Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Geologica Saxonica     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales de Paléontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Novitates Paleoentomologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Carnegie Museum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
PaleoBios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zitteliana     Open Access  
Ameghiniana     Open Access  
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Open Quaternary     Open Access  
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
Revue de Micropaleontologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Comptes Rendus Palevol     Open Access  
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Palaeontographica A
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0375-0442 - ISSN (Online) 2509-8373
Published by Schweizerbart Science Publishers Homepage  [23 journals]
  • Early Carnian ammonoids from China Mountain (Tobin Range, Nevada, USA)

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      Abstract: Early Carnian ammonoids from China Mountain (Tobin Range, Nevada, USA)Marchesi, Ruben; Balini, Marco; Jenks, James F.
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. - AbstractWe herein document a newly reported Early Carnian ammonoid fauna from China Mountain (Tobin Range, north-central Nevada, USA). Although the general locality was reported in the 1970s as representing the second site in North America with an ammonoid fauna belonging to the lowermost Carnian Trachyceras desatoyense Zone, neither the section nor the ammonoid fauna has ever been described. The area was surveyed in 2018, and the stratigraphic succession, i.e., the Panther Canyon and Smelser Pass members of the Augusta Mountain Formation and the overlying Cane Spring Formation, is herein described. The fossil-bearing interval occurs in the uppermost portion of the Smelser Pass Member, just a few meters below the unconformity at the base of the Cane Spring Formation. Four fossiliferous localities (A–D) were found, of which two (B and C) yielded many well preserved ammonoids. Taxonomic studies of these specimens provided unexpected results, namely that the fauna is dominated by Cryptomorphiceras, a new genus of the subfamily Trachyceratinae, which occurs with very rare specimens of Perrinoceras Badiotites Silenticeras Trachyceras and Clionitites Cryptomorphiceras n. gen. includes C. compressum (Johnston, 1941; type) from South Canyon (New Pass Range) and C. crassum n. sp., C. levicostatum n. sp. and C. sp. ind. from China Mountain. Cryptomorphiceras n. gen. is characterized by a weakly furrowed venter, which is crossed by ribs and a suture line with a shallow external lobe and wavy to weakly indented saddles. The internal mold of the new genus exhibits weakened ornamentation with respect to the outer surface of the test, due to the peculiar, triple-layered structure of the test.An earliest Carnian age assignment of the China Mountain ammonoid fauna is based on the occurrence of Cryptomorphiceras n. gen. at South Canyon, where the new genus is confined to the lowermost Trachyceras silberlingi chronozone.Based on its features, Cryptomorphiceras n. gen. does not occupy a clear position within the evolutionary trend of Muenster- ites → Daxatina → Trachyceras, the only trend thus far recognized in the Trachyceratinae across the Ladinian/Carnian boundary. The evolution of this group of ammonoids is more complex than previously thought, but ongoing investigations at South Canyon are expected to provide more information for a better understanding of this issue.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Aug 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • New materials of Khoratpithecus, a late Miocene hominoid from Nakhon
           Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand, confirm its pongine affinities
           

