Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (334 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (19 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
    - DENTISTRY (266 journals)
    - DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY (162 journals)
    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (178 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (90 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2230 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (331 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (199 journals)
    - ONCOLOGY (355 journals)
    - OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OPTOMETRY (135 journals)
    - ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (150 journals)
    - OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (76 journals)
    - PATHOLOGY (96 journals)
    - PEDIATRICS (254 journals)
    - PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION (153 journals)
    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (800 journals)
    - RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE (182 journals)
    - RESPIRATORY DISEASES (109 journals)
    - RHEUMATOLOGY (76 journals)
    - SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)
    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 151 of 151 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 307)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Blood Pressure     Open Access  
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 418)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 478)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access  
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
eJHaem     Open Access  
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access  
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Diabetes Spectrum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.623
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1040-9165 - ISSN (Online) 1944-7353
Published by American Diabetes Association Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Inpatient Diabetes Management Preface: Inpatient Diabetes Management:
           Should We Make It Simpler'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 387 - 389
      Abstract: Inpatient diabetes management is challenging for many hospitals and practitioners. Some large academic centers around the United States have specialized diabetes teams, diabetes technology such as continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and telehealth consultations for inpatient use, and even endocrine hospitalists available to tackle the challenge of inpatient hyperglycemia (1–8). However, most people with diabetes in the United States receive their inpatient care at small community hospitals, where robust (and complex) guidelines and inpatient glycemic protocols may not have significantly changed the culture of glycemic management (9). Some hospital-based practitioners (i.e., hospitalists) practicing within an antiquated culture may rely solely on “sliding-scale” rapid-acting insulin to “correct” high glucose levels, and nurses are desensitized to hyperglycemic events, with a fasting glucose level of, say, 112 mg/dL sometimes being labeled as “low” and prompting a phone call to the provider asking to “hold all insulins.”
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • About Mihail “Misha” Zilbermint: Guest Editor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 390 - 390
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds22-ge04
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Hospital Harm Measures for
           Severe Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia: Is Your Hospital Ready'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 391 - 397
      Abstract: Poor inpatient glycemic management is associated with increased lengths of stay and in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Improving inpatient glycemic outcomes can be difficult because there are no standardized benchmarks, and many hospitals lack the capacity to electronically extract and analyze glucose data. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently proposed new electronic clinical quality measures to be incorporated into its mandatory Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting Program. Among these measures is an assessment of hospital harm from severe hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia. Hospitals must be ready to collect the necessary data for these new measures by January 2023. The new measures could bring welcome attention to the need to implement guideline-based inpatient glycemic management. However, some hospitals that serve high-risk populations may be at risk for losing funding if they are unable to comply.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0008
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Supporting the Use of a Person’s Own Diabetes Technology in the
           Inpatient Setting

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 398 - 404
      Abstract: The use of diabetes technology, including insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring devices, and automated insulin delivery systems, has increased significantly in recent years. As more people with diabetes adopt technology in the outpatient setting, we are seeing these devices more frequently in the inpatient setting. This review offers best-practice guidelines for the continuation of personal diabetes technology use in the inpatient setting. It describes policy and guideline stipulations, roles and responsibilities, and device- and brand-specific considerations. Although these devices are not approved for inpatient use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, there is general expert consensus that the continuation of personal diabetes devices during hospitalization is appropriate for patients who have sufficient knowledge, are not critically ill, and retain sufficient mental capacity during an acute illness. Health care systems and inpatient providers need to understand the benefits and limitations of personal diabetes technology use during hospitalization.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0011
