Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted alphabetically
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ameghiniana     Open Access  
Annales de Paléontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Carnegie Museum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Comptes Rendus Palevol     Open Access  
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Geologica Saxonica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Novitates Paleoentomologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Quaternary     Open Access  
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
PaleoBios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal  
Peer Community Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue de Micropaleontologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zitteliana     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Quaternary Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.216
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0033-5894 - ISSN (Online) 1096-0287
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • QUA volume 106 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2022.12
       
  • Assessing the reliability of raptor pellets in recording local small
           mammal diversity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Viteri; Maria C., Stegner, Mary Allison, Hadly, Elizabeth A.
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Understanding how raptors select prey is important to determine taphonomic biases both in modern and paleo pellet assemblages. We tested whether pellets more closely represent raptor dietary specialization or local small mammal diversity by sampling pellets from seven raptor species across four study sites in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. We identified small mammal craniodental elements from each pellet and tested for differences among small mammal assemblages for each raptor species and study site. We found that reconstructed avian predator diets clustered significantly by site but not by predator species. Bray-Curtis diet dissimilarities were also significantly lower when comparing different raptor species within a site than when comparing the same raptor species across different sites. Our results suggest that raptors choose to eat a diversity of small mammal species close to their roosts rather than fly long distances to specialize on a particular prey species. Neontologists and paleoecologists alike can therefore be confident that raptor pellets faithfully represent local small mammal diversity.
      PubDate: 2021-10-21
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.59
       
  • Tectonic, hydrogeologic, and climatic controls on Late Holocene dune
           formation, China Lake basin, Indian Wells Valley, California, USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lancaster; Nicholas, Bacon, Steven N., Bullard, Thomas F., Neudorf, Christina M., Keen-Zebert, Amanda K., Decker, David L., Boggs, Matthew L.
      Pages: 11 - 27
      Abstract: Analysis of patterns of faulting and hydrogeology, stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies, and luminescence dating of aeolian deposits in China Lake basin provide new perspectives on the origins and development of Late Holocene dunes and sand ramps in the seismically active Indian Wells Valley of eastern California. Aeolian dune and sand sheet deposits were sourced from alluvial material derived from granitic rocks of the south-eastern Sierra Nevada and are concentrated in areas with sand-stabilizing phreatophyte vegetation influenced by high groundwater levels along the active oblique-normal Little Lake and Paxton Ranch faults, which locally form barriers to groundwater flow. Three episodes of sand accumulation are recognized (2.1 ± 0.1 to 2.0 ± 0.1 ka, 1.8 ± 0.2 to 1.6 ± 0.2 ka, and 1.2 ± 0.1 to 0.9 ± 0.1 ka) during conditions in which sediment supplied to the basin during periods of enhanced rainfall and runoff was subsequently reworked by wind into dunes and sand ramps at the transition to more arid periods. Understanding the role tectonics plays in influencing the hydrogeology of seismically active lake basins provides insights to accurately interpret landscape evolution and any inferences made on past hydroclimate variability in a region.
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.62
       
  • The signal of climate changes over the last two millennia in the Gulf of
           St. Lawrence, eastern Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wu; Xiner, de Vernal, Anne, Fréchette, Bianca, Moros, Matthias, Perner, Kerstin
      Pages: 28 - 43
      Abstract: Climate changes over the past two millennia in the central part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence are documented in this paper with the aim of determining and understanding the natural climate variability and the impact of anthropogenic forcing at a regional scale. The palynological content (dinocysts, pollen, and spores) of the composite marine sediment core MSM46-03 collected in the Laurentian Channel was used to reconstruct oceanographic and climatic changes with a multidecadal temporal resolution. Sea-surface conditions, including summer salinity and temperature, sea-ice cover, and primary productivity, were reconstructed from dinocyst assemblages. Results revealed a remarkable cooling trend of about 4°C after 1230 cal yr BP (720 CE) and a culmination with a cold pulse dated to 170–40 cal yr BP (1780–1910 CE), which likely corresponds to the regional signal of the Little Ice Age. This cold interval was followed by a rapid warming of about 3°C. In the pollen assemblages, the decrease of Pinus abundance over the past 1700 yr suggests changes in wind regimes, likely resulting from increased southerly incursions of cold and dry Arctic air masses into southeastern Canada.
      PubDate: 2021-10-21
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.56
       
  • Changes in the prairie–forest ecotone in northwest Ontario (Canada)
           across the Holocene

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Danesh; Donya C., Gushulak, Cale A.C., Moos, Melissa T., Karmakar, Moumita, Cumming, Brian F.
      Pages: 44 - 55
      Abstract: Pollen and diatom assemblages from well-dated sediment cores from three lakes forming a west-to-east transect across the boreal forest in northwest Ontario (Canada) were used to evaluate the timing and nature of the movement of the prairie–forest ecotone (PFE) across the Holocene. Changes in vegetation, temperature, and effective moisture were inferred from pollen and pollen-based transfer functions. Analyses indicated site-specific vegetational and climate changes across short spatial distances, with prolonged prairie-like conditions during the middle Holocene at the westernmost site. Increased reconstructed temperatures at this westernmost site occurred from ~9000 to 3000 cal yr BP, alongside increases in diatom-inferred lake levels beginning at ~6000 cal yr BP. The abundance of Quercus peaked concurrently with rising lake levels before declining to trace levels by ~3000 cal yr BP. Increases in the abundance of non-arboreal pollen between ~8500 and ~4500 cal yr BP at the more eastern lakes suggest relatively delayed and truncated PFE influence, before the reestablishment of primarily boreal taxa by ~4500 cal yr BP, coincident with diatom-inferred increases in lake levels. This study shows that the PFE moved both farther east and north than previously determined, but generally agrees with established patterns in vegetation from other studied regions along the PFE.
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.52
       
