) is the major challenge of peritoneal dialysis (PD). This study aimed to analyse the time-dependent incidence rates and risk factors for permanent HDT in patients under Thailand’s PD First policy.Methods:The records of 20,545 patients from January 2008 to June 2018 were studied. The time on therapy (TOT) was divided into 0–3, 3–12, 12–24, 24–36, 36–48 and more than 48 months. The time-dependent incidence rates and causes of PD dropout were investigated. The risk factors for HDT were analysed by multivariable Poisson regression model and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Results:The main cause of PD dropout was death (45.7%) with 17.4% of the patients transferred to HD. The median (25th to 75th interquartile range) dialysis vintage was 1.4 (0.5–2.7) years. The incidence rates of HDT increased with TOT. Patients with universal coverage were transferred to HD less frequently than those with other health schemes. Patients who were illiterate or only had primary school education had a higher risk of being transferred to HD after 48 months of TOT (IRR 1.41 (95% CI 1.07–1.89)). Peritonitis within the first year of PD was the risk for HDT during 13–48 months of PD. The reasons for HDT changed with TOT. Mechanical complications followed by peritonitis were the main causes of HDT during the first 3 months, and after that peritonitis was the main reason.Conclusions:The incidence of HDT increased with TOT. The risks for HDT changed over time on PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T09:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221081521
       
  • Associations, microbiology and outcomes of pre-training peritoneal
           dialysis-related peritonitis

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      Authors: Ashik Hayat, David W Johnson, Carmel M Hawley, Lauren R Jaffrey, Usman Mahmood, Sarah Saw Yu Mon, Yeoungjee Cho
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Pre-training peritonitis (PTP), defined as peritonitis that occurred after catheter insertion and before peritoneal dialysis (PD) training, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for adverse patient outcomes, yet poorly understood with limited studies conducted to date. This study was conducted to identify the associations, microbiologic profiles and outcomes of PTP compared to post-training peritonitis.Methods:This single-centre, case-control study involved patients with kidney failure who had PD as their first kidney replacement therapy and had experienced an episode of PD peritonitis between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015. Individuals experiencing their first episode of peritonitis were included in the study and categorized according to whether it occurred pre- or post-training. The primary outcome was peritonitis cure rates and composite outcome of hemodialysis (HD) transfer for ≥30 days or death. The secondary outcomes included catheter removal and refractory peritonitis rates.Results:Among 683 patients who received PD for the first time, 121 (17.7%) had PTP while 265 (38.8%) had post-training peritonitis. PTP patients were more likely to have had exit-site infection (ESI) prior to peritonitis (24.8% compared to 17% in the post-training peritonitis group, p = 0.2). Culture-negative peritonitis was significantly more common in the PTP patients (53.7%) than in the post-training group (27.3%, p < 0.001). The cure was achieved in 68.9% of cases and was not significantly different between the PTP and post-training peritonitis groups (66.1% vs. 70.2%; OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.51–1.35). Lower odds of cure were associated with peritonitis caused by moderate and high severity organisms (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.29–0.85; OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.08–0.43, respectively). Composite outcome of HD transfer or death was more commonly observed among patients with PTP (87.5% vs. 75.8%; OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.20–4.48) in whom significantly shorter median time to HD transfer was observed (PTP 10.7 months vs. post-training peritonitis 21.9 months, p < 0.0001).Conclusions:PTP is a common condition that is highly associated with preceding ESI, is frequently culture-negative and is associated with worse composite outcome of HD transfer or death. PTP rates should be routinely monitored and reported by PD units for continuous quality improvement.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T09:53:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221079183
       
  • Technique failure in peritoneal dialysis: Modifiable causes and
           patient-specific risk factors

