Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geologica Saxonica     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annales de Paléontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Zitteliana     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Quaternary     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Carnegie Museum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
PaleoBios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Novitates Paleoentomologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ameghiniana     Open Access  
Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
Revue de Micropaleontologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Comptes Rendus Palevol     Open Access  
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Comptes Rendus Palevol
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.768
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1631-0683 - ISSN (Online) 1777-571X
Published by Académie des sciences Homepage  [7 journals]
  • Summary and conclusions

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:

      Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • A methodology for skull reconstruction

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Michael DEBRAGA, Natalia RYBCZYNSKI & Robert REISZ
      The reconstruction process of the skull and skeleton represents a critical step in the study of fossil vertebrates and is often responsible for how the evolutionary history of a taxon is interpreted. It is also an important step in any test of the researcher’s understanding of the anatomy of the fossil. Even so, there is no recognized method for its completion, leaving the actual process to the individual undertaking the investigation. While this is often accomplished in an appropriate manner, there remains extensive room for error. With the onset of cladistic methodology dating back to the 1980s, character state description has become ever more critical in establishing phylogenetic histories, and over a period of 40 years, character state interpretation has often relied on specimen drawings and reconstructions. Based on a career dedicated to the detailed skeletal reconstruction of tetrapods, the content presented here highlights a stepwise approach that is designed to minimize error and increase the value of fossil reconstructions. We describe the skull reconstruction of the Palaeozoic tetrapod Limnoscelis paludis Williston, 1911 and highlight some of the more critical strategies that are necessary to maximize accuracy and hence increase phylogenetic reliability as well as support opportunities for testing anatomical interpretations as well as functional and ultimately behavioural interpretations. We also take the opportunity to highlight the extensive career contributions made to the field of palaeontology by Diane Scott, who for over 40 years has represented the nec plus ultra of fossil preparation, illustration, and reconstruction.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • First report in the fossil record of a shark tooth embedded in a pinniped
           bone

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Stephen J. GODFREY, Paul MURDOCH, Leonard DEWAELE, Victor J. PEREZ & Clarence SCHUMAKER
      There are now many examples in the fossil record of shark bite marks preserved on biogenic materials including coprolites, ammonoids, sea star ossicles, an echinoid, and bone and calcified cartilage. These exceptional fossils document evidence of exploratory behavior, active predation, and/or scavenging. However, only a small subset report on the presence of shark teeth embedded in fossilized bone or cartilage. Although a few shark tooth-marked seal bones are known from the fossil record, no direct evidence of predation or scavenging in the form of a shark tooth embedded in a fossil seal bone has yet been documented. Herein, we describe the first shark tooth embedded in a seal (Phocidae Gray, 1821) bone, a calcaneum (CMM-V-6964), that was surface collected in Mosaic’s South Fort Meade Mine, Hardee County, Fort Meade, Florida, United States. The isolated bone originated from within the Bone Valley Member of the Peace River Formation (Hawthorn Group). The partial tooth is identified as having come from an Early Pliocene great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Linnaeus, 1758). This discovery also represents the first C. carcharias tooth ever found embedded in a fossil bone. The embedded tooth may have come about as a result of active predation or scavenging. The extant macropredatory sharks, Carcharodon carcharias (great white shark), Notorynchus cepedianus (Péron, 1807) (sevengill shark), Somniosus microcephalus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (the Greenland shark), and Somniosus antarcticus Whitley, 1939 (sleeper shark), are known to actively prey upon seals (Pinnipedia Illiger, 1811). If this peculiar fossil association resulted from active predation, the seal did not survive the encounter because there is no evidence of healing in the area around the embedded shark tooth.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Visual methods for documenting the preservation of large-sized synapsids
           at Richards Spur

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Tea MAHO, Robert HOLMES & Robert R. REISZ
      Large isolated skeletal elements, including those of sphenacodontid and ophiacodontid synapsids from the upland cave systems of the Richards Spur locality, Oklahoma, are described. Multiple forms of visual representation, including coquille and stipple drawings, are used to document and examine the isolated elements. A fragmentary anterior portion of a dentary has the sphenacodontid four-leaf clover plicidentine attachment within the tooth roots, but the teeth are all of uniform size, and the symphyseal area is relatively slender and does not curve upward, suggesting that the specimen may not belong to any known member of the clade. A larger humerus with only the distal end preserved and a complete astragalus have distinct characteristics which are attributable to the sphenacodontid Dimetrodon Cope, 1878. A second, smaller humerus was identified to belong to Ophiacodon Marsh, 1878, cf. O. navajovicus and represents the first record of an ophiacodontid at Richards Spur. Finally, two large sphenacodontid interclavicles were discovered, with one having unusual growths representing a pathological condition. Typically, large amniotes are quite rare in this early Permian upland ecosystem, but the discovery of the new material shows that large synapsids are present at Richards Spur.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The sternum and interclavicle of Aelurognathus tigriceps (Broom &
           Haughton, 1913) (Therapsida: Gorgonopsia), with comments on sternal
           evolution in therapsids

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Christian A. SIDOR & Arjan MANN
      Understanding the origin and evolution of the unique mammalian respiratory system hinges on our knowledge of the osteological changes in the pectoral apparatus (i.e., scapulocoracoid, cleithrum, clavicle, interclavicle, sternum) throughout the synapsid fossil record. Among non-mammalian therapsids, documentation of this anatomy is woefully incomplete, with groups such as dinocephalians and gorgonopsians remaining poorly documented. Here we provide a detailed anatomical description of an articulated sternum and interclavicle of a well-preserved specimen of Aelurognathus tigriceps (Broom & Haughton, 1913) from the Lopingian upper Madumabisa Mudstone Formation, Luangwa Basin of Zambia. The sternal morphology reveals new anatomical details on the attachment sites for the ribs, showing three distinct facets, and a previously undescribed depression on the ventral surface for the attachment of the interclavicle. We also provide a preliminary discussion of the morphological variation of these elements both within Gorgonopsia and across Therapsida.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Skeletal reconstruction of fossil vertebrates as a process of hypothesis
           testing and a source of anatomical and palaeobiological inferences

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Corwin SULLIVAN, Robin SISSONS, Henry SHARPE, Khoi NGUYEN & Brandon THEURER
      Reconstructions of extinct animals play an important role in vertebrate palaeontology. Such reconstructions represent visual hypotheses regarding the original morphology of the vertebrates they depict, which are amenable to future testing as additional information comes to light through discoveries of new specimens and re-examination of specimens that have already been collected. In this contribution, we argue that the scientific value of reconstructing a fossil vertebrate extends beyond simple presentation of a visual hypothesis, because the process of creating a reconstruction is itself analytical and hypothetico-deductive. Successive drafts of the reconstruction represent provisional visual hypotheses that can be tested on the basis of their internal consistency and their congruence with empirical evidence about the extinct taxon that is the reconstruction’s subject. Iterative refinement of the reconstruction over successive rounds of testing and modification is likely to lead to discoveries about the subject’s anatomy, as certain anatomical possibilities are rejected and others found to be plausible. These anatomical discoveries, here termed first-order inferences, may in turn lead to second-order inferences about functional morphology or other aspects of palaeobiology. Three case studies from dinosaur palaeontology, respectively involving the skull of the hadrosaurid Edmontosaurus Lambe, 1917, the forelimb of the ceratopsid Pachyrhinosaurus Sternberg, 1950, and the hindlimb of an indeterminate ceratopsid, are provided to illustrate how the process of reconstruction can be a fertile source of discoveries.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Diane Scott: extraordinary researcher and scientific illustrator in
           vertebrate paleontology

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Robert R. REISZ & Michael DEBRAGA
      Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • A “preglacial” giant salamander from Europe: new record from the Late
           Pliocene of Caucasus

