Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1836 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (272 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (100 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (59 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1085 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (192 journals)

BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)

Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adoption Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Biodemography and Social Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Contraception : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fetal and Pediatric Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Human Fertility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Reproduction and Contraception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Obstetric Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Perspectives On Sexual and Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Raigal     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies In Family Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Teratology     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.132
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1682-5055 - ISSN (Online) 2520-5293
Published by UNISA Homepage  [6 journals]
  • Report on the 36th International Society for Quality in Health Care
           Conference held from the 20th–23rd October 2019 in Cape Town, South
           Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sibusiso Zuma
      Pages: 4 pages - 4 pages
      PubDate: 2020-07-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/7466
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • GladAfrica Epilepsy Research Project (GERP): Initiation, Launch and
           Community Interest Report

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lufuno Makhado, Thendo Gertie Makhado, Rachel Tsakani Lebese, Angelina Maphula , Maria Sonto Maputle, Jabu Tsakani Mabunda, Ntsieni Stella Mashau
      Pages: 5 pages - 5 pages
      PubDate: 2020-07-15
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/7552
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Health Surveillance Assistants’ Practices of Postnatal Care in
           Lilongwe District, Malawi

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      Authors: Mercy Pindani, Chrissie Phiri, Idesi Chilinda, Wanangwa Chikazinga, Janet Botha, Genesis Chorwe-Sungani
      Pages: 12 pages - 12 pages
      Abstract: Health surveillance assistants (HSAs) participate in the provision of postnatal care in Malawi, although their knowledge and skills in maternal and reproductive health are limited. This article presents the findings of a mixed-methods study that was conducted in three selected health centres to document the practices of HSAs in the provision of postnatal care to mothers and babies in Lilongwe district in Malawi. A random sample of 97 HSAs participated in the quantitative part of this study and 30 of these participated in the qualitative aspect of the study. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics while qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. This study found that many respondents (>60%) had limited capacity to provide adequate postnatal care and 85.3% of them never checked the vital signs of mothers and babies. They also lacked knowledge and skills in some aspects of postnatal care including danger signs. Almost all the respondents (96.8%) had never received any training in Basic Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (BEmONC), or Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EmONC). Considering that HSAs have limited capacity to provide postnatal care to mothers and their babies, shifting tasks of nurses or midwives to HSAs should not be considered as an “outright solution” for increasing access to postnatal care in low-resource settings because it may compromise the quality of care.
      PubDate: 2020-07-24
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/6963
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Community Service Nurses’ Experiences at a Public Hospital in
           Tshwane District, South Africa

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      Authors: Naomi Nkoane, Azwihangwisi Mavhandu-Mudzusi
      Pages: 15 pages - 15 pages
      Abstract: The South African Nursing Council (SANC), in Regulation R765 of 2007, requires every newly qualified professional nurse trained in South Africa to perform remunerated community service in a public hospital for a period of one year before registration as a nurse. However, most newly qualified professional nurses placed in a certain public hospital in Tshwane district as community service nurses request to be transferred to other hospitals before the end of their placement term. The study adopted interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), which aimed at gaining an in-depth understanding of community service nurses’ experiences at a public hospital in Tshwane district, South Africa. Data were collected using in-depth interviews with 11 purposively selected community service nurses. Data were analysed using Smith’s IPA framework. Three themes emerged from the data analysis: (1) limited material resources and a shortage of health care personnel; (2) poor interpersonal relationships; and (3) a lack of professional support during the placement of community service nurses at the public hospital under study. The findings imply a lack of hospital readiness and preparedness to offer a conducive environment for community service nurses to gain the required clinical experience and skills. This has a negative impact on the nursing profession, nursing education, and patient care. Recommendations are put forward focusing on the responsibilities of the Health Ministry and the SANC, mentorship, and the transformation of nursing curricula to be contextually relevant to the country’s health care systems and resources.
      PubDate: 2020-07-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/6577
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Experiences of Grandmothers Raising Their Orphaned Adolescent Grandsons

