Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8800 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (225 journals)
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    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (350 journals)
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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (350 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 350 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Angiologica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Cardiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acute Cardiac Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Adipositas - Ursachen, Folgeerkrankungen, Therapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Aktuelle Kardiologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
American Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Journal of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
American Journal of Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anatolian Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription  
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
AORTA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Argentine Journal of Cardiology (English edition)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Artery Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ARYA Atherosclerosis     Open Access  
ASAIO Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ASEAN Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aswan Heart Centre Science & Practice Services     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Atherosclerosis : X     Open Access  
Bangladesh Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Basic Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiac Electrophysiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cardiac Failure Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cardiocore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cardiology in Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cardiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cardiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cardiorenal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiothoracic Surgeon     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CardioVasc     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular & Haematological Disorders - Drug Targets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular & Hematological Agents in Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Diabetology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Cardiovascular Endocrinology & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cardiovascular Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Journal of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cardiovascular Journal of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cardiovascular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular System     Open Access  
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiovascular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cardiovascular Ultrasound     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
CASE : Cardiovascular Imaging Case Reports     Open Access  
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cerebrovascular Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra     Open Access  
Chest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 114)
Choroby Serca i Naczyń     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Circulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Circulation : Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Circulation : Genomic and Precision Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Circulation : Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Circulation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Cirugía Cardiovascular     Open Access  
CJC Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clínica e Investigación en Arteriosclerosis     Full-text available via subscription  
Clínica e Investigación en arteriosclerosis (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Research in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Research in Cardiology Supplements     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical Trials and Regulatory Science in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Congenital Heart Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Congestive Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cor et Vasa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Coronary Artery Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
CorSalud     Open Access  
Critical Pathways in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Cardiology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Cardiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Cardiovascular Imaging Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Current Heart Failure Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Current Hypertension Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Hypertension Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Opinion in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Problems in Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Research : Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CVIR Endovascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Kardiologe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Echo Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Journal of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
ESC Heart Failure     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Cardiology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Acute Cardiovascular Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Heart Journal : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Heart Journal Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Heart Failure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Stroke Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Folia Cardiologica     Open Access  
Forum Zaburzeń Metabolicznych     Hybrid Journal  
Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Future Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Global Cardiology Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart and Vessels     Hybrid Journal  
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Heart Failure Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart International     Full-text available via subscription  
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Heart Rhythm O2     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hearts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hellenic Journal of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herz     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hypertension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hypertension in Pregnancy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Hypertension Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ibrahim Cardiac Medical Journal     Open Access  
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Heart Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian Journal of Cardiovascular Disease in Women WINCARS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Clinical Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Innovations : Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca     Open Access  
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Cardiovascular Forum Journal     Open Access  
International Journal of Angiology     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Cardiology Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
International Journal of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Hyperthermia     Open Access  
International Journal of Stroke     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access  
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Hypertension
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.322
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0895-7061 - ISSN (Online) 1941-7225
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [415 journals]
  • From the Editor-in-Chief: Issue at a Glance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Schiffrin E.
      Pages: 429 - 431
      Abstract: The current issue of the American Journal of Hypertension for May 2021 begins with two reviews. One by J.D. Humphrey1 on vascular remodeling in hypertension argues that vasoactivity of the wall and inflammation determine the ability of the arterial wall to adapt to rises in blood pressure. Inflammation and fibrosis of the adventitia result in maladaptive behavior of aorta, with compromise of biomechanics and altered hemodynamics. These changes end up affecting tissue perfusion and trigger cardiovascular events. The author concludes that inflammation and phenotypic changes in smooth muscle of central arteries need to be investigated and controlled to prevent the former.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpab050
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • The Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Preeclampsia: Causative Factor or
           Collateral Damage'

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      Authors: Smith A; Wang X, Thomas D, et al.
      Pages: 442 - 452
      Abstract: Preeclampsia, new onset hypertension in pregnancy, affects ~5%–10% of the world’s population. Preeclampsia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and fetus. As of today, there is no cure for this disease except for delivery of the fetal–placental unit. The exact causation and onset of the disease are unknown. However, recent studies have shown a strong correlation between mitochondrial dysfunction and preeclampsia. Circulating mitochondrial DNA, elevated reactive oxygen species, angiotensin II type 1 receptor agonistic autoantibodies (AT1-AA), activated natural killer cells, and upregulated inflammatory responses all contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. This review summarizes the current literature of both experimental and clinical observations that support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia and may be a precursor to the disease onset. This review will also address the use of therapies to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in preeclampsia.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpab003
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • The Mysterious Role of Vasohibin-2 in Ascending Aorta Pathology

