Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Adoption Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Obstetric Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies In Family Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Human Fertility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biodemography and Social Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception : X     Open Access  
Raigal     Open Access  
Teratology     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
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BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2515-2009 - ISSN (Online) 2515-1991
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Strengthening contraceptive counselling: gaps in knowledge and
           implementation research

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      Authors: Ali, M; Tran, N. T, Kabra, R, Kiare, J.
      Pages: 235 - 237
      Abstract: Ensuring access to contraception is fundamental to upholding human rights as well as contributing to improved health outcomes. It is enshrined in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 3 on Good Health and Well-being and explicitly its target 3.7.1: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive healthcare services, including family planning.1 Despite increases in contraceptive use in recent decades, an estimated 218 million women of reproductive age, mostly in low- and middle-income countries, have an unmet need for modern contraceptive methods.2 Meeting the unmet need for contraception across the reproductive cycle in low- and middle-income countries and offering all pregnant women and their newborns the standard care recommended by the World Health Organizatoin (WHO) would result in dramatic reductions of unintended pregnancies by 68%, unsafe abortions by 72%, maternal deaths by 62% and neonatal deaths by 69%.3 In addition, adequate contraceptive coverage among users...
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201104
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Making the case for advance provision of mifepristone and misoprostol for
           abortion in the United States

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      Authors: Ehrenreich, K; Biggs, M. A, Grossman, D.
      Pages: 238 - 242
      Abstract: Introduction In the United States (US), mifepristone used together with misoprostol is registered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for termination of intrauterine pregnancy up to 70 days’ gestation.1 While medication abortion is safe and effective,1 current FDA requirements delineated in the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) for mifepristone mandate that it be dispensed in a clinic, medical office or hospital.2 Patients then complete the medication regimen outside of the facility. Post-treatment assessment is recommended to ensure the pregnancy is not ongoing, which can take place in person or remotely.3 While there is little evidence demonstrating that the mandated dispensing requirement improves patient safety, it may pose an insurmountable barrier for people unable to travel to an abortion facility.4 In addition, hostile policy environments have made abortion nearly unattainable in some US states, a situation that...
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201321
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • A place of safety' Protecting the sexual and reproductive health and
           rights of Ukrainian sanctuary-seeking women and young people

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      Authors: Neal, S; Cox, P, March-McDonald, J, Hutchinson, A.
      Pages: 243 - 245
      Abstract: Introduction and context The conflict in the Ukraine has generated a flow of refugees unprecedented within Europe since the Second World War. Over five million (as of 17th June 2022) Ukrainians have fled to neighbouring countries to escape violence and destruction.1 Ninety per cent are women, children and young people under the age of 18 years. Many have left behind partners and other loved ones and must come to terms with both recent trauma and a disquieting future without the emotional and practical support of those they would normally rely on. They also face major risks to their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) with possible long-term negative consequences.2 Vulnerabilities and new challenges Sanctuary-seekers face risks throughout their migratory journey, and the unique demographic composition of the Ukrainian refugee community creates specific heightened threats. Chaotic environments created by mass population movement...
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201538
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Client perspectives on choice of abortion method in England and Wales