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The Devil Is in the Details: Use, Limitations, and Implementation of
           Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Inpatient Setting

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 405 - 419
      Abstract: Until recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems were reserved for use in the outpatient setting or for investigational purposes in hospitalized patients. However, during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, use of CGM in the inpatient setting has grown rapidly. This review outlines important details related to the accuracy, limitations, and implementation of, as well as necessary staff education for, inpatient CGM use and offers a glimpse into the future of CGM in the inpatient setting.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0009
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Management of Hyperglycemia in the Noncritical Care Setting: A Real-World
           Case-Based Approach With Alternative Insulin- and Noninsulin-Based
           Strategies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 420 - 426
      Abstract: Insulin remains the mainstay of treatment for inpatient hyperglycemia in the United States and Canada. However, some other countries commonly use noninsulin agents such as metformin and sulfonylureas, and several trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of incretin-based agents in patients with type 2 diabetes who are admitted to noncritical care medicine and surgery services. There is a high degree of interest in alternative glucose-lowering strategies to achieve favorable glycemic outcomes with lower risks of hypoglycemia. In this case series, we highlight the challenges of inpatient glycemic management and the need for alternatives to the traditional basal-bolus insulin regimen. Additional investigation will be imperative to validate the safety and efficacy of appropriate insulin and noninsulin treatments and to further develop guidelines that are applicable in real-world hospital settings.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0012
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Glycemic Management of Hospitalized Patients Receiving Nutrition Support

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 427 - 439
      Abstract: Enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) increase the risk of hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes, including mortality, in patients with and without diabetes. A blood glucose target range of 140–180 mg/dL is recommended for hospitalized patients receiving artificial nutrition. Using a diabetes-specific EN formula, lowering the dextrose content, and using a hypocaloric PN formula have all been shown to prevent hyperglycemia and associated adverse outcomes. Insulin, given either subcutaneously or as a continuous infusion, is the mainstay of treatment for hyperglycemia. However, no subcutaneous insulin regimen has been shown to be superior to others. This review summarizes the evidence on and provides recommendations for the treatment of EN- and PN-associated hyperglycemia and offers strategies for hypoglycemia prevention. The authors also highlight their institution’s protocol for the safe use of insulin in the PN bag. Randomized controlled trials evaluating safety and efficacy of targeted insulin therapy synchronized with different types of EN or PN delivery are needed.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0010
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Instituting a Successful Discharge Plan for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes:
           Challenges and Solutions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 440 - 451
      Abstract: Achieving target inpatient glycemic management outcomes has been shown to influence important clinical outcomes such as hospital length of stay and readmission rates. However, arguably the most profound, lasting impact of inpatient diabetes management is achieved at the time of discharge—namely reconciling and prescribing the right medications and making referrals for follow-up. Discharge planning offers a unique opportunity to break through therapeutic inertia, offer diabetes self-management education, and institute an individualized treatment plan that prepares the patient for discharge and promotes self-care and engagement. However, the path to a successful discharge plan can be fraught with potential pitfalls for clinicians, including lack of knowledge and experience with newer diabetes medications, costs, concerns over insurance coverage, and lack of time and resources. This article presents an algorithm to assist clinicians in selecting discharge regimens that maximize benefits and reduce barriers to self-care for patients and a framework for creating an interdisciplinary hospital diabetes discharge program.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/dsi22-0013
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Continuous Glucose Monitoring Plus an Online Peer Support Community
           Reinforces Healthy Behaviors in Hispanic Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 452 - 460