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      Authors: Kuroda R; Eguchi S.
      Pages: 453 - 455
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpab025
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Combo Therapy in Hypertension: Still More to ACCOMPLISH After All These
           Years

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      Authors: Miller E; Bisognano J.
      Pages: 459 - 462
      Abstract: hpab032_graphical_abstract
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpab032
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • The Association of Orthostatic Hypotension With Ambulatory Blood Pressure
           Phenotypes in SPRINT

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      Authors: Ghazi L; Drawz P, Pajewski N, et al.
      Pages: 511 - 520
      Abstract: BackgroundClinic blood pressure (BP) when measured in the seated position, can miss meaningful BP phenotypes, including low ambulatory BP (white coat effects [WCE]) or high supine BP (nocturnal non-dipping). Orthostatic hypotension (OH) measured using both seated (or supine) and standing BP, could identify phenotypes poorly captured by seated clinic BP alone.MethodsWe examined the association of OH with WCE and night-to-daytime systolic BP (SBP) in a subpopulation of SPRINT, a randomized trial testing the effects of intensive or standard (<120 vs. <140 mm Hg) SBP treatment strategies in adults at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. OH was assessed during follow-up (6, 12, and 24 months) and defined as a decrease in mean seated SBP ≥20 or diastolic BP ≥10 mm Hg after 1 min of standing. WCE, based on 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring performed at 27 months, was defined as the difference between 27-month seated clinic and daytime ambulatory BP ≥20/≥10 mm Hg. Reverse dipping was defined as a ratio of night-to-daytime SBP >1.ResultsOf 897 adults (mean age 71.5±9.5 years, 29% female, 28% black), 128 had OH at least once. Among those with OH, 15% had WCE (vs. 7% without OH). Moreover, 25% of those with OH demonstrated a non-dipping pattern (vs. 14% without OH). OH was positively associated with both WCE (OR=2.24; 95%CI: 1.28, 4.27) and reverse dipping (OR=2.29; 95% CI: 1.31, 3.99).ConclusionsThe identification of OH in clinic was associated with two BP phenotypes often missed with traditional seated BP assessments. Further studies on mechanisms of these relationships are needed.Clinical trials registrationTrial Number NCT03569020.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa184
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • A Pedigree and Clinical Analysis of 11β-Hydroxylase Deficiency with
           Homozygous Mutation of CYP11B1 Gene

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      Authors: Yi R; Zhao S, Yan X, et al.
      Pages: 563 - 563
      Abstract: BackgroundTo analyze the clinical features and the mutation of CYP11B1 gene in a family with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency.MethodsThe clinical and laboratory tests data of the patient were collected. The complete sequences of CYP11B1 gene in the proband and potential mutations in other seven family members were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing technique.ResultsA 25-year female patient showed complicated clinical symptoms, comprising hypertension, heart failure, renal failure, and pulmonary infections. Laboratory results showed higher levels of 17α-hydoxy progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHS) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and lower levels of cortisol and potassium in serum. Additionally, a positive reaction in mid-dose dexamethasone suppression test and a significant enlargement of bilateral adrenal glands from computed tomography scan were exhibited in this patient. Furthermore, a homozygous c.1157C>T (p.Ala386Val) in exon 7 of the CYP11B1 gene was identified in this patient. Four family members (father, mother, maternal grandmother, and aunt of proband) were heterozygous of the same mutation.Conclusion11β-hydroxylase deficiency in this patient is caused by homozygous c.1157C>T (p.Ala386Val) in the CYP11B1 gene.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa221
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • The Risk and Influencing Factors of Hypertension in Jinchang Cohort