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      Authors: Blaylock, R; Makleff, S, Whitehouse, K. C, Lohr, P. A.
      Pages: 246 - 251
      Abstract: IntroductionThe National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the World Health Organization recommend that services provide a choice between medical and surgical methods of abortion. We analysed qualitative study data to examine patient perspectives on abortion method choice and barriers to meeting them.MethodsIn-depth interviews with 24 clients who had an abortion at British Pregnancy Advisory Service clinics were carried out between December 2018 and July 2019 to examine perspectives of quality of abortion care. In this article we focus on client perspectives on choice of abortion method. We performed thematic analysis of data relating to choice of abortion method, refined the analysis, interpreted the findings, and organised the data into themes.ResultsParticipants’ preferences for abortion method were shaped by prior experience of abortion, accessibility and privacy, perceptions of risk and experiences of abortion method, and information gathering and counselling. Participants’ ability to obtain their preferred method was impacted by intersecting constraints such as appointment availability, service location and gestational age.ConclusionsOur findings show that many factors shape participants’ preferences for abortion method. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, some abortion services have constrained abortion method choices, with an emphasis on medical abortion and ‘no-touch’ care. Providers in the UK and beyond should aim to restore and expand more treatment options when the situation allows.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201242
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Telemedicine as an alternative way to access abortion in Italy and
           characteristics of requests during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Brandell, K; Vanbenschoten, H, Parachini, M, Gomperts, R, Gemzell-Danielsson, K.
      Pages: 252 - 258
      Abstract: IntroductionInduced abortion is legal in Italy but with restrictions. The online abortion provider Women on Web (WoW) serves as an alternative way to access abortion. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected sexual and reproductive health worldwide. Italy was one of the first countries hit by the pandemic and imposed strict lockdown measures. We aimed to understand why women requested WoW abortion in Italy and how this was affected by the pandemic.MethodsWe conducted an observational study analysing requests made to WoW before and during the pandemic. We analysed 778 requests for medical abortion from Italy between 1 March 2019 to 30 November 2020 and compared the characteristics of requests submitted before and during the pandemic. We also performed subgroup analysis on teenagers and COVID-19-specific requests.ResultsThere was an increase in requests during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the previous year (12% in the first 9 months). The most common reasons for requesting a telemedicine abortion through WoW were privacy-related (40.9%); however, this shifted to COVID-19-specific (50.3%) reasons during the pandemic. Requests from teenagers (n=61) were more frequently made at later gestational stages (p=0.003), had a higher prevalence of rape (p=0.003) as the cause of unwanted pregnancies, and exhibited less access to healthcare services compared with adult women.ConclusionsThere was an increase in total demand for self-managed abortion during the pandemic and reasons for requesting an abortion changed, shifting from privacy-related to COVID-19-specific reasons. This study also highlighted the uniquely vulnerable situation of teenagers with unwanted pregnancies seeking self-managed abortion.
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201281
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Seeking online telemedicine abortion outside the jurisdiction from Ireland
           following implementation of telemedicine provision locally

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      Authors: Greene, J; Butler, E, Conlon, C, Antosik-Parsons, K, Gomperts, R.
      Pages: 259 - 266
      Abstract: BackgroundAbortion was legalised in Ireland in 2019 and telemedicine provision introduced in April 2020. We examined patterns in and reasons for seeking and receiving online telemedicine abortion outside the jurisdiction following legalisation and introduction of telemedicine abortion.MethodsQuantitative analysis compared frequency of contact, completed requests, service user characteristics and reasons for contacting Women on Web (WoW). Statistical analyses assessed if COVID-19 restrictions and the implementation of telemedicine abortion locally impacted on WoW contact patterns. Thematic analysis of email correspondence analysed reasons for seeking online telemedicine abortion.ResultsThere were 764 requests from Ireland to WoW in 2019–2020, with 225 (29.5%) completed. Requests declined by 90 (21%) between 2019 and 2020, and proportion of completed requests declined by 11.3% (n=70). During COVID-19 restrictions, the proportion of completed requests decreased even more (25%, n=24). Legal restrictions and cost declined as reasons for seeking online telemedicine and childcare, work/study commitments and being with partner/friend increased. During COVID-19 an abusive partner increased as the cited reason. Barriers cited in email correspondence included lack of proximate provider, not qualifying due to legal status and difficulty participating in consultations due to an abusive partner.ConclusionsOnline telemedicine abortion seeking from WoW outside the jurisdiction reduced in the second year of legalisation. Local introduction of telemedicine abortion addressed reasons cited for seeking online telemedicine, other than abusive partner. Increasing awareness of abortion provision, particularly access pathways, free cost and confidentiality, promoting normalisation and retaining local telemedicine can reduce reliance on online telemedicine. Extending the format of local telemedicine abortion to include text-based contact could alleviate how an abusive partner impedes access.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201205
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Can an online educational video broaden young womens contraceptive
           choice' Outcomes of the PREFER pre-post intervention study