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      Abstract: New materials of Khoratpithecus, a late Miocene hominoid from Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand, confirm its pongine affinitiesChaimanee, Yaowalak; Lazzari, Vincent; Yamee, Chotima; Suraprasit, Kantapon; Rugbumrung, Mana; Chaivanich, Kamol; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. - AbstractKhoratpithecus piriyai is a large-bodied hominoid documented from the late Miocene locality of Khorat sand pit in Nakhon Ratchasima province, northeastern Thailand that was previously known anatomically from a mandible fragment and a partial maxilla. Here we describe additional four mandible fragments and one hemi-maxilla, all of which originating from the same sedimentary unit. Most of these new specimens are assigned to K. piriyai based on their dentognathic morphology. However, one larger specimen forms the basis for the new species, Khoratpithecus magnus n. sp. These specimens provide important new information about Khoratpithecus and help to understand the morphological variability of this taxon, enabling us to propose an emended diagnosis for the genus. The absence of scars for the anterior digastric muscles, a uniquely derived character only shared with Pongo, characterizes all new lower jaws that preserved the base of the symphysis and constitutes a significant character for this genus, together with the strong robustness of the mandibular corpora. Some characters show high variation, such as the intercanine breadth of the lower jaws which, when reduced, induces a divergent shape of the tooth rows, a feature that also occurs in the closely related taxa, Ankarapithecus and Sivapithecus. This character is present in all new specimens referred to K. piriyai. The new species, K. magnus, displays many similarities with Khoratpithecus piriyai, but differs from it by its larger size, having a body mass estimated as 30 % larger than that of K. piriyai, combined with several distinct dental characters, including higher crown height and length/width molar proportions. Its lower jaw displays canine alveolar sizes similar to those of the other individuals from the same locality, which are of smaller size. Therefore, these differences cannot be attributed to sexual dimorphism, justifying the erection of a new species. These specimens also shed new light on the feeding adaptation of this genus. Several characters, including the rather small P3, reduced honing facets,thick enamel, large molar crowns, very robust mandibular corpora, high crowned molars and a tendency for heavy wear on the cheek teeth, point to a dental adaptation for an abrasive diet similar to that of Indopithecus. However, the comparison between these two genera suggests that their similarities are the result of an adaptation to an abrasive diet, reflecting homoplasy within the pongid clade. The climatic and vegetational changes occurring in South Asia during the late Miocene probably instigated these adaptative changes among three different large-bodied hominoids, Khoratpithecus Indopithecus and the unknown ancestor of Gigantopithecus.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Overview of and taphonomic bias in Archostemata (Insecta: Coleoptera) from
           Cretaceous amber

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      Abstract: Overview of and taphonomic bias in Archostemata (Insecta: Coleoptera) from Cretaceous amberSong, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xianye; Jarzembowski, Edmund A.; Xiao, Chuantao
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. - AbstractArchostemata are a notable element of Mesozoic insect faunas. Prior to the present study, a total of 35 species, including an indeterminate one, from 18 genera have been reported from Cretaceous amber. These are mainly ommatid and cupedid reticulated beetles, with only 3 species, including an indeterminate one, belonging to micromalthids. Most specimens are preserved in mid-Cretaceous Kachin amber, with only a larval specimen of Cretomalthus acracrowsonorum Kirejtshuk & Azar, 2008 being from Lower Cretaceous Lebanese amber. Permutation test based on body parameters was performed to analyze taphonomic bias about specimen size. Results of permutation test indicate that Cretaceous archostematans preserved in rock are significantly larger than amber-inclusions. This bias may be caused by a combination of size, body structure, behavior, habitat preferences as well as collectors.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The first tiger beetle (Coleoptera, Adephaga, Cicindelidae) from
           mid-Cretaceous Kachin amber, northern Myanmar

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      Abstract: The first tiger beetle (Coleoptera, Adephaga, Cicindelidae) from mid-Cretaceous Kachin amber, northern MyanmarSong, Zhenyu; Jarzembowski, Edmund A.; Xiao, Chuantao
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. - AbstractHujia rolfi gen. et. sp. nov., the first tiger beetle from mid-Cretaceous Kachin amber and the earliest record of the tribe Manticorini, is described based on a well-preserved male specimen. It is attributable to the tribe Manticorini due to the dark body (lacking evidence of bright-coloured pigments), eyes not bulging from the head and the very similar mandibles to constituent genera of this tribe; it can be distinguished from other genera mainly by its transverse labrum with at least 7 submarginal setae and multidentate anterior margin, and long labial palpus with long setae on palpomere 2. The new taxon was likely epigeic and nocturnal. It represents the third definite Mesozoic record of Cicindelidae, the first record of the Manticorini from Asia, and extends the origin time of the tribe to as early as the mid-Cretaceous.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Calcareous algae and foraminifers across the Permian-Triassic boundary
           interval (uppermost Bellerophon Formation and basal Werfen Formation) in
           the Dolomites (South Tyrol – Trentino, Italy)

