Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8186 journals)
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HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 153 of 153 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 280)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Blood Pressure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 247)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access  
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal  
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
eJHaem     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cell Science & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Plasmatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription  
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.128
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 23  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2052-4897
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Enhanced prediction of abnormal glucose tolerance using an extended
           non-invasive risk score incorporating routine renal biochemistry

    • Authors: He, J; Fan, B, Lau, E. S. H, Chu, N, Ng, N. Y. H, Leung, K. H. T, Poon, E. W. M, Kong, A. P. S, Ma, R. C. W, Luk, A. O. Y, Chan, J. C. N, Chow, E.
      Pages: e003768 - e003768
      Abstract: IntroductionType 2 diabetes is preventable in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance based on 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) during 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We incorporated routine biochemistry to improve the performance of a non-invasive diabetes risk score to identify individuals with abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) defined by 2hPG≥7.8 mmol/L during OGTT.Research design and methodsWe used baseline data of 1938 individuals from the community-based "Better Health for Better Hong Kong - Hong Kong Family Diabetes Study (BHBHK-HKFDS) Cohort" recruited in 1998–2003. We incorporated routine biochemistry in a validated non-invasive diabetes risk score, and evaluated its performance using area under receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) with internal and external validation.ResultsThe AUROC of the original non-invasive risk score to predict AGT was 0.698 (95% CI, 0.662 to 0.733). Following additional inclusion of fasting plasma glucose, serum potassium, creatinine, and urea, the AUROC increased to 0.778 (95% CI, 0.744 to 0.809, p
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T08:33:51-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003768
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Racial differences in measures of glycemia in the Vitamin D and Type 2
           Diabetes (D2d) Study: a secondary analysis of a randomized trial

    • Authors: LeBlanc, E. S; Pittas, A. G, Nelson, J, Chatterjee, R, Rasouli, N, Rhee, M. K, Pratley, R. E, Desouza, C. V, Neff, L. M, Peters, A. M, Dagogo-Jack, S, Hsia, D. S, the D2d Research Group
      Pages: e003613 - e003613
      Abstract: IntroductionUnderstanding how race may influence the association between A1c and glycemia can improve diabetes screening. We sought to determine whether, for a given A1c level, glucose levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) differed by race.Research design and methodsFrom data collected at 22 US clinical sites, we conducted a cross-sectional study of concurrently measured A1c and OGTT and observational longitudinal follow-up of the subset with high-risk pre-diabetes. Numerical integration methods were used to calculate area under the glycemic curve (AUCglu) during OGTT and least squares regression model to estimate A1c for a given AUCglu by race, controlling for potential confounders.Results1016 black, 2658 white, and 193 Asian persons at risk of diabetes were included in cross-sectional analysis. Of these, 2154 with high-risk pre-diabetes were followed for 2.5 years. For a given A1c level, AUCglu was lower in black versus white participants. After adjustment for potential confounders, A1c levels for a given AUCglu quintile were 0.15–0.20 and 0.02–0.19 percentage points higher in black and Asian compared with white participants, respectively (p
      Keywords: Open access, Cardiovascular and metabolic risk
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T20:13:34-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003613
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Association between lower extremity arterial calcification and coronary
           arterial calcification in a population at increased risk of cardiovascular
           disease

    • Authors: Meer, R; Hoek, A. G, Bouman, E. J, Doesburg, T, Elders, P. J. M, de Jong, P. A, Beulens, J, Study Group, U.-S.
      Pages: e003811 - e003811
      Abstract: IntroductionThere is conflicting evidence whether lower extremity arterial calcification coincides with coronary arterial calcification (CAC). The aims of this study were to investigate the associations between (1) femoral and crural calcification with CAC, and (2) femoral and crural calcification pattern with CAC.Research design and methodsThis cross-sectional study included 405 individuals (74% men, 62.6±10.9 years) from the ARTEMIS cohort study at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) who underwent a CT scan of the femoral, crural and coronary arteries. High CVD risk was defined as history/presence of cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, renal artery stenosis, peripheral artery disease or CVD risk factors: diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, hyperlipidemia. Calcification score within each arterial bed was expressed in Agatston units. Dominant calcification patterns (intimal, medial, absent/indistinguishable) were determined via a CT-guided histologically validated scoring algorithm. Multivariable-adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses were used. Replication was performed in an independent population of individuals with diabetes mellitus type 2 (Early-HFpEF cohort study).ResultsEvery 100-point increase in femoral and crural calcification score was associated with 1.23 (95% CI=1.09 to 1.37, p
      Keywords: Open access, Cardiovascular and metabolic risk
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T20:10:19-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003811
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Burden of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes
           undergoing hemodialysis