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      Authors: Anna A Bonenkamp, Anita van Eck van der Sluijs, Friedo W Dekker, Dirk G Struijk, Carola WH de Fijter, Yolande M Vermeeren, Frans J van Ittersum, Marianne C Verhaar, Brigit C van Jaarsveld, Alferso C Abrahams
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Technique survival is a core outcome for peritoneal dialysis (PD), according to Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Peritoneal Dialysis. This study aimed to identify modifiable causes and risk factors of technique failure in a large Dutch cohort using standardised definitions.Methods:Patients who participated in the retrospective Dutch nOcturnal and hoME dialysis Study To Improve Clinical Outcomes cohort study and started PD between 2012 and 2016 were included and followed until 1 January 2017. The primary outcome was technique failure, defined as transfer to in-centre haemodialysis for ≥ 30 days or death. Death-censored technique failure was analysed as secondary outcome. Cox regression models and competing risk models were used to assess the association between potential risk factors and technique failure.Results:A total of 695 patients were included, of whom 318 experienced technique failure during follow-up. Technique failure rate in the first year was 29%, while the death-censored technique failure rate was 23%. Infections were the most common modifiable cause for technique failure, accounting for 20% of all causes during the entire follow-up. Leakage and catheter problems were important causes within the first 6 months of PD treatment (both accounting for 15%). APD use was associated with a lower risk of technique failure (hazard ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.53–0.83).Conclusion:Infections, leakage and catheter problems were important modifiable causes for technique failure. As the first-year death-censored technique failure rate remains high, future studies should focus on infection prevention and catheter access to improve technique survival.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T09:10:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221077461
       
  • Dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitor phlorizin reduces glucose transport in
           experimental peritoneal dialysis

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      Authors: Giedre Martus, Karin Bergling, Carl M Öberg
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Glucose absorption during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is commonly assumed to occur via paracellular pathways. We recently showed that SGLT2 inhibition did not reduce glucose absorption in experimental PD, but the potential role of glucose transport into cells is still unclear. Here we sought to elucidate the effects of phlorizin, a non-selective competitive inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporters 1 and 2 (SGLT1 and SGLT2), in an experimental rat model of PD.Methods:A 120-min PD dwell was performed in 12 anesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats using 1.5% glucose fluid with a fill volume of 20 mL with (n = 6) or without (n = 6) intraperitoneal phlorizin (50 mg/L). Several parameters for peritoneal water and solute transport were monitored during the treatment.Results:Phlorizin markedly increased the urinary excretion of glucose, lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma creatinine after PD. Median glucose diffusion capacity at 60 min was significantly lower (p < 0.05) being 196 µL/min (IQR 178–213) for phlorizin-treated animals compared to 238 µL/min (IQR 233–268) in controls. Median fractional dialysate glucose concentration at 60 min (D/D 0) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in phlorizin-treated animals being 0.65 (IQR 0.63–0.67) compared to 0.61 (IQR 0.60–0.62) in controls. At 120 min, there was no difference in solute or water transport across the peritoneal membrane.Conclusion:Our findings indicate that a part of glucose absorption during the initial part of the dwell occurs via transport into peritoneal cells.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T07:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221080170
       
  • Effluent decoy receptor 2 as a novel biomarker of peritoneal fibrosis in
           peritoneal dialysis patients

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      Authors: Jie Yang, Mingyu Cai, Jinfang Wan, Liming Wang, Jia Luo, Xue Li, Wenjiang Gong, Yani He, Jia Chen
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Peritoneal fibrosis (PF) is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), but a specific and sensitive biomarker for PF is lacking. The present study aimed to determine the use of effluent decoy receptor 2 (eDcR2) as a biomarker for PF in PD patients.Methods:PD patients (n = 248) were recruited, and peritoneal specimens were collected at PD initiation (n = 30) and cessation (n = 33). Enzyme-linked immunoassay was used to measure eDcR2 and the eDcR2 appearance rate (eDcR2-AR) was calculated. The levels of DcR2 mRNA and protein were determined. The correlation of eDcR2 level with peritoneal function, histological parameters and DcR2 expression were analysed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the diagnostic performance of eDcR2 for PF, which was defined as a submesothelial thickness 150 µm or more. Co-localisation of DcR2 with a mesothelial marker, fibroblast markers and fibrotic markers were determined.Results:The eDcR2-AR level correlated with PD duration, D/P Cr values, peritoneal Kt/V and peritoneal injury scores, especially submesothelial thickness (r = 0.638, p < 0.001). DcR2 was primarily expressed in peritoneal fibroblasts, and co-localised with α-SMA, vimentin, collagen I and fibronectin, but not with E-cadherin. Peritoneal DcR2 expression had a positive correlation with eDcR2-AR. ROC analysis indicated eDcR2 had an area under the curve of 0.907 for detection of PF (sensitivity: 78.6%, specificity: 100%) and the best cut-off value was 392.5 pg/min.Conclusion:The eDcR2-AR level is a potential biomarker for assessing PF in PD patients. Effluent DcR2 was mainly derived from peritoneal fibroblasts and DcR2-positive cells may accelerate PF, suggesting that it may be a potential therapeutic target.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T09:35:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211067866
       
