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HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 151 of 151 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Haematologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Open Access  
Adipocyte     Open Access  
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Hematology Case Reports and Reviews     Open Access  
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Blood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Blood Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Blood and Lymphatic Cancer : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Blood Cancer Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Blood Pressure     Hybrid Journal  
Blood Pressure Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blood Purification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Blood Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
BMC Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Bone Marrow Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Primary Care Nursing - Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Kidney Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Clinical Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conquest : The Official Journal of Diabetes Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal  
Current Diabetes Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Diabetes Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Opinion in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cytotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Der Diabetologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Diabetes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 392)
Diabetes aktuell     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diabetes Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 450)
Diabetes Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diabetes Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Diabetes Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Diabetes Spectrum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Diabetes Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Diabetic Foot & Ankle     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diabetic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Diabetologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191)
Diabetologia Kliniczna     Hybrid Journal  
Diabetologie und Stoffwechsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Haematology     Open Access  
eJHaem     Open Access  
European Journal of Haematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Experimental Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Experimental Hematology & Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Expert Review of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Haematologica - the Hematology journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Haemophilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Hematologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hematología     Open Access  
Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Hematology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Hemodialysis International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hepatitis Monthly     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Immunohematology : Journal of Blood Group Serology and Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Info Diabetologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie : Interdisziplinäre Fortbildung von Ärzten für Ärzte     Full-text available via subscription  
Integrated Blood Pressure Control     Open Access  
International Blood Research & Reviews     Open Access  
International Journal of Clinical Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hematologic Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hematology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Laboratory Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Iraqi Journal of Hematology     Open Access  
JMIR Diabetes     Open Access  
Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Blood Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Diabetes Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Hematological Malignancies     Open Access  
Journal of Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hypo & Hyperglycemia     Partially Free  
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Health and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Transfusion Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Kidney and Blood Pressure Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Leukemia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Leukemia and Lymphoma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Leukemia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Leukemia Research Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Leukemia Supplements     Full-text available via subscription  
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases     Open Access  
Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Diabetologie     Hybrid Journal  
Nutrition & Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Oncohematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Diabetes Journal     Open Access  
Open Hematology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Hypertension Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Blood Diseases     Open Access  
Pediatric Blood & Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Peritoneal Dialysis International     Hybrid Journal  
Platelets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Primary Care Diabetes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Oncology and Hematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access  
Seminars in Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Thalassemia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lancet Haematology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Therapeutic Advances in Hematology     Hybrid Journal  
Thrombosis & Haemostasis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 124)
Thrombosis Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Transfusionsmedizin - Immunhämatologie, Hämotherapie, Immungenetik, Zelltherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Transplantation and Cellular Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Veins and Lymphatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

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Journal Cover
Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.159
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0094-6176 - ISSN (Online) 1098-9064
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [233 journals]
  • 2021 Eberhard F. Mammen Award Announcements: Part II—Young
           Investigator Awards

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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 265-273
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1743175



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 265-2732022-04-12T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • Hemostasis and Neuroscience—Hemostasis and Fibrinolysis Involved in
           Brain Pathology and Brain Disorders

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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 274-276
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742737



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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 274-2762022-04-12T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • Editorial Compilation XI

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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 127-131
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1740151



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      Semin Thromb Hemost 2022; 48: 127-1312022-02-28T00:00:00+0100
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 02 (2022)
       
  • Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Rare Coincidence after
           COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine'