    • Authors: Habte-Asres, H. H; Jiang, Y, Rosenthal, M, Wheeler, D. C.
      Pages: e003730 - e003730
      Abstract: IntroductionImpaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) refers to a diminished capacity to detect hypoglycemia. IAH can result in severe and even life-threatening outcomes for individuals with diabetes, especially those in advanced stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of IAH in people with diabetes on hemodialysis.Research design and methodsWe conducted a single-center audit to assess the prevalence of IAH using the Clarke questionnaire. Simultaneously, we measured fear of hypoglycemia with an adapted version of the Hypoglycemia Survey and recorded the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. Data were presented as mean±SD or counts/percentages. Logistic regression was then employed to analyze the association between IAH and various sociodemographic and clinical factors.ResultsWe included 56 participants with diabetes on hemodialysis, with a mean age of 67.2 years (±12.9), of whom 51.8% were male. The ethnic distribution was 23.2% white, 23.2% black, 19.6% Asian, and 33.9% unspecified. The mean HbA1c was 52 mmol/mol (±18.6). The majority (91.1%) had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and 55.4% of those were treated with insulin. The use of diabetes technology was low, with 2.8% of the participants using a continuous glucose monitor. IAH prevalence was 23.2%, and among the 57 participants, 23.6% had a history of severe hypoglycemia, and 60.6% reported fear of hypoglycemia. There were no significant differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between those with IAH and normal hypoglycemia awareness.ConclusionsWe observed that 23.2% of individuals with diabetes undergoing hemodialysis had IAH. IAH was more prevalent in people who reported a fear of hypoglycemia and had a history of severe hypoglycemia episode. The study highlights the unmet needs and disparities in access to diabetes technology within this population.
      Keywords: Open access, Cardiovascular and metabolic risk
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T17:09:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003730
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Unfavorable social determinants of health and risk of mortality in adults
           with diabetes: findings from the National Health Interview Survey

    • Authors: Chang, R; Philip, J, Javed, U, Titus, A, Gardezi, S. K, Kundi, H, Yousefzai, R, Hyder, A. A, Mossialos, E, Nasir, K, Javed, Z.
      Pages: e003710 - e003710
      Abstract: IntroductionUnderstanding the role of social determinants of health as predictors of mortality in adults with diabetes may help improve health outcomes in this high-risk population. Using population-based, nationally representative data, this study investigated the cumulative effect of unfavorable social determinants on all-cause mortality in adults with diabetes.Research design and methodsWe used data from the 2013–2018 National Health Interview Survey, linked to the National Death Index through 2019, for mortality ascertainment. A total of 47 individual social determinants of health were used to categorize participants in quartiles denoting increasing levels of social disadvantage. Poisson regression was used to report age-adjusted mortality rates across increasing social burden. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between cumulative social disadvantage and all-cause mortality in adults with diabetes, adjusting for traditional risk factors.ResultsThe final sample comprised 182 445 adults, of whom 20 079 had diabetes. In the diabetes population, mortality rate increased from 1052.7 per 100 000 person-years in the first quartile (Q1) to 2073.1 in the fourth quartile (Q4). In multivariable models, individuals in Q4 experienced up to twofold higher mortality risk relative to those in Q1. This effect was observed similarly across gender and racial/ethnic subgroups, although with a relatively stronger association for non-Hispanic white participants compared with non-Hispanic black and Hispanic subpopulations.ConclusionsCumulative social disadvantage in individuals with diabetes is associated with over twofold higher risk of mortality, independent of established risk factors. Our findings call for action to screen for unfavorable social determinants and design novel interventions to mitigate the risk of mortality in this high-risk population.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T17:30:07-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003710
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Incident dementia risk among patients with type 2 diabetes receiving
           metformin versus alternative oral glucose-lowering therapy: an
           observational cohort study using UK primary healthcare records