  • Assisted peritoneal dialysis performed by caregivers and its association
           with patient outcomes

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      Authors: Pongpratch Puapatanakul, Talerngsak Kanjanabuch, Kriang Tungsanga, Areewan Cheawchanwattana, Kittisak Tangjittrong, Niwat Lounseng, Phichit Songviriyavithaya, Junhui Zhao, Angela Yee-Moon Wang, Jenny Shen, Jeffrey Perl, Simon J Davies, Fredric O Finkelstein, David W Johnson
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Although caregivers allow peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with disabilities the opportunity to perform PD, it is crucial to clarify the safety and effectiveness of assisted PD performed by caregivers compared to self-PD.Methods:PD patients from 22 PD centres in Thailand were prospectively followed in the Peritoneal Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study during 2016–2017. Patients receiving assisted PD performed by caregivers were matched 1:1 with self-PD patients using propensity scores calculated by logistic regression. The associations between assisted PD and risk of mortality, peritonitis and permanent transfer to haemodialysis (HD) were assessed by multivariable competing risk regression.Results:Of 778 eligible patients, 447 (57%) required assisted PD performed by caregivers. Most of the caregivers were family members (98%), while the rest were non-family paid caregivers (2%). Patient factors associated with assisted PD were older age, female gender, lower educational level, cardiovascular comorbidities, diabetes, automated PD modality, poorer functional status and lower blood chemistries (albumin, creatinine, sodium, potassium and phosphate). After 1:1 matching, the baseline characteristics were adequately matched, and 269 patients in each group were analysed. Compared with self-PD, assisted PD was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted sub-hazard ratio: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.24–3.74). There were no differences in the occurrences of peritonitis and permanent HD transfer between the groups.Conclusions:Assisted PD was required by more than half of Thai PD patients and was independently associated with a higher mortality risk. This may reflect causal effect or confounding by indication.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T09:39:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221078903
       
  • Rapid detection of Gordonia aichiensis by metagenomic next-generation
           sequencing in a patient with peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis

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      Authors: Bin Wang, Ziqi Cui, Shuai Yu, Ding Sun, Weiguang Zhang, Xinye Jin, Xiaowei Cheng, Yizhi Chen
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T09:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221077459
       
  • Comparison between the ‘pull technique’ and open surgery for
           peritoneal catheter removal in Chinese patients on peritoneal dialysis

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      Authors: Yunxin Dai, Hancheng Guo, Tingmin Li, Chunmeng Yao, Zugang Xie, Fuzhen Wang, Cuiwei Yao, Tianjun Guan
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The removal techniques for peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters are open surgical dissection (OD) and the ‘pull technique’ (PT). The latter is limitedly used because of uncertainty about its feasibility and safety. This study aimed to compare the outcomes and complications between the two techniques.Methods:This retrospective study included patients who underwent PD catheter removal from January 2015 to January 2021 in four PD centres in China. The patients were grouped according to the different removal techniques and were followed up to observe the potential complications.Results:The demographic characteristics of patients in the PT (n = 68) and OD (n = 44) groups showed no significant difference. The indications for PD catheter removal were similar between the two groups, except for a higher frequency of peritonitis in the OD group (p = 0.010). In the PT group, the main complications were broken catheter (7.4%), superficial cuff infection (4.8%) and subcutaneous bleeding (4.8%). In the OD group, the main complications were death (9.1%) and subcutaneous bleeding (4.6%).Conclusion:PT might be a safe and reliable technique for PD catheter removal compared to OD. Considering its simple and non-invasive nature, PT should be recommended as the alternative to OD in suitable PD patients.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T09:17:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221077458
       