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Elena V. SYROMYATNIKOVA, Vadim V. TITOV, Alexey S. TESAKOV & Pavel P. SKUTSCHAS
      Disarticulated cranial and postcranial bones of a giant salamander (Cryptobranchidae: Andrias sp.) were found in the Upper Pliocene deposits of the Belorechensk locality in the Northern Caucasus. These remains probably belonged to one individual that died during a stage of rapid growth and had a total length of about 90-100 cm. The giant salamander from Belorechensk is among the geologically youngest and the easternmost known in Europe.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Tooth in the spotlight: exploring the integration of archaeological and
           genetic data to build multidisciplinary narratives of the Past

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Francesco D’ERRICO, Luc DOYON, Joao ZILHÃO & Jack BAKER
      The article addresses the challenges posed by the interdisciplinary collaboration that led to the recent Nature article presenting results of the extraction of ancient human DNA from a perforated deer tooth found in Denisova Cave. We provide a critical analysis of the contextual data that directly impacts the interpretation of the genetic data and the evaluation of the potential of the new DNA extraction technique for future studies. We discuss in greater detail Denisova, the only site that has produced truly exploitable palaeogenetic results. We highlight major unresolved dating inconsistencies at Denisova that need inquiry and explanation. We also emphasize the lack of an appropriate theoretical framework in the analysis of the tooth, of information on the lateralization, sex, age, perforation technique, wear, on the ochre residues, and the release of erroneous information on the associated faunal assemblage. We conclude that quality archaeological data and their sound evaluation should complement paleogenetic data to create unified, reliable, and verifiable narratives about human history.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Faire gras à Molène: dairy products and ruminant fats detected by lipid
           and isotopic analysis of pottery dating to the Final Neolithic-Early
           Bronze Age from the island site of Beg ar Loued (Molène, western
           Brittany, France)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Camielsa PRÉVOST, Akshyeta SURYANARAYAN, Yvan PAILLER, Clément NICOLAS, Thierry BLASCO, Arnaud MAZUY, Pauline HANOT, Yvon DRÉANO, Catherine DUPONT & Martine REGERT
      The subsistence strategies of early farming communities have been highlighted since the beginning of the Neolithic, thanks to numerous studies on lipid residues from ceramic vessels conducted in various parts of continental Europe. However, after the Early Neolithic, evidence of subsistence strategies along the northern Atlantic coast are still lacking, especially for island contexts. This paper presents the results of lipid residue analysis of 129 potsherds from Beg ar Loued (Molène, France), an island site dating primarily to the Early Bronze Age (c. 2700-2600 to 1800 BCE). Aiming to understand the use of vessels, vessel treatment and culinary practices on the settlement, analyses of visible charred residues, sherds and ceramic surfaces/coating layers were carried out using chromatographic (n = 174) and isotopic techniques (n = 24) after lipid extraction by solvent (n = 174) or acid methanolysis (n = 31). The results demonstrate the extensive use of terrestrial products (ruminant carcass and dairy) in pottery, including occasional plant products (with possible mixtures of different waxes), while the detection of aquatic products is limited. Thus, combined with evidence from faunal remains at the site, the results indicate that terrestrial resources like ruminant meat and dairy products were preferentially processed in vessels, and aquatic products mostly without the use of ceramics. These findings demonstrate the significance of lipid residue analysis for studying the role of pottery in food production and consumption at sites along the Atlantic coast.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Archaeometric characterization of chlorite-based manufacturing waste from
           workshop areas of the Konar Sandal South Complex, Jiroft (Kerman, Iran,
           3rd millennium BCE)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Mojgan SHAFIEE, Chiara COLETTI, Hassan FAZELI NASHLI, Nasir ESKANDARI, Massimo VIDALE & Lara MARITAN
      Sixteen small samples of fragmentary “chlorite” containers, coming from three different workshop sites of the Konar Sandal South network (Iran), were analyzed using a multianalytical approach, consisting in thin-section petrography and mineralogical characterization by X-ray powder diffraction. This preliminary study singled out at least two major different mineralogical groups, suggesting that different craft groups, possibly in different times, exploited different local sources of chloritic rocks. Results also indicates that the surroundings of Konar Sandal South, the main urban hub of the Halil valley, were involved – probably for several centuries – in the production of three major different classes of stone pots (cylindrical vessels with intricate geometric patterns, plain bell-shaped bowls and incised série récente vessels).Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Chilotherium schlosseri (Weber, 1905) (Rhinocerotidae, Mammalia) from
           the late Miocene of the foreland of the Eastern Carpathians in Romania

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Paul ȚIBULEAC, Jérémy TISSIER, Alexandru PETCULESCU & Damien BECKER
      The paper provides an overview of the Chilotherium Ringström, 1924 fossils from Romania, which are recorded so far in three different Upper Miocene localities of the Eastern Carpathians Foreland: mammal localities of Reghiu, Bacău and Pogana. The fossils include a partial skull, several maxillary and mandible fragments and isolated teeth. They have been partially illustrated, but never described excepting the isolated teeth of Pogana. The previous assignments were confusing, ranging from Chilotherium schlosseri (Weber, 1905) and C. cf. sarmaticum for Reghiu specimens to an indeterminate species close to C. sarmaticum Korotkevich, 1958, C. kiliasi (Geraads & Koufos, 1990), and C. kowalevskii (Pavlow, 1913) for Pogana teeth. Based on descriptions and comparisons with other Chilotherium remains, all specimens from Romania can be referred to C. schlosseri. Chilotherium schlosseri is the most widespread species of the genus, ranging from Eastern Europe to Central Asia. The presence of this genus in Romania, and more globally in Eastern Europe, attests to a transition area between the more closed and wooded environments of Western Europe (where Chilotherium is absent) to the more open ones in Asia.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Additions to the late Eocene Süngülü mammal fauna in Easternmost
           Anatolia and the Eocene-Oligocene transition at the periphery of
           Balkanatolia

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Grégoire MÉTAIS, Pauline COSTER, Alexis LICHT, Faruk OCAKOĞLU & K. Christopher BEARD
      The Eocene-Oligocene transition marks a period of dramatic global climatic change correlated with pronounced mammalian faunal change. Fossil evidence is indispensable for studying the distribution of taxa through time, and determining how abiotic parameters shaped ancient biodiversity. Here we report ruminant artiodactyls and a new anthropoid primate from Süngülü, a locality in Eastern Anatolia that has yielded a diversified and largely endemic assemblage of rodents. Three taxa of ­ruminants are recognized, the tragulid Iberomeryx parvus Gabunia, 1964, a larger species of Iberomeryx Gabunia, 1964, and a bachitheriid referred to cf. Bachitherium sp. A lower molar is identified as the new eosimiid primate Sungulusimias unayae n. gen., n. sp., which is the first occurrence of Paleogene anthropoids in western Asia. The lower molar of Sungulusimias unayae n. gen., n. sp. is characterized by protoconid and metaconid closely spaced and of similar height and volume, paraconid cuspidate and nearly connate with metaconid, strong mesiobuccal cingulid, and entoconid without strong connection to hypoconulid via the postcristid. The composition of this assemblage together with rodents indicates a probable Latest Eocene age for Süngülü, although an early Oligocene age cannot be completely ruled out. The rodent fauna from Süngülü suggests that endemism persisted at the periphery of Balkanatolia until the latest Eocene while Eastern Anatolia was situated in a strategic corridor for faunal exchanges between eastern Asia, Indo-Pakistan and Europe. During the Eocene-Oligocene transition, Balkanatolia probably functioned as a “holding pen” where various taxa were confined for significant intervals of time before proceeding to colonize Western Europe at the Grande Coupure.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Dec 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • New insights into the fossil record of the turtle genus Chelus
           Duméril, 1806 including new specimens with information on cervicals and
           limb bones

