Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (334 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (19 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (266 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (162 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (177 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (90 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2241 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (331 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (199 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (355 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (135 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)
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    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (800 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (182 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (109 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (76 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)
    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 151 of 151 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Blood Pressure     Hybrid Journal  
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal  
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 391)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 450)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
eJHaem     Open Access  
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access  
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free  
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 124)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Diabetes Spectrum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.623
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1040-9165 - ISSN (Online) 1944-7353
Published by American Diabetes Association Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Limited Diabetes Education and Resources in American Sign Language

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      Authors: Litchman ML; Moreland C, Fagerlin A, et al.
      Pages: 134 - 135
      Abstract: An estimated 500,000 deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) people use American Sign Language (ASL) (1). Rates of diabetes among deaf middle-aged and older adult signers who self-identify as LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer) are higher than those in the general population for this age-group (∼26 vs. 14–21%) (2). While diabetes rates in the overall DHH populations are not available, data indicate these individuals are 3.2 times more likely to be told they have diabetes when compared with hearing individuals (3). The disparity in self-reported diabetes among DHH signers is believed to be related to a lack of access to health information in ASL. In health care settings, ASL interpreters are not provided in half of medical appointments (4), including during diabetes specialty visits (5). When an interpreter is provided, about one-third of the time the interpreter is unqualified (not trained for health care settings) (4). As a result, DHH people who use ASL as their primary language lack access to easily accessible and high-quality information in ASL and turn to other sources for health information, including social media (6).
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0091
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A Sincere Thank You to the Reviewers of Diabetes Spectrum

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      Pages: 136 - 136
      Abstract: Each year, Diabetes Spectrum calls on many scientific and medical experts in the field of diabetes to critically review submitted manuscripts. The journal’s editors and staff sincerely appreciate these reviewers, whose valuable feedback helps to ensure the high quality of the research and review articles published in each issue. We would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank all of the reviewers who have volunteered their time and expertise in the past year (1 November 2020 to 31 October 2021) for their contributions to Diabetes Spectrum.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-en02
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • 2022 National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support

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      Authors: Davis J; Fischl A, Beck J, et al.
      Pages: 137 - 149
      Abstract: By the most recent estimates, 34.2 million people in the U.S. have diabetes (1). At the same time, 88 million people are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The U.S. also sees an increasing prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents (2). Thus, more than 122 million Americans are at risk for developing devastating complications associated with chronic hyperglycemia (1). Diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) is a critical element of care for all people with diabetes (PWD). “The purpose of DSMES is to give PWD the knowledge, skills, and confidence to accept responsibility for their self-management. This includes collaborating with their healthcare team, making informed decisions, solving problems, developing personal goals and action plans, and coping with emotions and life stresses” (3). DSMES interventions include activities that support PWD to implement and sustain the self-management behaviors and strategies to improve diabetes and related cardiometabolic conditions and quality of life on an ongoing basis. Despite progress in diabetes treatment modalities, glycemic and cardiometabolic outcomes continue to decline in the U.S. (4). Now, more than ever, the provision of DSMES is a vital component of the full treatment for diabetes.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-ps02
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Diabetes Simulation Challenge: Enhancing Patient Perspective-Taking
           for Medical Students

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      Authors: Shaffer-Hudkins E; Orbeck S, Bradley-Klug K, et al.
      Pages: 150 - 158
      Abstract: The Diabetes Simulation Challenge is a unique training tool to foster empathy, a key facet of patient-centered care, for medical students. Thirty-two medical students participated in a 24-hour perspective-taking activity as part of their curriculum, during which they simulated some common experiences of living with a chronic health condition, specifically type 1 diabetes. Students’ written reflections were analyzed using a phenomenological qualitative approach to provide a composite description of the experience. An exhaustive, iterative method of thematic analysis that included manual coding was used to determine whether this activity led to expressions of empathy or thoughts and beliefs consistent with patient-centered health care. Nine unique themes emerged, six of which indicated that students adopted the perspective of an individual with a chronic illness. Most of the students’ reflections illustrated an understanding of the behavioral, social, and emotional challenges related to living with type 1 diabetes, as well as increased empathy toward individuals with the disease. Medical students who aim to provide patient-centered care benefited from this perspective-taking exercise, and training programs should consider using such methods to extend learning beyond traditional didactic education.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0039
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Characterization of Symptoms and Symptom Clusters for Type 2 Diabetes
           Using a Large Nationwide Electronic Health Record Database