  • Current costs of dialysis modalities: A comprehensive analysis within the
           United Kingdom

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      Authors: Gareth Roberts, Jennifer Holmes, Gail Williams, James Chess, Ned Hartfiel, Joanna M Charles, Leah McLauglin, Jane Noyes, Rhiannon Tudor Edwards
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Previous evidence suggests home-based dialysis to be more cost-effective than unit-based or hospital-based dialysis. However, previous analyses to quantify the costs of different dialysis modalities have used varied perspectives, different methods, and required assumptions due to lack of available data. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence reports uncertainty about the differences in costs between home-based and unit-based dialysis. This uncertainty limits the ability of policy makers to make recommendations based on cost effectiveness, which also impacts on the ability of budget holders to model the impact of any service redesign and to understand which therapies deliver better value. The aim of our study was to use a combination of top-down and bottom-up costing methods to determine the direct medical costs of different dialysis modalities in one UK nation (Wales) from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS).Methods:Detailed hybrid top-down and bottom-up micro-costing methods were applied to estimate the direct medical costs of dialysis modalities across Wales. Micro-costing data was obtained from commissioners of the service and from interviews with renal consultants, nurses, accountants, managers and allied health professionals. Top-down costing information was obtained from the Welsh Renal Clinical Network (who commission renal services across Wales) and the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust.Results:The annual direct cost per patient for home-based modalities was £16,395 for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), £20,295 for automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and £23,403 for home-based haemodialysis (HHD). The annual cost per patient for unit-based modalities depended on whether or not patients required ambulance transport. Excluding transport, the cost of dialysis was £19,990 for satellite units run in partnership with independent sector providers and £23,737 for hospital units managed and staffed by the NHS. When ambulance transport was included, the respective costs were £28,931 and £32,678, respectively.Conclusion:Our study is the most comprehensive analysis of the costs of dialysis undertaken thus far in the United Kingdom and clearly demonstrate that CAPD is less costly than other dialysis modalities. When ambulance transport costs are included, other home therapies (APD and HHD) are also less costly than unit-based dialysis. This detailed analysis of the components that contribute to dialysis costs will help inform future cost-effectiveness studies, inform healthcare policy and drive service redesign.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T10:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211061126
       
  • Cloudy fluid, cloudy diagnosis

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      Authors: Jimena Del Risco-Zevallos, Juan Piñeyroa, Diana Rodríguez-Espinosa, Marta Garrote, Anna Gaya, José Jesús Broseta, Luis F Quintana, Miquel Blasco, Manel Vera Rivera
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Here, we report a case of a patient with cloudy effluent that was initially diagnosed as bacterial peritonitis. The persistence of a cloudy effluent despite antibiotic therapy led to an extensive peritoneal dialysis (PD) effluent analysis, with the final diagnosis being high-grade B-cell lymphoma. This case will increase the awareness of this rare presentation of a lymphoproliferative disorder reminding clinicians to consider this diagnosis as a part of the differential diagnosis PD effluent.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-21T09:23:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211072345
       
  • Optimised versus standard automated peritoneal dialysis regimens pilot
           study (OptiStAR): A randomised controlled crossover trial