    • Authors: Doran, W; Tunnicliffe, L, Muzambi, R, Rentsch, C. T, Bhaskaran, K, Smeeth, L, Brayne, C, Williams, D. M, Chaturvedi, N, Eastwood, S. V, Dunachie, S. J, Mathur, R, Warren-Gash, C.
      Pages: e003548 - e003548
      Abstract: Introduction4.2 million individuals in the UK have type 2 diabetes, a known risk factor for dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Diabetes treatment may modify this association, but existing evidence is conflicting. We therefore aimed to assess the association between metformin therapy and risk of incident all-cause dementia or MCI compared with other oral glucose-lowering therapies (GLTs).Research design and methodsWe conducted an observational cohort study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink among UK adults diagnosed with diabetes at ≥40 years between 1990 and 2019. We used an active comparator new user design to compare risks of dementia and MCI among individuals initially prescribed metformin versus an alternative oral GLT using Cox proportional hazards regression controlling for sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical confounders. We assessed for interaction by age and sex. Sensitivity analyses included an as-treated analysis to mitigate potential exposure misclassification.ResultsWe included 211 396 individuals (median age 63 years; 42.8% female), of whom 179 333 (84.8%) initiated on metformin therapy. Over median follow-up of 5.4 years, metformin use was associated with a lower risk of dementia (adjusted HR (aHR) 0.86 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.94)) and MCI (aHR 0.92 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.99)). Metformin users aged under 80 years had a lower dementia risk (aHR 0.77 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.85)), which was not observed for those aged ≥80 years (aHR 0.95 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.05)). There was no interaction with sex. The as-treated analysis showed a reduced effect size compared with the main analysis (aHR 0.90 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.98)).ConclusionsMetformin use was associated with lower risks of incident dementia and MCI compared with alternative GLT among UK adults with diabetes. While our findings are consistent with a neuroprotective effect of metformin against dementia, further research is needed to reduce risks of confounding by indication and assess causality.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:54:34-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003548
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Adverse perinatal outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus with and
           without SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy: results from two nationwide
           registries in Germany

    • Authors: Liedtke, T. P; Weber, K. S, Adamczewski, H, Weber, D, Ramsauer, B, Schaefer-Graf, U. M, Groten, T, Strathmann, E. A, Lieb, W, Rüdiger, M, Pecks, U, Kleinwechter, H. J, the CRONOS-GestDiab Collaboration
      Pages: e003724 - e003724
      Abstract: IntroductionPregnancy is a known independent risk factor for a severe course of COVID-19. The relationship of SARS-CoV-2 infection and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on neonatal outcomes is unclear. Our aim was to determine if SARS-CoV-2 infection represents an independent risk factor for adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnancy with GDM.Research design and methodsWe compared data from two German registries including pregnant women with GDM, established during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic (COVID-19-Related Obstetric and Neonatal Outcome Study (CRONOS), a multicenter prospective observational study) and already existing before the pandemic (German registry of pregnant women with GDM; GestDiab). In total, 409 participants with GDM and SARS-CoV-2 infection and 4598 participants with GDM, registered 2018–2019, were eligible for analyses. The primary fetal and neonatal outcomes were defined as: (1) combined: admission to neonatal intensive care unit, stillbirth, and/or neonatal death, and (2) preterm birth before 37+0 weeks of gestation. Large and small for gestational age, maternal insulin therapy, birth weight >4500 g and cesarean delivery were considered as secondary outcomes.ResultsWomen with SARS-CoV-2 infection were younger (32 vs 33 years) and had a higher median body mass index (28 vs 27 kg/m²). In CRONOS, more neonates developed the primary outcome (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.48, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.97) and were born preterm (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.10). Fasting glucose was higher in women in CRONOS versus GestDiab (5.4 vs 5.3 mmol/L) considering each 0.1 mmol/L increase was independently associated with a 5% higher risk of preterm birth among women in CRONOS only (aOR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09).ConclusionsGDM with SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes as compared with GDM without SARS-CoV-2 infection.
      Keywords: Open access, Pathophysiology/complications, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:54:34-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003724
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Impact of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors on cardiovascular
           outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease: propensity score matched
           analysis

