Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Adoption Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Obstetric Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies In Family Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Human Fertility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biodemography and Social Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception : X     Open Access  
Raigal     Open Access  
Teratology     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.132
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1682-5055 - ISSN (Online) 2520-5293
Published by UNISA Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in
           Limpopo Province, South Africa

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      Authors: Elelwani Ntshauba, Eric Maimela, Sam Thembelihle Ntuli
      Abstract: The increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) worldwide has been noted, and this can have an adverse impact on maternal and infant health and well-being. As developing countries are undergoing an epidemiological transition due to urbanisation, Westernised diets and a sedentary lifestyle, the prevalence of GDM in rural areas needs to be determined, and its associated risk factors understood. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of GDM in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. A questionnaire adapted from the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Centre (DCP 2.0) was used to measure the prevalence and associated risk factors of GDM. In this study, 101 pregnant women (74%) who were attending antenatal care (ANC) visits in Greater Giyani health facilities completed the questionnaire. Overall, the prevalence of GDM in Greater Giyani, Mopani district was 1.9%. Pregnant women above 30 years with secondary education, employed, obese and at a gestational age of 31–35 weeks were more likely to present with GDM. The results of the current study showed that a family history of diabetes was significantly associated with the development of GDM amongst pregnant women diagnosed with the health condition (P-value=0.018). The study recommends that awareness campaigns be conducted by health practitioners working with women in primary healthcare centres and hospitals during ANC visits, outreach clinics and consultations to educate women about the risk factors associated with GDM and its adverse outcomes. Therefore, this will enable women who are pregnant to be cognisant of this obstetric condition and take precautionary health measures to avoid modifiable risk factors. This study recommends that further research needs to be done on the development of an ideal strategy for screening gestational diabetes in a South African context.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12158
       
  • Nursing Students’ Satisfaction with and Experiences of Using Movies in
           Teaching Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing: A Mixed Methods Study

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      Authors: Eman Dabou, Rabab G. Abd El-Kader , Azza S. Z. Ahmed
      Pages: 1`8 pages - 1`8 pages
      Abstract: Movies have become a widely used educational tool in the medical and nursing fields. They have been understood to be facilitators of theoretical learning, cultural practices and awakening interests. Thus, it is necessary to understand students’ experiences in using this advanced method. The present study aimed to assess nursing students’ satisfaction with and experiences of using movies in teaching psychiatric mental health nursing. A cross-sectional mixed methods research design using a qualitative approach was used. A purposive sample was taken from 84 Year 1 Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Bridge Programme students, recruited from a university in the United Arab Emirates during the 2018/2019 academic year. Two tools were used: (1) a self-administered sheet for participants’ demographic data and satisfaction level; and (2) an interview schedule conducted as a focus group discussion according to the participants’ preferences in order to assess their experiences. The questionnaire’s content validity and the themes were revised by three PhD faculty who are specialists in the field of qualitative research and nursing education. The findings showed that most of the students were satisfied with using movies as a teaching strategy and the qualitative data fell into three themes and nine sub-themes. The students expressed that using movies allowed them to assess the environment where the patients lived and grew up. The study highlighted that nursing students found movies were an enjoyable educational method; helped them to understand psychiatric disorders; and improved their critical thinking skills. The study proved that using movies in teaching psychiatric mental health nursing is a promising strategy.
      PubDate: 2022-11-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/9931
       
  • Can the Use of Impepho Leaves Extend beyond Traditional to Modern
           Medicine' An Opinion

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      Authors: Aviwe Belani, Kelechi Elizabeth Oladimeji, Francis Leonard Hyera, Chrys Matubatuba, Ivan J Juzang
      Pages: 4 pages - 4 pages
      Abstract: Impepho is an indigenous African herb well known to most people in South Africa, particularly Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces. The term “Impepho” is how the IsiXhosa speaking tribe from Eastern Cape called this herb while the IsiZulu’s from KwaZulu-Natal called it “Imphepho”. Despite documented uses for healing by traditional healers, especially in Africa, the healing abilities and mechanism of Impepho remain under-studied by science and medicine for modern drug development. There is a disconnection between medical scholars and traditional healers on how adequately and jointly to use this herb. We therefore urge researchers to work with traditional healers and medical professionals in South Africa and other African countries to carry out additional scientific studies on the Impepho herb.
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11872
       