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      Authors: Brady V; Whisenant M, Wang X, et al.
      Pages: 159 - 170
      Abstract: OBJECTIVEA variety of symptoms may be associated with type 2 diabetes and its complications. Symptoms in chronic diseases may be described in terms of prevalence, severity, and trajectory and often co-occur in groups, known as symptom clusters, which may be representative of a common etiology. The purpose of this study was to characterize type 2 diabetes–related symptoms using a large nationwide electronic health record (EHR) database.MethodsWe acquired the Cerner Health Facts, a nationwide EHR database. The type 2 diabetes cohort (n = 1,136,301 patients) was identified using a rule-based phenotype method. A multistep procedure was then used to identify type 2 diabetes–related symptoms based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th revisions, diagnosis codes. Type 2 diabetes–related symptoms and co-occurring symptom clusters, including their temporal patterns, were characterized based the longitudinal EHR data.ResultsPatients had a mean age of 61.4 years, 51.2% were female, and 70.0% were White. Among 1,136,301 patients, there were 8,008,276 occurrences of 59 symptoms. The most frequently reported symptoms included pain, heartburn, shortness of breath, fatigue, and swelling, which occurred in 21–60% of the patients. We also observed over-represented type 2 diabetes symptoms, including difficulty speaking, feeling confused, trouble remembering, weakness, and drowsiness/sleepiness. Some of these are rare and difficult to detect by traditional patient-reported outcomes studies.ConclusionTo the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use a nationwide EHR database to characterize type 2 diabetes–related symptoms and their temporal patterns. Fifty-nine symptoms, including both over-represented and rare diabetes-related symptoms, were identified.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0064
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A Conversation on an Effective, Straightforward, Quantitative Approach to
           the Outpatient Use of Insulin

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      Authors: Davidson MB.
      Pages: 179 - 189
      Abstract: For primary care providers, using insulin can present challenges that can be met by a straightforward approach using the following principles. Depending on when it is injected, each component of the insulin regimen has a maximal effect on a specific period of the 24-hour cycle (e.g., overnight, morning, afternoon, or evening). The glucose pattern in that period determines whether the dose of that component of the insulin regimen requires adjusting. Regarding which insulin types and insulin regimens to use, human insulin (NPH and regular) is as effective as analog insulins, and a two-injection intensified insulin regimen is as effective as a four-injection regimen.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0001
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Financial Barriers in Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative
           Analysis

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      Authors: Grigorian EG; Litchman ML, Porter ME, et al.
      Pages: 190 - 197
      Abstract: BackgroundEmerging adulthood is a period fraught with challenging life transitions for many and is especially difficult for individuals with type 1 diabetes, as they encounter more obstacles to independently managing their diabetes. We examined the barriers faced by emerging adults and parents of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and the impact these barriers had on their lives.MethodsEmerging adults and parents of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes were recruited from primary care and specialty clinics and via social media posts. In the parent study, semi-structured interviews were conducted to understand what supported and did not support diabetes self-management. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for common themes. This sub-analysis analyzed data related to financial challenges in accessing diabetes management equipment and supplies.ResultsThis study included emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (n = 33; mean age 20 ± 2.9 years) and parents of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (n = 17; mean age 47.5 ± 6.9 years). The majority of emerging adults used an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring system (n = 24 [73%]). Four main themes emerged related to access to care: 1) affordability of diabetes management tools, 2) managing insurance, 3) communication with pharmacies and health care providers, and 4) emotional consequences of financial stress.ConclusionThe current health system is challenging for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and parents and is causing substantial emotional and financial stress. Future research is needed to address interventions for helping emerging adults and their parents navigate the cost of living with diabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0038
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Risk of Negative Health Outcomes and High Costs for People With Diabetes
           and Unmet Psychological Needs in the United States

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      Authors: Sepassi A; Bounthavong M, Singh RF, et al.
      Pages: 207 - 215
      Abstract: Measuring the population-level relationship between compromised mental health and diabetes care remains an important goal for clinicians and health care decision-makers. We evaluated the impact of self-reported unmet psychological need on health care resource utilization and total health care expenditure in people with type 2 diabetes. Patients who reported unmet psychological needs were more likely than those who did not to incur a higher annual medical expenditure, have greater resource utilization, and have a higher risk of all-cause mortality.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0019
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • “I’m Going to Be Good to Me”: Exploring the Role of Shame and Guilt
           in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