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Edwin-Alberto CADENA, Andrés LINK, Andrés VANEGAS, Carlos A. AVELLANEDA-OTERO, César PERDOMO, URUEÑA-CARRILLO, Rodolfo SÁNCHEZ, Rubén VANEGAS, Torsten M. SCHEYER & Jorge D. CARRILLO-BRICEÑO
      Matamata turtles (Chelus Duméril, 1806) are composed of two extant species, Chelus fimbriata ­Schneider, 1783 and Chelus orinocensis Vargas-Ramírez, Caballero, Morales-Betancourt, Lasso, Amaya, Martínez, Silva-Viana, Vogt, Farias, Hrbek, Campbell & Fritz, 2020, inhabitants of the main freshwater drainages of northern South America. The systematics and palaeobiogeography of Chelus is still unresolved. Here, we describe several new fossil specimens from the Late Miocene of Urumaco (Venezuela) and Tatacoa (Colombia). The fossils are mostly complete, articulated shells that allow reestablishing validity of two extinct taxa, Chelus colombiana Wood, 1976 and Chelus lewisi Wood, 1976. One of the specimens of C. lewisi from Urumaco represents the first record within the genus for which autopodial bones (a left manus) and additional limb bones are preserved together with ashell, demonstrating evolutionary conservatism in limb anatomy for the genus. The specimen comes from the Socorro Formation, representing the earliest so far known record of Chelus for the Urumaco sequence. Additionally, one specimen from Tatacoa is the first fossil for which cervical and pectoral girdle elements are preserved. Phylogenetic analysis supports the existence of two separate clades inside of Chelus, one formed by the extinct species and the other by the extant ones.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Nov 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Late Miocene hominoid Ouranopithecus macedoniensis (Bonis, Bouvrain,
           Geraads & Melentis, 1974): maxillary deciduous dentition and virtual
           reconstruction of the unerupted permanent teeth

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      George D. KOUFOS, Christos-Alexandros PLASTIRAS, Constantine N. DAVID & Dimitrios SAGRIS
      The hominoid Ouranopithecus macedoniensis (Bonis, Bouvrain, Geraads & Melentis, 1974) is known from three Late Miocene localities in Greece. All are correlated with late Vallesian, MN10; more precisely, they are dated between 9.6 and 8.7 Ma. During the last 50 years several fossils of this hominoid have been recovered. The present article describes the first specimen with upper deciduous teeth, recovered from the locality Ravin de la Pluie in Axios Valley (Macedonia, Greece). The upper deciduous dentition of O. macedoniensis is characterised by a small canine relative to the length of the deciduous premolars, with a rounded occlusal crown outline, a trapezoidal dP3 with metacone and a rudimentary hypocone, a sub-squared dP4, and the absence of cingulum. The taxonomic and sexual attribution of the studied material is based on the preserved and virtually reconstructed permanent dentition, using high resolution microcomputed tomography. The morphological and metrical comparisons of the permanent dentition with the available sample of O. macedoniensis, as well as the monospecific character and the strong sexual dimorphism of the Ravin de la Pluie sample, allow its attribution to a female sub-adult individual of this taxon. The upper deciduous teeth of Ouranopithecus macedoniensis preserve some morphological features, that may have a phylogenetic value, but this hypothesis requires further investigation as the available material of all fossil taxa is poor.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Nov 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Limb histology of the Triassic stem turtles Proterochersis porebensis
           Szczygielski & Sulej, 2016 and Proganochelys quenstedtii Baur, 1887 with
           insights into growth patterns of early turtles

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Tomasz SZCZYGIELSKI, Nicole KLEIN, Justyna SŁOWIAK-MORKOVINA & Torsten M. SCHEYER
      Data on turtle limb bone histology and microstructure are spotty, especially for Mesozoic taxa, despite significant progress made in recent years. Here we provide first detailed information on the stylopodia of the Late Triassic stem turtles Proganochelys quenstedtii Baur, 1887 from Switzerland and Proterochersis porebensis Szczygielski & Sulej, 2016 from Poland. In both taxa we observed large, internal medullary regions filled with endosteal trabeculae and poorly to moderately vascularized parallel-fibered (grading locally to lamellar) periosteal cortices. Primary vasculature is predominantly longitudinal, in Proterochersis porebensis locally with radial inclination. In large specimens, secondary remodeling is significant in the deeper cortex, but it neither completely obliterates the primary tissue nor reaches the external surface of the bone in either taxon. Comparison of histological data, limb morphology, shell and limb lengths as well as proportions reveal differences in growth patterns between the taxa: Proganochelys quenstedtii seems to grow faster during early life stages than Proterochersis porebensis and attained distinctly larger body sizes earlier in ontogeny, even though the asymptotic body size is roughly the same for both species. Overall, the histological and microstructural characteristics of stylopodial bones of Triassic turtles more closely resemble those of more recent representatives of that group than earlier stem turtles.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Nov 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Présence en Corse d’un coléoptère thermophile appartenant au complexe
           d’espèces « Canthydrus diophthalmus » à l’Holocène moyen,
           possible témoin d’un optimum climatique vers 6 500 ans BP (île
           Cavallo, Corse-du-Sud, France)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Philippe PONEL, Yoann POHER, Frédéric MÉDAIL & Frédéric GUITER
      La découverte de fragments subfossiles de Canthydrus Sharp, 1882 (Coleoptera, Noteridae) dans des sédiments d’âge holocène (c. 6 500 ans BP) provenant de l’étang côtier rétro-dunaire du Greco, sur l’île Cavallo (archipel des Lavezzi, Corse-du-Sud, France), constitue la première citation française pour ce genre de coléoptère aquatique thermophile. Des hypothèses pour expliquer sa probable extinction à l'échelle locale sont évoquées.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Oct 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Histovariability and lifestyle in Proterochampsidae Romer, 1966
           (Archosauriformes) from the Chañares Formation (Late Triassic),
           northwestern Argentina

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Jordi Alexis GARCIA MARSÀ, Denis A. PONCE, Federico Lisandro AGNOLÍN & Fernando E. NOVAS
      This present work reports new data on the palaeohistology of Chañares Formation (early Carnian) proterochampsids based on appendicular bones, particularly Chanaresuchus bonapartei Romer, 1971 (i.e., PULR-V 116, femur, tibia and fibula) and Tropidosuchus romeri Arcucci, 1990 (i.e., PVL-4606, femur), and provides new insights into their paleobiology, histovariability, as well as lifestyle. Chanaresuchus bonapartei presents intraspecific and interelemental histovaribility with collagen fibers organized from lamellar to woven fibered bone tissue, and degree of vascular density from sparse to dense. Both specimens appear to have attained sexual and skeletal maturity, but somatic maturity could not be inferred. Tropidosuchus romeri presents intraspecific histovaribility with collagen fibers organized from parallel-fibered to woven fibered bone tissue, and dense vascularization. The lifestyle analysis for T. romeri, using a statistical model that employs anatomical and microanatomical data, suggests a terrestrial habit. The Proterochampsidae Romer, 1966 recovered from the Chañares Formation exhibits a large disparity in growth strategies among individuals of the same taxa, and with respect to other contemporaneous Archosauriformes.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Oct 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • A new species of possible archipolypodan millipede from the Carboniferous
           of the Netherlands with unusually long tergites

    • Authors: erocklin
      Abstract:
      Joachim T. HAUG, René H. B. FRAAIJE & Carolin HAUG
      Millipedes have a long evolutionary history, with the oldest presumed fossils of Diplopoda de Blainville in Gervais, 1844 being from the Silurian and the first definite fossil record originating from Devonian deposits. The phylogeny of Diplopoda is not fully resolved yet, especially not concerning fossil representatives. At the same time, already in the Palaeozoic millipedes showed quite a morphological and presumably also ecological variety. We describe here a new species of a Carboniferous millipede from the Westphalian A of the Netherlands, Lauravolsella willemeni n. gen., n. sp., a possible representative of Archipolypoda (†Archipolypoda Scudder, 1882). The species is based on a single specimen, preserved with part and counterpart, which both show a three-dimensional preservation. The specimen has unusually long tergites, in normal life position covering most of the following segment. These long tergites might have been beneficial when performing defensive enrolling. In extant millipedes, enrolling is usually facilitated by softer areas between the sternites, allowing for a certain degree of ventral compression. In the new fossil, the sclerotic sternites occupy the entire length of the ventral side of the segment, not allowing for any type of compression. The new fossil therefore demonstrates another solution for the mechanical challenges during enrolment and increases the morphological diversity of Carboniferous millipedes.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 20 Oct 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Taxonomy and palaeoecology of the fossil anamorphic fungus
           Mycoenterolobium eccentricum (R.K. Kar) G. Worobiec, n. comb.

