Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8185 journals)
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HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 151 of 151 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Blood Pressure     Open Access  
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 411)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 469)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access  
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
eJHaem     Open Access  
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access  
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free  
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 145)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Diabetes Educator
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.011
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0145-7217 - ISSN (Online) 1554-6063
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Management:
           A Qualitative Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kacey Ferguson, Hailey Moore, Jasmine H. Kaidbey, Shazmenna Khattak, Abbas Saeed, Fran R. Cogen, Randi Streisand, Allison C. Sylvetsky
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of this study was to understand impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on pediatric type 1 diabetes management.Methods:In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 parents of children (age 6-12 years) with type 1 diabetes. Parents responded to 8 open-ended questions about their experiences managing their children’s type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. All interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using qualitative thematic methods.Results:Parents reported both positive and negative aspects of managing their children’s type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Facilitators of diabetes management included spending more time together at home and enhanced convenience of telehealth appointments and online supply ordering. Parents also described difficulties managing their children’s type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic, including a lack of structure in their child’s daily routine, which led to increases in sedentary behavior. Furthermore, they reported psychosocial challenges of type 1 diabetes management, which were exacerbated by the pandemic.Conclusion:While the COVID-19 pandemic was described as having overall positive impacts on pediatric type 1 diabetes management, efforts to support parents in increasing children’s physical activity and reducing screen time are needed, along with readily accessible mental health resources for both parents and their children with type 1 diabetes.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T12:36:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221125701
       
  • Effectiveness of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving
           Community-Based Intervention for Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes
           Mellitus in Singapore

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      Authors: Siang Joo Seah, Susana Concordo Harding, Jing Wang, Su Aw, Jocelin Lam, Raymond Boon Tar Lim
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a community-based intervention on improving knowledge about diabetes, self-care behaviors, and glycemic control among older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Singapore, a country in Asia with a high prevalence of diabetes.Methods:A 3-arm cluster randomized controlled trial involving community-dwelling older adults ages 55 to 99 with T2DM was conducted. Intervention group 1 and 2 participants received a 12-session intervention program designed to teach knowledge and practical skills in diabetes self-care with psychological techniques for behavioral change like problem solving, goal setting, and motivational interviewing. In addition, intervention group 2 participants received a glucometer and a supply of accessories each. The control group received routine care from their health care providers.Results:Compared to the control group, intervention group 2 reported an increase in medication adherence and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) at 3-month follow-up and increased knowledge about diabetes and self-care behavior in general diet control at 6-month follow-up.Conclusions:The community-based intervention should be extended to more older adults with T2DM in the community. Glucometers and accessories could be provided at subsidized rates or be made free contingent on older adults’ income status to overcome the barrier of performing SMBG.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T12:35:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221125695
       
  • DKA Prevention and Insulin Pumps: Lessons Learned From a Large Pediatric
           Pump Practice

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      Authors: Elizabeth Ann Doyle, Stuart Alan Weinzimer, William Tamborlane
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This purpose of the study was to describe recent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) incidence data in youth with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps and the impact of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) on DKA rates.Methods:DKA data were obtained through a retrospective chart review of insulin pump users (ages
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T11:07:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221125699
       
  • Diabetes Care Network: A Novel Model to Disseminate Team-Based Diabetes
           Specialty Care in a Rural Population

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      Authors: Margaret F. Zupa, Janice Beattie, Monique Boudreaux-Kelly, Meg Larson, Brandi Lumley, Stacey Lutz-McCain, Ashley Summerville, Archana Bandi
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of a novel approach to provide diabetes specialty team care to rural patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) on clinical outcomes and processes of care.Methods:Diabetes Care Network (DCN) provides Veterans with T2DM and elevated A1C an initial 6-week period of remote self-management education and support and medication management by a centrally located team of diabetes specialists. Participants are then comanaged by remote liaisons embedded in rural primary care facilities for the remainder of the 12-month intervention. In this pre-post intervention study, 87 Veterans enrolled in DCN from 2 different clinical sites had baseline and 12-month postenrollment A1C, systolic blood pressure, weight, and LDL cholesterol levels collected and compared using paired t tests.Results:Participants were mostly male and White with elevated baseline A1C. Participants from both sites had significant improvement in A1C over the 12-month intervention period compared to an increase in the 12 months prior to enrollment. There were also significant improvements in LDL and systolic blood pressure at 1 site, with no significant change in weight at either site.Conclusions:DCN participants had significant improvement in A1C after not meeting similar goals previously in a robust primary care setting. A technology-enabled collaborative partnership between centrally located diabetes care teams and local liaisons is a feasible approach to enhance access to diabetes specialty care for rural populations.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T11:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221125690
       