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      Authors: Miao Q; Zheng S, Luo Y, et al.
      Pages: 563 - 563
      Abstract: BackgroundTo investigate the incidence and influencing factors of hypertension in Jinchang cohort.MethodsA prospective cohort study was conducted to collect the baseline and follow-up information of 22,826 employees from 2011 to 2015 based on the Jinchang cohort platform. The incidence of hypertension in the cohort was calculated and the influencing factors were analyzed by Cox proportional risk model.ResultsThe subjects were followed up for an average of 22 years, and the incidence density of hypertension was 56.31/1000 person-years. Multivariate Cox regression results showed that the main risk factors for hypertension in the population included age ≥40 years, alcohol consumption, high-salt diet, history of diabetes, family history of hypertension, overweight and obesity, baseline systolic blood pressure ≥110 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure ≥75 mm Hg, and higher education levels (middle school, high school, and above) were a protective factor. The incidence of grade 1 hypertension was related to age, drinking, history of diabetes, family history of hypertension and baseline blood pressure levels, and the incidence of grades 2 and 3 hypertension was related to high-salt diet, family history of hypertension, overweight or obesity, and baseline blood pressure levels.ConclusionsThe Jinchang cohort has a higher risk of hypertension. Age, unhealthy lifestyle, history of diabetes, family history of hypertension, obesity, and baseline blood pressure are strongly associated with the onset of hypertension. There are differences in the risk factors for the occurrence of grades 1, 2, and 3 hypertension.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa220
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Mechanisms of Vascular Remodeling in Hypertension

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      Authors: Humphrey J.
      Pages: 432 - 441
      Abstract: Hypertension is both a cause and a consequence of central artery stiffening, which in turn is an initiator and indicator of myriad disease conditions and thus all-cause mortality. Such stiffening results from a remodeling of the arterial wall that is driven by mechanical stimuli and mediated by inflammatory signals, which together lead to differential gene expression and concomitant changes in extracellular matrix composition and organization. This review focuses on biomechanical mechanisms by which central arteries remodel in hypertension within the context of homeostasis—what promotes it, what prevents it. It is suggested that the vasoactive capacity of the wall and inflammatory burden strongly influence the ability of homeostatic mechanisms to adapt the arterial wall to high blood pressure or not. Maladaptation, often reflected by inflammation-driven adventitial fibrosis, not just excessive intimal–medial thickening, significantly diminishes central artery function and disturbs hemodynamics, ultimately compromising end organ perfusion and thus driving the associated morbidity and mortality. It is thus suggested that there is a need for increased attention to controlling both smooth muscle phenotype and inflammation in hypertensive remodeling of central arteries, with future studies of the often adaptive response of medium-sized muscular arteries promising to provide additional guidance.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa195
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Circadian Variation and Arterial Stiffness in Chronic Kidney Disease and
           Their Treatment

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      Authors: Hoshide S; Suzuki D, Kario K.
      Pages: 456 - 458
      Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been recognized as a cause of progression to end-stage renal disease and as a risk of cardiovascular disease.1 Although the risk factors of CKD are diverse, hypertension and arterial stiffness are especially predominant risk factors. A number of studies have discussed the association between hypertension and CKD.2 For the management of hypertension, recent international guidelines recommend not only the measurement of office blood pressure (BP) but also out-of-office BP. The guidelines in Japan have stressed the use of home BP measurement,3 because the use of home BP devices has spread throughout Japan, and there is now an accumulation of evidence regarding the prognostic power of home BP measurement in Japanese hypertensive populations.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa197
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Long-Term Habitual Vigorous Physical Activity Is Associated With Lower
           Visit-to-Visit Systolic Blood Pressure Variability: Insights From the
           SPRINT Trial