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      Authors: Mazza, D; Buckingham, P, McCarthy, E, Enticott, J.
      Pages: 267 - 274
      Abstract: IntroductionContraceptive knowledge mediates access and use. We aimed to assess whether an online educational video describing all methods and their benefits, side effects and mode of action increased young women’s contraceptive knowledge and their long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) preference and uptake.MethodWe used Facebook advertising to recruit young women aged 16–25 years. Participants completed the pre-video survey (S1), watched the 11-min video, then completed surveys immediately after (S2) and 6 months later (S3). Outcomes were analysed using McNemar tests and multivariate logistic regression (generalised estimating equations).ResultsA total of 322 participants watched the video, completed S1 and S2, and 88% of those completed S3. At S1 only 6% rated their knowledge about every method as high. Knowledge improved at S2 for all methods (OR 10.0, 95% CI 5.9 to 17.1) and LARC (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.1 to 5.7). LARC preference increased at S2 (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4 to 2.1) and S3 (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.7), as did LARC uptake at S3 (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.5). LARC uptake was driven by a 4.3% (n=12) absolute increase in intrauterine device (IUD) use, but there was no change in contraceptive implant use (p=0.8). The use of non-prescription methods such as condoms and withdrawal did not change (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.11).ConclusionsMany young women in Australia do not feel well informed about their contraceptive options. The contraceptive education video, delivered via social media, increased their self-reported contraceptive knowledge and IUD preference immediately after viewing, and their IUD uptake 6 months later. Focus should be given to how young women navigate contraceptive access after internet-based education, and strategies to increase access to preferred methods.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201301
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Transabdominal lidocaine to induce fetal demise: a cohort study

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      Authors: Reeves, M. F; Goldfarb, C. N, Rubin, S. L, Kuperstock, J. L, DiBianco, L, Picciotto, A.
      Pages: 275 - 280
      Abstract: IntroductionWe sought to assess the efficacy of transabdominal intrafetal lidocaine to achieve fetal demise before pregnancy termination.MethodsThis study was a retrospective cohort analysis of patients undergoing transabdominal intrafetal lidocaine injections prior to abortion procedures after 24 weeks from January 2018 to June 2020 at DuPont Clinic, an outpatient obstetrics and gynaecology clinic in Washington, DC, USA. We recorded data on maternal factors, gestational age, time of injection and fetal asystole, and injection dose and location. We defined successful intrafetal lidocaine injection as asystole achieved prior to the patient leaving the clinic.ResultsWe performed injections in 338 fetuses in 335 patients, with a median gestational age of 27 weeks and 6 days (range 24–32 weeks). Lidocaine dose was 200–240 mg in 310 cases (91.7%) and 400–480 mg in 27 cases (8.0%) without difference in success (p>0.05). Lidocaine successfully induced fetal demise with one injection in 331 cases (97.9%). A second injection was required to induce demise for five fetuses (1.5%). Intracardiac injection was successful in 280 of 285 cases (98.3%), with asystole confirmed within 1 min in 75% of cases. Intrathoracic injection caused asystole in 45 of 47 cases (95.7%), with asystole confirmed within 2 min in 75% of cases. Success was not significantly associated with gestational age, body mass index or parity (p>0.05). One patient reported lidocaine-related side effects (0.3%).ConclusionsIntrafetal lidocaine is a safe and effective method of inducing fetal demise. Intracardiac injection achieves fetal asystole almost immediately. Intrathoracic injection is also highly effective.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201350
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Views of clinicians towards providing contraceptive advice and
           contraception to women following early pregnancy loss: a qualitative study
           