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Grzegorz WOROBIEC, Elżbieta WOROBIEC & Yusheng (Christopher) LIU
      Microremains of fungi from Neogene deposits from the Gray Fossil Site (Tennessee, United States) and the Bełchatów Lignite Mine (Poland), similar to the enigmatic fossil-species Kutchiathyrites eccentricus R.K. Kar, 1979, were reconsidered as representatives of the modern mitosporic genus Mycoenterolobium Goos, 1970. A new combination, Mycoenterolobium eccentricum (R.K. Kar) G. Worobiec, n. comb., is proposed. The geographical and stratigraphical range and ecology of the fossil and modern Mycoenterolobium species are discussed. Investigated remains of Mycoenterolobium eccentricum (R.K. Kar) G. Worobiec, n. comb. document the first fossil record of this fungus from both Northern America and Europe, while the Bełchatów mine represents the northernmost known fossil and modern occurrence of the Mycoenterolobium genus. Both modern and fossil species of Mycoenterolobium seem to prefer warm (tropical to warm temperate), usually humid climates. They are associated with plant debris (mainly wood) decaying in a damp or aquatic environment. Mycoenterolobium eccentricum (R.K. Kar) G. Worobiec, n. comb. is suggested to be used as a non-pollen palynomorph proxy for palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Sep 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Thalassinoides horizontalis Myrow, 1995 from the Middle-Upper Ordovician
           shallow marine siliciclastics of Iran (Lashkerak Formation)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Carlos NETO DE CARVALHO & Aram BAYET-GOLL
      Thalassinoides Ehrenberg, 1944 are relatively common bioturbational structures in carbonate shallow marine successions from the early Paleozoic. Much rarer is the reference to this ichnogenus in siliciclastic formations from the same age. In the Ordovician Lashkerak Formation cropping out at the Central Alborz mountains, Iran, Thalassinoides is a common trace fossil in wave-dominated shoreface complex and prodelta-mouth bar environments of a fluvial-dominated delta. We compare the Middle-to-Upper Ordovician branching networks of the Unit 2 of the Lashkerak Formation with the ichnospecies Thalassinoides horizontalis Myrow, 1995 emphasizing the almost entire bedding-parallel orientation, regular branching and lack of constrictions and swellings. The eodiagenetic halos developed from mucus-lining walls, or by change of the original sediment fabric, typical of this and other ichnospecies of Thalassinoides in carbonate settings are not found in sandstones. The almost polygonal mazes from the Lashkerak Formation are also compared with the recently erected Protopaleodictyon aitkeni Morgan, Henderson & Pratt (2019), considered as a giant graphoglyptid in an early evolutionary stage of these forms in shallow marine environments. Both trace fossils are similar in morphology, size, preservation, ichnofacies and interpreted function, thus being P. aitkeni a junior synonym of Thalassinoides horizontalis.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Aug 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Rhodolith-forming coralline red algae in the CaCO3 biofactory — A case
           study from the Serravallian of tropical northeastern Indian Ocean

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Rikee DEY, Daniela BASSO, Arindam CHAKRABORTY, Lopamudra ROY, Ajoy Kumar BHAUMIK & Amit K. GHOSH
      Rhodolith-forming non-geniculate coralline red algae have been recorded from the Long Formation, exposed in four different outcrops at Little Andaman Island (Hut Bay) in the northeastern Indian Ocean. The non-geniculate corallines are represented by species of Sporolithon Heydrich, 1897, Mesophyllum Lemoine, 1928, Lithothamnion Heydrich, 1897, Phymatolithon Foslie, 1898, Lithoporella (Foslie) Foslie, 1909, Spongites Kützing, 1841, Neogoniolithon Setchell & Mason, 1943 and Lithophyllum Philippi, 1837. The algal assemblages also include geniculate corallines belonging to the genera Amphiroa Lamouroux, 1812 and Corallina Linnaeus, 1758. In addition, larger benthic foraminifers and few planktonic foraminifers also have been identified in thin section analysis. Based on the earlier study carried out on planktonic foraminifers, the Long Formation has been dated as Serravallian (late middle Miocene) and chronostratigraphically, the Long Formation has been included in the Ongeian Regional Stage. In the rhodolith-forming non-geniculate corallines, various growth forms and taphonomic features have been recognized. Diagenesis affected the studied material by micritization, cementation and compaction. The four outcrops are dominated by bioclastic wackestone and packstone composed of coralline red algae, benthic and planktonic foraminifers, echinoid spines and unidentified coral fragments. The rhodolith-forming coralline red algae, the growth forms and taphonomic features in non-geniculate corallines and the characteristic benthic foraminifers are indicative of a moderate energy depositional environment. This study indicates that the carbonate production was considerably high during the Serravallian of the tropical northeastern Indian Ocean.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Aug 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • La séquence gravettienne de Belgique : mise à jour et mises au
           point

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Olivier TOUZÉ
      Le Gravettien en Belgique est documenté dans un nombre limité de gisements. Il s’agit en général de gisements de grottes ou d’abris sous roche situés dans le bassin mosan, qui ont souvent fait l’objet de fouilles dès le XIXe siècle, notamment les plus importants d’entre eux. La connaissance que nous avons du Gravettien belge doit énormément aux recherches de M. Otte. Dans les années 1970, cet auteur a compilé, synthétisé et structuré une documentation éparse et bien souvent imprécise et, sur cette base, formulé une proposition de séquence régionale. Les connaissances accumulées au cours des dernières décennies permettent d’aborder certains aspects de ce modèle sous un angle différent, tandis que de nouvelles questions sont également apparues. Cet article a ainsi pour objectif de dresser un bilan critique du phasage de la séquence gravettienne belge, à partir des données chronologiques et lithiques de quatre sites majeurs : Maisières-Canal, les grottes et l’Abri supérieur de Goyet, et la Station de l’Hermitage. Au terme de ce bilan, trois entités sont identifiées. Le Maisièrien et le Gravettien ancien correspondent à des traditions lithiques, dont les aires de répartition s’étendent sur une partie de l’Europe nord-occidentale, et qui sont bien documentées en Belgique grâce à deux sites de référence. Un Gravettien « post-phase ancienne » est aussi détecté, mais uniquement dans des ensembles dont l’intégrité pose question, ou qui sont limités quantitativement. Seule la découverte de nouveaux sites, fouillés avec des moyens modernes, permettra d’en acquérir une connaissance plus précise.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Aug 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Taphonomic analysis of a Caribbean subfossil herpetofaunal bone assemblage
           (Marie Galante Island, Lesser Antilles)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Morgane SAYAH, Arnaud LENOBLE & Corentin BOCHATON
      Taphonomic analyses are of primary importance to understand the accumulation processes of fossil vertebrate bone assemblages. These approaches are fundamental in archaeological contexts in which the role of humans in the formation of an accumulation must be investigated in detail. However, taphonomic works have so far focused on temperate regions and mammals and few studies extensively deal with other vertebrates, especially the herpetofauna, and tropical areas. This results in an important gap in the scientific literature, which has a strong impact on the paleoecological and zooarchaeological research in the areas where squamates and amphibians are well-represented. In this paper, we present a detailed taphonomic study of a large herpetofaunal assemblage of nearly 11 000 bones collected in the Abri Cadet 3, on Marie Galante Island, and dated from the beginning of the Holocene to the Amerindian period. Obtained results don’t support the role of humans in the constitution of the assemblage despite the occurrence of clear archaeological layers in the site. The most-likely culprit for the creation of the bone assemblage is a small nocturnal raptor (i.e., Athene cunicularia guadeloupensis (Ridgway, 1874) or Tyto insularis (Pelzeln, 1872)). We also conduct a comparison with the other available deposits from Marie Galante, highlighting the diversity of accumulation processes in the different nearby cave sites but also the lack of detailed taphonomic studies which would be needed to explain this diversity.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 21 Jul 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • A new campterophlebiid damsel-dragonfly (Odonata: Isophlebioidea) from the
           