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      Authors: Xu X; Meng X, Oka S.
      Pages: 463 - 466
      Abstract: BackgroundOur work aimed to investigate the association between vigorous physical activity and visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure variability (BPV).MethodsWe conducted a post hoc analysis of SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial), a well-characterized cohort of participants randomized to intensive (<120 mm Hg) or standard (<140 mm Hg) systolic blood pressure targets. We assessed whether patients with hypertension who habitually engage in vigorous physical activity would have lower visit-to-visit systolic BPV compared with those who do not engage in vigorous physical activity. Visit-to-visit systolic BPV was calculated by SD, average real variability (ARV), and SD independent of the mean (SDIM) using measurements taken during the 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month study visits. A medical history questionnaire assessed vigorous physical activity, which was divided into 3 categories according to the frequency of vigorous physical activity.ResultsA total of 7,571 participants were eligible for analysis (34.8% female, mean age 67.9 ± 9.3 years). During a follow-up of 1-year, vigorous physical activity could significantly reduce SD, ARV, and SDIM across increasing frequency of vigorous physical activity. There were negative linear trends between frequency of vigorous physical activity and visit-to-visit systolic BPV.ConclusionsLong-term engagement in vigorous physical activity was associated with lower visit-to-visit systolic BPV.Clinical trials registrationSPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial); Trial Number: NCT01206062, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01206062.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa198
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Vasohibin-2 Aggravates Development of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms but not
           Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms nor Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice

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      Authors: Otaka N; Uchida H, Okuyama M, et al.
      Pages: 467 - 475
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDVasohibin-2 (VASH2) has been isolated as a homologue of vasohibin-1 (VASH1) that promotes angiogenesis counteracting with VASH1. Chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion promotes both ascending and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAs) in mice. The present study aimed to investigate whether exogenous VASH2 influenced AngII-induced vascular pathology in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice.METHODSMale, ApoE−/− mice (9–14 weeks old) were injected with Ad LacZ or Ad VASH2. After a week, saline or AngII (1,000 ng/kg/minute) was infused into the mice subcutaneously via mini-osmotic pumps for 3 weeks. Consequently, all these mice were divided into 4 groups: saline + LacZ (n = 5), saline + VASH2 (n = 5), AngII + LacZ (n = 18), and AngII + VASH2 (n = 17).RESULTSExogenous VASH2 had no significant effect on ex vivo maximal diameters of abdominal aortas (AngII + LacZ: 1.67 ± 0.17 mm, AngII + VASH2: 1.52 ± 0.16 mm, n.s.) or elastin fragmentation and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Conversely, exogenous VASH2 significantly increased intima areas of aortic arches (AngII + LacZ: 16.6 ± 0.27 mm2, AngII + VASH2: 18.6 ± 0.64 mm2, P = 0.006). VASH2 effect of AngII-induced ascending AAs was associated with increased cleaved caspase-3 abundance. AngII-induced atherosclerosis was not altered by VASH2.CONCLUSIONSThe present study demonstrated that augmented VASH2 expression had no effect of AngII-induced abdominal AAs or atherosclerosis, while increasing dilation in the ascending aorta.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa181
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Longitudinal Risk of
           Hypertension

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      Authors: Nicoli C; Plante T, Long D, et al.
      Pages: 476 - 483
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDHypertension is a common condition that increases risk for future cardiovascular disease. N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is higher in individuals with hypertension, but studies of its association with hypertension risk have been mixed.METHODSThe REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study enrolled 30,239 U.S. Black or White adults aged ≥45 years from 2003 to 2007. A subcohort included 4,400 participants who completed a second assessment in 2013–2016. NT-proBNP was measured by immunoassay in 1,323 participants without baseline hypertension, defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 or self-reported antihypertensive prescriptions. Two robust Poisson regression models assessed hypertension risk, yielding incidence rate ratios (IRRs): Model 1 included behavioral and demographic covariates and Model 2 added risk factors. A sensitivity analysis using a less conservative definition of hypertension (blood pressure ≥130/80 or self-reported antihypertensive prescriptions) was conducted.RESULTSFour hundred and sixty-six participants developed hypertension after mean follow-up of 9.4 years. NT-proBNP was not associated with hypertension (Model 2 IRR per SD log NT-proBNP 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.92–1.12), with no differences by sex, body mass index, age, or race. Similar findings were seen in lower-threshold sensitivity analysis.CONCLUSIONSNT-proBNP was not associated with incident hypertension in REGARDS; this did not differ by race or sex.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa224
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Associations Between Arterial Stiffness Indices and Chronic Kidney Disease
           Categories in Essential Hypertensive Patients