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      Authors: Narayanan, N; Reynolds-Wright, J. J, Cameron, S. T.
      Pages: 281 - 287
      Abstract: IntroductionNational guidelines advise that clinicians caring for women post-pregnancy should give women opportunities to discuss contraception, regardless of pregnancy outcome, and provide contraception to women who choose to take up a method. This study aimed to explore knowledge, views and needs of Early Pregnancy Unit (EPU) clinicians around discussing and offering contraception and discussing pregnancy intendedness with women after early pregnancy loss using a qualitative approach.MethodsSemi-structured, audio-recorded interviews with 11 clinicians from a single regional EPU in Edinburgh, Scotland. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically.ResultsClinicians were reluctant to discuss contraception as they believed women would find the topic overwhelming and distressing. Thoughts on discussing pregnancy intendedness were polarised; some considered it insensitive, and others essential. Barriers to discussing contraception and providing it were numerous and included time pressure, and inadequate knowledge and training on contraception. Participants suggested training on contraception, closer working with sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and availability of information on contraception specifically aimed at women who have experienced an early pregnancy loss could facilitate discussions and method provision.ConclusionsEPU clinicians require ongoing training and support to be effective at discussing pregnancy intendedness and discussing and providing post-pregnancy contraception. This will require close working with SRH services and development of sensitive information around contraception for women experiencing an early pregnancy loss.
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201480
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Should COVID-specific arrangements for abortion continue' The views of
           women experiencing abortion in Britain during the pandemic

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      Authors: Lohr, P. A; Lewandowska, M, Meiksin, R, Salaria, N, Cameron, S, Scott, R. H, Reiter, J, Palmer, M. J, French, R. S, Wellings, K.
      Pages: 288 - 294
      Abstract: BackgroundDuring the COVID-19 pandemic, the British governments issued temporary approvals enabling the use of both medical abortion pills, mifepristone and misoprostol, at home. This permitted the introduction of a fully telemedical model of abortion care with consultations taking place via telephone or video call and medications delivered to women’s homes. The decision was taken by the governments in England and Wales to continue this model of care beyond the original end date of April 2022, while at time of writing the approval in Scotland remains under consultation.MethodsWe interviewed 30 women who had undergone an abortion in England, Scotland or Wales between August and December 2021. We explored their views on the changes in abortion service configuration during the pandemic and whether abortion via telemedicine and use of abortion medications at home should continue.ResultsSupport for continuation of the permission to use mifepristone and misoprostol at home was overwhelmingly positive. Reasons cited included convenience, comfort, reduced stigma, privacy and respect for autonomy. A telemedical model was also highly regarded for similar reasons, but for some its necessity was linked to safety measures during the pandemic, and an option to have an in-person interaction with a health professional at some point in the care pathway was endorsed.ConclusionsThe approval to use abortion pills at home via telemedicine is supported by women having abortions in Britain. The voices of patients are essential to shaping acceptable and appropriate abortion service provision.
      Keywords: Editor''s choice, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201502
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Womens attitudes towards a human papillomavirus-based cervical cancer
           screening strategy: a systematic review

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      Authors: Nothacker, J; Nury, E, Roebl Mathieu, M, Raatz, H, Meerpohl, J. J, Schmucker, C.
      Pages: 295 - 306
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo provide insights into women’s attitudes towards a human papillomavirus (HPV)-based cervical cancer screening strategy.Data sourcesMedline, Web of Science Core Collection, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ClinicalTrials.gov were systematically searched for published and ongoing studies (last search conducted in August 2021).Methods of study selectionThe search identified 3162 references. Qualitative and quantitative studies dealing with women’s attitudes towards, and acceptance of, an HPV-based cervical cancer screening strategy in Western healthcare systems were included. For data analysis, thematic analysis was used and synthesised findings were presented descriptively.Tabulation, integration, and resultsTwelve studies (including 9928 women) from USA, Canada, UK and Australia met the inclusion criteria. Women’s attitudes towards HPV-based screening strategies were mainly affected by the understanding of (i) the personal risk of an HPV infection, (ii) the implication of a positive finding and (iii) the overall screening purpose. Women who considered their personal risk of HPV to be low and women who feared negative implications of a positive finding were more likely to express negative attitudes, whereas positive attitudes were particularly expressed by women understanding the screening purpose. Overall acceptance of an HPV-based screening strategy ranged between 13% and 84%.ConclusionThis systematic review provides insights into the attitudes towards HPV-based cervical cancer screening and its acceptability based on studies conducted with women from USA, Canada, UK and Australia. This knowledge is essential for the development of education and information strategies to support the implementation of HPV-based cervical cancer screening.Systematic review registrationPROSPERO (CRD42020178957).
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201515
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • UK Government created statutory bereavement leave for abortions after 24
           weeks and should acknowledge it