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Fusheng TIAN, Daran ZHENG, André NEL, Yifei YE, Ting MEI & Haichun ZHANG
      The family Campterophlebiidae Handlirsch, 1920 is the dominant Jurassic clade of Odonata Fabricius, 1793, especially hosting a high diversification in northern China. The Chinese campterophlebiid damsel-dragonflies were mainly recovered from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, northern China. In the present study, a new campterophlebiid, Parasinitsia qingyunensis n. gen., n. sp., is described from the early Middle Jurassic Yanan Formation of the Ordos Basin, NW China. Parasinitsia n. gen. resembles the genus Sinitsia Pritykina, 2006 recorded from the Upper Jurassic of eastern Transbaikalia, but differs from the latter in having two or three rows of cells between RA and RP1 distal of the pterostigma, IR2 and RP3/4 with at least four rows of cells near the wing margin, and CuAa with about 15 rows of cells between it and the posterior wing margin in the broadest area. The new damsel-dragonfly comes from a new early Middle Jurassic insect site from the Ordos Basin, providing new clues to understand the terrestrial ecosystems during this epoch.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jul 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Micronautilus n. gen., a new dwarf Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) nautilid
           from Western France

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Patrick BRANGER
      The new genus Micronautilus n. gen. (type species Micronautilus evolutus n. gen., n. sp.) is described and assigned to the family Paracenoceratidae Spath, 1927. Known from only two species with a very small shell, this taxon is regarded to represent a natural lineage within the family. As currently known, the occurrence of Micronautilus n. gen. is limited to the Bathonian of Western France, extending from the Zigzag Zone to the Retrocostatum Zone. The origin of Micro­nautilus n. gen. is likely to lie in the upper Bajocian group of nautilids assigned to ‘Cenoceras’ fuscum (Crick, 1898). Paleoenvironmental data suggest that the dwarfism of this new taxon cannot be interpreted as a consequence of an isolated population or any specific environmental conditions.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jul 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Late Holocene filling of the Canale di Imbocco (Portus, central Italy): a
           multidisciplinary palaeoenvironmental perspective

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Manuel ABAD, Francisco RUIZ, Marta ARROYO, Gabriel GÓMEZ, Adolfo MUÑOZ, Juan Manuel CAMPOS, Javier BERMEJO, Lucía FERNÁNDEZ, Alberto BERMEJO, María Luz GONZÁLEZ-REGALADO, Josep TOSQUELLA, Joaquín RODRÍGUEZ VIDAL, Fernando MUÑIZ, Manuel POZO, Luis Miguel CÁCERES, Paula GÓMEZ, Antonio TOSCANO, Tatiana IZQUIERDO & Verónica ROMERO
      Portus was the main port of imperial Rome from the 2nd century AD to the 5th century AD, with an inner, hexagonal port (Trajan basin) and an outer port (Claudius basin) linked by a channel bounded by quays. Six sedimentary facies have been differentiated in the geological analysis of a core extracted in this channel, basically composed of poorly classified bioclastic muds typical of restricted environments, accumulations of Posidonia oceanica (Linnaeus) Delile, 1813 and a final anthropic fill. The subfossil record of bivalves, foraminifera and ostracods is characteristic of Mediterranean brackish environments (lagoons, estuaries, deltas) with significant environmental stress, due to changes in the physical-chemical parameters and probably the periodic dredging of this seaway during a period of about 300 years. The presence of “Neptune balls” points to the development of probable stormy periods that deposit these unique structures in the internal areas of this historic port.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Jun 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Amber and plants from the Upper Cretaceous of La
           Gripperie-Saint-Symphorien (Charente-Maritime, Western France)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Jean-David MOREAU & Didier NÉRAUDEAU
      Amber and plant remains were discovered in the lower Cenomanian lignitic clay from La Gripperie-Saint-Symphorien (Charente-Maritime, western France). The amber mainly consists of scarce and infracentimetric pieces showing a wide range of sizes and colours. The shape of the amber grains greatly varies, including more or less cylindrical fragments of flows and spherical drops. Plants consist of foliar remains corresponding to isolated pinnae and pinnules of ferns (Matonia sp., Weichselia reticulata (Stokes & Webb, 1824) Fontaine emend. Alvin, 1971), leafy axes of conifers (Geinitzia reichenbachii (Geinitz, 1842) Hollick & Jeffrey, 1909, Pagiophyllum sp.) and leaves of angiosperms (including cf. Eucalyptolaurus depreii Coiffard, B.Gomez, Thiébaut & J.Kvaček and three morphotypes of undeterminable leaves). They are preserved as isolated cuticles, charcoalified compressions without cuticle, and external casts. Angiosperms are clearly the most abundant and diverse remains of the plant assemblage. This latter contrasts with most of Albian-Cenomanian coastal floras from the Aquitaine Basin, which are dominated by gymnosperms characterised by xeromorphic adaptations and tolerating halophytic conditions. Similar to the coeval sites of Puy-Puy (Charente-Maritime) and Jaunay-Clan (Vienne), the plant-rich clay from La Gripperie-Saint-Symphorien was probably deposited in innermost coastal environments heavily influenced by inland/continental freshwater.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Jun 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Elliptical body fossils from the Fortunian (Early Cambrian) of Normandy
           (NW France)

    • Authors: erocklin
      Abstract:

      Body fossils have been discovered in the Fortunian deposits of the Rozel Cape, in Normandy (NW France). The material consists of about 80 specimens preserved on a shale surface, recently observed at the base of a cliff at the Cap Rozel, in the Cotentin region. The fossils, centimetric in size, have an elliptical outline, with a peripheral bulge, generally without other conspicuous ornamentation, but showing sometimes concentric or radial lines possibly of taphonomic origins. In addition, these body fossils are preserved parallel to the bedding plane, locally rich in horizontal trace fossils (e.g. Archaeonassa Fenton & Fenton, 1937, Helminthoidichnites Fitch, 1850, Helminthopsis Heer, 1877) and also complex treptichinids burrows (e.g. Treptichnus pedum (Seilacher, 1955)) sometimes associated with microbial mats. The sedimentological characteristics of these deposits (ripple marks, syneresis cracks) correspond to a shallow marine shelf environment, with a variable hydrodynamism in the intertidal zone, low for surfaces showing elliptic fossils and syneresis cracks, higher for surfaces with ripple marks. These new discoveries unravel the potential of the Fortunian strata from Normandy and provide new information about the early Cambrian biocenoses.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jun 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Squamates, rodents, and birds from Holocene deposits of the Illa Grossa
           Island (Columbretes Islands, Castellón, Spain): an unexpected diverse
           assemblage

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Rafael MARQUINA-BLASCO, Ana FAGOAGA, Vicente CRESPO, Alberto MARTÍNEZ-ORTÍ, Salvador BAILON, Antonio SÁNCHEZ-MARCO, Daniel GRACIA-MONFERRER, Carlos de SANTISTEBAN & Francisco RUIZ-SÁNCHEZ
      The Columbretes Islands (eastern Spain) comprise a volcanic archipelago 50 km off the eastern Spanish coast. Illa Grossa is the main island of the archipelago. After the settlement of humans during the mid-19th century, strong modifications in biodiversity took place, including the reduction of the non-flying vertebrate fauna to a single taxon, Podarcis liolepis atratus (Boscá, 1916). The study of the fossils yielded at the COLT site (dated by AMC between 2780-2724 cal BP and 2600-2492 cal BP) from a loess deposit located at the south of Illa Grossa Island shows that this fauna was more diverse in the past. The assemblage was dominated by squamate reptiles, belonging to two lizards (Chalcides bedriagai (Boscá, 1880) and cf. Podarcis Wagler, 1830) and one snake (Vipera cf. latastei Boscá, 1878). The record in the late Holocene of Columbretes of Vipera cf. latastei settles the existing controversy about the identity of snakes in the archipelago. Regarding Chalcides bedriagai, this is the first record of its presence in the Columbretes Islands. Other faunal elements recovered from the site include at least six species of undetermined birds (passeriforms and procellariforms) and the anthropophilic Mus cf. musculus Linnaeus, 1758. The origin of the squamates taxa from Columbretes palaeontological site (COLT) is still unclear, but was probably related to the Late Pleistocene-Greenlandian (11 700 to 8300 BP, Early Holocene) sea transgression, natural passive colonization, and/or human introduction. We hypothesize implications for the conservation and management of the Natural Reserve.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jun 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Erratum: volume 22 (16) 2023: 279-406, May 16, 2023. Woznikella triradiata
           n. gen., n. sp. – a new kannemeyeriiform dicynodont from the Late
           Triassic of northern Pangea and the global distribution of Triassic
           dicynodonts