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      Authors: Karin Bergling, Javier de Arteaga, Fabián Ledesma, Carl M Öberg
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The continuous global rise of end-stage kidney disease creates a growing demand of economically beneficial home-based kidney replacement therapies such as peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, undesirable absorption and exposure of peritoneal tissues to glucose remain major limitations of PD.Methods:We compared a reference (standard) automated PD regimen 6 × 2 L 1.36% glucose (76 mmol/L) over 9 h with a novel, theoretically glucose sparing (optimised) prescription consisting of ‘ultrafiltration cycles’ with high glucose strength (126 mmol/L) and ‘clearance cycles’ with ultra-low, physiological glucose (5 mmol/L) for approximately 40% of the treatment time. Twenty-one prevalent PD patients underwent the optimised regimen (7 × 2 L 2.27% glucose + 5 × 2 L 0.1% glucose over 8 h) and the standard regimen in a crossover fashion. Six patients were excluded from data analysis.Results:Median glucose absorption was 43 g (IQR 41–54) and 44 g (40–55) for the standard and optimised intervention, respectively (p = 1). Ultrafiltration volume, weekly Kt/V creatinine and urea were significantly improved during optimised interventions, while no difference in sodium removal was detected. Post hoc analysis showed significantly improved ultrafiltration efficiency (ml ultrafiltration per gram absorbed glucose) during optimised regimens. No adverse events were observed except one incidence of drain pain.Conclusion:Optimised treatments were feasible and well tolerated in this small pilot study. Despite no difference in absorbed glucose, results indicate possible improvements of ultrafiltration efficiency and small solute clearances by optimised regimens. Use of optimised prescriptions as glucose sparing strategy should be evaluated in larger study populations.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T09:20:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211069232
       
  • Serum vancomycin levels predict the short-term adverse outcomes of
           peritoneal dialysis–associated peritonitis

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      Authors: Ying Ma, Yingzhou Geng, Li Jin, Xiaopei Wang, Changna Liang, Liyi Xie, Wanhong Lu, Jing Lv
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The role of monitoring serum vancomycin levels during treatment of peritoneal dialysis (PD)–associated peritonitis is controversial. Substantial inter-individual variability may result in suboptimal serum levels despite similar dosing of vancomycin. The published predictors of suboptimal serum vancomycin levels remain limited.Methods:Data were retrospectively collected from 541 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis between 1 January 2018 and 31 December 312019. For gram-positive cocci and culture-negative peritonitis, we adopted a vancomycin administration and monitoring protocol. Short-term adverse outcomes of PD-associated peritonitis, including transfer to haemodialysis, death, persistent infection beyond planned therapy duration and relapse, were observed. The association between trough serum vancomycin levels and short-term adverse outcomes was evaluated.Results:Intraperitoneal vancomycin was used in 61 gram-positive cocci or culture-negative peritonitis episodes in 56 patients. Fourteen episodes of short-term adverse outcomes occurred in 12 patients, whose average trough serum vancomycin levels on day 5 of treatment were significantly lower than those who didn’t experience any adverse outcomes (8.4 ± 1.7 vs 12.5 ± 4.3 mg/L, p = 0.003). In gram-positive cocci or culture-negative peritonitis patients, those with higher day 5 trough serum vancomycin levels had a lower risk of short-term adverse outcomes (odds ratio: 0.6, 95% confidence interval: 0.4 to 0.9, p = 0.011). Receiver operating charecteristic curve (ROC) analyses showed that the day 5 trough serum vancomycin levels diagnostic threshold value for short-term adverse outcomes was 10.1 mg/L. After adjustments for gender, exchange volume and residual kidney function (RKF), baseline higher peritoneal transport was associated with a suboptimal (
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T09:10:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211064192
       
  • Practice variations in antibiotic administration for the management of
           peritonitis in patients on automated peritoneal dialysis in Australia and
           New Zealand