    • Authors: Sun, W; Yan, B. P.
      Pages: e003544 - e003544
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:11:19-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003544
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Diabetes and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults: a population-based
           cohort study

    • Authors: Wang, X; Chen, L, Shi, K, Lv, J, Sun, D, Pei, P, Yang, L, Chen, Y, Du, H, Liu, J, Yang, X, Barnard, M, Chen, J, Chen, Z, Li, L, Yu, C, China Kadoorie Biobank Collaborative Group
      Pages: e003721 - e003721
      Abstract: IntroductionCohort evidence of the association of diabetes mellitus (DM) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. Previous studies often describe patients with kidney disease and diabetes as diabetic kidney disease (DKD) or CKD, ignoring other subtypes. The present study aimed to assess the prospective association of diabetes status (no diabetes, pre-diabetes, screened diabetes, previously diagnosed controlled/uncontrolled diabetes with/without antidiabetic treatment) and random plasma glucose (RPG) with CKD risk (including CKD subtypes) among Chinese adults.Research design and methodsThe present study included 472 545 participants from the China Kadoorie Biobank, using baseline information on diabetes and RPG. The incident CKD and its subtypes were collected through linkage with the national health insurance system during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to calculate the HR and 95% CI.ResultsDuring 11.8 years of mean follow-up, 5417 adults developed CKD. Screened plus previously diagnosed diabetes was positively associated with CKD (HR=4.52, 95% CI 4.23 to 4.83), DKD (HR=33.85, 95% CI 29.56 to 38.76), and glomerulonephritis (HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.40 to 1.97). In those with previously diagnosed diabetes, participants with uncontrolled diabetes represented higher risks of CKD, DKD, and glomerulonephritis compared with those with controlled RPG. The risk of DKD was found to rise in participants with pre-diabetes and increased with the elevated RPG level, even in those without diabetes.ConclusionsAmong Chinese adults, diabetes was positively associated with CKD, DKD, and glomerulonephritis. Screen-detected and uncontrolled DM had a high risk of CKD, and pre-diabetes was associated with a greater risk of DKD, highlighting the significance of lifelong glycemic management.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:11:19-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003721
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 primary vaccines and boosters in patients with
           type 2 diabetes mellitus in Hungary (HUN-VE 4 Study)

    • Authors: Molnar, G. A; Voko, Z, Süto, G, Rokszin, G, Nagy, D, Surjan, G, Surjan, O, Nagy, P, Kenessey, I, Weber, A, Palosi, M, Müller, C, Kasler, M, Wittmann, I, Kiss, Z.
      Pages: e003777 - e003777
      Abstract: IntroductionType 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for severe COVID-19 infection and is associated with increased risk of complications. The present study aimed to investigate effectiveness and persistence of different COVID vaccines in persons with or without diabetes during the Delta wave in Hungary.Research design and methodsData sources were the national COVID-19 registry data from the National Public Health Center and the National Health Insurance Fund on the total Hungarian population. The adjusted incidence rate ratios and corresponding 95% CIs were derived from a mixed-effect negative binomial regression model.ResultsA population of 672 240 cases with type 2 diabetes and a control group of 2 974 102 non-diabetic persons free from chronic diseases participated. Unvaccinated elderly persons with diabetes had 2.68 (95% CI 2.47 to 2.91) times higher COVID-19-related mortality rate as the ‘healthy’ controls. Primary immunization effectively equalized the risk of COVID-19 mortality between the two groups. Vaccine effectiveness declined over time, but the booster restored the effectiveness against mortality to over 90%. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness of the primary Pfizer-BioNTech against infection in the 14–120 days of postvaccination period was 71.6 (95% CI 66.3 to 76.1)% in patients aged 65–100 years with type 2 diabetes and 64.52 (95% CI 59.2 to 69.2)% in the controls. Overall, the effectiveness tended to be higher in individuals with diabetes than in controls. The booster vaccines could restore vaccine effectiveness to over 80% concerning risk of infection (eg, patients with diabetes aged 65–100 years: 89.1 (88.1–89.9)% with Pfizer-on-Pfizer, controls 65–100 years old: 86.9 (85.8–88.0)% with Pfizer-on-Pfizer, or patients with diabetes aged 65–100 years: 88.3 (87.2–89.2)% with Pfizer-on-Sinopharm, controls 65–100 years old: 87.8 (86.8–88.7)% with Pfizer-on-Sinopharm).ConclusionsOur data suggest that people with type 2 diabetes may have even higher health gain when getting vaccinated as compared with non-diabetic persons, eliminating the marked, COVID-19-related excess risk of this population. Boosters could restore protection.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:11:19-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003777
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Correction: Normative data on cardiovascular autonomic function in
           Greenlandic Inuit

