Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Geologica Saxonica     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales de Paléontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Novitates Paleoentomologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Carnegie Museum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
PaleoBios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zitteliana     Open Access  
Ameghiniana     Open Access  
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Open Quaternary     Open Access  
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
Revue de Micropaleontologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Comptes Rendus Palevol     Open Access  
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Paläontologische Zeitschrift
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.658
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1867-6812 - ISSN (Online) 0031-0220
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Oldest known West Gondwanan graptolite: Ovetograptus' sp. (lower
           Agdzian/lowest Wuliuan; basal Middle Cambrian) of the Franconian Forest,
           Germany, and review of pre-Furongian graptolithoids

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      Abstract: Abstract The occurrence of a likely graptolite in lowest Wuliuan strata of the Franconian Forest almost certainly records the oldest known graptolithoid hemichordate in West Gondwana and possibly the oldest graptolite presently known. The fossil is a delicate, erect, apparently unbranched rhabdosome with narrow thecae tentatively assigned to the poorly known genus Ovetograptus of the Dithecodendridae. This report includes an overview of pre-Furongian graptolithoids with slight corrections on the stratigraphic position of earlier reported species.
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
       
  • A new canid species (Carnivora: Canidae) from the Plio-Pleistocene
           hominin-bearing site of Kromdraai (Cradle of Humankind, Gauteng, South
           Africa)

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      Abstract: Abstract The Plio-Pleistocene site of Kromdraai, covering a chronological range from 1.8 Ma (Kromdraai A Locality) up to older than 2.0 Ma (Kromdraai Member 2), (Cradle of Humankind, Gauteng, South Africa) has been investigating since the first half of the XXth century. These researches have led to the discovery of the type specimen of Paranthropus robustus. Kromdraai is also characterized by an extremely rich bone accumulation (including more than 10000 remains with more than 4800 from the recent field works). Carnivores are highly diverse including Felidae, Hyaenidae, Herpestidae, Viverridae, Mustelidae and Canidae. Based on 27 newly discovered dental and postcranial specimens, a new canid species is described. Canis hewitti sp. nov. is comparable in size to the extant African hunting dog Lycaon pictus but it differs significantly from this species in dental features that are typical of the genus Canis including the m1 with a trigonid of about two-thirds the length of the crown, a metaconid clearly dissociated from the protoconid and a talonid consisting in a hypoconid and an entoconid. Its premolars suggest a certain specialization in meat-cutting (long and thin p4 with a high protoconid backwardly flanked of a well-developed cusp followed by an accessory small denticle). C. hewitti appears as the potential ancestor of the more robust southern African Canis atrox from Kromdraai A (ca. 1.8 Ma).
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
       
  • Seeds of Coronilla talaverae (Fabaceae), an endemic endangered species, in
           Argaric Early Bronze Age levels of Punta de Gavilanes (Mazarrón, Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract Punta de Gavilanes (Mazarrón Bay, Spain) was occupied from third millennium cal BC to the first century BC. Overall, the archaeobotanical remains suggest that agriculture and gathering coexisted in the site since the beginning of the occupation of the site. Depending on the sea level variation, the site passed from island in the middle Holocene to peninsula in the late Holocene. Seeds from this archaeological site associated with radiocarbon dates of ≈ 4200 and ≈ 1500 cal years BP include specimens of eight species of shrubs and trees, of which a winter flowering shrub (Coronilla talaverae Lahora and Sánchez-Gómez), is an endangered species that no longer occurs on Punta de Gavilanes area. The seeds of this endemic Coronilla species are associated with materials dated ≈ 3900 cal years BP in a Bronze Age cultural context. The vanished species was presumably locally exterminated by human alteration of its natural habitat or because of environmental changes. The species of Coronilla identified from Punta de Gavilanes is known from relatively distant seashore areas. This endangered species could be effectively preserved by reintroduction to areas that it occupied prior to human alteration, in particular Punta de los Gavilanes.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • Fusulinid biozonation of the Bashkirian–Moscovian successions from the
           Hadim Nappe, central Taurides, southern Turkey