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      Authors: Chau Wei Ling, Kamal Sud, Connie Van, Gregory M Peterson, Rahul P Patel, Syed Tabish Razi Zaidi, Ronald L Castelino
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      In the absence of guidelines on the management of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis in patients on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD), variations in clinical practice potentially exist between PD units that could affect clinical outcomes. This study aimed to document the current practices of treating PD-associated peritonitis in patients on APD across Australia and New Zealand and the reasons for practice variations using a cross-sectional online survey. Of the 62 PD units, 34 medical leads (55%) responded to the survey. When treating APD-associated peritonitis, 21 units (62%) continued patients on APD and administered intraperitoneal (IP) antibiotics in manual daytime exchanges; of these, 17 (81%) considered allowing at least 6 h dwell time for adequate absorption of the IP antibiotics as an important reason for adding manual daytime exchange. Nine units (26%) temporarily switched patients from APD to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD); of these, five (55%) reported a lack of pharmacokinetic (PK) data for IP antibiotics in APD, four (44%) reported a shortage of APD-trained nursing staff to perform APD exchanges during hospitalisation and three (33%) reported inadequate time for absorption of IP antibiotics on APD as important reasons for their practice. Four units (12%) continued patients on APD and administered IP antibiotics during APD exchanges; of these, three (75%) believed that PK data available in CAPD could be extrapolated to APD. This study demonstrates wide variations in the management of APD-associated peritonitis in Australia and New Zealand; it points towards the lack of PK on antibiotics used to treat peritonitis as an important reason underpinning practice variations.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T08:20:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211069231
       
  • High versus low ultrafiltration rates during experimental peritoneal
           dialysis in rats: Acute effects on plasma volume and systemic
           haemodynamics

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      Authors: Jakob Helman, Carl M Öberg
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Intradialytic hypotension is a common complication of haemodialysis, but uncommon in peritoneal dialysis (PD). This may be due to lower ultrafiltration rates in PD compared to haemodialysis, allowing for sufficient refilling of the blood plasma compartment from the interstitial volume, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we assessed plasma volume and hemodynamic alterations during experimental PD with high versus low ultrafiltration rates.Methods:Experiments were conducted in two groups of healthy Sprague-Dawley rats: one group with a high ultrafiltration rate (N = 7) induced by 8.5% glucose and a low UF group (N = 6; 1.5% glucose), with an initial assessment of the extracellular fluid volume, followed by 30 min PD with plasma volume measurements at baseline, 5, 10, 15 and 30 min. Mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored during the experiment.Results:No significant changes over time in plasma volume, mean arterial pressure or central venous pressure were detected during the course of the experiments, despite an ultrafiltration (UF) rate of 56 mL/h/kg in the high UF group. In the high UF group, a decrease in extracellular fluid volume of −7 mL (−10.7% (95% confidence interval: −13.8% to −7.6%)) was observed, in line with the average UF volume of 8.0 mL (standard deviation: 0.5 mL).Conclusion:Despite high UF rates, we found that plasma volumes were remarkably preserved in the present experiments, indicating effective refilling of the plasma compartment from interstitial tissues. Further studies should clarify which mechanisms preserve the plasma volume during high UF rates in PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T09:26:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608211069224
       
  • Assessment of the size selectivity of peritoneal permeability by the
           restriction coefficient to protein transport

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      Authors: Raymond T Krediet, Deirisa Lopes Barreto, Anouk TN van Diepen
      First page: 335
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Transport of serum proteins from the circulation to peritoneal dialysate in peritoneal dialysis patients mainly focused on total protein. Individual proteins have hardly been studied. We determined serum and effluent concentrations of four individual proteins with a wide molecular weight range routinely in the standardised peritoneal permeability analysis performed yearly in all participating patients. These include β2-microglobulin, albumin, immunoglobulin G and α2-macroglobulin. The dependency of transport of these proteins on their molecular weight and diffusion coefficient led to the development of the peritoneal protein restriction coefficient (PPRC), which is the slope of the relation between the peritoneal clearances of these proteins and their free diffusion coefficients in water, when plotted on a double logarithmic scale. The higher the PPRC, the more size restriction to transport. In this review, we discuss the results obtained on the PPRC under various conditions, such as effects of various osmotic agents, vasoactive drugs, peritonitis and the hydrostatic pressure gradient. Long-term follow-up of patients shows an increase of the PPRC, the possible causes of which are discussed. Venous vasculopathy of the peritoneal microcirculation is the most likely explanation.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T10:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221075102
       
  • The availability of support and peritoneal dialysis survival: A cohort
           study