      Abstract: BackgroundPrevious research has suggested beneficial glycemic outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes with the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM); yet, there is a dearth of data examining CGM in diverse populations. Additionally, the use of online peer support communities (OPSCs) can further support the application of CGM information to improve health behaviors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess participant experiences with a CGM+OPSC intervention.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted after a 12-week combined CGM+OPSC intervention with Hispanic, Spanish-speaking people with type 2 diabetes not using insulin. The OPSC was managed by five trained bilingual peer facilitators. Interviews were conducted in Spanish. Audio recordings were translated and transcribed and then reviewed by the interviewer for accuracy. Emergent themes were identified through inductive thematic analysis.ResultsTwenty-six participants completed interviews. Three main themes emerged from the data: 1) CGM supports participants’ understanding of the relationship between glucose levels and health behaviors such as healthy eating, being active, taking medication, stress reduction, and improving sleep; 2) the OPSC reinforced how to make healthy choices through personal experiments, collective learning, and social support; and 3) CGM+OPSC supports behavior change and increases confidence.ConclusionWhen combined, CGM+OPSC interventions appear to create a positive feedback loop to reinforce and optimize healthy behaviors for diabetes self-management in individuals with type 2 diabetes who are not on insulin. The provision of such an intervention tailored to Hispanic, Spanish-speaking individuals has the potential to address the health care disparity seen in this population.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0067
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 Pandemic Effects on Caregivers of Youth With Type 1 Diabetes:
           Stress and Self-Efficacy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 461 - 468
      Abstract: BackgroundLittle is known about the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic’s psychological effects on caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes.ObjectiveThis study aimed to investigate the experience of caregivers of youth with type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic.MethodsA 49-item questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale and open-response questions was distributed via e-mail and type 1 diabetes–related social media platforms from 4 May to 22 June 2020. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS v.25 statistical software. Descriptive statistics were used. Relationships were compared using Pearson correlation. Qualitative data were coded and categorized.ResultsA total of 272 caregivers participated (mean ± SD respondent age 42.1 ± 7.8 years; 94.5% females; 81.3% with college degree or higher; 52.6% with annual income >$99,000; 80.1% with private insurance). The mean ± SD age of caregivers’ children with type 1 diabetes was 11.0 ± 4.1 years, and their mean ± SD diabetes duration was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Participants reported being diagnosed with or knowing someone with COVID-19 (24.6%), increased stress (71.9%), job loss (10.3%), and financial difficulty (26.8%) as a result of the pandemic. General self-efficacy scores were high (mean ± SD 16.2 ± 2.6, range 8–20) and significantly correlated with COVID-19–related self-efficacy (mean ± SD 12.6 ± 2.1; R = 0.394, P <0.001) and type 1 diabetes self-efficacy during COVID-19 (mean ± SD 17.1 ± 2.5; R = 0.421, P <0.001).ConclusionDespite reporting high overall self-efficacy, caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes reported greater overall stress and challenges during the pandemic. Health care providers should be prepared to provide families with specific social and mental health support.
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0092
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Marked Improvement in A1C Levels After Initiation of Intermittently
           Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring Is Maintained Over 4 Years in
           Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 469 - 475
      Abstract: ObjectiveThis study aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of long-term use of intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes.Design and methodsIn this retrospective real-world study, 689 patients with type 1 diabetes who were >18 years of age and using isCGM were identified from the electronic patient records in North Karelia, Finland. A1C data were collected before and after the initiation of isCGM. The primary outcome was a change in the mean A1C over time after isCGM started.ResultsThe greatest reductions in the mean A1C levels were observed 6 months (−0.54% [−5.9 mmol/mol], P <0.001) and 12 months (−0.42% [−4.6 mmol/mol], P <0.001) after the initiation of isCGM. Reduction in A1C remained significant for 4 years, although the mean reduction in A1C was −0.18% (−2.05 mmol/mol) (P = 0.009) at 48 months compared with baseline. In a subgroup analysis, patients with a baseline A1C >9% (75 mmol/mol) benefited the most from initiation of isCGM (reduction −0.97% [−10.6 mmol/mol], P <0.001, at 12 months and −0.92% [−10.1 mmol/mol], P <0.001, at 48 months). Neither sex nor age at the start of isCGM were correlated with A1C reduction.ConclusionUse of isCGM improves A1C levels significantly in adult patients with type 1 diabetes. Significant reduction in A1C persisted over 4 years of use, although the effect diminished over time.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0087
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Sharps Disposal Practices Among People With Diabetes in a Community Care
           Clinic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 476 - 483