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      Authors: Kusunoki H; Iwashima Y, Kawano Y, et al.
      Pages: 484 - 493
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDThis study investigated the association between arterial stiffness indices and asymptomatic chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk categories in hypertensive patients.METHODSArterial stiffness indices, including 24-hour brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), were measured by an oscillometric Mobil-O-Graph device, brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) by a volume-plethysmographic method, and renal resistive index (RI) by ultrasonography, in 184 essential hypertensive patients (66.0 ± 17.1 years, 47.3% male). CKD was categorized into 3 stages based on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria, using a combination of estimated glomerular filtration and albuminuria.RESULTSThe 24-hour aortic PWV (aPWV), baPWV, and RI increased with worsening severity of CKD risk category (all P < 0.01 for trend). Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that a 1 SD increase of nighttime aortic SBP (odds ratio [OR] 1.52), PWV (OR 4.80), or RI (OR 1.75) was an independent predictor of high or very-high CKD stage (all P < 0.05). After adjustment for potential confounders, day-to-night change in brachial SBP as well as in aPWV differed among groups (P < 0.05, respectively). In a multivariate regression model, day-to-night changes in aortic SBP and PWV, and RI were independently associated with day-to-night brachial SBP change.CONCLUSIONSIn hypertension, circadian hemodynamics in high CKD stage are characterized by higher nighttime values of aortic SBP and PWV and disturbed intrarenal hemodynamics. Further, the blunted nocturnal BP reduction in these patients might be mediated via disturbed intrarenal hemodynamics and circadian hemodynamic variation in aortic SBP and arterial stiffness.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Oct 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa163
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Twenty-Five-Year Changes in Office and Ambulatory Blood Pressure: Results
           From the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

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      Authors: Bundy J; Jaeger B, Huffman M, et al.
      Pages: 494 - 503
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDBlood pressure (BP) measured in the office setting increases from early through later adulthood. However, it is unknown to what extent out-of-office BP derived via ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) increases over time, and which participant characteristics and risk factors might contribute to these increases.METHODSWe assessed 25-year change in office- and ABPM-derived BP across sex, race, diabetes mellitus (DM), and body mass index (BMI) subgroups in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study using multivariable-adjusted linear mixed effects models.RESULTSWe included 288 participants who underwent ABPM at the Year 5 Exam (mean [SD] age, 25.1 [3.7]; 45.8% men) and 455 participants who underwent ABPM at the Year 30 Exam (mean [SD] age, 49.5 [3.7]; 42.0% men). Office, daytime, and nighttime systolic BP (SBP) increased 12.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.6–17.9), 14.7 (95% CI, 9.7–19.8), and 16.6 (95% CI, 11.4–21.8) mm Hg, respectively, over 25 years. Office SBP increased 6.5 (95% CI, 2.3–10.6) mm Hg more among black compared with white participants. Daytime SBP increased 6.3 (95% CI, 0.2–12.4) mm Hg more among participants with a BMI ≥25 vs. <25 kg/m2. Nighttime SBP increased 4.7 (95% CI, 0.5–8.9) mm Hg more among black compared with white participants, and 17.3 (95% CI, 7.2–27.4) mm Hg more among participants with vs. without DM.CONCLUSIONSOffice- and ABPM-derived BP increased more from early through middle adulthood among black adults and participants with DM and BMI ≥25 kg/m2.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa189
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Masked and White Coat Uncontrolled
           Hypertension