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Tomasz SZCZYGIELSKI & Tomasz SULEJ
      On page 329, in Figure 19, the names of the following countries, Mozambique, Zambia, Australia and Antarctica, did not appear. Figure 19 is reproduced here, and the country names have been added. Appendix 15 has also been included in the article, to represent the phylogenetic matrix.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Jun 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Woznikella triradiata n. gen., n. sp. – a new kannemeyeriiform
           dicynodont from the Late Triassic of northern Pangea and the global
           distribution of Triassic dicynodonts

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Tomasz SZCZYGIELSKI & Tomasz SULEJ
      Despite nearly two centuries of intensive research of dicynodont diversity and distribution, the progress of the last two decades makes the early 21st century a dicynodont renaissance. Here we introduce Woznikella triradiata n. gen., n. sp., a Late Triassic European kannemeyeriiform with stahleckeriid affinities that may represent an early diverging lineage of that family, preceding its split into Placeriinae King, 1988 and Stahleckeriinae Lehman, 1961. Woznikella triradiata n. gen., n. sp. is distinguished from other dicynodonts by its autapomorphic, slender scapula with distinctly expanded dorsal and ventral parts, acromion directed anterodorsally, and inconspicuous scapular spine. Furthermore, we review reported global occurrences of Triassic dicynodonts, including fragmentary, indeterminate finds that may capture cryptic diversity, and analyze the biogeography of the Permian and Triassic Dicynodontia. According to our results, the region of southeastern Africa (Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia) throughout the Permian and Triassic served as a hotspot of dicynodont diversity and origin point for lineages migrating north and west. Multiple taxa independently migrated to the Americas and Eurasia, indicating open passages between the regions of Southern and Northern Hemisphere. Southern migrations from the Northern Hemisphere appear to be very rare, however.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 16 May 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Fréquentations des réseaux karstiques profonds par Néanderthal.
           Nouveaux exemples à la grotte de Saint-Marcel (Ardèche, France)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Nicolas LATEUR, Marie-Hélène MONCEL, Ludovic MOCOCHAIN & Paul FERNANDES
      Dans la partie terminale des gorges de l’Ardèche, la grotte de Saint-Marcel constitue un très grand réseau karstique, mais aussi un site moustérien de première importance à proximité de la vallée du Rhône. De nombreuses occupations datées entre le dernier interglaciaire (MIS 5e) et la fin du MIS 3/début MIS 2 sont bien documentées sous le porche de l’entrée naturelle. Récemment, deux découvertes d’industries lithiques moustériennes dans la galerie d’entrée, à 150 et 500 m du porche, ont été mises au jour. Elles témoignent d’incursions profondes des Néanderthaliens dans le karst, dans des très grands volumes, loin de la zone éclairée par la lumière du jour. L’association de ces industries lithiques avec des assemblages fauniques pléistocènes relevant principalement de tanières d’ours des cavernes suggérerait une exploitation des Ursidés par Néanderthal. Ces découvertes constituent des documents inédits pour appréhender l’appropriation par ces hominidés du milieu souterrain et leurs capacités à y évoluer dans le cadre de leur économie de subsistance ou de pratiques symboliques. Elles marquent également un nouveau jalon pour contribuer à la connaissance de l’exploitation des territoires et des ressources animales qu’elles abritent, en particulier les taxons troglophiles souvent représentés de manière anecdotiques dans les spectres des espèces exploitées à des fins alimentaires ou techniques.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Wed, 10 May 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Cenozoic diversity and distribution of the mangrove- and
           mudflat-associated gastropod genus Terebralia Swainson, 1840 (Potamididae:
           Caenogastropoda) in Europe

    • Authors: erocklin
      Abstract:
      Danae THIVAIOU, Mathias HARZHAUSER & Efterpi KOSKERIDOU
      We analyse the distribution of the potamidid genus Terebralia Swainson, 1840 in the European fossil record (middle Eocene to Miocene). Extant Terebralia contains species restricted to mangroves and mudflats, rendering it a reliable element for detecting these coastal environments in the fossil record. Our contribution summarizes the European fossil record of this taxon and highlights the presence of this genus within coastal environments in the European realm. Distribution in the Cenozoic is interpreted based on ecological preferences, dispersal modes and climatic restrictions of recent species. Maximum geographical distribution is reached during the Early and Middle Miocene with two species being present from the southernmost parts of Europe and Anatolia to the North Sea Basin and the Paratethys. During the Late Miocene, the distribution of Terebralia lignitarum (Eichwald, 1830) is patchy and limited to the South of Europe. The Messinian Salinity Crisis coupled with a changing climate caused the disappearance of Terebralia in the Mediterranean first, and then marked the end of mangrove environments in this province.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Fri, 28 Apr 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • A small penguin cranium (Aves, Spheniscidae) from the Late Miocene of
           Bahía Inglesa Formation, Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Carolina ACOSTA HOSPITALECHE & Sergio SOTO-ACUÑA
      A new cranium of penguin from the Late Miocene of the Bahía Inglesa Formation (Northern Chile) is described here. Specimen SGO.PV.22245 exhibits a unique combination of characters that suggests it belongs to a new species of either Eudypula Bonaparte, 1856, Spheniscus Brisson, 1760, or more probably to a more basal taxon related to them. The specimen is notably smaller than the fossil species of Spheniscus and more similar in size to the extant Spheniscus. The fossa glandulae nasalis narrows caudally, the crista nuchalis transversa and the crista temporalis are expanded like short wings, and a short crista nuchalis sagittalis connects with the rounded and cranially projected eminentia cerebellaris. The fossa temporalis is subtriangular and deeper caudally and the cranial roof is widely expanded. All these features approach the condition to some species of Spheniscus and Eudyptula. However, because of the incompleteness of the material and the fact that it cannot be compared with some fossil species of Spheniscus only known through postcranial material, we are not able to provide a more accurate assignment.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Apr 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Foraminifers and calcareous algae in Brigantian rocks as guides for the
           recognition of the Viséan-Serpukhovian boundary interval of Morocco

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Pedro CÓZAR, Daniel VACHARD & Ian SOMERVILLE
      Revision of foraminifers, algae and problematic algae of well-known late Viséan formations in the Jerada syncline in the Eastern Meseta, Azrou-Khenifra Basin in the Central Meseta and Oued Cherrat in the Western Meseta, suggests that the recognition of the chronostratigraphic units within this period lacks most of the foraminiferal markers in the Western European foraminiferal biozonations. Many taxa recorded in the Moroccan Meseta are considered as late Asbian guides in Western Europe, but in the Meseta, they are first recorded in the early Brigantian. Although some foraminiferal taxa are proposed as guides for the early Brigantian in Morocco, this substage is far more easily recognized by the algal and problematic algal assemblages. In contrast, the late Brigantian, and thus, the equivalent to the lower part of the Serpukhovian, is recognized by typical foraminifers that have been also recorded in Western Europe. Moreover, the algae do not display any significant change at this level. The unusual and unrepresentative foraminiferal assemblages recorded from the Brigantian in Morocco, suggest that most of the numerous outcrops and sections ascribed to the late Asbian in the literature should be revised because, as is demonstrated in a few cases in this study, those outcrops probably belong to younger Brigantian chronostratigraphic units.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Apr 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Palaeobiology and palaeobiogeography of amphibians and reptiles: An
           homage to Jean-Claude Rage – Part II