  • Embracing Implementation Science in Nursing and Midwifery to translate
           evidence-based interventions into policies and clinical practice

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      Authors: Lindiwe Zungu, Geoffrey Setswe
      Pages: 6 pages - 6 pages
      Abstract: Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are the subject of dissemination and implementation efforts in nursing and midwifery. Nursing and midwifery research generates mountains of EBIs with proven efficacy and effectiveness. These include interventions such as the diabetes prevention programme, practices such as cervical cancer screening, and workplace policies such as Covid-19 vaccination. However, evidence is not always used in practice, and there are many examples of problematic implementation of research into practice. Implementation science, defined as “the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of research findings and other evidence-based practice into routine practice … to improve the quality and effectiveness of health services” (Eccles and Mittman 2006), is increasingly being used to implement evidence-based nursing interventions in real-life settings.
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12431
       
  • A Position Statement on Abortion: A Case Study in Jordan

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      Authors: Rasha Abu Baker, Majd T. Mrayyan
      Pages: 10 pages - 10 pages
      Abstract: Abortion is a critical life event and death choice for every pregnant woman. Women who are faced with unwanted pregnancies may seek abortions, regardless of their religious or ethical beliefs, or legal sanctions and any considerable risk. Opinions about abortion describe a combination of personal beliefs about foetal rights, beliefs about abortion morality, beliefs about governmental authority in public policies, and beliefs about the rights and responsibilities of the women seeking to have abortions. The purpose of this position statement is to pinpoint proponents’ and opponents’ viewpoints regarding abortion and provide recommendations to reduce unwanted pregnancies and meet women’s family planning needs.
      PubDate: 2022-11-23
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12287
       
  • Prenatal Anxiety, Perceived Stress, and Coping Behaviour regarding
           Covid-19 among Pregnant Women at a selected Hospital, Kochi, South India

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      Authors: Anju Philip Thurkkadayil, Neeha Elizabeth Joseph, Gopika Manoj, Greeshma C Ravindran
      Pages: 10 pages - 10 pages
      Abstract: Background: The uncertainty brought about by the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) disease threatens the mental well-being of pregnant women with stress and anxiety. Further, pregnancy is a period of mixed feelings, aggravated by hormonal imbalances. This study aimed to describe pregnant women’s prenatal anxiety, perceived stress, and coping behaviour. Method: The study (N=384) utilised a cross-sessional design. Respondents were recruited by consecutive sampling. Through online mode, a structured proforma was used to collect demographics. The “Beck Anxiety Inventory Scale” was used to measure the prenatal anxiety level. Perceived stress was examined by administering the “Perceived Stress Scale,” and the “Brief Cope Scale” was used to assess the coping behaviour among participants. The data were analysed to determine the level of Covid-19-related anxiety, perceived stress, and coping behaviour adopted by the participants. This was done by using SPSS software, IBM SPSS 20, and p<0.05level of significance. Results: The majority of pregnant women, 210(55%), showed moderate anxiety. Their anxieties were related to Covid-19. The commonly found anxiety symptoms among pregnant women in this study were wobbliness in the legs, a feeling of hotness, numbness or tingling, faint or light-headedness, and hot or cold sweats. There was a moderate positive correlation (r=0.566, significant at p<0.001) between perceived stress and prenatal anxiety. The Coefficient of Determination showed that 32% of prenatal anxiety was accounted for by the perceived stress of the mother. The mean perceived stress score was 16.88+6.218, with a range of 9, and the mean coping behaviour score was 57.99+20, with a range of 20. The degree of correlation between perceived stress and coping behaviour had a moderate positive correlation (r=0.444, significant at p<0.001level). Conclusions: The study demonstrated increased anxiety and perceived stress that was related to Covid-19 amongst pregnant women.
      PubDate: 2022-09-28
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/10325
       