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      Authors: Coccina F; Pierdomenico A, De Rosa M, et al.
      Pages: 504 - 510
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDRisk of atrial fibrillation (AF) in masked and white coat uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH and WUCH, respectively) has not yet been investigated. We assessed the risk of new-onset AF in MUCH and WUCH detected by ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring.METHODSThe occurrence of AF was evaluated in 2,135 treated hypertensive patients aged >40 years, with baseline sinus rhythm, by electrocardiogram. Controlled hypertension (CH) was defined as clinic BP <140/90 mm Hg and daytime BP, regardless of nighttime BP, <135/85 mm Hg, MUCH as clinic BP <140/90 mm Hg and daytime BP ≥135 and/or ≥85 mm Hg, WUCH as clinic BP ≥140 and/or ≥90 mm Hg and daytime BP <135/85 mm Hg, and sustained uncontrolled hypertension (SUCH) as clinic BP ≥140 and/or ≥90 mm Hg and daytime BP ≥135 and/or ≥85 mm Hg.RESULTSMUCH was identified in 203 patients (9.5% of all the population, 29% of those with normal clinic BP) and WUCH in 503 patients (23.5% of all the population, 35% of those with high clinic BP). During the follow-up (mean 9.7 years), 116 cases of AF occurred. After adjustment for covariates, patients with MUCH (hazard ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval, 1.06–3.85) and SUCH (hazard ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval, 1.04–3.21) had higher risk of new-onset AF than those with CH, whereas those with WUCH (hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval, 0.59–2.13) did not.CONCLUSIONSWhen compared with patients with CH, those with MUCH and SUCH are at higher risk (approximately doubled) of new-onset AF, whereas those with WUCH are not.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa185
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Digit Preference in Office Blood Pressure Measurements, United States
           2015–2019

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      Authors: Foti K; Appel L, Matsushita K, et al.
      Pages: 521 - 530
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDBlood pressure (BP) measurement error may lead to under- or overtreatment of hypertension. One common source of error is terminal digit preference, most often a terminal digit of “0.” The objective was to evaluate national trends in terminal digit preference in office BP measurements among adults with treated hypertension.METHODSData were from IQVIA’s National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative, serial cross-sectional survey of office-based physicians. The analysis included office visits from 2015 to 2019 among adults aged ≥18 years receiving antihypertensive treatment. Annual trends were examined in the percent of systolic and diastolic BP measurements ending in zero by patient sex, age, and race/ethnicity, physician specialty, and first or subsequent hypertension treatment visit.RESULTSFrom 2015 to 2019, there were ~60 million hypertension treatment visits annually (unweighted N: 5,585–9,085). There was a decrease in the percent of visits with systolic (41.7%–37.7%) or diastolic (42.7%–37.8%) BP recordings ending in zero. Trends were similar by patient characteristics. However, a greater proportion of measurements ended in zero among patients aged ≥80 (vs. 15–59 or 60–79) years, first (vs. subsequent) treatment visits, visits to cardiologists (vs. primary care physicians), and visits with systolic BP ≥140 or diastolic BP ≥90 (vs. <140/90) mm Hg.CONCLUSIONSDespite modest improvement, terminal digit preference remains a common problem in office BP measurement in the United States. Without bias, 10%–20% of measurements are expected to end in zero. Reducing digit preference is a priority for improving BP measurement accuracy and hypertension management.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa196
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Cardiovascular Benefits of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition Plus
           Calcium Channel Blockade in Patients Achieving Tight Blood Pressure
           Control and With Resistant Hypertension

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      Authors: Brook R; , Kaciroti N, et al.
      Pages: 531 - 539
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDThe 2017 hypertension guidelines lowered systolic blood pressure (BP) goals to <130 mm Hg and redefined resistant hypertension. We investigated if these changes alter the cardiovascular benefits demonstrated by combining a calcium channel blocker (CCB), rather than hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI).METHODSIn this post hoc analysis of the Avoiding Cardiovascular Events Through Combination Therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension trial (n = 11,506), we compared the primary composite outcome (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for angina, resuscitation after sudden cardiac death, and coronary revascularization) between the 2 combination-treatment limbs in patients achieving a systolic BP ≤130 mm Hg and those with “apparent resistant hypertension” (prescribed ≥4 antihypertensive medications).RESULTSAmong study patients, 5,221 (45.4%) achieved a systolic BP ≤130 mm Hg. There were fewer primary endpoints in the amlodipine/benazepril (9.2%) vs. the HCTZ/benazepril (10.9%) limb (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70–0.99). There were also fewer primary endpoints in the amlodipine/benazepril (12.8%) vs. the HCTZ/benazepril (15.2%) limb (n = 4,451, 38.7%) among patients with apparent resistant hypertension (HR 0.81, 95% CI, 0.70–0.95).CONCLUSIONSCombination therapy adding a CCB, rather than HCTZ, to an ACEI was more effective in preventing composite cardiovascular events even in hypertensive patients achieving aggressive systolic BP targets as well as in those with apparent resistant hypertension. Our findings add support that most patients, including those following contemporary clinical guidelines, will benefit from this combination.CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATIONTrial Number NCT00170950.
      PubDate: Fri, 20 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa192
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Effect of the Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Blocker,
           Esaxerenone, on Nocturnal Hypertension: A Post Hoc Analysis of the
           ESAX-HTN Study