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      Authors: Hodson; N.
      Pages: 307 - 308
      Abstract: Statutory bereavement leave after abortions Around the world, activists call for bereavement leave after pregnancy loss, many inspired by New Zealand’s widely celebrated policy.1 In the UK, statutory bereavement leave is only available when pregnancy loss occurs after 24 weeks, under the Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Act 20182 which came into force in April 2020. While the law in New Zealand excluded abortions, the UK law did not. This means British women who have a termination of pregnancy after 24 weeks (and their partners) are eligible for 2 weeks of bereavement leave. While some other countries have provided maternity leave following certain abortions, this statutory recognition that abortion can, under certain rare circumstances, be a ‘bereavement’ experience is unique. This option for statutory bereavement leave covering some abortions is world-leading. This policy is also humane. Under clauses 1 (1)b-d of the Abortion Act 1967,...
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201528
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Highlights from the literature

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      Pages: 309 - 309
      Abstract: Double-dose oral LNG EC may be no more effective than a single dose for women with obesity Many clinical guidelines recommend increasing the dose of oral levonorgestrel (LNG) for emergency contraception (EC) from 1500 µg to 3000 µg in patients with overweight/obesity. This multicentre pharmacodynamic study in the USA randomised women with obesity to receive either 1500 µg or 3000 µg during a natural menstrual cycle to determine whether ovulation was more effectively inhibited with a higher dose. Ovulation was determined with a combination of biochemical and ultrasonographic measures. There was no statistically significant difference in inhibition of ovulation between groups suggesting that double-dose LNG does not confer benefit in this patient group compared with a standard (single) dose. This patient group may benefit more greatly from ulipristal acetate oral EC, which does not appear to be affected by obesity. Copper emergency intrauterine devices remain the most effective...
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2021-201376
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Induced abortion and access to contraception in Sweden during the COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Authors: Niemeyer Hultstrand, J; Törnroos, E, Gemzell-Danielsson, K, Larsson, M. I, Makenzius, M, Sundström-Poromaa, I, Tyden, T, Ekstrand Ragnar, M.
      Pages: 311 - 312
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in many ways globally. In a survey conducted in 29 countries across the world, access to abortion was limited in approximately half of all countries, and 86% reported that access to contraceptive services was affected.1 In the UK, one out of four young adults reported that their access to contraception had been limited due to COVID-19.2 We investigated if the pandemic affected Swedish women’s decision to have an induced abortion and their access to contraceptive counselling. Swedish-speaking women (n=623) seeking a first-trimester abortion at seven clinics in different parts of Sweden, filled out an anonymous 39-item paper questionnaire with both multiple choice and open-ended questions on demographics, abortion and contraception between January and June 2021. The regional Ethical Review Board concluded that no formal ethical approval was needed as the questionnaire did not...
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201464
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Period product insecurity in higher education: a call for change

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      Authors: Seed, L; Biju, A, Johnson, E.
      Pages: 313 - 314
      Abstract: Period product insecurity describes unreliable access to sufficient menstrual products. People experiencing period product insecurity are at risk of period poverty. Period poverty is defined as a lack of access to menstrual products or any other component of satisfactory menstrual hygiene management (MHM): "clean menstrual management material to absorb or collect blood that can be changed in privacy as often as necessary for the duration of the menstruation period, using soap and water for washing the body as required and having access to facilities to dispose of used menstrual management materials".1 A key contributing factor to period product insecurity is the cost of menstrual products, such that 1 in 10 girls in the UK are unable to afford period products.2 Period poverty can be detrimental to both physical and mental health. For example, in the UK, 38% of teenage girls wear period products for longer...
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T01:03:21-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjsrh-2022-201489
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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