  • General Anxiety, Diabetes-Specific Anxiety, and Quality of Life in
           Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

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      Authors: Kaitlyn Rechenberg, Rebecca Koerner MS
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to identify the differential associations between general anxiety, diabetes-specific anxiety, and diabetes-specific quality of life (QOL).Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted of 146 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) ages 13 to 17 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing demographic characteristics, general anxiety, diabetes-specific anxiety, depressive symptoms, and diabetes-specific QOL.Results:The final sample of 146 adolescents was mostly male, non-Hispanic White, mean age of 14.5 ± 1.27, having diabetes for more than 1 year, and using insulin pumps. Higher diabetes-specific anxiety was associated with poorer general treatment-related QOL, but general anxiety was not. General anxiety, diabetes-specific anxiety, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with diabetes-specific treatment-related QOL, worry-specific QOL, and poorer communication-related QOL.Conclusions:There may be a differential impact of general anxiety and diabetes-specific anxiety in adolescents with T1DM. Diabetes-specific anxiety may be a more important factor in adolescents reporting poorer general treatment-related QOL, worry-related QOL, and communication-related QOL, while general anxiety and diabetes-specific anxiety appear to similarly impact poorer diabetes-specific treatment-related QOL. Diabetes-specific anxiety may be a more important component of QOL in adolescents. Targeted interventions may be required to effectively improve QOL.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T11:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221125689
       
  • Current and Emerging Trends in Diabetes Care and Education: 2021 National
           Practice and Workforce Survey

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      Authors: Jan Kavookjian, Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, Monica M. DiNardo, Barbara Kocurek, Leslie E. Kolb, Dawn Noe, Donna Ryan, Magon May Saunders, Michael See, Sacha Uelmen
      First page: 307
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the National Practice Survey is to understand current trends related to the diabetes care and education specialist’s integration into the full care team beyond formal diabetes self-management education and support services.Methods:The 2021 National Practice Survey (NPS2021) contained 61 questions for all respondents with an additional 56 questions pertaining to specific diabetes care and education segments. An anonymous survey was administered online to respondents who are diabetes care and education specialists or a part of the diabetes care team. Email lists were obtained from the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists (ADCES) and the Certification Board for Diabetes Care and Education (CBDCE). Approximately 39,258 emails were sent, and 3357 were undeliverable, with 3797 surveys completed between February 9 to April 6, 2021, resulting in an 11% response rate. The response rate may have been affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency.Results:Diabetes care and education specialists represent an interprofessional specialty of nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, health educators, and others. Many respondents reported holding either certification as a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist (CDCES) or being Board Certified in Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM). In addition, there appears to be a slight increase in those trained as a Lifestyle Coach to provide the National Diabetes Prevention Program (CDC Recognized National DPP) compared to NPS2017. Most respondents reported being Caucasian/White (84%), followed by Hispanic or Latinx (7%) and African American/Black and Asian/Asian American (at 4% each), like in previous surveys. Respondents reported diverse care delivery models, including traditional and nontraditional services, and expanded models of care such as population health/risk stratification models, the Chronic Care Model, Accountable Care Organizations, managed care, and others.Conclusion:The NPS2021 describes DCES workforce opportunities and challenges. Identifying and addressing those that impact the specialty’s sustainability, diversity, and growth will guide strategies for the future workforce and their practice settings. Opportunities identified include embracing diabetes community care coordinators for person-centered delivery of care and education services and supporting frontline health care team members to increase competence and expertise in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, diabetes care, and education/support for related chronic diseases. In addition, as health care evolves, it creates opportunities for the DCESs to demonstrate a broader, key role as part of the diabetes care team.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:21:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221120787
       