  • Harnessing Capacity in Southern Africa to Support and Develop Human
           

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      Authors: Judith Bruce, Mzobanzi Mboya
      Pages: 13 pages - 13 pages
      Abstract: The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) Project on Nursing and Midwifery Education in Africa is designed to respond to critical health skill concerns and a pledge made by the Heads of State and Government of the African Union (AU) in Uganda in 2010 (AU 2010). Ten years later, the State of the World’s Nursing Report (SoWN) (WHO 2020) estimates a shortage of 5.9 million nurses, with the greatest gap (89%) found in low- and lower middle-income countries. To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) relating to health and well-being, World Health Organisation (WHO) member states would have to educate enough nurses to eliminate global shortages and to meet changing healthcare needs. In low- and lower middle-income countries, addressing nursing shortages requires an average increase in the number of graduates of 8.8% per year from 2018 to 2030 and an uptake of at least 70% into the workforce. The production and uptake burden facing southern Africa is a double-edged sword; a project such as this attempts to address this dual burden by adopting a novel approach to build nursing and midwifery capacity that espouses the values of collaboration, self-reliance and humanness. In this paper, we report on South-South collaboration as one of the strategies to develop nursing and midwifery education in the context and challenges of universities in southern Africa. The paper outlines the principles and values of the project; rooted in Ubuntu as a theoretical framework, it articulates the project vision, goals, objectives and implementation methodology, concluding with the profile of six NEPAD projects.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12413
       
  • Midwifery Manpower in Primary Healthcare Centres of Tehran, Iran: A
           Cross-sectional Survey

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      Authors: Mahsa Khoshnam, Elham Ehsani -Chime, Shahla Khosravi, Ali Mosadeghrad, Seyed Tahereh Mirmolaei
      Pages: 13 pages - 13 pages
      Abstract: Background: It is necessary to use accurate methods of calculating manpower to avoid wasting resources. Given that reproductive health services are an important part of primary health services, it would be useful to apply manpower calculation methods to service providers in related occupational groups. This study calculated the required midwifery manpower in health care centers using the Workload Indicator of Staffing Need method. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1400 in 276 health centers in Tehran according to the WISN model, in which the list of activities related to reproductive health in the centers under the auspices of the University of Tehran was determined. The available working time, main workload components, and the activity standards (service standards and allowance standards) were determined through a mixed method (direct observation, comments of service providers, and meetings with experts). The volume of services provided over the period of one year prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic was estimated using national statistics. Finally, the required manpower was calculated and compared with the actual workforce. Results: The results showed that currently Tehran health centers need 34 more staff to provide reproductive health services. The working pressure was calculated 0.9, and the current allowance factor is 1.31. Based on observations, midwifery capacity is currently not fully and exclusively used. Conclusion: To improve the quality of reproductive health services, it is recommended to eliminate the current shortage of midwives, focus more on special midwifery tasks, and reduce the amount of indirect activities of midwives.
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11574
       
  • Improving Families’ Perceptions of Nursing Care of Patients in Intensive
           Care Units in Iran: A Non-randomised Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Halimeh Kamali, Masoomeh Imanipour, Zahra Razzaghi
      Pages: 13 pages - 13 pages
      Abstract: Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate families’ perceptions regarding nursing care provided to patients in intensive care units (ICUs) at a district hospital in Iran. Methods: A non-randomised controlled trial was done in the ICU of a hospital located in Sari, Iran, in 2019. The eligible families of patients were assigned into two groups (N=80) through convenience sampling. The families in the experimental group were allowed to present in the ICU in a planned way. In the control group, the families just followed the restricted hospital visiting policy. The families’ perceptions of nurses’ caring behaviours in both groups were measured using the Caring Behaviour Inventory. Independent and paired t-tests were used for comparing families’ perceptions between and within the groups, respectively. Data were analysed by SPSS. Results: A significant positive increase was found in the families’ perceptions in the experimental group after intervention (84.90 7.87), P<0.0001). The mean difference between the two groups was statistically significant, with a higher positive perception in the experimental group (33.78 (1.04), P<0.0001). Conclusion: Planned presence in the ICU has an effective role in improving families’ positive perceptions of nurses’ caring behaviours. Therefore, reconsidering a restricted visiting policy is recommended.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11195
       
  • Ethical Sensitivity and Empathy among Nursing Students at Hamadan
           University of Medical Sciences: A Correlational Study