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      Abstract: Abstract A relatively complete succession of the Bashkirian to Moscovian rocks is exposed in the Hadim Nappe, central Taurides, where rich and diverse fusulinid assemblages have been analysed in three sections (Yassıpınar, Gölbelen and Bademli). The Bashkirian–Moscovian successions mainly consist of medium-bedded sandstones, medium–thick-bedded oolitic limestone and thin–medium bedded fossiliferous limestones with medium–thick-bedded dolomite levels (Bademli section). Eight first occurrence fusulinid biozones are identified in three sections in the Bashkirian to Moscovian strata. The Bashkirian Stage comprises in ascending order the Plectostaffella jakhensis-Plectostaffella bogdanovkensis, Pseudostaffella antiqua-Pseudostaffella sofronizkyi, Staffellaeformes staffellaeformis-Staffellaeformes parva parva, and Tikhonovichiella tikhonovichi-Verella spicata zones, the Moscovian Stage contains in ascending order the Aljutovella aljutovica-Solovievaia ovata ovata, Aljutovella priscoidea-Eofusulina triangula, Fusulinella vozhgalensis devexa-Beedeina schellwieni, and Fusulinella bocki bocki zones. These fusulinid zones, and their characteristic index species, allow to correlate the Bashkirian–Moscovian strata in the Hadim Nappe with coeval strata in the Donets Basin, southern China, southern Urals, and especially, with the Russian Platform.
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
       
  • The age of the Bailongbinghe Formation and the oil shales in northern
           Qiangtang (North Tibet)

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      Abstract: Abstract Since oil shales in northern Qiangtang were found, the determination of the age of the Bailongbinghe Formation bearing the oil shales becomes particularly important economically. In general, the Jurassic rocks and fossils of northern Qiangtang demonstrate a vast shallow marine environment. Three sedimentary facies have been recognized, they are subtidal–lagoonal facies in the eastern area (e.g., the Yanshiping area), represented by siliciclastic depositional sequences, intercalated by two sets of calcareous deposition. The Jurassic rocks and fossils in the Bailongbinghe area demonstrate the shallow-water carbonate platform facies, in which ammonites, bivalves, brachiopods, corals and calcareous sponges, and patch reefs of oyster, are widely distributed, thus an open marine environment is implied. The oil shales, outcropping in a depression band near the northern margin of the middle rising ridge in the Bandaohu area, are considered as the restrict lagoonal facies. The Bailongbinghe Formation is subdivided into the Lower and Upper parts, the Lower Bailongbinghe Formation is capped by the oil shales of Bathonian to lower Oxfordian age, confirmed by brachiopods and bivalves. The Upper Bailongbinghe Formation has been regarded as upper Jurassic to lower Cretaceous age, consisting of evaporitic rocks with a considerable thickness. Two Jurassic marine–faunal dispersals are, respectively, recorded in lower Bathonian and lower Oxfordian strata. Occurrences of western Tethyan components such as Planisphinctes planilobus, Lobosphinctes intersertus, Procerites subprocerus, and P. cf. aurigera indicate a Bathonian eastward-dispersal. In the meanwhile, various species of Burmirhynchia attain a wide distribution over the northern Qiangtang region. The early Oxfordian transgressive in scale is considered smaller than the Bathonian one, represented only by bivalves, such as Radulopecten scarburgensis, R. variants, and Capillimya striata. Early Bathonian sea-level rise plays a significant role in the development of oil shales in the Bandaohu area. A depositional model of irregular-bottom topography is applicable to interpretation of the oil shales formation. The Himalayan Spiti shale fauna, utilized for age-evidence of the Bailongbinghe Formation, are mistaken and misunderstood. Cretaceous age of the Bailongbinghe Formation, derived from palynofossils and Re–Os dating is challenged by the present biostratigraphical succession in the light of facilitate accurate identification of Bailongbinghe fossils. Furthermore, so-called Barremian–Aptian negative excursions of carbon isotopes in the Bailongbinghe Formation is thereby questionable.
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
       
  • Reappraisal of the braincase anatomy of the ornithopod dinosaurs
           Telmatosaurus and Zalmoxes from the Upper Cretaceous of the Haţeg Basin
           (Romania) and the taxonomic reassessment of some previously referred
           specimens