  • Factors Associated With Diabetes Self-Care Behaviors of People With Visual
           Impairment: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Sun Ju Chang, Hee Jung Kim, Kyoung-eun Lee, Eunjin Yang
      First page: 324
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to examine the factors associated with diabetes self-care behaviors (DSCB) in people with visual impairment (PVI), including demographics, disease-related characteristics, and psychosocial factors (self-efficacy, depression, and family support).Methods:A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted. Adults with visual impairment and diabetes were recruited online and through posting notices, and a total of 141 participants were included. Measurements were completed using email and telephone surveys. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the factors associated with DSCB.Results:Higher self-efficacy and positive family support were significant predictors of better DSCB, whereas higher negative family support was a significant predictor of worse DSCB. Diabetes medication regimen was another major influencing factor on DSCB. However, depression was not associated with DSCB.Conclusion:Diabetes interventions for the visually impaired should have strategies to improve vulnerable areas of diabetes self-care, such as blood glucose monitoring. Health care providers are needed to consider diabetes education programs focused on improving self-efficacy or include family members in interventions to promote DSCB in PVI. Further studies are required to understand the problems and solutions for diabetes self-care in this population.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T05:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221116023
       
  • Diabetes Distress in Emerging Adulthood: Content Validity of the Problem
           Areas in Diabetes—Emerging Adult Version (PAID-EA) Using Qualitative
           Analysis

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      Authors: Katherine Wentzell, Rebecca Vitale, Lori Laffel
      First page: 336
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of this study was to explore the emotional work of diabetes during emerging adulthood and to explicate the validity of a newly developed measure of diabetes distress (DD) for use with emerging adults living with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), the Problem Areas in Diabetes—Emerging Adult version (PAID-EA).Methods:Young people ages 18 to 30 with T1DM were recruited online to complete a cross-sectional survey including measures of DD, depressive symptomology, and the PAID-EA. To evaluate content validity, 2 open-ended questions asked what was the most significant emotion or worry discussed in the survey items and what feelings were missed in those items. Responses were analyzed using directed qualitative content analysis.Results:A total of 254 (87%) participants responded to at least 1 of the 2 open-ended questions. Three themes and 1 subtheme were identified: (1) fear of the future with the subtheme of worry about the cost of diabetes, (2) acute worries about living with diabetes, and (3) challenges with finding support. More PAID-EA items corresponded with these themes than items on the original Problem Areas in Diabetes or Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, supporting the validity of the PAID-EA and clarifying the developmental-stage-specific aspects of DD.Conclusions:Emerging adulthood is a period in which the future should hold infinite possibility, but young people with T1DM describe a staggering fear of the future with markedly limited possibilities, supporting the need to measure the developmental-stage-specific experience of DD as captured on the PAID-EA.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T05:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221110817
       
  • Health Professionals’ Opinions About Secondary Prevention of
           Diabetes-Related Foot Disease

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      Authors: Aaron Drovandi, Leonard Seng, Benjamin Crowley, Malindu E. Fernando, Rebecca Evans, Jonathan Golledge
      First page: 349
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of health professionals regarding the ideal design of a remotely delivered diabetes-related foot disease (DFD) secondary prevention program.Methods:A qualitative study involving 33 semistructured phone interviews was conducted with health professionals with experience managing DFD. Interviews discussed the role of health professionals in managing DFD, their experience in using telehealth, perceived management priorities, preferences for a secondary prevention management program, and perceived barriers and facilitators for such a program. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, and inductive thematic analysis was used to derive key themes.Results:Three themes were derived: (1) barriers in current model of DFD care, (2) facilitators and ideas for a remotely delivered secondary prevention program, and (3) potential challenges in implementation. DFD care remains acute-care focused, with variability in access to care and a lack of “clinical ownership.” Patients were perceived as often having poor knowledge and competing priorities, meaning engagement in self-care remains poor. Participants felt a remote secondary prevention program should be simple to follow and individualized to patients’ context, with embedded support from a case manager and local multidisciplinary service providers. Challenges to implementation included limited DFD awareness, poor patient motivation, patient-related issues with accessing and using technology, and the inability to accurately assess and treat the foot over telehealth.Conclusions:Health professionals felt that an ideal remotely delivered secondary prevention program should be tailored to patients’ needs with embedded support from a case manager and complemented with multidisciplinary collaboration with local service providers.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T09:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221112115
       
  • Experiences of Using Wearable Continuous Glucose Monitors in Adults With
           Diabetes: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