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      Authors: Maede Ghadermazi, Efat Sadeghian, Farshid Shamsaei, Leili Tapak
      Pages: 13 pages - 13 pages
      Abstract: Ethical sensitivity affects the moral performance and relationship of nursing students with their clients. On the other hand, moral burnout may be associated with reduced empathy during their training course. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between moral sensitivity and empathy for clients among nursing students. In this correlational study, 200 nursing students were randomly selected from Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2020 and completed demographic questionnaires based on Lutzen’s concept of moral sensitivity and Jefferson’s scale of empathy. Data were analysed by means of a t-test, one-way analysis of variance and a Pearson correlation coefficient using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS-24). The mean age of the nursing students was 23 ± 2.5 years, and most of them were male (60%) and in the fourth academic year (39.5%). The mean score of moral sensitivity was 88.9 ± 9.9, and students’ empathy was 92.3 ± 6.5. There was a direct and significant correlation between the variables (P = 0.001, r = 0.392). Also, a significant and indirect correlation was observed between the number of semesters passed and the degree of empathy shown to clients (P = 0.037, r = -0.14). Moral sensitivity among nursing students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences is desirable, and there is a relationship between moral sensitivity and showing empathy to clients. It was also revealed that students’ empathy levels towards clients decrease with increasing semesters. Decreasing the amount of empathy over time can affect the care of patients, so this component can be given more attention in the training of future nurses.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11593
       
  • Relationship between Communication Skills, Mental Health and Self-esteem
           among Nursing Students at a Medical Sciences University in Hamadan, Iran

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      Authors: Leili Tapak, Fariba Soleymani, Efat Sadeghian, Roya Amini, Nahid Mohammadi
      Pages: 15 pages - 15 pages
      Abstract: Communication is considered to be one of the central concepts in nursing and a prominent part of practising this profession. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between communication skills, mental health and self-esteem among nursing students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in Hamadan, Iran. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted in 2018 on 320 undergraduate nursing students who were selected using a stratified random sampling method. The data was gathered using three self-administered questionnaires, namely, the Queendom Communication Skills Test, the Goldberg Mental Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. The data was analysed using R.V4.0.2. Using the elastic net method, mental health, self-esteem and age were shown to be associated with communication skills over 1 000 repetitions of the model. Communication skills were significantly associated with the three subscales of mental health (p < 0.001), self-esteem (p < 0.01), and age (p < 0.05). Regarding the significant relationship between communication skills, mental health and self-esteem of nursing students, it is recommended to organise self-esteem building and focus on mental health promotion to promote communication skills among nursing students.
      PubDate: 2022-11-23
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12206
       
  • Association Between Domestic Violence and Sexual Dysfunction in Women on
           Infertility Treatment in Turkey

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      Authors: Neşe Karakaya, Meral Kılıç, Emine Koç
      Pages: 15 pages - 15 pages
      Abstract: Infertility is a global problem that closely concerns people of reproductive age. Infertility has many negative effects on the lives of individuals, especially women who are more exposed to violence. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the perceptions of domestic violence against women and the sexual functions of women who apply to a clinic for fertility treatment. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 150 infertile women who applied to the clinic of a university hospital in northern Turkey between August 2018 and February 2019. The data were collected face-to-face using the descriptive information form, the Female Sexual Function Index and domestic-violence-against-women forms. The frequency, percentage, Pearson’s product–moment correlation analysis, linear regression analysis, the Mann Whitney U test, and Cronbach’s alpha methods were used in the analysis of the data. It was found that 54 per cent of the participants had a high school or higher education, 62 per cent of the participants did not work in an income-generating job, the participants were married for an average of 6.08 ± 3.99 years, and the mean age of the participants was 30.69 ± 6.13. The mean score of the domestic violence scale was 65.79 ± 11.16, and the mean score of the sexual function index was determined as 25.24 ± 5.47. Correlation values between domestic violence and sexual function index scores were found to be inversely significant (p < 0.05). The research indicates that infertile women who are exposed to violence experience more sexual dysfunction. It also indicates that women who are not satisfied with their sex life are more exposed to sexual violence.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12306
       
  • Nurse Educators’ Views on the Implementation of Simulation-based
           Education in Lesotho