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744301



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-06-27T07:35:53+01:00
       
  • Platelet Activation and Thrombosis in COVID-19

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      Authors: Iba; Toshiaki, Wada, Hideo, Levy, Jerrold H.
      Abstract: Although thrombosis frequently occurs in infectious diseases, the coagulopathy associated with COVID-19 has unique characteristics. Compared with bacterial sepsis, COVID-19-associated coagulopathy presents with minimal changes in platelet counts, normal prothrombin times, and increased D-dimer and fibrinogen levels. These differences can be explained by the distinct pathophysiology of the thromboinflammatory responses. In sepsis-induced coagulopathy, leukocytes are primarily responsible for the coagulopathy by expressing tissue factor, releasing neutrophil extracellular traps, multiple procoagulant substances, and systemic endothelial injury that is often associated with vasoplegia and shock. In COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, platelet activation is a major driver of inflammation/thrombogenesis and von Willebrand factor and platelet factor 4 are deeply involved in the pathogenesis. Although the initial responses are localized to the lung, they can spread systemically if the disease is severe. Since the platelets play major roles, arterial thrombosis is not uncommon in COVID-19. Despite platelet activation, platelet count is usually normal at presentation, but sensitive biomarkers including von Willebrand factor activity, soluble P-selectin, and soluble C-type lectin-like receptor-2 are elevated, and they increase as the disease progresses. Although the role of antiplatelet therapy is still unproven, current studies are ongoing to determine its potential effects.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T09:40:15+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1749441
       
  • Proposal for a Simple Algorithmic Approach to Manage Drug–Drug
           Interactions of Oral Anticoagulants with Nirmatrelvir/Ritonavir in
           COVID-19 Outpatients

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1750024



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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-06-23T09:37:54+01:00
       
  • Heparin: The Journey from Parenteral Agent to Nasal Delivery

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      Authors: Carpenè; Giovanni, Negrini, Davide, Lippi, Giuseppe, Favaloro, Emmanuel J., Montagnana, Martina
      Abstract: Although the worldwide usage of direct oral anticoagulants has continuously increased over the past decade, heparin remains an important weapon in the current arsenal of anticoagulant drugs. Parenteral heparin administration (i.e., either intravenously or subcutaneously) has represented for decades the only possible route for generating a significant anticoagulant effect, although being notoriously associated with some important drawbacks such as discomfort and risk of low compliance, thus paving the way to searching for more amenable means of administration. We provide here an updated analysis of animal and human studies that have explored the feasibility, suitability, and efficiency of heparin administration through the unconventional nasal route, as a possible alternative to the more traditional parenteral injection. The major hurdles that contribute to impair intranasal absorption and systemic delivery of heparin are represented by its relatively high molecular weight and negative charge. Therefore, although pure drug administration would not be associated with efficient nasal adsorption, or by systemic biological activity (i.e., anticoagulant effect), the combination of low molecular weight heparins and absorption enhancers such as surfactants, mucoadhesive, cyclodextrins, polyethylenimines and encapsulation into (nano)carriers seems effective to at least partially improve drug transport through the nasal route and allow systemic delivery in animals. Besides generating anticoagulant effects, intranasal heparin administration can also produce local pleiotropic effects, mostly related to anti-inflammatory properties, such as attenuating airway allergic inflammation or inhibiting the binding of the spike protein of some coronaviruses (including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) to their host cell receptors. This preliminary evidence represents a valuable premise for planning future studies in humans aimed at establishing the pharmacokinetics and biological activity of locally and systemically delivered intranasal heparin formulations.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T11:37:36+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1749395
       
  • Molecular Mimicry between hPF4 and SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein: Response to
           Comment

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744280



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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-06-21T07:55:24+01:00
       
  • Antiphospholipid Syndrome in Patients with Venous Thromboembolism

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      Authors: Pengo; Vittorio, Denas, Gentian
      Abstract: Unprovoked (or provoked by mild risk factors) venous thromboembolism (VTE) in young patients, VTE in uncommon sites, or cases of unexplained VTE recurrence may be positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and thus may be diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The evaluation of aPL is standardized using immunological tests for anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I. The determination of functional antibodies (lupus anticoagulant) is less standardized, especially in patients on anticoagulant treatment. Patients positive for all the three tests are at high risk of recurrence, which, in turn, might lead to chronic obstruction of pulmonary vessels (chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension). Randomized clinical trials have shown that triple-positive patients should be treated with vitamin K antagonists maintaining an international normalized ratio between 2 and 3. Whether patients with VTE and incomplete aPL profile can be treated with direct oral anticoagulants should be further investigated.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T07:52:53+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1749590
       