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      Authors: Solomon E; Salcedo VJ, Reed MK, et al.
      Pages: 216 - 222
      Abstract: ObjectivePeople with type 2 diabetes are likely to experience shame or guilt as they navigate through their disease. Previous research has shown that feelings of shame and guilt often exist within the clinician-patient relationship, often as a result of the complex care regimen required to achieve treatment goals. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patients’ experiences of shame and guilt in type 2 diabetes management and the impact their clinicians have on these experiences.MethodsSemistructured interviews were used to explore patients’ experiences with shame and guilt. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using directed content analysis. Demographic data were also obtained.ResultsWe completed 20 interviews with people with type 2 diabetes (65% Black, 70% female). Participants exhibited feelings more consistent with guilt than with shame. All participants discussed how their clinicians affected these feelings. Patients who expressed feelings of guilt were able to recognize opportunities for behavior change without experiencing global devaluation, in which they linked their actions to an unchangeable aspect of their identity or personality, often describing their guilt as motivating of change. Unlike guilt, when patients experienced shame, they often exhibited global devaluation, in which they blamed their personality, experienced hopelessness, and increased maladaptive behaviors.ConclusionOur findings highlight a notable difference between shame and guilt in the context of type 2 diabetes management. We believe that incorporation of an understanding of these nuances, along with ideal responses to both shame and guilt, will enhance clinicians’ ability to provide high-quality patient-centered care to people with diabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0062
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Race Across America: First Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes to Finish Solo
           With Diabetes Technology Support

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      Authors: Weitgasser R; Ocenasek H, Fallwickl S.
      Pages: 227 - 231
      Abstract: Challenges for athletes with type 1 diabetes are numerous. To find the individual balance between energy intake and consumption and adequate insulin treatment without risking severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia is a demanding task. Nevertheless, people with type 1 diabetes are active in various sports, both individually and as members of teams (1,2). We report on the first athlete with type 1 diabetes ever to finish solo what is probably the hardest bicycle race worldwide—the Race Across America (RAAM). The U.S. race stretches from Oceanside, CA, to Annapolis, MD, over ∼3,000 miles and 170,000 vertical feet and has to be finished within 12 days.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0033
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Changing Face of Pediatric Diabetes: How the Pandemic Brought an
           Epidemic to Light

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      Authors: Muñoz CE.
      Pages: 239 - 244
      Abstract: Editor’s Note: This article is adapted from a speech Dr. Muñoz delivered in June 2021 as President, Health Care & Education of the American Diabetes Association. She delivered her address at the Association’s 81st Scientific Sessions, which was held online as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. A webcast of this speech is available for viewing at https://bit.ly/3rk3Esp.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-0013
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • It Takes a Brain, a Heart, Courage, and Support

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      Authors: Charron-Prochownik D.
      Pages: 245 - 251
      Abstract: Editor’s note: This article is adapted from the virtual address Dr. Charron-Prochownik delivered as the recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award for 2021. She delivered the address in June 2021 during the Association’s 81st Scientific Sessions, which was held online as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. A webcast of this speech is available for viewing on the DiabetesPro website (https://bit.ly/3Lry4B9).
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-0015
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • An Article in Two Parts: My Dinners With Richard and Addressing Diabetes
           Disparities in Hispanic Populations

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      Authors: Marrero DG.
      Pages: 252 - 256
      Abstract: Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the address Dr. Marrero delivered as the recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Richard R. Rubin Award for 2021. This award recognizes a behavioral researcher who has made outstanding, innovative contributions to the study and understanding of the behavioral aspects of diabetes in diverse populations. Dr. Marrero delivered the address in June 2021 at the Association’s virtual 81st Scientific Sessions. A webcast of this speech is available for viewing at https://bit.ly/3HIkOpz.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-0011
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Effects of Trauma and Anxiety on Adherence in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