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      FOLIE, BUFFETAUT, BARDET, HOUSSAYE, GHEERBRANT & LAURIN
      Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Apr 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • A multi-proxy study from new excavations in the Middle Palaeolithic site
           of Cova del Puntal del Gat (Benirredrà, València, Spain)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Aleix EIXEA, Miguel Ángel BEL , Yolanda CARRIÓN-MARCO, Carlos FERRER-GARCÍA, Pere M. GUILLEM, Álvaro MARTÍNEZ-ALFARO, Carmen M. MARTÍNEZ-VAREA, Raquel MOYA, Ana Luísa RODRIGUES, Maria Isabel DIAS, Dulce RUSSO & Alfred SANCHIS
      The Mediterranean basin constitutes one of the best areas to analyse Neanderthal populations and lifestyles in South-Western Europe. In this context, new excavations conducted in the Middle Palaeolithic site of Cova del Puntal del Gat expand the information available regarding this rich region. In this study, new results are reported, including detailed studies on stratigraphy, lithic technology, anthracology, carpology, and zooarchaeology and taphonomy of macro and micromammals, with the final objective of characterizing the Neanderthals’ subsistence strategies and occupational patterns. These results are framed within a broader regional study perspective that includes MIS 5 and 4 sites. Chronostratigraphic review has enabled us to reorganize many sites that were originally included in MIS 3, towards older stages belonging to the end of MIS 4 and throughout MIS 5.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +020
       
  • First biostratigraphic dating for a Cretaceous ichthyosaur from the
           Apennine Chain (Italy)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Alessandro FRESCHI, Alessia MORIGI, Simone CAU, Davide PERSICO, Francesco GARBASI, Filippo FONTANA & Andrea CAU
      We report a new fossil-bearing locality from the “Chaotic Complex” units in the Northern Apennine Chain of the Emilia-Romagna Region (northern Italy). The material collected includes an articulated series of nine caudal vertebrae referable to a large-bodied ichthyosaur. Based on the nannofossil assemblage sampled from the matrix encasing the vertebrae, we refer the specimen to the early Aptian: this is the first accurate chronostratigraphic dating of a Cretaceous ichthyosaur from the Apennine Chain. The discovery of this new fossil-bearing locality is also significant because of the rather poor record of Aptian ichthyosaurs worldwide. Compared to the large majority of vertebrate remains from the “Chaotic Complex” units, usually represented by isolated or damaged skeletal elements, the specimen retains several vertebral elements in articulation and is associated to ichnological traces left by possibly saprophagous invertebrates, a taphonomic pattern which might indicate depositional conditions less destructive than those usually assumed for the genesis of the “Chaotic Complex’’ vertebrate fossils. The presence of both ichthyosaurs and thalattosuchians in the Aptian of Italy supports the persistence in the Western Tethys of the large-bodied pelagic reptile clades typical of the Middle and Late Jurassic along the first half of the Early Cretaceous.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Cranial morphology and phylogenetic relationships of Amynodontidae Scott &
           Osborn, 1883 (Perissodactyla, Rhinocerotoidea)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Léa VEINE-TONIZZO, Jérémy TISSIER, Maia BUKHSIANIDZE, Davit VASILYAN & Damien BECKER
      Les Amynodontidae Scott & Osborn, 1883 sont une famille éteinte de Rhinocerotoidea Owen, 1845 connue depuis l’Éocène moyen jusqu’à la fin de l’Oligocène en Asie, en Amérique du Nord et en Europe. Nous présentons ici deux spécimens inédits d’Amynodontidae, un crâne et une mandibule, de Zaisanamynodon borisovi Belyaeva, 1971, datés de la fin de l’Éocène du bassin de Zaïssan (Kazakhstan) et un crâne de Metamynodon planifrons Scott & Osborn, 1887, daté du début de l’Oligocène des Big Badlands (États-Unis). Ce nouveau matériel a été inclus dans une matrice de caractères morpho-­anatomiques. Elle a été complétée par le codage de l’espèce récemment décrite Amynodontopsis jiyuanensis Wang X.-Y., Wang Y.-Q., Zhang R., Zhang Z.-H., Liu & Ren, 2020 et les codages révisés de Cadurcotherium cayluxi Gervais, 1873 et Cadurcotherium minum Filhol, 1880. Nous avons réalisé une analyse cladistique basée sur cette matrice, incluant 31 taxons terminaux de Rhinocerotoidea. La nouvelle hypothèse phylogénétique proposée permet de discuter des positions phylogénétiques des spécimens étudiés au sein des Amynodontidae et de la position des Amynodontidae au sein des Rhinocerotoidea. Notre analyse cladistique clarifie la composition générique et spécifique des tribus Metamynodontini Kretzoi, 1942 et Cadurcodontini Wall, 1982 et soutient la monophylie de Zaisanamynodon Belyaeva, 1971. La dichotomie des deux tribus s’exprime notamment par la présence de plusieurs caractéristiques crâniennes telles que “l’allongement de l’incisure nasale” ou “la fosse préorbitaire bien développée” chez les Cadurcodontini. Ces spécialisations témoignent d’une adaptation de la région péri-nasale à la présence d’un proboscis. Notre étude ouvre également une discussion sur la biogéographie des Amynodontidae, leur émergence et dispersion en Asie à l’Éocène moyen puis leur colonisation de l’Amérique du Nord et de l’Europe de l’Est. Leur présence en Europe occidentale est, quant à elle, restreinte à l’Oligocène et liée à l’événement de la Grande Coupure.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • 2D Geometric morphometrics of the first lower molar of the genus Meles
           Brisson, 1762 including new badger evidence from the Lower Pleistocene
           Quibas site (Murcia, Spain)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Antonio ROSAS, Ana SOLER-FAJARDO, Antonio GARCIA-TABERNERO, Rosa HUGUET, Josep VALLVERDÚ, Darío FIDALGO, Emilia GALLI, Pedro PIÑERO, Jordi AGUSTÍ, Alberto VALENCIANO & Daniel GARCÍA-MARTÍNEZ
      Badgers belong to the genus Meles Brisson, 1762, which comprise four extant species (M. anakuma Temminck, 1844, M. leucurus (Hodgson, 1847), M. canescens Blanford, 1875, and M. meles (Linnaeus, 1758)). The genus is included in the subfamily Melinae Bonaparte, 1838, a polyphyletic group of Eurasian mustelids whose evolutionary relationships need further clarification. The evolutive relationships of the genus are complex and far from being resolved. This work aims to describe a nearly 1 Ma unpublished badger mandible from the Sierra de Quibas (Murcia) and to help clarify the evolutionary patterns of Euroasiatic badgers. To this end, we used 2D geometric morphometric techniques to measure 57 landmarks and semilandmarks in 79 first lower molars (m1) of Meles, ranging from Pleistocene to extant species. Our results show evidence for differentiating between primitive badgers and living species of Meles. The new m1 of Meles from the Quibas site is more gracile (relatively narrower and longer) than the other Eurasian extinct species, and shows that this specimen can be placed in the subspecies M. meles meles (Linnaeus, 1758). Our results also show that the denomination of M. meles atavus Kormos, 1914 as a related subspecies with a primitive morphology is morphologically supported. Therefore, we conclude that the living subspecies of badger M. meles meles was already differentiated in the south of the Iberian Peninsula at around 1 Ma, but some primitive remnant populations persisted in the north of the Iberian Peninsula, for which we recognize the subspecies M. meles atavus.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Revision of the short-necked Cretaceous plesiosaurians from New Zealand