  • 2022 Eberhard F. Mammen Award Announcements: Part I—Most Popular
           Articles

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1748192



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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-06-14T14:04:19+01:00
       
  • Solid Phase Assays for Antiphospholipid Antibodies

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      Authors: Devreese; Katrien M.J.
      Abstract: The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) relies on the detection of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Currently, lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL), and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI) IgG or IgM are the laboratory criteria if persistently present over time. As aCL and aβ2GPI are two out of the three laboratory criteria, the detection of aPL by solid phase assays is an essential step in the diagnosis of APS. Advancement has been made to resolve some of the methodological challenges of aCL and aβ2GPI assays by providing guidelines how to measure aPL, as well as to gain a better understanding of their diagnostic role. However, solid phase assays for aCL and aβ2GPI still show substantive inter-assay differences, resulting in disagreement concerning positive/negative results, but also differences in titer of antibodies. This hampers the semiquantitative classification into low-medium-high positivity. The non-criteria aPL, such as antibodies against the domain one of β2GPI and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) have roles in confirming the risk in APS, and can be useful, especially in patients with incomplete antibody profiles.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T08:18:46+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744364
       
  • Testing for Lupus Anticoagulants

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      Authors: Moore; Gary W.
      Abstract: Lupus anticoagulant (LA) is one of the three criteria antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) employed in classification, and by default diagnosis, of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Detection of LA is not via calibrated assays but is based on functional behavior of the antibodies in a medley of coagulation assays. A prolonged clotting time in a screening test is followed by demonstration of phospholipid dependence and inhibitory properties in confirmatory and mixing tests, respectively, which are modifications of the parent screening test. Complications arise because no single screening test is sensitive to every LA, and no test is specific for LA, because they are prone to interference by other causes of elevated clotting times. Several screening tests are available but the pairing of dilute Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT) with LA-sensitive activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is widely used and recommended because it is proven to have good detection rates. Nonetheless, judicious use of other assays can improve diagnostic performance, such as dilute prothrombin time to find LA unreactive with dRVVT and aPTT, and the recently validated Taipan snake venom time with ecarin time confirmatory test that are unaffected by vitamin K antagonist and direct factor Xa inhibitor anticoagulation. Expert body guidelines and their updates have improved harmonization of laboratory practices, although some issues continue to attract debate, such as the place of mixing tests in the medley hierarchy, and areas of data manipulation such as assay cut-offs and ratio generation. This article reviews current practices and challenges in the laboratory detection of LA.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:24:52+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744363
       
  • Tranexamic Acid and Its Potential Anti-Inflammatory Effect: A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Okholm; Søren Hauge, Krog, Jan, Hvas, Anne-Mette
      Abstract: Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug primarily used for reducing blood loss in patients with major bleedings. Animal and cell studies have shown that TXA might modulate the inflammatory response by either enhancing or inhibiting cytokine levels. Furthermore, recent human studies have found altered inflammatory biomarkers in patients receiving TXA when compared with patients who did not receive TXA. In this systematic review we investigated the effect of TXA on inflammatory biomarkers in different patient groups. A systematic literature search was conducted on the databases PubMed and Embase to identify all original articles that investigated inflammatory biomarkers in patients receiving TXA and compared them to a relevant control group. The review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines, and the literature search was performed on November 29, 2021. Thirty-three studies were included, among which 14 studies compared patients receiving TXA with patients getting no medication, another 14 studies investigated different dosing regimens of TXA, and finally five studies examined the administration form of TXA. The present review suggests that TXA has an anti-inflammatory effect in patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery illustrated by decreased levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in patients receiving TXA compared with patients receiving no or lower doses of TXA. However, the anti-inflammatory effect was not found in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, pediatric craniosynostosis patients, or in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The inflammatory response was not affected by administration form of TXA (oral, intravenous, or topical). In conclusion, an anti-inflammatory effect of TXA was consistently found among orthopaedic patients only.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742741
       
  • To Anticoagulate or Not to Anticoagulate in COVID-19: Lessons after 2
           Years