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      Authors: Raj R; Nguyen M, Pozzo A, et al.
      Pages: 171 - 178
      Abstract: BackgroundPsychiatric factors such as depression, anxiety, and life stressors have been shown to negatively affect diabetes self-management and A1C in children and adolescents. However, less is known about how trauma exposure and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may affect type 1 diabetes.ObjectivesTo determine the rates of trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in patients aged 7–21 years with type 1 diabetes and to examine the relationships among trauma exposure, PTSD, anxiety, depression, and diabetes self-management.MethodsPatients underwent standardized psychiatric screening questionnaires during clinic visits. A1C at goal was defined as <7.0%, and behavioral adherence was defined as specific parameters of blood glucose monitoring. χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to assess the relationships among trauma, PTSD, anxiety, and behavioral adherence. ANOVA was conducted to examine group differences between A1C and the presence of suicidal ideation.ResultsOf the participants, 38.4% (n = 99, mean age 13.8 ± 3.5 years, 51.5% female) had trauma symptoms and functional impairment concerning for PTSD. Rates of trauma secondary to accidental injury, medical traumatic stress, natural disaster, and witness to family violence were 28.3, 22.2, 10.1, and 6.1%, respectively. Neither PTSD nor anxiety nor depression symptoms were associated with behavioral nonadherence (P = 0.546, P = 0.337, and P = 0.697, respectively), but the subscales for significant school avoidance and generalized anxiety disorders were associated with behavioral nonadherence (P = 0.023 and P = 0.032, respectively). Those who reported suicidal ideation had higher mean A1C than those who did not (A1C 8.9 vs. 8.3, P = 0.047).ConclusionAlthough trauma was common among youth with type 1 diabetes, neither trauma nor PTSD was associated with changes to self-management. However, certain forms of anxiety and suicidal ideation were associated with poor self-management and higher A1C, respectively.
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0024
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Depression and Diabetes in Workers Across the Life Span: Addressing the
           Health of America’s Workforce—Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
           System, 2014–2018

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      Authors: Kaur H; Scholl JC, Owens-Gary M.
      Pages: 198 - 206
      Abstract: OBJECTIVEDiabetes affects nearly 12.2% of U.S. adults. Comorbid depressive symptoms among U.S. workers with diabetes are associated with increased unemployment and reduced work performance. This study examined the age-group–specific prevalence of depression among U.S. workers with self-reported diabetes and identified factors associated with depression.METHODSData from the 2014–2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to examine the prevalence of depression among adult workers with diabetes in the United States. Relationships between depression prevalence and diabetes and demographic, physical, and behavioral risk factors were examined through bivariate and multivariable analyses. Age was categorized into four groups: 18–34, 35–54, 55–64, and ≥65 years.RESULTSThe overall prevalence of self-reported depression among U.S. workers with diabetes was 17.4–30% higher than among those without diabetes. Workers with diabetes aged 18–34 years had the highest depression prevalence (28.7%) compared with other age-groups. Female workers with diabetes were significantly more likely than male workers to report depression in all age-groups. Young adult workers with diabetes who had another chronic disease were nearly three times more likely to report depression than those without another chronic condition. There were no overlapping patterns of prevalence of diabetes and depression by state.CONCLUSIONWorkers with diabetes are at an increased risk of depression, which can affect their overall health and productivity. These findings indicate that, among those with diabetes, young adult workers and women are most likely to have depression. Employee wellness programs may address the specific needs of individuals with diabetes and depression.
      PubDate: Sat, 28 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0022
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Distressed Families Demonstrate Resilience in the Context of COVID-19:
           Perspectives of Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Mothers

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      Authors: Goethals ER; Bergner EM, Mayberry LS, et al.
      Pages: 223 - 226
      Abstract: The psychosocial impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is relatively unknown in the general pediatric population, and particularly in families managing type 1 diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the pandemic and social distancing requirements are linked to increased parenting stress (1), worsening mental health in parents (2), and mixed effects for adolescent mental health (3,4). Both maternal depression and diabetes distress, the psychological burden and stress of caring for the complex daily demands of diabetes, are established risk factors for broad negative consequences in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, including worsening glycemic outcomes, problems with self-management, and poor quality of life (5,6). Because families already dealing with diabetes distress and/or depression may be more likely to struggle to adapt to a major stressor such as the COVID-19 pandemic, it is especially important to explore their responses to understand how best to support them (7). To our knowledge, this is the first multi-informant study to describe the reactions of adolescents and their mothers to COVID-19 and the perceived impact of the pandemic on diabetes management and adolescents’ mood, as well as the coping strategies they used to deal with the stress of the pandemic.
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0026
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Probable Dapagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis

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      Authors: Barrett AD; Pitts MA, Myers EM, et al.
      Pages: 232 - 238
      Abstract: Type 2 diabetes directly affects 34.2 million Americans (1). Combined pathophysiologic mechanisms of impaired pancreatic insulin production and release, resistance to insulin by target tissues, and dysregulation of hepatogluconeogenesis lead to hyperglycemia (2). Long-term complications of chronically uncontrolled type 2 diabetes include both microvascular and macrovascular disease. The effects of diabetes on the vasculature increase the risk of death from heart disease by two to four times; as a result, >68% of people ≥65 years of age with diabetes die of some form of heart disease and 16% die of stroke (3). The prevalence of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes is four times that in the general population, ranging between 9 and 22% (4). Additionally, 38.6% experience end-stage renal disease (2).
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0025
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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