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      Authors: Hee Sun Kang, Hyang Rang Park, Chun-Ja Kim, Savitri Singh-Carlson
      First page: 362
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to understand the experiences of adults with diabetes wearing a continuous glucose monitor (CGM).Methods:This qualitative, descriptive study included 19 adults with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, who had used the FreeStyle Libre CGM for at least 4 weeks, from an outpatient clinic at a university-affiliated hospital in Korea. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach.Results:The content analysis revealed 3 major themes—navigating glucose level fluctuations, reframing diabetes self-care and improving quality of life, and device improvement and service quality. Participants reported that CGMs offered convenient glucose level monitoring, allowed early response to rapid glucose changes, and facilitated effective patient-clinician communication. Participants expressed concerns about the financial burden and limited services, recommending improvements for devices, consumer services, and health insurance coverage.Conclusions:Study findings indicated that using wearable CGMs could improve self-care and quality of life in adults with diabetes. Using CGMs could improve patients’ understanding of how diabetes self-care management affects real-time glucose levels. Health care providers could support patients’ self-care by using device data. Improvements in quality, services, and insurance coverage could increase user satisfaction and promote self-care.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T11:37:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221116899
       
  • Understanding Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management in Racial/Ethnic Minorities:
           Application of the Extended Parallel Processing Model and Sensemaking
           Theory in a Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Sarah Bauerle Bass, Deborah Swavely, Shaneisha Allen, Patrick J. Kelly, Ariel Hoadley, Yaara Zisman-Ilani, Maryyam Durrani, Jesse Brajuha, Amy Iwamaye, Daniel J. Rubin
      First page: 372
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of the study was to understand the role of perceived disease threat and self-efficacy in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients’ self-management by using the extended parallel processing model (EPPM) and sensemaking theory.Methods:Semistructured interviews (n = 25) were conducted with T2DM patients from an urban safety-net hospital. Participants were 50% male/female median age was 55 years and 76% were Black. Participants were categorized by EPPM group based on validated questionnaires (high/low disease threat [HT/LT]; high/low self-efficacy [HE/LE]). Nine were HT/HE, 7 HT/LE, 6 LT/HE, and 3 LT/LE. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using inductive and deductive coding. Sensemaking theory was applied to contextualize and analyze data.Results:Those with HT indicated threat fluctuated throughout diagnosis but that certain triggers (eg, diabetic complications) drove changes in disease view. Those in the HT/HE group more frequently expressed disease acceptance, whereas the HT/LE group more often expressed anger or denial. HT/HE participants expressed having adequate social support and higher trust in health care providers. HT/LE participants reported limited problem-solving skills. In those with LT, the HE group took more ownership of self-management behaviors. The LT/LE group had heightened positive and negative emotional responses that appeared to limit their ability to perform self-care. They also less frequently described problem-solving skills, instead expressing reliance on medical guidance from their providers.Conclusions:EPPM and sensemaking theory are effective frameworks for understanding how perceived health threat and self-efficacy may impede T2DM self-care. A greater focus on these constructs is needed to improve care among low-income minority patients, especially those with low threat and self-efficacy.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T09:34:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221116904
       
  • Diabetes Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Care in Asian American and Pacific
           Islanders of Texas: Data From the 2015–2019 Behavioral Risk Factors
           Surveillance System

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      Authors: Angelina P. Nguyen, Alona D. Angosta, Weiming Ke, Thy M. Khong, Connie C. Tran, Miyong T. Kim
      First page: 387
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of this study was to investigate the health status and needs of the Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) population with diabetes in Texas.Methods:This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of data collected from the Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System in Texas from 2015 to 2019 for non-Hispanic White (NHW) and AAPI adults.Results:Although the overall crude diabetes prevalence was lower in AAPI adults, age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was higher than in NHWs. Significant risk factors associated with diabetes in the AAPI group included being male, marital status, lower education levels, lower income, being overweight/obese, and having a sedentary lifestyle. Engagement in self-management activities (checking blood glucose, checking feet, attending a diabetes management course) was lower in AAPIs than in NHWs.Conclusions:Given stiff barriers to adequate screening and self-management support in diabetes care among ethnic populations such as AAPIs, targeted efforts to improve diabetes screening and effective care are warranted. Because today’s AAPI populations are predominantly first-generation immigrant groups who suffer from language barriers, efforts should be made to develop health surveys in multiple languages for wider inclusion of understudied groups like AAPIs in diabetes-related research.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T05:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221116902
       
  • Building the 2022 Diabetes Technology Practice Competencies Using Modified
           Delphi Methodology