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      Authors: Rizk; John G., Gupta, Aashish, Lazo, Jose G., Sardar, Partha, Henry, Brandon Michael, Lavie, Carl J., Effron, Mark B.
      Abstract: A hypercoagulable state associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been well documented and is believed to be strongly supported by a proinflammatory state. The hypercoagulable state in turn results in increased incidence of arterial and venous thromboembolism (VTE) seen in hospitalized COVID-19 when compared with hospitalized non-COVID-19 patient cohorts. Moreover, patients with arterial or VTE and COVID-19 have higher mortality compared with COVID-19 patients without arterial or VTE. Prevention of arterial or VTE thus remains an essential question in the management of COVID-19 patients, especially because of high rates of reported microvascular and macrovascular thrombosis. This has prompted multiple randomized control trials (RCTs) evaluating different anticoagulation strategies in COVID-19 patients at various stages of the disease. Herein, we review findings from RCTs in the past 2 years of antithrombotic therapy in critically ill hospitalized patients, noncritically ill hospitalized patients, patients postdischarge from the hospital, and outpatients. RCTs in critically ill patients demonstrated therapeutic dose anticoagulation does not improve outcomes and has more bleeding than prophylaxis dose anticoagulant in these patients. Trials in noncritically ill hospitalized patients showed a therapeutic dose anticoagulation with a heparin formulation might improve clinical outcomes. Anticoagulation with a direct oral anticoagulant posthospital discharge may improve outcomes, although there is a large RCT in progress. Nonhospitalized COVID-19 patients have an insufficient burden of events to be candidates for antithrombotic therapy. Anticoagulation in pregnant and lactating patients with COVID-19, as well as antiplatelet therapy for COVID-19, is also reviewed.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744302
       
  • Molecular Mimicry between hPF4 and SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein: Comment

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744279



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-04-21T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Aspirin use Reduces Platelet Hyperreactivity and Degranulation in COVID-19
           Patients

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1744281



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      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-03-07T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Systemic Antiangiogenic Therapies for Bleeding in Hereditary Hemorrhagic
           Telangiectasia: A Practical, Evidence-Based Guide for Clinicians

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      Authors: Al-Samkari; Hanny
      Abstract: Management of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the second most common hereditary bleeding disorder in the world, is currently undergoing a paradigm shift. Disease-modifying antiangiogenic therapies capable of achieving durable hemostasis via inducing telangiectasia regression have emerged as a highly effective and safe modality to treat epistaxis and gastrointestinal bleeding in HHT. While evidence to date is incomplete and additional studies are ongoing, patients presently in need are being treated with antiangiogenic agents off-label. Intravenous bevacizumab, oral pazopanib, and oral thalidomide are the three targeted primary angiogenesis inhibitors, with multiple studies describing both reassuring safety and impressive effectiveness in the treatment of moderate-to-severe HHT-associated bleeding. However, at present there is a paucity of guidance in the literature, including the published HHT guidelines, addressing the practical aspects of antiangiogenic therapy for HHT in clinical practice. This review article and practical evidence-based guide aims to fill this unaddressed need, synthesizing published data on the use of antiangiogenic agents in HHT, relevant data for their use outside of HHT, and expert guidance where evidence is lacking. After a brief review of principles of bleeding therapy in HHT, guidance on hematologic support with iron and blood products, and alternatives to antiangiogenic therapy, this article examines each of the aforementioned antiangiogenic agents in detail, including patient selection, initiation, monitoring, toxicity management, and discontinuation. With proper, educated use of antiangiogenic therapies in HHT, patients with even the most severe bleeding manifestations can achieve durable hemostasis with minimal side-effects, dramatically improving health-related quality of life and potentially altering the disease course.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1743467
       