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      Authors: Pule Solomon Moabi, Ntombifikile Gloria Mtshali
      Pages: 16 pages - 16 pages
      Abstract: The adoption of a competency-based curriculum has necessitated the shift of simulation-based education to the centre stage rather than being an add-on in the nursing education programme. Since the adoption of a competency-based nursing curriculum in Lesotho in 2014, simulation-based learning has been one of the policy areas and is implemented in all private nursing education institutions. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe nurse educators’ views on the implementation of simulation-based education by nursing education institutions in Lesotho. A qualitative study, guided by the grounded theory approach, was conducted in the four private nursing education institutions in Lesotho. Participants, who included nurse educators (24), were purposively selected. Focused group discussions were used to collect data, and theoretical sampling was also employed as one of the sampling methods. Data were collected from 25 August 2020 to 5 January 2021. The data were analysed following Corbin and Strauss’s grounded theory approach, which includes open and axial coding. Three categories emerged: 1) learning resources; 2) learning environment; and 3) views on the delivery of simulation-based education. Participants expressed various views on teaching and learning resources that are used for simulation teaching, how learning is structured in the simulation laboratories to suit their context and diverse positive and negative views on the delivery of simulation-based education. Limited numbers of high-fidelity mannikins and simulation equipment do not prevent institutions from implementing simulation-based education. Before student placement in the real clinical setting, in order to bridge the theory-practice gap, students are placed in the simulation laboratory.
      PubDate: 2022-11-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12370
       
  • Pearls and Practical Tips of Mammography: What Nurses and Midwives Should
           Know

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      Authors: Fattaneh Pahlavan, Zohreh Rashdi, Shayesteh Jahanfar , Maryam Javam, Firoozeh Ahmadi
      Pages: 16 pages - 16 pages
      Abstract: Early detection is of great significance in breast cancer; if the tumour is identified at an early stage, the treatment will be more straightforward, and it could prevent the metastasis of the tumour to other tissues. Screening would be an efficacious strategy that discriminates asymptomatic patients and healthy individuals in the early stages. Breast cancer screening involves Breast Self-Examination (BSE), Clinical Breast-Examination (CBE), imaging methods such as mammography, oncologic assessment, and diagnostic surgical techniques. Healthcare professionals are in charge of the early detection of breast cancer. Accordingly, raising the awareness, knowledge and skills of midwives, nurses, and other medical staff is necessary. The most reliable and available method of breast screening would be mammography. We aim at reviewing the necessary points of mammography. This article introduces mammography as an essential means of screening, the indications and practical tips, and mammographic features of some breast diseases in women. Along with the advanced equipment of mammography, other determinant factors such as age, the time of mammography, the patient’s preparation, the relief of stress, operator’s skill, and procedure are explained. Moreover, the practical features of mammograms and other complementary methods, such as Galactography, pneumo-cystography, and magnification mammography techniques are considered. Overall, the proper application and the correct interpretation of the screening and mammography play a crucial role in the early detection and survival of patients.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11782
       
  • The effect of a Maternal Mentoring Programme on Pregnancy Readiness among
           Indonesian Women: Results of a Cluster Randomised Control Trial

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      Authors: Siti Nurunniyah, Detty Siti Nurdiati, Madarina Julia, Emma Clare Lewis, Hamam Hadi
      Pages: 16 pages - 16 pages
      Abstract: Many Indonesian women are not properly prepared for pregnancy prior to conception. The goal of the present study was to test the effect of a maternal mentoring programme on Indonesian women’s pregnancy readiness before conception. The maternal mentoring programme was expected to increase pregnancy readiness among this population. A cluster randomised control trial (CRCT) involving preconception women was conducted in three sub-districts of Special Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. There were 122 clusters with a total of 384 eligible participants who were randomly allocated to either the intervention group (n = 189) or the control group (n = 195). The maternal mentoring programme provided preconception health education; health monitoring; and text message reminders for the intervention group. The control group received standard care. Pregnancy readiness was measured using a pregnancy readiness score consisting of 15 indicators adapted from the National Preconception Health and Health Care Initiative. The data was collected using a structured questionnaire including: pregnancy readiness, age, parity, level of education, employment status, income, body mass index (BMI) and time spent preparing for pregnancy. Statistical tests included the independent t-test, and multilevel mixed effects logistic regression was used to measure effect of the programme. The results demonstrated that the intervention group had a significantly higher average pregnancy readiness score change from pre-intervention to post-intervention (4.5) than the control group (1.0) (p < 0.005). The intervention group was almost 12 times more likely (OR = 12.5; 95% CI: 6.6–23.6) to be prepared for pregnancy compared to the control group adjusting for age, parity, employment status, level of education, BMI and income. The study concluded that the maternal mentoring programme improved readiness for pregnancy among a cluster sample of Indonesian women.
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/9367
       