    • Pages: e002121cor - e002121cor
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:11:19-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2021-002121corr1
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Effects of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors on serum
           uric acid levels in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic
           review and network meta-analysis

    • Authors: Zhang, L; Zhang, F, Bai, Y, Huang, L, Zhong, Y, Zhang, X.
      Pages: e003836 - e003836
      Abstract: Elevated serum uric acid levels are an independent predictor of occurrence and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strongly associated with prognosis. Several clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors. To evaluate and rank the effects and safety of various SGLT-2 for serum uric acid levels in patients with CKD. We performed a systematic PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science search, including studies published before July 1, 2023. Two researchers independently extracted data on study characteristics and outcomes and assessed study quality using the Cochrane Collaboration’s risk of bias tool 2. The gemtc package of R software was used to perform network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework. The primary outcome was serum uric acid levels, and the secondary outcome was adverse events. Effect sizes are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs), risk ratio (RR), and 95% CI, respectively. The certainty of evidence was evaluated using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) criteria. Eight RCTs (9367 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. The results of the paired meta-analysis showed that SGLT-2 inhibitors significantly reduced serum uric acid levels in patients with CKD compared with the placebo group (SMD –0.22; 95% CI –0.42 to –0.03; GRADE: low). Pooled analysis of any adverse events reported in the included studies showed similar incidence rates in the SGLT-2 inhibitor and placebo groups (RR: 0.99; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.00; p=0.147; GRADE: high). Subgroup analysis showed a statistically significant difference only for tofogliflozin. Further network meta-analysis showed that dapagliflozin 10 mg and ipragliflozin 50 mg may be the most effective in reducing uric acid levels. SGLT-2 inhibitors significantly reduced serum uric acid levels in patients with CKD, and dapagliflozin 10 mg and ipragliflozin 50 mg may be the optimal dosages. SGLT-2 inhibitors hold great promise as an antidiabetic therapeutic option for patients with CKD who have elevated serum uric acid levels. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42023456581.
      Keywords: Open access, Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T02:00:11-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003836
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Association of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio with cardiometabolic
           risk markers and pre-diabetes in adults with normoglycemia,
           normoalbuminuria, and normotension with parental type 2 diabetes

    • Authors: Everett, M; Rushing, N, Asuzu, P, Wan, J, Dagogo-Jack, S.
      Pages: e003609 - e003609
      Abstract: IntroductionThis is a post hoc analysis of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR) within the normoalbuminuric range in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors among initially normoglycemic, normotensive participants in the Pathobiology of Prediabetes in a Biracial Cohort (POP-ABC) Study.Research design and methods308 healthy African American (AA) and European American (EA) participants in the POP-ABC Study underwent baseline assessments, including oral glucose tolerance test, anthropometry, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR), lipids, adipocytokines, insulin sensitivity and secretion. Participants were followed quarterly for 5.5 years (mean 2.62 years) for the primary outcome of incident pre-diabetes.ResultsThe cohort’s mean fasting glucose was 92.1±6.90 mg/dL, 2-hour plasma glucose was 123±25.0 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure was 123±15.9 mm Hg, and diastolic blood pressure was 74±8.80 mm Hg. Baseline uACR levels (range 1–29 mg/g) were similar in AA versus EA participants (6.40 mg/g±4.80 vs 6.80±5.40 mg/g, p=0.52), higher in women than men (7.30 mg/g±5.30 vs 4.60±3.90 mg/g, p
      Keywords: Open access, Cardiovascular and metabolic risk
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T03:34:31-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003609
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Increased glycemic variability in pregnant women with Roux-en-Y gastric
           bypass compared with sleeve gastrectomy