      Abstract: ObjectivesThe primary objective of this study was to determine sharps disposal practices among people with diabetes in a community care clinic. Secondary objectives were to identify patterns of sharps use and barriers to proper use.MethodsSurveys were distributed to patients at a community care clinic in person and via mail. Survey questions focused on how sharps are used and disposed of, the frequency of sharps changes, sharps disposal training, sharps identification, and confidence in sharps disposal. Participant demographics and diabetes profiles were also collected.FindingsAmong 89 respondents, mean age was 60 years (range 29–93 years), 61.8% were Caucasian, 88.8% had type 2 diabetes, and 60.7% had had a diabetes diagnosis for ≤10 years, with diverse diabetes management methods; 57.3% did not receive or were unsure of sharps training, 25.8% discarded used sharps without a designated sharps container, and 37.1% properly disposed of sharps containers at sharps disposal facilities. Barriers to proper sharps practices included perceived safety of reusing sharps and waste with single use, cost, and the hassle of disposal. Those with prior sharps training were more likely to properly use and discard sharps; however, gaps in knowledge were still evident in this population.ConclusionResults indicate gaps in proper sharps use and disposal knowledge among people with diabetes. Responses revealed sharps practices that are inconsistent with current federal and state regulations and are potentially dangerous for those handling improperly discarded sharps. Targeted sharps usage and disposal education resources are needed for individuals with and without prior sharps training.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0106
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Risk Factors for Hypoglycemia During Treatment of Hyperglycemic Crises

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 484 - 490
      Abstract: ObjectiveDiabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state are life-threatening hyperglycemic crises often requiring intensive care unit (ICU) management. Treatment includes intravenous (IV) insulin with a transition to subcutaneous (SC) insulin upon resolution. Hypoglycemia is a common complication associated with treatment of hyperglycemic crises, but risk factors have not been well established. This study aimed to assess risk factors associated with hypoglycemia during treatment for hyperglycemic crises.MethodsThis case-control study included ICU patients admitted with hyperglycemic crises at a single Veterans Affairs health system from 1 January 2013 to 31 March 2020. Patients who developed hypoglycemia during insulin treatment were compared with a control group. Odds of hypoglycemia were assessed based on risk factors, including BMI, comorbidities, and type of SC insulin used.ResultsOf the 216 cases of hyperglycemic crises included, hypoglycemia occurred in 61 cases (44 on SC insulin, 11 on IV insulin, and 6 on both). Odds for hypoglycemia were significantly higher for underweight patients (odds ratio 4.52 [95% CI 1.05–19.55]), type 1 diabetes (4.02 [2.09–7.73]), chronic kidney disease (1.94 [1.05–3.57]), those resumed on the exact chronic SC insulin regimen following resolution (2.91 [1.06–7.95]), and patients who received NPH versus glargine insulin (5.13 [1.54–17.06]). No significant differences were seen in the other evaluated variables.ConclusionThis study found several factors associated with hypoglycemia during hyperglycemic crises treatment, many of which are not addressed in consensus statement recommendations. These findings may help ICU clinicians prevent complications related to hyperglycemic crisis management and generate hypotheses for future studies.
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0094
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Leveraging Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and Registered Nurses in
           Medication Management to Reduce Therapeutic Inertia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 491 - 503
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo conduct a systematic review of studies that used registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) or registered nurses (RNs) to deliver pharmacological therapy using protocols for diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension.Research Design and MethodsA database search of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted of literature published from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2019.ResultsTwenty studies met the inclusion criteria, representing randomized controlled trials (12), retrospective (1) and prospective cohort design studies (6), and time series (1). In all, the studies include 7,280 participants with a median study duration of 12 months (range 6–25 months). Fifteen studies were led by RNs alone, two by RDNs, and three by a combination of RDNs and RNs. All demonstrated improvements in A1C, blood pressure, or lipids. Thirteen studies provided a lifestyle behavior change component in addition to medication protocols.ConclusionThis systematic review provides evidence that RDN- and RN-led medication management using physician-approved protocols or treatment algorithms can lead to clinically significant improvements in diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension management and is as good or better than usual care.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0104
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Personalized Medical Group Visits: A Novel Approach for the Care of
           Prediabetes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 504 - 511
      Abstract: Persistent challenges in diabetes prevention require innovations in primary care that engage and empower patients to adopt lifestyle changes and to proactively manage their health (1). Therefore, an important opportunity for diabetes prevention is the development and implementation of primary care approaches that promote self-management knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy to abate disease progression.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.2337/ds21-0077
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.238.72.180
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-