  • Compliance with Standard Precaution Practices During the Early Phase of
           the Covid-19 Pandemic among Nurses in Nigeria

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      Authors: Zaccheus Opeyemi Oyewumi, Oluwadamilare Akingbade, Olamide Olajumoke Afolalu, Semiu Opeyemi Adeyeye, Karimat Itunu Jolayemi, Oluwabusolami Esther Atekoja
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: Background: Nurses serve at the frontline during disease outbreaks. While measures have been adopted to control the rapid spread of the Covid-19 pandemic, little is known about the level of compliance of nurses to standard precaution practices during the early phase of the pandemic. Objective: This study aimed to assess compliance with standard precaution practices (SPPs) among 713 nurses in Nigerian hospitals during the early phase of the pandemic. Method: The study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional design using an anonymous online questionnaire to elicit data from respondents. Data were analysed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 25. Chi-square test and multiple regression analyses were also conducted where appropriate. Results: Findings from this study indicated that 448 (62.8%) of the respondents had good knowledge of Covid-19 and 265 (37.2%) had poor knowledge. Also, 529 (74.2%) had good compliance with the practice of standard precautions, and 184 (25.8%) showed non-compliance. A significant association was found between the age of nurses (χ2=14.034 p=0.015), years of experience (χ2=8. 636 p =0.035) and their overall compliance with the practice of standard precautions. Conclusion: During the early phase of the Covid-19 pandemic in Nigeria, although over an average of the nurses had good knowledge of the disease, over one-third had poor knowledge, and one-quarter showed poor compliance with standard precautions. Interventions to improve the knowledge and compliance of health workers during the early phase of disease outbreaks are hereby advocated, as 21.3% had no previous training on Covid-19.
      PubDate: 2022-11-23
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12074
       
  • Support in the Battle against COVID-19: A National Qualitative Study among
           Midwives in Indonesia

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      Authors: Mergy Gayatri, Oluwadamilare Akingbade, Emmanuel Adesuyi , Rahmat Oyekale, Faremi Oluwabunmi, Grace Oluwatomi Olufayo, Dian Kusumaningtyas, Sujarwoto Sujarwoto
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in 2019 was met with various responses globally in an effort to reduce its spread. Despite these efforts, however, low- and middle-income countries like Indonesia are still being confronted with challenges, especially the healthcare providers who are frontline workers in the struggle. The current study aimed to explore the support expected by and provided to Indonesian midwives and pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research method used was a descriptive-interpretative qualitative research design. The data was collected through conducting in-depth interviews with 24 midwives who were purposively sampled and evenly recruited across all regions and all areas of midwifery practice in Indonesia. The recorded interviews were coded and themes were identified, after which a thematic analysis was done. Two main themes emerged and nine sub-themes were identified from the main themes. The study findings offered new insights into the individual and collective experiences of midwives from various regions in Indonesia. They had to adjust by leveraging the internet and mobile telephones in order to continue delivering standard care to pregnant women amid the pandemic. In addition, the midwives saw the need to provide food and financial support to pregnant women. However, despite the end of the pandemic being in sight in September 2022, there is a need to continue to support midwives and pregnant women in the disruption caused by the pandemic. Government agencies and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) should plan interventions targeted at providing specific support to midwives and pregnant women.
      PubDate: 2022-11-18
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11871
       
  • Midwives’ Risk Perception of and Preventive Behavioural Responses to
           COVID-19