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      Abstract: Abstract The hadrosauroid Telmatosaurus and the rhabdodontid Zalmoxes were the first and second dinosaur taxa that were described in detail from the famous Upper Cretaceous continental deposits of the Haţeg Basin by Franz Baron Nopcsa at the beginning of the twentieth century. Although they are among the most common and best-known dinosaurs discovered from these deposits, there are still many open questions as to their taxonomy and anatomy. Here, we re-describe two partial braincases from the uppermost Cretaceous of the Haţeg Basin that have been recently referred to the rhabdodontid Zalmoxes and re-assign them to hadrosauroids, possibly to Telmatosaurus. These specimens both exhibit basicranial features that are characteristic of derived hadrosauroids but are absent in more basal iguanodontians. These include an antero-posteriorly short basioccipital lacking a distinct neck, the presence of two well-developed sphenoccipital tubercles on the ventral aspect of the braincase and that are directly positioned anterior to the basioccipital, as well as a deep depression on the ventral aspect of the braincase between the sphenoccipital tubercles. The comparison provided herein demonstrates several important differences between the basicranium of hadrosauroids and that of rhabdodontids, which allows for the confident identification of even isolated and incomplete specimens. Moreover, the removal of the only basicranium that has been referred to Zalmoxes shqiperorum prompts a revised diagnosis of that species.
      PubDate: 2022-06-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00621-x
       
  • Large-sized Late Turonian–Early Coniacian (Late Cretaceous) inoceramid
           bivalves from Germany: taxonomic issues, temporal framework and
           palaeoecological implications

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      Abstract: Abstract A systematic-stratigraphic revision of selected large Late Turonian–Early Coniacian inoceramids of the lamarcki group from Germany showed that both historical specimens of Goldfuss (1836), introduced as Inoceramus annulatus and later becoming the types of Late Turonian I. lamarcki stuemckei Heinz, 1928a and Early Coniacian I. annulatus Goldfuss, 1836, respectively, are of Late Turonian age. I. stuemckei Heinz, 1928a, as emended herein, is well represented by its lectotype. Bulky isolated hinges from Upper Turonian strata, used by Heinz (1932a) to erect Heroceramus hercules, are just fragments of contemporaneous large I. stuemckei; H. hercules is thus invalid. The common Late Turonian I. stuemckei occurs facies-independent from near- to offshore settings and its first common appearance is an excellent marker for the substage base. I. annulatus Goldfuss, 1836 was later applied to very large forms first appearing in the mid-Early Coniacian. Thus, I. annulatus sensu Walaszczyk and Wood (1998) is poorly represented by its medium-sized latest Turonian lectotype, causing some nomenclatorial issues. I. stuemckei (heightmax 500 mm) and I. annulatus (heightmax one metre) are characterized by a stratigraphically abrupt shell enlargement and hinge buttressing across the Middle/Upper Turonian boundary and within the Early Coniacian, respectively. This shift to larger sizes, a common passive defense strategy against predation, is accompanied by widespread evidence for increased Late Turonian predation pressure by marine durophages. We thus speculate that the size increase in Late Turonian–Early Coniacian inoceramid bivalves is part of an escalating arms race between prey and predators, ultimately triggering Late Cretaceous inoceramid gigantism.
      PubDate: 2022-06-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00615-9
       
  • Morphological analysis of Cricetodon aliveriensis (Rodentia, Mammalia)
           from the locality of Karydia (Rhodope, Northern Greece)

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      Abstract: Abstract Cricetodon is present in the early Miocene of Greece in six assemblages, Cricetodon aliveriensis Klein Hofmeijer and de Bruijn, 1988 in Aliveri and Karydia (both MN4) and Cricetodon meini Freudenthal, 1963 in the MN5 localities of Thymiana A and C, Antonios and Komotini. The two MN4 small mammal assemblages in Aliveri (Euboea island) and Karydia (Northern Greece) have several species in common and Cricetodon aliveriensis is one of them. The aim of this paper is to record and describe this species, the most abundant rodent in the Karydia assemblage, to compare the morphological variation and to discuss the differences in size between the material of Karydia and Aliveri. The results of this study indicate that we deal with one Cricetodon species in Karydia, although more advanced than Cricetodon aliveriensis from Aliveri. This study highlights the importance of a detailed morphological description to the size range of a species. The Karydia material shows a large range in length and width measurements that may indicate heterogeneity of samples. However, the morphological similarity and the normal distribution of the Cricetodon values support the assignment to only one species.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00601-7
       
  • Dermal tubercles and bucklers of gigantic stingrays (Dasyatidae) from the
           Pleistocene of South Carolina and the stratigraphic origin of
           “Ceratoptera unios” Leidy, 1877