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      Abstract: Calcareous algae and foraminifers across the Permian-Triassic boundary interval (uppermost Bellerophon Formation and basal Werfen Formation) in the Dolomites (South Tyrol – Trentino, Italy)Vachard, Daniel; Krainer, Karl
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. - AbstractThree measured sections (Seres A and B, and Göma) have been studied in the Peitlerkofel/Sass de Putia (2875 m a.s.l.) massif in the northwestern Dolomites (South Tyrol/Northern Italy) and one section at a small gorge near Gabbiolo about 3 km SE of Trento (Italy). These sections exhibit the Permian-Triassic boundary interval in the uppermost Bellerophon Formation (including the Bulla Member) and lower Werfen Formation (Tesero Member and basal Mazzin Member). Four assemblages of foraminifers and calcareous algae are defined, which correspond respectively to the early or late Changhsingian; late Changhsingian; latest Changhsingian; and earliest Triassic. Most interesting cyanobacteria and calcareous algae are Cayeuxia alpina Boueina? cf. tubulata, classical gymnocodiaceans, and dasycladalean algae Aciculella preromangica Atractyliopsis lastensis Eogoniolina johnsoni Mizzia velebitana Physoporella laevis, and Succodium luciae n. sp. Eogoniolina is relatively abundant, whereas Mizzia is rare. Some Calcitarcha (incertae sedis) are noticeable: Calcisphaera?, Bituberitina?, Eotuberitina Eotubespina n. gen., and Floritheca. The plurilocular Fusulinata belong principally to Globivalvulina and Charliella, especially Charliella dolomitica n. sp., and to the nankinellid Hayasakaina cf. paraminor. Miliolata are represented by calcivertellids Planiinvoluta, hemigordiids Hemigordius, and neodiscids Multidiscella n. gen., Midiella, and Pseudomidiella. The lineage which encompasses the genera Postcladella Praetriadodiscus Rectoglomospira Semimeandrospira Planiinvoluta?, Pilammina?, and Hoyenella, seems to be transitional between the foraminiferal classes Miliolata and Involutinata. The Nodosariata are composed of Rectostipulina Nodosinelloides Polarisella Nestellorella Pseudolangella?, Langella?; Geinitzina Neogeinitzina Praerectoglandulina Frondinodosaria Calvezina Ichthyofrondina Pachyphloia, and Aulacophloia. New taxa are Multidiscinae n. subfam.; Multidiscella langei n. sp.; M. zaninettiae n. sp.; Postcladella giaccobei n. sp.; and Hoyenella annulata n. sp.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The enigmatic teleostean fish, Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel, 1933 from
           the Eocene of Lake Messel (Hessen, S Germany). Part I: Anatomy and
           taxonomy revised