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      Authors: Mergy Gayatri, Oluwadamilare Akingbade, Emmanuel O. Adesuyi, Natasha van Antwerpen, Marizsa Herlina, Agung Dwi Laksono
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: As the novel Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is highly contagious, application of preventive practices, such as personal protective equipment (PPE) usage and hand-washing, are crucial to prevent its spread. Evidence suggests that preventive behavioural responses to COVID-19 might be affected by risk perception. The present study aimed to assess risk perception and preventive behavioural responses among midwives and the association between them. In September 2020, a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Indonesia among 421 midwives. Spearman’s correlation coefficient or Spearman’s rho (ρ) was used to identify the factors associated with risk perception and preventive behavioural responses as well as the correlation between risk perception and preventive practices. Generally, the midwives had a high-risk perception of COVID-19 infection. However, approximately 27% of the midwives did not always use PPE, and around 56% did not often wash their hands. Midwives who worked at health facilities had a higher level of risk perception of COVID-19 infection as well as adherence to preventive practices than those who worked at universities. A significant association was found between perception of risk severity and preventive practices (p < 0.05). The healthier the midwives, the higher their level of adherence to PPE and hand-washing. Older midwives tended to use PPE at any time, while those who had a chronic disease were more likely to wash their hands for at least 20 seconds more frequently. Although the midwives had a high-risk perception of the COVID-19, it is necessary to improve their preventive practices, particularly hand hygiene.
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/10743
       
  • Midwives’ Perspectives regarding Involvement of Male Partners during
           Pregnancy at a Maternal Health Facility in Eswatini

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      Authors: Ziyanda Alicia Khulu, Malmsey Lydia Mmasello Sengane , Tshimangadzo Mudau
      Pages: 19 pages - 19 pages
      Abstract: Globally, maternal and child health services have made efforts to involve men for several decades. There has been noted progress among some European countries, which is contrary to some observations among African states. Midwives’ attitudes have an impact on men accompanying pregnant women for antenatal care services. This study aimed to investigate midwives’ perspectives regarding male partners’ involvement during pregnancy at a maternal health facility in Eswatini (previously Swaziland). A qualitative, explorative, descriptive design was used to achieve the study objectives. Eight midwives were purposively sampled to conduct face-to-face in-depth interviews using an interview guide. Research instruments such as a semi-structured interview guide and audiotapes were used to maintain consistency and minimise memory bias. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. Findings include midwives’ feelings; health system challenges such as a shortage of staff and space and a lack of guiding policies; male partner-related challenges such as time constraints and competing responsibilities, social stigma and cultural taboo from communities, and co-habiting behaviour. Benefits for men accompanying their pregnant women included instant informed consent and initiation of medications, health education opportunities, partner involvement in breastfeeding techniques and family planning, and building a positive family relationship. Conclusions are that, despite the interest among males to be available to provide support for women in the process of pregnancy, midwives are not yet ready. It is, therefore, recommended that midwives’ education and policy development be considered for positive male involvement.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/12096
       
  • Digital Health Ecosystem Framework to Address Fragmentation of the Health
           System in South Africa

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      Authors: Kabelo Chuma, Philangani Sibiya
      Pages: 28 pages - 28 pages
      Abstract: Globally, the healthcare industry is plagued by fragmentation, and this fragmentation of the health system has become one of the major problems facing especially low- and middle-income countries. Likewise, the current health system in South Africa is highly fragmented and segmented, with two-tiered systems characterised by a multiplicity of health information systems. This fragmentation has inhibited the efficient delivery of healthcare services and resulted in limited access to integrated health data across healthcare providers. This paper proposes a Digital Health Ecosystem framework to address fragmentation of the health system in South Africa. A qualitative approach was employed, using desktop-based research. A literature review was conducted to elucidate the need for a framework to address fragmentation of the health system in South Africa. It emerged from the literature that the coexistence of subsystems operating independently contributes to health system fragmentation in South Africa. The proposed framework aims to address the ubiquitous problem of health system fragmentation and to enhance data-sharing capabilities across healthcare facilities. A Digital Health Ecosystem offers capabilities to create a digital environment for cooperation, data sharing and information exchange between a network of healthcare organisations. The technology offers South African healthcare facilities a new way to work seamlessly together to provide multidisciplinary and collaborative healthcare services to patients. Healthcare facilities in South Africa are urged to embrace a Digital Health Ecosystem to improve the safety and quality of healthcare and increase access to and availability of clinical, patient and administrative data.
      PubDate: 2022-11-10
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/11547
       
 
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