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      Authors: Kario K; Ito S, Itoh H, et al.
      Pages: 540 - 551
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDNocturnal hypertension is an important phenotype of abnormal diurnal blood pressure (BP) variability and a known risk marker for target organ damage and cardiovascular events. This study aimed to assess the differential BP-lowering effects of esaxerenone vs. eplerenone on nocturnal BP in hypertensive patients with different nocturnal dipping patterns.METHODSThis was a post hoc analysis of the “Esaxerenone (CS-3150) Compared to Eplerenone in Patients with Essential Hypertension” study (NCT02890173), which was a phase 3, multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group clinical study conducted in Japan. Ambulatory BP monitoring data were collected.RESULTSPatients (n = 1,001) were randomized to esaxerenone 2.5 mg/day (n = 331) or 5 mg/day (n = 338), or eplerenone 50 mg/day (n = 332). Reductions in nighttime systolic BP (95% confidence interval) were significantly greater with 2.5 and 5 mg/day esaxerenone vs. eplerenone (−2.6 [−5.0, −0.2] and −6.4 mm Hg [−8.8, −4.0], respectively). Esaxerenone significantly reduced nighttime BP from baseline compared with eplerenone in non-dippers with previously uncontrolled BP. In addition, esaxerenone did not markedly alter nighttime BP in extreme dipper patients. In the esaxerenone 5 mg/day group, esaxerenone-induced decreases in nighttime BP were greater than eplerenone-induced decreases in older patients.CONCLUSIONSEsaxerenone may be an effective treatment option for nocturnal hypertension, especially in older patients and those with a non-dipper pattern of nocturnal BP.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa155
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Angiotensin II and Amyloid-β Synergistically Induce Brain Vascular Smooth
           Muscle Cell Senescence

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      Authors: Bai H; Min L, Shan B, et al.
      Pages: 552 - 562
      Abstract: BACKGROUNDAmyloid-β (Aβ) induces cerebrovascular damage and is reported to stimulate endothelial cell senescence. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II)-promoted vascular senescence. We examined the possible cross-talk between Ang II and Aβ in regulating brain vascular smooth muscle cell (BVSMC) senescence.METHODSBVSMCs were prepared from adult male mice and stimulated with Ang II (0, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 nmol/l) and/or Aβ 1–40 (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 µmol/l) for the indicated times. Cellular senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining.RESULTSTreatment with Ang II (100 nmol/l) or Aβ (1 µmol/l) at a higher dose increased senescent cells compared with control at 6 days. Treatment with Ang II (10 nmol/l) or Aβ (0.5 µmol/l) at a lower dose had no effect on senescence whereas a combined treatment with lower doses of Ang II and Aβ significantly enhanced senescent cells. This senescence enhanced by lower dose combination was markedly blocked by valsartan (Ang II type 1 receptor inhibitor) or TAK-242 (Aβ receptor TLR4 inhibitor) treatment. Moreover, lower dose combination caused increases in superoxide anion levels and p-ERK expression for 2 days, NF-κB activity, p-IκB, p-IKKα/β, p16 and p53 expression for 4 days, and an obvious decrease in pRb expression. These changes by lower dose combination, except in p-IκB expression and NF-κB activity, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with U0126 (ERK inhibitor).CONCLUSIONSAng II and Aβ synergistically promoted BVSMC senescence at least due to enhancement of the p-ERK–p16–pRb signaling pathway, oxidative stress, and NF-κB/IκB activity.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpaa218
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 5 (2020)
       
 
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