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      Abstract: Abstract Rays (Batoidea) possess some of the absolutely largest dermal elements of any cartilaginous fish. One of the largest known batoid dermal elements is an isolated fossil tubercle originally interpreted as a manta ray caudal stinger and named Ceratoptera unios Leidy, 1877 from an unknown locality near Charleston, South Carolina. Though recently considered to be a stingray (Dasyatidae), the lack of stratigraphic provenience for the specimen has hampered attempts to identify it. A new collection of gigantic dermal tubercles and bucklers from the Lower Pleistocene Waccamaw Formation of South Carolina includes mid-dorsal tubercles similar in morphology to “Ceratoptera unios” and dermal bucklers similar in morphology to those of the extant roughtail stingray Bathytoshia centroura (Mitchill, 1815). Mid-dorsal tubercles and bucklers suggest gigantic stingrays in excess of 3 m disc width. These new specimens suggest that C. unios may have originated from upper Pliocene or Pleistocene deposits, and possible synonymy with Bathytoshia centroura, pending careful study of extant dasyatid dermal elements.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00592-5
       
  • New and overlooked occurrences of the rarely reported protochelonibiine
           “turtle” barnacles from the Oligocene and Miocene of Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract We report on two clustering chelonibiid shells from Rupelian deposits of southwestern Germany. One of these specimens displays a tripartite rostral complex and disparietal radii that indicate the Oligocene species Protochelonibia melleni, which was known so far from isolated compartments only. A literature review reveals two additional, overlooked records of the rarely reported genus Protochelonibia, coming, respectively, from the Burdigalian of France and the Langhian of Austria. Both these historical finds likely represent the Miocene species Protochelonibia submersa. All together, these occurrences support the notion that the protochelonibiines had acquired a broad distribution as early as in Rupelian times, when P. melleni occurred along the proto-Gulf of Mexico and in the Western Paratethys. Both P. melleni and P. submersa grew in form of peltate shells that evoke a superficial adhesion to some kind of quickly moving hosts. The outer wall of the abraded German colony of P. melleni is comprised of pillar-like blocks of shelly material. In other coronuloids, similar yet more prominent septa abut outward to form T-shaped flanges and intervening longitudinal canals that facilitate the grasping of various kinds of penetrable substrates. The diminutive external longitudinal parietal septa of P. melleni are more likely to represent an early stage in the evolution of the coronuloid shell architecture than vestigial structures. New additions to the pre-Pliocene fossil record of Coronuloidea and a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the turtle and whale barnacles will hopefully clarify this and other crucial aspects of the origin and early evolution of these remarkable forms.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00576-5
       
  • New Pliocene Rhinocerotidae findings from the Iberian Peninsula and the
           revision of the Spanish Pliocene records

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      Abstract: Abstract A fragmentary mandible from the early Pliocene of the Vera Basin is here investigated to clarify its taxonomic position. The studied specimen is here assigned to Pliorhinus megarhinus, documented in Europe from the latest Miocene to the mid-Pliocene. The morphometrical comparison reveals that this taxon is larger than Stephanorhinus etruscus and S. jeanvireti but overlaps with Dihoplus schleiermacheri. P. megarhinus and D. schleiermacheri differ in some characters of the lower molars, such as the length of the metalophid and the shape of the trigonid in occlusal view, thus allowing new considerations on the Pliocene Spanish rhinocerotine record. According to the results here obtained, three species are at least documented in Span during the Pliocene: P. megarhinus, P. miguelcrusafonti, and S. etruscus. The presence of S. jeanvireti has to be verified and confirmed by further evidence. The presence of Dihoplus schleiermacheri as a relict taxon in the Pliocene of Spain is here discarded.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00607-9
       
  • New thyreophoran dinosaur material from the Early Jurassic of northeastern
           Germany

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      Abstract: Abstract Thyreophora is a clade of globally distributed herbivorous ornithischian dinosaurs. The earliest forms are known from the Early Jurassic, and their latest surviving representatives witnessed the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Throughout their evolutionary history, these ‘shield bearers’ became lumbering quadrupeds, evolved a wide array of bony armor, plates and spikes, as well as sweeping tail weapons in the form of tail clubs and thagomizers. An isolated new thyreophoran osteoderm from a Lower Jurassic Konservatlagerstätte near Grimmen is described and, with the aid of micro-CT data, compared to an osteoderm of the early diverging thyreophoran Emausaurus ernsti from a different stratigraphic horizon at the same locality.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00605-x
       