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      Authors: Lindiwe Buyisile Mthembu, Marie Poggenpoel , Chris P. H. Myburgh
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: Worldwide, grandparent-headed households have emerged as one of the fastest-growing family constellations responsible for caring for grandchildren as a result of various crises, including increased death of middle-aged people. Little is known about mental health factors influencing grandmothers’ daily well-being when raising orphaned adolescent grandsons (OAGs). The main objective of this study was to explore and describe the lived experiences of grandmothers raising their OAGs in uMkhanyakude District, KwaZulu-Natal. In this study, a qualitative research design, which is exploratory, descriptive and contextual in nature, was used. The study was based on the application of a philosophy of constructivism by conducting individual in-depth phenomenological interviews to understand the experience of grandmothers as they narrate it and the meaning they attach to raising their OAGs. Purposive sampling was used in the selection of grandmothers raising OAGs. Data saturation was reached after 10 interviews, and was supplemented by documented observations and field notes. The data was analysed using Tesch’s method of open coding. The themes that emerged were the following: the burden of meeting the basic needs of their OAGs, concern about the future and their health as well as their grandsons’ health, and living everything in God. The results are discussed in the context of existing literature. Many mental health conditions are undiagnosed; the study highlights the need to promote mental health strategies that will be sensitive to the challenges experienced by grandmothers raising OAGs and empower them with skills and the mobilisation of resources.
      PubDate: 2020-07-30
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/6200
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Challenges Faced by Mental Health Nurse Specialists in North West, South
           Africa

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      Authors: Leepile Alfred Sehularo, Kelebogile Rebecca Setona, Isaac Mokgaola
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: This article reports on a study that sought to explore and describe the challenges faced by mental health nurse specialists in North West (NW), South Africa, using a qualitative research design. The study population comprised all mental health nurse specialists working in public mental health care institutions in NW. A non-probability expert sampling method was used to identify mental health nurse specialists for voluntary participation. The sample size was determined when data saturation was reached after interviewing seven mental health nurse specialists working in the province. Data analysis was done independently by both the researcher and the co-coder. Credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability were observed to ensure trustworthiness. Three themes emerged from the study, namely: (1) challenges affecting mental health nurse specialists directly; (2) challenges directly influenced by the government; as well as (3) suggestions to support mental health nurse specialists. Recommendations were derived and proffered to support mental health nurse specialists in NW.
      PubDate: 2020-07-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/6392
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • A Conceptual Model for Improving Working Conditions at Selected Public
           Hospitals in Mpumalanga, South Africa

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      Authors: Zodwa Margaret Manyisa
      Pages: 17 pages - 17 pages
      Abstract: Employees in public hospitals in South Africa work under dreadful conditions and are at risk of developing psychological stress and occupational diseases as well as occupational injuries. These poor working conditions translate to poor service delivery and as a result, the patients are the ones who suffer the most while under the care of these healthcare professionals. Despite these poor working conditions in public hospitals, there are limited studies that have dealt with this important topic in South Africa. The purpose of this paper was to describe a conceptual model which can be used as a framework of reference to improve the working conditions and the health and safety of employees at selected public hospitals in South Africa. A descriptive, explorative and theory construction research design was used to construct a conceptual model for improving the working conditions in public hospitals in the specific province in South Africa. The model suggests that improvement of working conditions, employee health and safety and quality patient care can only be achieved if employees and managers work interdependently for the betterment of the working conditions of their hospitals. Improvement should focus on enablers such as leadership commitment, infrastructure, resources, safety and security communications, decision-making, interpersonal relationships, support, and education and training. The implication for the managers and employees is that the model can be used as a framework for improving working conditions in hospitals, to promote the health and safety of employees and to improve quality patient care.
      PubDate: 2020-07-10
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/4655
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Operational Managers’ Experiences Regarding Supportive Supervision at
           Primary Healthcare Facilities in the North West Province, South Africa