  • Utilization of the Caprini Score for Risk Stratification of the
           

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      Authors: Krauss; Eugene S., Segal, Ayal, Dengler, Nancy, Cronin, MaryAnne, Pettigrew, Janelle, Simonson, Barry G.
      Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious and predictable complication following arthroplasty. It has been recognized that a strategy utilizing individualized anticoagulation choices based on patient risk stratification results in improved patient outcomes. A 2013 version of the Caprini Risk Score has previously been validated for use in total joint arthroplasty. A Caprini score of 10 or greater assesses the patient as “high risk” while 9 or less is considered “low risk.” Patients scored as “low risk” for postoperative VTE receive enteric coated aspirin 81 mg twice a day for 6 weeks. Patients scored as “high risk” for VTE are prescribed apixaban. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of the thromboprophylaxis treatment prescribed based on a standardized risk assessment protocol for the calendar year 2020. Patients having total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, revision total hip arthroplasty, revision total knee arthroplasty, or bilateral arthroplasties by 13 surgeons (N = 873) were reviewed. Patients were risk assessed using the Caprini Risk Score and thromboprophylaxis was prescribed based on the score obtained. The annual rate of VTE was 0.2%. The Caprini Risk Score is an effective approach to individualize thromboprophylaxis choices after total joint arthroplasty.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742739
       
  • Flow Cytometric Assessment of Changes in Platelet Reactivity after Acute
           Coronary Syndrome: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Pedersen; Oliver Buchhave, Pasalic, Leonardo, Nissen, Peter H., Grove, Erik Lerkevang, Kristensen, Steen Dalby, Hvas, Anne-Mette
      Abstract: Increased platelet activity is an important predictor for recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Flow cytometry is an advanced method for evaluation of platelet activity. We aimed to summarize the current literature on dynamic changes in platelet activity analyzed by flow cytometry in patients with ACS. Employing the guidelines of Preferred Report Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), we searched PubMed and Embase on October 26, 2021, and identified studies measuring platelet activity with flow cytometry in ACS patients in the acute phase (baseline) and at follow-up in a more stable phase. In the 12 included studies, fibrinogen receptor, α-granule secretion, platelet reactivity index, monocyte-platelet aggregates, neutrophil-platelet aggregates, and reticulated platelets were measured. The fibrinogen receptor and α-granule secretion were either unchanged or lower during follow-up measurements than in the acute phase. Platelet reactivity index showed inconsistent results. Values of monocyte-platelet aggregates and neutrophil-platelet aggregates were lower at follow-up than at baseline (p-values 0.64) or lower at 1 to 2 months follow-up (p-value 0.04), and also lower at 5 months to 1-year follow-up (p-value>0.005) compared with baseline. Overall, flow cytometric analyses of platelet function in ACS patients showed that platelet activity was lower at follow-up than at baseline. However, in some patients, platelet activity remained unchanged from baseline to follow-up, possibly indicating a sustained high platelet activity that may increase the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742742
       
  • The Benefits of Heparin Use in COVID-19: Pleiotropic Antiviral Activity
           beyond Anticoagulant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742740



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-02-14T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Trousseau's Syndrome in 19th Century Qing Dynasty Paintings of Breast
           Tumors: Early Insights into Cancer and Thrombosis Risk

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742437



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-02-09T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Response to “Parathyroid Adenoma in a Young Girl with Type 3 von
           Willebrand Disease”

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742436



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-02-09T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Effects of Inflammation on Hemostasis in Acutely Ill Patients with Liver
           Disease

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      Authors: Driever; Ellen G., Lisman, Ton
      Abstract: Patients with liver diseases are in a rebalanced state of hemostasis, due to simultaneous decline in pro- and anticoagulant factors. This balance seems to remain even in the sickest patients, but is less stable and might destabilize when patients develop disease complications. Patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, acute-on-chronic liver failure, or acute liver failure often develop complications associated with changes in the hemostatic system, such as systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation causes hemostatic alterations by adhesion and aggregation of platelets, release of von Willebrand factor (VWF), enhanced expression of tissue factor, inhibition of natural anticoagulant pathways, and inhibition of fibrinolysis. Laboratory tests of hemostasis in acutely-ill liver patients may indicate a hypocoagulable state (decreased platelet count, prolongations in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, decreased fibrinogen levels) due to decreased synthetic liver capacity or consumption, or a hypercoagulable state (increased VWF levels, hypofibrinolysis in global tests). Whether these changes are clinically relevant and should be corrected with antithrombotic drugs or blood products is incompletely understood. Inflammation and activation of coagulation may cause local ischemia, progression of liver disease, and multiorgan failure. Anti-inflammatory treatment in acutely-ill liver patients may be of potential interest to prevent thrombotic or bleeding complications and halt progression of liver disease.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742438
       