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      Abstract: The enigmatic teleostean fish, Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel, 1933 from the Eocene of Lake Messel (Hessen, S Germany). Part I: Anatomy and taxonomy revisedMicklich, Norbert; Arratia, Gloria
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. 1 - 73AbstractThaumaturus intermedius from the oil shale of the Messel Formation (Middle Eocene, Lower Geiseltalian; 48 Ma, European Land Mammal Age MP 11) is reinvestigated and redescribed. The original materials are very poorly preserved and not suited for a proper demarcation from other species of Thaumaturus. Therefore, an amended diagnosis is given on the base of better preserved new materials and some of them were chosen that represent their main morphological traits. The Messel species differs from all other members of Thaumaturus and from several other fossil and extant teleostean taxa in body proportions, several meristic data and in other anatomical details. In particular, Th. intermedius has a maxilla that is included in the gape and bears teeth in its posteriormost section, a stout dorso-posterior process that is developed on its upper posterior margin, a smooth parasphenoid, a caudal fin endoskeleton with one epural and two uroneurals (of which the first one extends to the anterior margin of the first preural centrum and has a membranous outgrowth along its complete dorsal margin), and cycloid scales with delicate circuli that converge to a pointed angle in their posterior field. Several characters of Th. intermedius are discussed with respect to their variability and ecological significance. For example, the large deviations in the relative body depth may be indicative of sexual dimorphism. Other morphological variations may have resulted from speciation events. Th intermedius likely inhabited the near-shore superficial layers of ancient Lake Messel, where it predominantly fed on small arthropods. A comparison with other species of Thaumaturus and other fossil and extant teleosts indicates that it does not belong to any extant family or previously suggested higher taxa (e.g., Hiodontiformes or Osteoglossiformes) and remains in its own family of uncertain relationships.KurzfassungThaumaturus intermedius aus dem Ölschiefer der Messel Formation (Mittel Eozän, Unteres Geiseltalium, 48 Mio. J., Europäisches Landsäugetier-Niveau MP 11) wird neu untersucht und beschrieben. Das Original-Material ist sehr schlecht erhalten und erlaubt keine saubere Abgrenzung von anderen Thaumaturus-Arten. Aus diesem Grund wird die Diagnose anhand des neuen, besser erhaltenen Materials ergänzt und, sofern notwendig, korrigiert. Einige Exemplare werden ausgewählt, die wesentliche Merkmalszüge der Messeler Art besonders gut repräsentieren. Thaumaturus intermedius unterscheidet sich demnach sowohl von allen anderen Vertretern der Gattung Thaumaturus, als auch von mehreren anderen fossilen und rezenten Knochenfisch-Taxa in den Körperproportionen, einigen meristischen Merkmalen, und in einer Reihe von anatomischen Details. Insbesondere zu nennen sind hier das Maxillare, das am Biß beteiligt ist und in seinem hinteren Abschnitt Zähne trägt, ein kräftiger, kurzer, und nach hinten gerichteter Fortsatz, der an seinem oberen Hinterrand ausgebildet ist, ein unbezahntes Parasphenoid, ein Schwanzflossen-Stützskelett mit einem Epurale und zwei Uroneuralia (von denen das erste bis an Vorderrand des ersten präuralen Zentrums reicht und durch einen membranösen Auswuchs gekennzeichnet ist, der sich über seinen gesamten Oberrand erstreckt), und Schuppen mit sehr feinen Circuli, die im hinteren Sektor zu einem spitzen Winkel zusammenlaufen. Etliche Merkmale von Th. intermedius werden im Hinblick auf ihre Variabilität und ökologische Bedeutung diskutiert. Die großen Unterschiede in der relativen Körperbreite könnten auf einen Sexualdimorphismus hindeuten, andere Unterschiede aus einem Artneubildungs-Prozess resultieren. Thaumaturus intermedius dürfte ein Bewohner des ufernahen Flachwassers des ehemaligen Messelsees gewesen sein, der sich vorrangig von Kleintieren (Arthropoden) ernährt hat. Ein Vergleich mit anderen Arten der Gattung Thaumaturus sowie mit weiteren fossilen und rezenten Knochenfischen legt nahe, dass diese nicht zu irgendeiner der heutigen Knochenfisch-Familien gehören kann. Ebenso wenig kann sie einem der höherrangigen Taxa, mit denen sie früher in Beziehung gebracht worden war (z.B. den Hiodontiformes oder den Osteogossiformes), zugeordnet werden. Daher wird die Gattung Thaumaturus auch weiterhin als Mitglied einer eigenständigen „incertae sedis“ Familie angesehen.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • More than one large constrictor snake lurked around paleolake Messel

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      Abstract: More than one large constrictor snake lurked around paleolake MesselSmith, Krister T.; Scanferla, Agustín
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. 75 - 103AbstractThe largest terrestrial snakes from Europe pertain to the constrictor genus Palaeopython Rochebrune, 1880. Two specimens from the early–middle Eocene of Messel, Germany, are the first skeletons referable to Palaeopython, which we describe as Palaeopython schaali sp. nov. The new species shares numerous derived features with Messelopython freyi Zaher & Smith, 2020, including a sigmoidal lateral margin of the maxilla, a highly distinctive ectopterygoid-pterygoid articulation, a crescentic supra-orbital element, and a strongly convex prearticular crest of the compound bone. We erect the family Messelopythonidae nov. for the fossil genera Palaeopython and Messelopython P. schaali has a highly unique posterodorsal circumorbital element that in its great extent is similar to the combined supra- and post-orbital elements of M. freyi P. schaali co-existed with the stem boid Eoconstrictor fischeri (Schaal, 2004), demonstrating that similarly sized species of these two lineages of hyper-macrostomate snakes were sympatric. Although evidence of body proportions suggests a terrestrial way of life for Messelopythonidae, several skull traits such as the sigmoid-shaped maxilla, highly enlarged anterior maxillary teeth, and a straight lower jaw suggest an arboreal lifestyle for P. schaali. Analysis of morphometric data provides no support for the presence of pit organs in this species.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A fossil wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula' hassiaca) from the
           Eocene of Messel

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      Abstract: A fossil wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula? hassiaca) from the Eocene of MesselAbels, Jacqueline; Wedmann, Sonja
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. 105 - 117AbstractA new fossil wasp species, Vespula? hassiaca sp. nov., is described from the Eocene UNESCO world heritage site Grube Messel in Germany. This species can be assigned definitely to the eusocial Vespinae, and it probably belongs to the extant genus Vespula. Besides classical morphology, as an additional method for investigation of the fossil, geometric morphometric analysis of the front wing shapes of extant and fossil Vespinae was used. The fossil record of wasps, especially of the social wasps belonging to the subgroup Vespinae, is sparse. Until now, there was no fossil of the extant genus Vespula (Vespinae, Vespidae) recorded.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The first Procercopidae (Insecta: Hemiptera) from the Jurassic Sangonghe
           Formation of northwestern China