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      Authors: Danielle E Fox, Kathryn M King-Shier, Matthew T James, Lorraine Venturato, Alix Clarke, Pietro Ravani, Matthew J Oliver, Robert R Quinn
      First page: 353
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Providing support is important to maintain a patient on peritoneal dialysis (PD), though its impact on outcomes has not been investigated thoroughly. We examined the association between having support and risk of a transfer to hemodialysis.Methods:In this retrospective observational cohort study, we used data captured in the Dialysis Measurement Analysis and Reporting system about patients who started PD in Alberta, Canada, between 1 January 2013 and 30 September 2018. Support was defined as the availability of a support person in the home who was able, willing and available to provide support for PD in the patient’s residence. The outcome of interest was a transfer to hemodialysis for at least 90 days. We estimated the cumulative incidence of a transfer over time accounting for competing risks and hazard ratios to summarise the association between support and a transfer. We split follow-up time as hazard ratios varied over time.Results:Six hundred and eighty-three incident PD patients, median age 58 years (IQR: 47–68) and 35% female, were followed for a median of 15 months. The cumulative incidence of a transfer to hemodialysis at 24 months was 26%. Having support was associated with a reduced risk of a transfer between 3 and 12 months after the start of dialysis (HR3-12mo: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.25–0.78), but not earlier (hazard ratio (HR)12mo: 1.19; 95% CI: 0.65–2.17).Conclusions:A transfer to hemodialysis is common. Having a support person at home is associated with a short-term protective effect after the initiation of PD.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T01:35:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221086752
       
  • Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine level is associated with
           the severity of chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus in patients
           undergoing peritoneal dialysis

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      Authors: Takashin Nakayama, Kohkichi Morimoto, Kiyotaka Uchiyama, Ei Kusahana, Naoki Washida, Tatsuhiko Azegami, Takeshi Kanda, Tadashi Yoshida, Hiroshi Itoh
      First page: 415
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), which induces a Th2-dominated inflammation, is a well-known biomarker that reflects the severity of atopic dermatitis. The present study aimed to evaluate TARC as a Th2-associated marker with chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD).Methods:This single-centre cross-sectional study included patients who underwent PD in our hospital between August 2020 and July 2021. The severity and impaired quality of life (QOL) of CKD-aP were assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Japanese version of the 5-D itch scale (5D-J), respectively.Results:A total of 48 patients with PD were included in the present study. Age and dialysis vintage were (mean ± SD) 64.8 ± 12.0 year and (median (IQR)) 38.5 (11.5–91.5) month, respectively. VAS and 5D-J scores were 3.3 ± 2.0 and 10.5 (9.0–12.0), respectively. Serum TARC level was 481.5 (278.9–603.4) pg/mL (upper limits of normal 450 pg/mL) and significantly correlated with VAS (r = 0.39, p = 0.006) and 5D-J score (r = 0.37, p = 0.009). Multivariate linear analysis revealed that higher serum TARC level was significantly associated with VAS (p < 0.001) and 5D-J score (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the serum brain natriuretic peptide level tended to be associated with VAS (p = 0.060) and 5D-J score (p = 0.029).Conclusion:Serum TARC level is an independent predictor of the severity and impaired QOL of CKD-aP in patients with PD, and TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of CKD-aP.
      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T06:49:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221085432
       
  • A case of pleuroperitoneal communication during long-term steroid therapy
           for dermatomyositis

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      Authors: Masanobu Takasu, Hiroyuki Kadoya, Yu Yamanouchi, Yuji Nojima, Toshiya Yamamoto, Seiji Itano, Masao Nakata, Tamaki Sasaki, Naoki Kashihara
      First page: 434
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T09:27:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221088441
       
  • Peritoneal dialysis post-Mitrofanoff (appendicovesicostomy) procedure

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      Authors: Zeenia Aga, Joanne M Bargman
      First page: 437
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T09:43:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221090792
       
  • Corrigendum to Time-dependent incidence rates and risk factors for
           technique failure in patients on peritoneal dialysis under the Thai PD
           First policy

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      First page: 439
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T05:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221097579
       
  • Corrigendum to a case of pleuroperitoneal communication during long-term
           steroid therapy for dermatomyositis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 440
      Abstract: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Peritoneal Dialysis International
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T11:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08968608221097603
       
 
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