    • Authors: Alexiadou, K; Ansari, S, Jones, B, Yu, C, Dornhorst, A, Oliver, N, Tsironis, C, Purkayastha, S, Ahmed, A, Agha-Jaffar, R, Khoo, B, Tan, T. M.-M.
      Pages: e003642 - e003642
      Abstract: IntroductionBariatric surgery is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as reduced birth weight and premature birth. One possible mechanism for this is increased glycemic variability (GV) which occurs after bariatric surgery. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) versus vertical sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on GV during pregnancy and to investigate the relationships of GV, type of bariatric surgery and maternal and neonatal outcomes.Research design and methodsFourteen pregnant women after RYGB and 14 after SG were investigated with continuous glucose monitoring in their second or third trimester in this observational study carried out as part of routine clinical care.ResultsPregnant women with RYGB had similar mean interstitial glucose values but significantly increased indices of GV and a lower %time in range 3.9–7.8 mmol/L (70–140 mg/dL), compared with SG.ConclusionsPregnant women who have undergone RYGB have greater GV during pregnancy compared with those who have undergone SG. Further research is needed to establish the relationship between GV and pregnancy outcomes to determine the preferred bariatric operation in women of reproductive age, and whether interventions to reduce GV might improve outcomes.
      Keywords: Open access, Obesity studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T03:34:31-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003642
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Association between brain imaging biomarkers and continuous glucose
           monitoring-derived glycemic control indices in Japanese patients with type
           2 diabetes mellitus

    • Authors: Inoue, C; Kusunoki, Y, Ohigashi, M, Osugi, K, Kitajima, K, Takagi, A, Inoue, M, Yagi, C, Tsunoda, T, Kakutani, M, Kadoya, M, Konishi, K, Katsuno, T, Koyama, H, The Hyogo Diabetes Hypoglycemia Cognition Complications (HDHCC) Study Group
      Pages: e003744 - e003744
      Abstract: IntroductionAlthough type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with alterations in brain structure, the relationship between glycemic control indices and brain imaging markers remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the association between continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)-derived glycemic control indices and brain imaging biomarkers assessed by MRI.Research design and methodsThis cross-sectional study included 150 patients with T2DM. The severity of cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) was assessed using MRI for deep and subcortical white matter and periventricular hyperintensities. The degree of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Each participant wore a retrospective CGM for 14 consecutive days, and glycemic control indices, such as time in range (TIR) and glycemia risk index (GRI), were calculated.ResultsThe proportion of patients with severe WMLs showed a decreasing trend with increasing TIR (P for trend=0.006). The proportion of patients with severe WMLs showed an increasing trend with worsening GRI (P for trend=0.011). In contrast, no significant association was observed between the degree of MTA and CGM-derived glycemic control indices, including TIR (P for trend=0.325) and GRI (P for trend=0.447).ConclusionsThe findings of this study indicate that the severity of WMLs is associated with TIR and GRI, which are indices of the quality of glycemic control.Trial registration numberUMIN000032143.
      Keywords: Open access, Pathophysiology/complications
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T03:34:31-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003744
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Continuous intrafemoral artery infusion of urokinase improves diabetic
           foot ulcers healing and decreases cardiovascular events in a long-term
           follow-up study

    • Authors: Tong, J; Zhang, J, Xiang, L, Li, S, Xu, J, Zhu, G, Dong, J, Cheng, Y, Ren, H, Liu, M, Yue, L, Xiang, G.
      Pages: e003414 - e003414
      Abstract: IntroductionDiabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a disabling complication of diabetes mellitus. Here, we attempted to assess whether long-term intrafemoral artery infusion of low-dose urokinase therapy improved DFUs and decreased cardiovascular events in patients with DFUs.Research design and methodsThis trial was a single-center, randomized, parallel study. A total of 195 patients with DFU were randomized to continuous intrafemoral thrombolysis or conventional therapy groups. The continuous intrafemoral thrombolysis group received continuous intrafemoral urokinase injection for 7 days, and conventional therapy just received wound debridement and dressing change. Then, a follow-up of average 6.5 years was performed.ResultsCompared with conventional therapy, at the first 1 month of intervention stage, the ulcers achieved a significant improvement in continuous intrafemoral thrombolysis group including a complete closure (72.4% vs 17.5%), an improved ulcer (27.6% vs 25.8%), unchanged or impaired ulcer (0% vs 56.7%). During the 6.5-year follow-up, for the primary outcome of ulcer closure rate, continuous intrafemoral thrombolysis therapy obtained a better complete healing rate (HR 3.42 (95% CI 2.35 to 4.98, p
      Keywords: Open access, Clinical care/education/nutrition/psychosocial research
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T08:07:13-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003414
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Association of GLP-1 secretion with parameters of glycemic control in
           women after gestational diabetes mellitus