  • Parathyroid Adenoma in a Young Girl with Type 3 von Willebrand Disease:
           Comment on “Cancers in Patients with von Willebrand Disease”

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-1742435



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-02-02T00:00:00+0100
       
  • Mutations Accounting for Congenital Fibrinogen Disorders: An Update

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      Authors: Richard; Maxime, Celeny, David, Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite
      Abstract: Fibrinogen is a complex protein that plays a key role in the blood clotting process. It is a hexamer composed of two copies of three distinct chains: Aα, Bβ, and γ encoded by three genes, FGA, FGB, and FGG, clustered on the long arm of chromosome 4. Congenital fibrinogen disorders (CFDs) are divided into qualitative deficiencies (dysfibrinogenemia, hypodysfibrinogenemia) in which the mutant fibrinogen molecule is present in the circulation and quantitative deficiencies (afibrinogenemia, hypofibrinogenemia) with no mutant molecule present in the bloodstream. Phenotypic manifestations are variable, patients may be asymptomatic, or suffer from bleeding or thrombosis. Causative mutations can occur in any of the three fibrinogen genes and can affect one or both alleles. Given the large number of studies reporting on novel causative mutations for CFDs since the review on the same topic published in 2016, we performed an extensive search of the literature and list here 120 additional mutations described in both quantitative and qualitative disorders. The visualization of causative single nucleotide variations placed on the coding sequences of FGA, FGB, and FGG reveals important structure function insight for several domains of the fibrinogen molecule.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742170
       
  • Is Molecular Mimicry between hPF4 and SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein a Potential
           Basis for Autoimmune Responses in Vaccinated and Naturally Infected
           Patients'

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      Semin Thromb Hemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742092



      Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 333 Seventh Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10001, USA

      Artikel in Thieme eJournals:
      Inhaltsverzeichnis     Volltext

      Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -2022-01-12T00:00:00+0100
       
  • The Role of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 (PAI-1) in
           Placenta-Mediated Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Agersnap; Ida, Nissen, Peter H., Hvas, Anne-Mette
      Abstract: Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a main inhibitor of fibrinolysis. The PAI-1 gene (SERPINE1) harbors genetic variants with the potential of modifying plasma levels of PAI-1. A delicate balance exists between the coagulation and fibrinolytic system, and changes in PAI-1 have been suggested to compromise establishment of a successful pregnancy. Therefore, this systematic review investigated the association between genetic variants and/or plasma levels of PAI-1 and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. An extensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science on the 29th of April 2021. All studies underwent quality rating according to The Study Quality Assessment Tools checklist provided by National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. A total of 71 studies were included, among which 60 studies investigated PAI-1 genotypes and 11 studies measured PAI-1 plasma levels. In 32 out of 59 studies, no association was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism (rs1799768) and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, which was stated as no significant difference in the genotype distribution comparing women with and without placenta-mediated pregnancy complications or no significantly increased odds of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications carrying the 4G/4G or 4G/5G genotype. Eight out of 11 studies reported significantly higher PAI-1 plasma levels in preeclamptic women than in women without preeclampsia. In conclusion, no clear evidence indicates that PAI-1 polymorphisms are associated with placenta-mediated pregnancy complications, and the possible association between high PAI-1 plasma levels and preeclampsia needs further investigations. Thus, investigation of PAI-1 genotypes and PAI-1 plasma levels does not currently seem to have a place in daily clinical practice managing placenta-mediated pregnancy complications.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742082
       