  • Two passeriform birds (Aves: Passeriformes) from the Middle Miocene of
           Austria

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      Abstract: Abstract Two newly discovered specimens of passerine birds—an isolated sternum and an associated skeleton—from the upper Middle Miocene (ca. 12 Ma) are the oldest representatives of Passeriformes from Austria. Although the condition of the specimens prevents their accurate identification, they provide further clues on the morphological diversity of the avifauna during this period and fill gaps in the paleobiogeography of Miocene passerines. The associated skeleton represents a bird similar in size to the extant Sylvia atricapilla or Erithacus rubecula, and the delicate beak indicates that the bird fed mainly on small invertebrates and possibly also soft fruit. The isolated sternum belonged to a small thrush-sized bird and, considering the fragility of this skeletal element, is one of the best-preserved Miocene passerine sterna in the world.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00579-2
       
  • Debris-carrying behaviour of bark lice immatures preserved in 100 million
           years old amber

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      Abstract: Abstract Camouflage strategies, including several types of concealments, are known for several insect groups today, such as immatures of some species within reduviid bugs (Hemiptera), lace wings (Neuroptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera) and bark lice (Psocodea). However, camouflage has only rarely been reported in the fossil record. Here we report findings of four bark lice preserved in 100 Million year old amber from Myanmar, which represent the first fossil evidence for masking behaviour in Cretaceous representatives of Psocodea. All four of these, probably not conspecific, and immature bark lice carry sand granules and organic material atop their back, which probably resulted in camouflaging them against the background (e.g. bark) to avoid detection by predators. We briefly summarise concepts of camouflage and examples of decoration behaviour within insects, as well as possible “receiver” (i.e. predators) of the camouflage of the herein described bark lice. The exact phylogenetic position of the specimens remains unclear, due to the scarce fossil record of Cretaceous immatures of Psocodea, as well as extant immatures. This demonstrates the importance of findings as reported here, as a wide knowledge of morphology and development of a certain group is crucial to get an insight into their evolution and reconstructing environments in deep time.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00567-6
       
  • Caught in travertine: computed tomography reveals the youngest record of
           Amphicyon giganteus from the travertine deposits of Karacalar (late middle
           Miocene, central Anatolia, Turkey)

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      Abstract: Abstract A computed tomography scan of a travertine slab from the Karacalar Silver Travertine Quarry (Afyonkarahisar Province, Turkey) revealed the presence of an encased partial cranium, partial mandible and three vertebrae. 3D reconstruction of the fossil helped identifying it as Amphicyon giganteus. As the travertine caps a section correlated to MN7/8, the specimen represents the youngest record of Amphicyon giganteus, the known range previously being limited to MN4 – MN6. This young age is in line with the more advanced morphology of the lower molars.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00610-0
       
  • A remarkable new thorny lacewing from mid-Cretaceous amber from northern
           Myanmar (Neuroptera: Rhachiberothidae)

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      Abstract: Abstract Thorny lacewings (Rhachiberothidae) are a small group of Neuroptera, and currently distributed only within sub-Saharan Africa. They are relatively abundant in the fossil record of various Cretaceous ambers across the Northern Hemisphere, but all the Cretaceous rhachiberothids belong to the extinct subfamily Paraberothinae. Here, a new thorny lacewing, Paradoxoberotha chimaera gen. et sp. nov., is described from the mid-Cretaceous Kachin amber of northern Myanmar. This new genus is characterized by absence of spine or spine-like setae on ventral edge of protibia, well-developed recurrent humeral vein in the forewing, and well-developed hypocauda and pseudohypocauda in female genital segments. The peculiar combination of the morphological characters found in Paradoxoberotha gen. nov. cannot allow the definitive subfamilial placement within the currently recognized two subfamilies of Rhachiberothidae. This new species enhances knowledge on the morphological and species diversity of the Rhachiberothidae in the Cretaceous.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00589-0
       
  • Eifelosaurus triadicus Jaekel, 1904, a “forgotten” reptile from the
           Upper Buntsandstein (Triassic: Anisian) of the Eifel region, Germany