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      José Patricio O’GORMAN & Rodrigo A. OTERO
      Polycotylidae Cope, 1869 is a clade of short-necked plesiosaurians that achieved a cosmopolitan distribution by the Late Cretaceous. Here, the material previously referred to Polycotylidae/Pliosauridae from the Upper Cretaceous of New Zealand is reviewed, concluding that only 2.4% and 7.7% respectively of the total plesiosaurians specimens recovered in these formations (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian Tahora Formation and Campanian-Maastrichtian Conway Formation) belong to Polycotylidae. This proportion is similar to that recorded in upper Campanian-Maastrichtian levels of the Allen, Los Alamitos and La Colonia formations, northern Patagonia (Argentina) and southernmost Chile, but contrasts with the coeval absence of polycotylids in Campanian-Santonian levels of Antarctica and central Chile. These new results improve our knowledge about the representation of Weddellian polycotylids and underline the relative scarcity of Campanian-Maastrichtian records in the Weddellia Province.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Early Holocene Hoabinhian (8300-8000 cal BC) occupation from
           Hiem Cave, Vietnam

    • Authors: erocklin
      Abstract:
      Mirosław MASOJĆ, Hai Dang LE, Tomasz GRALAK, Grzegorz MICHALEC, Karina APOLINARSKA, Monika BADURA, Marzena CENDROWSKA, Andrzej GAŁAŚ, Joanna KRUPA-KURZYNOWSKA, Beata MIAZGA, Marta OSYPIŃSKA, Zofia RÓŻOK & Nguyen VIET
      This paper presents a case study from the Hiem cave (Hoà Bình province, North Vietnam) showing how a multidisciplinary approach in archaeological research can develop knowledge on the everyday life of the hunter-gatherer Hoabinhian groups occupying the cave during the early Holocene (8500-8200 cal BC). The archaeological analysis presents the characteristic Hoabinhian artefacts and their usage, while archeozoological, malacological and archaeobotanical research throw light on the way of life, including plant and animal elements of a daily diet as well as the settlement seasonality of the cave.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Mar 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Morphology and reconstruction of the retiolitines: Silurian graptolites of
           the Paraplectograptus lineage (Graptolithina)

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Denis E. B. BATES, Nancy H. KIRK† & Anna KOZŁOWSKA
      The long ranging Silurian retiolitines belonging to the Paraplectograptus lineage (Spirograptus turriculatus to Cyrtograptus/lundgreni Biozone), represented by the genera Paraplectograptus Bouček & Münch, 1952 and Pseudoplectograptus Obut & Zaslavskaya, 1983 are described in detail based on well preserved, three-dimensional material from the Canadian Arctic and Poland. For the first time, reconstructions of their structure are attempted, and comparisons are made with the related genera, Stomatograptus Tullberg, 1883 and Retiolites Barrande, 1850. Ultrastructural details vary somewhat between the genera: the bandaging on the Paraplectograptus lineage and Pseudoplectograptus has a characteristic pustulose ornament, while that of Retiolites and Stomatograptus shows a surface of longitudinal striations. Prosicular preservation is generally incomplete, represented merely by the prosicular apex and prosicular rim. The thecal part of the Paraplectograptus and Pseudoplectograptus tubaria (rhabdosomes) possesses transverse rods, connecting rods, lateral apertural rods and lips. The ancora sleeve lists are variably developed but lack a dorsal/zigzag list, which is present in Stomatograptus and Retiolites. The Paraplectograptus lineage appears to mark an intermediate stage in the evolution of the retiolitines, from the early Silurian forms, with strong thecal and ancora sleeve frameworks (e.g. Retiolites, Stomatograptus), to late Silurian descendants with strong ancora sleeves, minimal thecal frameworks and pustular ornament, with no transverse rods.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Feb 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Interspecific competition in ictitheres (Carnivora: Hyaenidae) from the
           Late Miocene of Eurasia

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Nikolaos KARGOPOULOS, Socrates ROUSSIAKIS, Panagiotis KAMPOURIDIS & George KOUFOS
      The present paper deals with the ecomorphological characteristics of two sympatric species of ictitheres: Ictitherium viverrinum Roth & Wagner, 1854 and Hyaenictitherium wongii (Zdansky, 1924) from the Late Miocene of the Eastern Mediterranean. These two species represent different taxonomic groups with allegedly distinct ecological roles. The values of 11 ecomorphological proxies were calculated using cranial and dental elements, in order to make an extensive comparison between them (body mass, bite force, canines’ and incisors’ bending strength, endocranial volume, relative rostral width, dental mesowear, intercuspid notches and carnassial vs grinding surfaces). The proxies show similar results for both species, pointing out that they had a similar ecological niche in the Late Miocene ecosystems. Carnivorans are usually in the top of the food chain, so the existence of two ecologically similar species in the same spatiotemporal range results in interspecific competition. This explains the geographical distinction of the two species with several localities being dominated by only one of the two (e.g. Samos for Hyaenictitherium Kretzoi, 1938 and Pikermi for Ictitherium Wagner, 1848). The reason for the prevalence of each genus can be associated with their postcranial morphology, as Hyaenictitherium has been proposed to be better adapted to chase hunting, because of its longer limbs, while Ictitherium is characterized by shorter and stouter limbs.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Another piece in the puzzle of mantis shrimp evolution – fossils from
           the Early Jurassic Osteno Lagerstätte of Northern Italy

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Florian BRAIG, Joachim T. HAUG, Shane T. AHYONG, Alessandro GARASSINO, Mario SCHÄDEL & Carolin HAUG
      Mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda Latreille, 1817) are marine predatory crustaceans of the group Hoplocarida Calman, 1904 with an interesting, though incompletely known, evolutionary history. Here we introduce a new species of fossil mantis shrimps, Ostenosculda teruzzii n. gen., n. sp. from the Early Jurassic (Sinemurian) limestone formation of Osteno (Northern Italy). We present distinctive features that characterize the specimens as a new species, such as a unique arrangement of maxillipeds 2-5 (maxilliped 2 is the major raptorial appendage). We also present a phylogenetic systematic interpretation of the species based on the available features of morphology and body organisation. The unusual arrangement of the maxillipeds appears to represent a plesiomorphic condition relative to extant mantis shrimps: the maxillipeds are arranged in an almost straight anterior-posterior line, with rather large distances between them. This contrasts with extant forms and slightly younger fossils of about 150 million years old lithographic limestones (Late Jurassic) where further anterior maxillipeds are inserting far laterally and further posterior ones more medially, with very small distances between the next posterior ones. The herein studied specimens are the first of their kind to be confirmed for this period and geographical region and further close gaps in our understanding of the evolution of mantis shrimps.Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Late Miocene Dasypodidae Gray, 1821 (Xenarthra, Cingulata) from the Toro
           Negro Formation (Central Andes, Argentina): diversity and chronological
           and biogeographical implications

    • Authors: aneveu
      Abstract:
      Diego BRANDONI, Daniel BARASOAIN & GONZÁLEZ RUIZ Laureano R.
      Fossil remains herein described are referred to different species of Dasypodidae Gray, 1821 (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata) and come from the upper levels of the lower member (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene) of the Toro Negro Formation at Quebrada de Las Torrecillas, La Rioja Province, Argentina, where previous vertebrate records only include those of Pyramiodontherium scillatoyanei De Iuliis, Ré & Vizcaíno, 2004 (Mammalia, Xenarthra) and Opisthodactylus cf. kirchneri Noriega, Jordan, Vezzosi & Areta, 2017 (Aves, Rheidae). The remains of Dasypodidae herein presented include Vetelia ghandii Esteban & Nasif, 1996, Chasicotatus peiranoi Esteban & Nasif, 1996, Macrochorobates scalabrinii (Moreno & Mercerat, 1891), Prozaedyus sp., and Paleuphractus argentinus (Moreno & Mercerat, 1891), and constitute the first records of these species for the Toro Negro Formation, increasing the mammal diversity for this unit. The association of dasypodids here described shows strong affinities with those described for Late Miocene localities of Northwestern Argentina. Under these evidences, the Dasypodidae here reported for Quebrada de Las Torrecillas site show a characteristic association of taxa from Northwestern Argentina, suggesting a Messinian age (Late Miocene) for the bearing levels of the Toro Negro Formation. In this way, these records support the accurate ages recently proposed for the lower Member of the Toro Negro Formation (i.e., Late Miocene-Early Pliocene).Lire la suite
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2023 00:00:00 +010
       
 
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  Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geologica Saxonica     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
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Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
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Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
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Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
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