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      Authors: Maserapelo Gladys Serapelwane, Eva Mofatiki Manyedi
      Pages: 18 pages - 18 pages
      Abstract: A lack of supportive supervision of operational managers is a disturbing phenomenon in the management of primary healthcare facilities in developing countries. The North West province of South Africa is not exempt from a lack of supportive supervision of operational managers. This occurs despite the burden of disease and a high demand for the provision of quality services. The study explored and described experiences of operational managers regarding supportive supervision by local area managers in the facilities of the North West province. Operational managers’ perceptions of how supportive supervision can be facilitated effectively were also described. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual study was conducted. The population comprised operational managers who worked for at least one year in the primary healthcare facilities. Purposive sampling was used and fundamental ethical principles underlying the protection of human participants were adhered to. Four semi-structured in-depth focus group interviews were conducted in the four districts of North West. The analysis of data followed Tesch’s method of content analysis. The first theme that surfaced concerned the participants’ experiences of factors related to compromised critical aspects of supportive supervision. The second theme embodied experiences of factors related to a lack of the qualities and competencies of a supportive supervisor. Perceptions of how effective supportive supervision of operational managers can be facilitated constituted the third theme. Based on the results, it was apparent that supportive supervision of operational managers in primary healthcare facilities should be enhanced.
      PubDate: 2020-07-27
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/7256
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • The Midwife-woman interaction as a critical component of antenatal care:
           ethical implications and lessons to be learned

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      Authors: Johanna Mmabojalwa Mathibe-Neke
      Pages: 19 pages - 19 pages
      Abstract: Pregnancy and childbirth are important rites of passage for women and their families, with deep personal and cultural significance, bringing joy along with great physical and emotional vulnerability. The purpose of the study under review was to explore pregnant women’s experiences of midwife-woman interaction and the extent to which it conforms to respectful ethical care. A qualitative case study design was applied. The setting was randomly selected primary health care facilities that form a first point of contact for pregnant women for antenatal care in Gauteng, South Africa. The population of the study was pregnant women of low socio-economic class receiving free antenatal care service at public primary health care facilities. Women waiting for their routine antenatal care were conveniently selected to be part of the focus group discussions (FGDs). The data was analysed thematically. Whilst a few positive aspects regarding midwife-woman interaction were shared, the participants expressed a desire for personal care; a shorter waiting time; continuity of care; enhanced communication with midwives; a greater opportunity for asking questions and receiving comprehensive answers; and a greater attention to their needs and fears. Recommendations were provided based on the study findings to enhance respectful practice by midwives.
      PubDate: 2020-07-20
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/6882
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Managing Caregiver Burden among Families of Patients with End-Stage Renal
           Disease

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      Authors: Yemisi Okikiade Oyegbile, Petra Brysiewicz
      Pages: 16 pages - 16 pages
      Abstract: Family caregivers of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) play a significant role in providing substantial care for a prolonged period for their sick relatives, often with very limited resources, making it a difficult environment. Government support for family caregivers of patients with ESRD is lacking in Nigeria, increasing their vulnerability to caregiver burden and its consequences. An action research study using a complimentary mixed-method approach was used to develop the intervention model for managing caregiver burden. Quantitative data were collected to measure the extent of caregiver burden using a Zarit Burden Interview questionnaire for 96 family caregivers, while individual in-depth interviews with 15 participants provided the qualitative data. Integrating the quantitative and qualitative data led to the identification of four moderators to manage the caregiver burden in this study. The model for managing caregiver burden was developed from the findings, using stressors and associated moderators of caregiving, and the role played by culture and finance in this context. An implementation checklist was developed, which was used by registered nurses to implement the concepts in the model with the family caregivers during the model implementation phase. Family caregivers of patients with ESRD need to be supported by nurses during the caregiving process. Nurses can increase caregivers’ identity and knowledge of the disease as a way of preventing the family caregivers from being overwhelmed by their caregiving role.
      PubDate: 2019-09-26
      DOI: 10.25159/2520-5293/4330
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 2 (2019)
       
 
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