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      Abstract: Abstract We provide a detailed description of the poorly known reptile Eifelosaurus triadicus Jaekel, 1904 from the Upper Buntsandstein (Triassic: early Anisian) of Oberbettingen in the southwestern Eifel region of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. The holotype and only known specimen is a partial postcranial skeleton exposed in ventral view. Since its original description Eifelosaurus triadicus has been almost completely ignored in the literature. Our phylogenetic analysis recovered this taxon within Rhynchosauria and Rhynchosauridae, as the sister taxon to the clade comprising Stenaulorhynchinae and hyperodapedontine-line rhynchosaurids. A unique combination of character states allows distinguishing Eifelosaurus triadicus from other rhynchosaur species with preserved matching postcranial bones. Thus, we tentatively consider this taxon valid until more information about the postcrania of other Early to Middle Triassic rhynchosaurs becomes available. Eifelosaurus triadicus represents a paleobiogeographically important record, showing that rhynchosaurs had already attained a broad paleolatitudinal distribution by the early Middle Triassic.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-021-00584-5
       
  • Placodus (Placodontia, Sauropterygia) dentaries from Winterswijk, The
           Netherlands (middle Anisian) and Hünfeld, Hesse, Germany (late Anisian)
           with comments on ontogenetic changes

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      Abstract: Abstract Two recently found dentaries from the Lower Muschelkalk of Winterswijk (The Netherlands) and from the Upper Muschelkalk of an outcrop in the vicinity of Hünfeld (Hesse, Germany) are studied and compared to lower jaws of placodonts. As a result, the here described specimens can be assigned to Placodus cf. gigas. However, this assignment should be regarded as preliminary due to the isolated nature of the material. More diagnostic material is necessary to validate this affiliation. A certain morphological variability in P. gigas dentaries that had been pointed out before is also obvious among the new material. Placodus gigas has a wide paleogeography and stratigraphic range and a revision of the material assigned to P. gigas with new methods is overdue but beyond the scope of the current paper. The dentary from Hünfeld is with about 4 cm preserved length the smallest so far known dentary of a Placodus. It provides interesting insights in morphological changes during ontogeny and reveals differences in trajectories when compared to dentaries of different ontogenetic stages of Cyamodus hildegardis.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00614-w
       
  • Listriodon dukkar sp. nov. (Suidae, Artiodactyla, Mammalia) from the late
           Miocene of Pasuda (Gujarat, India): the decline and extinction of the
           Listriodontinae

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      Abstract: Abstract The Listriodontinae were a common and widespread group of Suidae (pigs) that lived in an area extending from Portugal to China and to southern Africa. Here, we describe the new species Listriodon dukkar from Pasuda (Gujarat, India). It shares features with Li. pentapotamiae, evolved from it, and is the last representative of this lineage. The Listriodontinae flourished for about 10 million years, reached their maximum diversity and geographic extension during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (about 17–13.6 Ma), and their last records are close in age and date to ~ 9.8 Ma in the Indian Subcontinent, 9.78 Ma in Europe, and ~ 10 Ma in Africa. We review the environments in which the last listriodont lineages lived and went extinct. Their extinctions occurred against a background of increasing seasonality, vegetation change, a rise in bovid diversity and abundance, and local events, such as the European Vallesian Crisis and a dramatic drop in tragulid abundance in the Siwaliks. However, changes in the atmospheric pCO2 may have contributed to their decline and extinction in all their geographic distribution. Decreasing pCO2 is expected to have decreased sugar content and increased protein content of leaves and fruit. Hindgut fermenting Suoidea have higher protein requirements, while foregut fermenting Suoidea are more efficient in digesting sugars. Listriodontinae were probably foregut fermenters and were less well adapted in a low pCO2 world.
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00606-w
       
  • First fossil tumbling flower beetle-type larva from 99 million-year-old
           amber

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      Abstract: Abstract Beetle larvae often differ significantly in morphology from their adult counterparts. Therefore, it should be surprising that these immatures are often not considered to the same extent as the adult beetles. As an example, the fossil record of most beetle groups is largely represented by adult specimens. Representatives of Mordellidae, the group of tumbling flower beetles, have a cosmopolitan distribution with myriads of formally described species, based mostly on adult male specimens. Mordellidae is also well represented in the fossil record, but again only by adults; not a single fossil specimen of a larva has been reported until now. We report a new well-preserved beetle larva in 99 million-year-old Kachin amber. The larva possesses specialisations not known from the modern larvae of Mordellidae, but otherwise is clearly similar to them in many aspects. It appears possible that the fossil represents yet another holometabolan larva in Kachin amber that is associated with life within wood and/or fungi, and therefore, may have contributed to carbon cycling of the past.
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s12542-022-00608-8
       
 
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