  • What We Know (and Do not Know) Regarding the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary
           Thrombosis in COVID-19

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      Authors: Lippi; Giuseppe, Favaloro, Emmanuel J.
      Abstract: The clinical course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is often complicated by the onset of venous thrombosis and thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing also pulmonary thrombosis. Recent statistics attests that the cumulative frequency of VTE can be as high as 30% in COVID-19 hospitalized patients, increasing to nearly 40 to 70% (depending on systematic screening) in those with severe illness, mechanical ventilation, or intensive care unit admission. The risk of venous thrombosis seems mostly limited to the active phase of disease, and is directly associated with some genetic (i.e., inherited prothrombotic predisposition) and demographical factors (male sex, overweight/obesity), disease severity (risk increasing progressively from hospitalization to development of severe illness, being the highest in patients needing mechanical ventilation and/or intensive care), presence and extent of pulmonary disease, coexistence of multiple risk factors (immobilization, mechanical ventilation, co- or superinfections), along with increased values of inflammatory and thrombotic biomarkers. At least three different phenotypes of pulmonary thrombosis may develop in COVID-19 patients, one caused by typical embolization from peripheral venous thrombosis (e.g., deep vein thrombosis), a second type triggered by local inflammation of nearby pulmonary tissue, and a third one mostly attributable to the prothrombotic state consequent to the pronounced systemic inflammatory response (i.e., the so-called cytokine storm) that is frequently observed in COVID-19. Although the pathogenesis of these three conditions has different features, their discrimination is essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The prognosis of COVID-19 patients who develop pulmonary thrombosis is also considerably worse than those who do not, thus probably needing frequent monitoring and more aggressive therapeutic management.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742091
       
  • Interaction between Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Protein C
           Anticoagulant Pathway: A Narrative Review

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      Authors: Pengo; Vittorio
      Abstract: Thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a condition in which thrombosis in venous, arterial, and/or small vessels is ascribed to the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Among the various proposed pathogenic theories to explain thrombotic APS, those involving the interaction between aPL and the protein C system have gained much consensus. Indeed, robust data show an acquired activated protein C resistance (APC-R) in these patients. The role of aPL in this impairment is clear, but the mechanism of action is uncertain, as the type of aPL and to what extent aPL are involved remains a gray area. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) is often associated with APC-R, but antibodies generating LA comprise those directed to β2-glycoprotein I and antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin. Moreover, the induction of APC-R by aPL requires the presence of phospholipids and is suppressed by the presence of an excess of phospholipids. How phospholipids exposed on the cell membranes work in the system in vivo is unknown. Interestingly, acquired APC-R due to aPL might explain the clinical phenotypes of thrombotic APS. Indeed, the literature reports cases of both venous and arterial thromboembolism as well as skin necrosis, the latter observed in the severe form of protein C deficiency and in catastrophic APS.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1742083
       
  • Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Congenital Bleeding Disorders

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      Authors: Samii; Amir, Norouzi, Mahshaad, Ahmadi, Abbas, Dorgalaleh, Akbar
      Abstract: Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is serious, intractable, and potentially life-threatening condition. There is considerable heterogeneity in GIB phenotypes among congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), making GIB difficult to manage. Although GIB is rarely encountered in CBDs, its severity in some patients makes the need for a comprehensive and precise assessment of underlying factors and management approaches imperative. Initial evaluation of GIB begins with assessment of hematological status; GIB should be ruled out in patients with chronic anemia, and in presentations that include hematemesis, hematochezia, or melena. High-risk patients with recurrent GIB require urgent interventions such as replacement therapy for treatment of coagulation factor deficiency (CFD). However, the best management strategy for CFD-related bleeding remains controversial. While several investigations have identified CBDs as potential risk factors for GIB, research has focused on assessing the risks for individual factor deficiencies and other CBDs. This review highlights recent findings on the prevalence, management strategies, and alternative therapies of GIB related to CFDs, and platelet disorders.
      Citation: Semin Thromb Hemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T00:00:00+0100
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1741571
       
 
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