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      Abstract: The first Procercopidae (Insecta: Hemiptera) from the Jurassic Sangonghe Formation of northwestern ChinaZhang, Qian-Qi; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Chun
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. 117 - 124AbstractAbstract: A new genus and species, Longucercopis xinjiangensis gen. et sp. nov., is established and assigned to the froghopper family Procercopidae based on a well-preserved tegmen from the Lower Jurassic Sangonghe Formation in Haojiagou-Toutunhe section, Urumqi, Xinjiang, NW China. The new taxon is unique in having a slender tegmen (length/width near 4.0:1) with narrow appendix, crossvein mp-cua2connected to vein MP much basal of rp-mp and ir, and cua-cup long. A key to genera of Procercopidae is provided, and the phylogenetic position of Longucercopis gen. nov. in Procercopidae is also discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The early Pleistocene aquatic palaeoecolgy in Central Java, Indonesia as
           recorded in mollusc assemblages from the Puren and Sangiran layers of the
           Sangiran Dome

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      Abstract: The early Pleistocene aquatic palaeoecolgy in Central Java, Indonesia as recorded in mollusc assemblages from the Puren and Sangiran layers of the Sangiran DomeFaylona, Marie Grace Pamela G.; Sémah, Anne-Marie; Sémah, François; Lozouet, Pierre; Adityas, Metta
      Palaeontographica Abteilung A, (2022), p. 125 - 152AbstractThis study explores quantitative patterns recorded in mollusc assemblages with the goal of elucidating the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, and the relationship between the established palaeodatasets of analysis and the levels of variability in palaeontological data. Mollusc fossil assemblages obtained from the Upper Puren to the Lower Sangiran layers of the early Man Site, Sangiran Dome in Central Java, Indonesia were analyzed by using bulk samples that were collected from the different facies of the dome which were deposited during the early Pleistocene.A total of 58,216 specimens from 18 samples were collected from the Blue Clay Puren, Corbicula Bed, Lower Lahar, and Black Clay Sangiran. All specimens were identified up to the genus level with a total of 61 mollusc taxa, which were further classified in terms of their ecology. These samples were then subsequently analyzed using ecological statistics methods. Specimens were compared based on the overall composition and taxa abundances, as well as the autoecological investigation of their life habit, substrate preference, depth range, and the ecological implication of the assemblagesThe Puren mollusc assemblage exhibits generally similar overall composition and ecological marine structure with those that inhabited the soft bottom sublittoral zone. This assemblage contained predominant species of the family Arcidae (Anadara sp., Arca sp. and Arcopsis sp.) and the genus Turritella sp. (Turritellidae) suggesting the development of a shallow body of water in Central Java of the Sunda arc around 2 million years ago (Ma). Species from the Corbicula Bed assemblages, characterized by the presence of numerous Corbicula, contained shell species that originated from both freshwater and marine environment. Mollusc assemblages from the Lower Lahar and Black Clay Sangiran were pure freshwater shells. The examined mollusc assemblages in the Lower Sangiran were associated with marine and swampy coasts and lotic ecosystems with landward flowing waters indicating landmass deposits. Their presence characterizes the start of marine episodes linked to shift in regression and continental lacustrine environments, and counterparts of Pleistocene glacials/interglacials and volcanic activities within the last 2 Ma. These lines of evidence suggest that the molluscan diversity in Sangiran Dome in Central Java is associated with sub-environmental diversity of the localities with patterns likely resulting from a combination of ecological, environmental, and taphonomic processes.Overall, this study illustrates the usefulness of fossil shells obtained from Sangiran Dome. Species richness of mollusc assemblages is useful in tracing the environment and its sequence of early Pleistocene succession of the Sangiran Dome in Central Java. The changing environment has resulted in significant shifts in the density and distribution of Sangiran molluscs as revealed by the assemblages that were deposited on the different facies of Puren and Sangiran layers. The approach provides a narrative of the relevant transformation of the aquatic ecology in Sangiran Dome. It also elucidates the sources of variability on paleontological patterns.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
 
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