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      Authors: Allyson S. Hughes, Anastasia Albanese-O’Neill, Jane Jeffrie Seley, Kirsten Yehl, Patty Scalzo, Joanne Rinker, Shivajirao P. Patil
      First page: 400
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The purpose of this study was to construct professional competencies for diabetes technology use in various care settings reflecting the mission of the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists (ADCES).Method:ADCES convened a core team of nationally representative diabetes technology experts to develop professional competencies specifically related to diabetes technology use. A modified Delphi methodology, which comprised 4 rounds, was used for consensus development among these experts. First, experts developed and arrived at a consensus on the initial draft of competencies. They also identified health care professionals and staff essential for effective technology integration in various diabetes care settings. A survey was completed by diabetes technology experts that are members of ADCES. Next, a multidisciplinary focus group was conducted to gain feedback. Finally, the edited competencies were distributed via survey for feedback by diabetes technology experts from various disciplines.Results:One hundred four diabetes technology experts in the United States participated in the final survey, representing various health care professions and clinical settings. A final set of 94 competencies across 7 domains was determined.Conclusion:Modified Delphi methodology is an effective way to utilize multidisciplinary expertise to develop diabetes technology-related competencies for diabetes care professionals and staff in a variety of settings. These competencies align with the mission of ADCES to empower diabetes care and education specialists to expand the horizons of innovative education, management, and support.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T02:33:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221120900
       
  • Impact of Diabetes Self-Management Education/Support on Self-Reported
           Quality of Life in Youth With Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes

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      Authors: Jan Kavookjian, Jacqueline B. LaManna, Patricia Davidson, Jean W. Davis, Shahariar Mohammed Fahim, Cassidi C. McDaniel, Gladys Ekong, Andrew Todd, Kirsten Yehl, Carla Cox
      First page: 406
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The persistent requirement of self-management for diabetes impacts quality of life (QoL), yet the literature for impact of diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) on QoL in youth has not been synthesized and reported. The purpose of this review was to systematically identify and describe the state of the science exploring the impact of DSMES on self-reported QoL in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM).Methods:A modified Cochrane review was conducted. Retained studies were published in the English language between January 1, 2007, and March 31, 2020. Included studies specified that the intervention had diabetes education addressing at least 1 or more of The Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists’ ADCES7 Self-Care BehaviorsTM (ADCES7™) and used an established self-reported QoL measure. Retained studies were assessed for risk of bias.Results:Eleven studies reported in 12 articles were retained. The interventions were primarily delivered to youth with T1DM or T2DM and included caregivers/families in some studies. The ADCES7™ were addressed across the retained studies. Five of the 11 studies assessed QoL as the primary outcome and 6 studies as a secondary outcome.Conclusion:To enhance the QoL outcomes and to provide insight into how to positively impact self-perceptions of QoL, ongoing generic and diabetes-specific QoL assessments are warranted for youth with T1DM or T2DM. Further research is needed in structured DSMES programs to help reduce variability in research designs, methods, measures, and outcomes to generate evidence for best practices that can be translated and disseminated into real-world settings.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T10:19:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221115450
       
  • Professional Competencies for Diabetes Technology Use in the Care Setting

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      Authors: Shivajirao P. Patil, Anastasia Albanese-O’Neill, Kirsten Yehl, Jane Jeffrie Seley, Allyson S. Hughes
      First page: 437
      Abstract: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The integration of diabetes technology into diabetes care and self-management is evolving so rapidly that providing sufficient support has become an obstacle for many health care professionals (HCPs) in practice. Diabetes technology requires HCPs to stay current with treatment goals and practice guidelines. Diabetes care and education specialists (DCESs) are well positioned to take on this challenge by seizing opportunities to apply their skills, knowledge, and experience to contribute to a technology-enabled practice environment. Diabetes technology includes devices, hardware, and software utilized to manage all aspects of diabetes care, including lifestyle management, glucose monitoring, and insulin delivery. The complexities of caring for persons with diabetes (PWD) who utilize diabetes technology is best accomplished in partnership with other members of the care team and support staff to cover all aspects of technology including prior authorizations, onboarding PWD, downloading and interpreting data, and supporting ongoing utilization. The purpose of this article is to introduce a comprehensive set of role-based competencies for HCPs, DCESs, and staff for the selection, implementation, and sustainability of diabetes technology when providing diabetes care, education, and support. The role-based competencies described in this article are intended to support the initiation, continuation, and optimal use of diabetes technology in practice through ongoing education and guidance of care team members.Conclusion:This article describes the diabetes technology competencies essential for all levels of the care team and support staff in various care settings to deliver comprehensive diabetes management and support to PWD utilizing diabetes technology in their self-care regimen.
      Citation: The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T02:25:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26350106221120889
       
 
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