    • Authors: Pappa, E; Busygina, K, Harada, S, Hermann, H, Then, C, Lechner, A, Ferrari, U, Seissler, J.
      Pages: e003706 - e003706
      Abstract: IntroductionWomen with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while the exact mechanisms underlying its pathophysiology are still unclear. We investigated the association of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response to oral glucose with parameters of glycemic control in women with previous GDM in the prospective PPSDiab (Prediction, Prevention, and Subclassification of Type 2 Diabetes) study.Research design and methodsGlucose metabolism parameters and GLP-1 secretion were analyzed during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in women with previous GDM (n=129) and women with a history of normal glucose tolerance (n=67) during pregnancy (controls). First- and second-phase insulin and GLP-1 secretion in relation to plasma glucose (PG) levels were assessed, and development of pre-diabetes was analyzed after 5-year follow-up among women with previous GDM and a normal glycemic state at baseline (n=58).ResultsThe area under the curve (AUC during the OGTT 0–120 min) of PG and insulin but not GLP-1 differed significantly between post-GDM women and controls. However, women with previous GDM had a significantly decreased GLP-1 response in relation to PG and plasma insulin during the second phase of the OGTT. After a follow-up of 5 years, 19.0% post-GDM women with a normal glycemic state at the baseline visit developed abnormal glucose metabolism. The total, first- and second-phase AUC GLP-1/PG and GLP-1/insulin ratios were not associated with development of abnormal glucose tolerance.ConclusionsWomen with previous GDM showed a reduced GLP-1 response in relation to PG and insulin concentrations indicating early abnormalities in glucose metabolism. However, the altered GLP-1 response to oral glucose did not predict progression to pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes in the first 5 years after GDM.
      Keywords: Open access, Metabolism
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T08:41:56-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003706
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Should insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion (HOMA-{beta}), and
           visceral fat area be considered for improving the performance of diabetes
           risk prediction models

    • Authors: Hu, H; Nakagawa, T, Honda, T, Yamamoto, S, Mizoue, T.
      Pages: e003680 - e003680
      Abstract: IntroductionInsulin resistance and defects in pancreatic beta cells are the two major pathophysiologic abnormalities that underlie type 2 diabetes. In addition, visceral fat area (VFA) is reported to be a stronger predictor for diabetes than body mass index (BMI). Here, we tested whether the performance of diabetes prediction models could be improved by adding HOMA-IR and HOMA-β and replacing BMI with VFA.Research design and methodsWe developed five prediction models using data from a cohort study (5578 individuals, of whom 94.7% were male, and 943 had incident diabetes). We conducted a baseline model (model 1) including age, sex, BMI, smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and HbA1c. Subsequently, we developed another four models: model 2, predictors in model 1 plus fasting plasma glucose (FPG); model 3, predictors in model 1 plus HOMA-IR and HOMA-β; model 4, predictors in model 1 plus FPG, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-β; model 5, replaced BMI with VFA in model 2. We assessed model discrimination and calibration for the first 10 years of follow-up.ResultsThe addition of FPG to model 1 obviously increased the value of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.79 (95% CI 0.78, 0.81) to 0.84 (0.83, 0.85). Compared with model 1, model 2 also significantly improved the risk reclassification and discrimination, with a continuous net reclassification improvement index of 0.61 (0.56, 0.70) and an integrated discrimination improvement index of 0.09 (0.08, 0.10). Adding HOMA-IR and HOMA-β (models 3 and 4) or replacing BMI with VFA (model 5) did not further materially improve the performance.ConclusionsThis cohort study, primarily composed of male workers, suggests that a model with BMI, FPG, and HbA1c effectively identifies those at high diabetes risk. However, adding HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, or replacing BMI with VFA does not significantly improve the model. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T08:50:01-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003680
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • High prevalence of retinopathy in young-onset type 2 diabetes and possible
           sex differences: insights from Norwegian general practice

    • Authors: Tibballs, K; Jenum, A. K, Kirkeboen, L, Berg, T. J, Claudi, T, Cooper, J. G, Nokleby, K, Sandberg, S, Straand, J, Buhl, E. S.
      Pages: e003624 - e003624
      Abstract: IntroductionPeople with young-onset type 2 diabetes (YOD), defined as diabetes diagnosis before age 40, have a high lifetime risk of vascular complications. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of YOD among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Norwegian general practice and explore associations between age at diabetes diagnosis and retinopathy overall and in men and women.Research design and methodsWe collected cross-sectional data from general practice electronic medical records of 10 241 adults with T2D in 2014, and repeated measurements of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from 2012 to 2014. Using multivariate logistic regression, we assessed associations between YOD and later-onset T2D, sex and retinopathy.ResultsOf all individuals with T2D, 10% were diagnosed before 40 years of age in both sexes. Compared with later-onset T2D, HbA1c increased faster in YOD, and at the time of diagnosis HbA1c was higher in men, particularly in YOD. Retinopathy was found in 25% with YOD, twice as frequently as in later onset. After adjustments for confounders (age, country of origin, education, body mass index), OR of retinopathy was increased in both men with YOD (OR 2.6 (95% CI 2.0 to 3.5)) and women with YOD (OR 2.2 (1.5 to 3.0)). After further adjustments for potential mediators (diabetes duration and HbA1c), the higher OR persisted in men with YOD (OR 1.8 (1.3 to 2.4)) but was attenuated and no longer significant for women with YOD.ConclusionsRetinopathy prevalence was more than twice as high in YOD as in later-onset T2D. The increased likelihood of retinopathy in YOD was partly mediated by higher HbA1c and longer T2D duration, but after accounting for these factors it remained higher in men with YOD.
      Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology/health services research
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T07:29:50-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003624
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Ocular microvascular complications in diabetic retinopathy: insights from
           machine learning

    • Authors: Ahmed, T. S; Shah, J, Zhen, Y. N. B, Chua, J, Wong, D. W. K, Nusinovici, S, Tan, R, Tan, G, Schmetterer, L, Tan, B.
      Pages: e003758 - e003758
      Abstract: IntroductionDiabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of preventable blindness among working-age adults, primarily driven by ocular microvascular complications from chronic hyperglycemia. Comprehending the complex relationship between microvascular changes in the eye and disease progression poses challenges, traditional methods assuming linear or logistical relationships may not adequately capture the intricate interactions between these changes and disease advances. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the microvascular involvement of diabetes mellitus (DM) and non-proliferative DR with the implementation of non-parametric machine learning methods.Research design and methodsWe conducted a retrospective cohort study that included optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) images collected from a healthy group (196 eyes), a DM no DR group (120 eyes), a mild DR group (71 eyes), and a moderate DR group (66 eyes). We implemented a non-parametric machine learning method for four classification tasks that used parameters extracted from the OCTA images as predictors: DM no DR versus healthy, mild DR versus DM no DR, moderate DR versus mild DR, and any DR versus no DR. SHapley Additive exPlanations values were used to determine the importance of these parameters in the classification.ResultsWe found large choriocapillaris flow deficits were the most important for healthy versus DM no DR, and became less important in eyes with mild or moderate DR. The superficial microvasculature was important for the healthy versus DM no DR and mild DR versus moderate DR tasks, but not for the DM no DR versus mild DR task—the stage when deep microvasculature plays an important role. Foveal avascular zone metric was in general less affected, but its involvement increased with worsening DR.ConclusionsThe findings from this study provide valuable insights into the microvascular involvement of DM and DR, facilitating the development of early detection methods and intervention strategies.
      Keywords: Open access, Pathophysiology/complications
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T07:29:50-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003758
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Young-onset type 2 diabetes and retinopathy: evidence of an adverse
           phenotype

    • Authors: Song; S. H.
      Pages: e003899 - e003899
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T07:29:50-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003899
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
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Showing 1 - 153 of 153 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 280)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Blood Pressure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 247)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access  
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal  
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
eJHaem     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cell Science & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Plasmatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription  
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

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