  • Holocene regional climate change and formation of southern Ontario's
           largest swamp inferred from a kettle-lake pollen record

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Byun; Eunji, Cowling, Sharon A., Finkelstein, Sarah A.
      Pages: 56 - 74
      Abstract: Greenock Swamp wetland complex is one of few remaining natural wetlands in the Great Lakes region and, at 89 km2 in areal extent, is currently the largest hardwood swamp in southern Ontario, Canada. We present here pollen and sediment records from a kettle hole (Schmidt Lake) and adjacent Thuja occidentalis swamp to reconstruct regional paleoclimate and vegetation history, and to assess the timing and development of the swamp ecosystem and associated carbon stocks. Pollen-inferred paleoclimate reconstructions show the expected warming in the Early Holocene, and indicate the Mid-Holocene initiation of lake-effect snow. This enhanced snowfall may have maintained high water tables in the adjacent wetland since ca. 8300 years ago, promoting the establishment of a swamp dominated by Thuja occidentalis. Carbon accumulation rates in a>2-m-long peat core collected from a Thuja occidentalis stand adjacent to Schmidt Lake are 30–40 g C/m2/yr, which is higher than the average of northern high-latitude peatlands. Using topographic and hydrological parameters, we estimated that mean swamp peat thicknesses could exceed 2 m. Thus, this study encourages future investigations on temperate swamps from the perspective of hitherto underestimated Holocene carbon sinks and shows the importance of regional hydroclimate in supporting swamp ecosystems.
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.54
       
  • A Paleo-Lake and wetland paleoecology associated with human use of the
           distal Old River Bed Delta at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the
           Bonneville Basin, Utah, USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Palacios-Fest; Manuel R., Duke, Daron, Young, D. Craig, Kirk, Jason D., Oviatt, Charles G.
      Pages: 75 - 93
      Abstract: Mollusk and ostracode assemblages from the distal Old River Bed delta (ORBD) contribute to our understanding of the Lake Bonneville basin Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) wetland and human presence on the ORBD (ca. 13,000–7500 cal yr BP). Located on U.S. Air Force-managed lands of the Great Salt Lake Desert (GSLD) in western Utah, USA, the area provided 30 samples from 12 localities. The biological assemblages and the potential water sources using 87Sr/86Sr analyses showed wetland expansion and contraction across the PHT, including the Younger-Dryas Chronozone (YDC). The record reflects cold, freshwater conditions, which is uncharacteristic of the Great Salt Lake Desert, after recession of Lake Bonneville. Lymnaea stagnalis jugularis, Cytherissa lacustris, and possibly Candona sp. cf. C. adunca, an endemic and extinct species only reported from Lake Bonneville, suggest cold-water environments. Between 13,000–12,400 cal yr BP, a shallow lake formed, referred to as the Old River Bed delta lake, fed by Lake Gunnison, as shown by 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.71024–0.71063 in mollusk fossils collected at the ORBD, characteristic of the Sevier basin. These findings add paleoenvironmental context to the long-term use of the ORBD by humans in constantly changing wetland habitats between 13,000–9500 cal yr BP.
      PubDate: 2021-09-10
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.49
       
  • Reconstruction of climate and ecology of Skagit Valley, Washington, from
           27.7 to 19.8 ka based on plant and beetle macrofossils

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Riedel; Jon L., Telka, Alice, Bunn, Andy, Clague, John J.
      Pages: 94 - 112
      Abstract: Glacial lake sediments exposed at two sites in Skagit Valley, Washington, encase abundant macrofossils dating from 27.7 to 19.8 cal ka BP. At the last glacial maximum (LGM) most of the valley floor was part of a regionally extensive arid boreal (subalpine) forest that periodically included montane and temperate trees and open boreal species such as dwarf birch, northern spikemoss, and heath. We used the modern distribution and climate of 14 species in 12 macrofossil assemblages and a probability density function approach to reconstruct the LGM climate. Median annual precipitation (MAP) at glacial Lake Concrete (GLC) was ~50% lower than today. In comparison, MAP at glacial Lake Skymo (GLS) was only ~10% lower, which eliminated the steep climate gradient observed today. Median January air temperature at GLC was up to 10.8°C lower than today at 23.5 cal ka BP and 8.7°C lower at GLS at 25.1 cal ka BP. Median July air temperature declines were smaller at GLC (3.4°C–5.0°C) and GLS (4.2°C–6.3°C). Warmer winters (+2°C to +4°C) and increases in MAP (+200 mm) occurred at 27.7, 25.9, 24.4, and 21.2–20.7 cal ka BP. These changes accord with other regional proxies and Dansgaard–Oeschger interstades in the North Atlantic.
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.50
       
  • Analysis of pollen across the surface sediments of Lake Imbradas,
           Lithuania

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Balakauskas; Lauras, Gaižutytė, Justina, Valskys, Vaidotas, Vaikutienė, Giedrė
      Pages: 113 - 128
      Abstract: In conventional pollen analysis, usually one sediment core per basin is analyzed to reconstruct past environmental conditions. This approach does not consider spatial heterogeneity of pollen assemblages, and assumes that one analyzed location is representative of the whole basin. To improve the spatial resolution of fossil pollen studies, further knowledge of the factors influencing variations in pollen assemblages throughout a basin is needed. We examined the spatial heterogeneity of pollen assemblages from 45 lacustrine surface samples from a lake with relatively simple hydrology and compared this dense network of surface pollen samples with the Lithuanian State Forest Service arboreal vegetation database. Calculations of pollen productivity at different locations across the lake revealed variations in the behavior of a pollen-vegetation relationship model in different parts of the basin. Our findings suggest that the model underestimated pollen contributions from the lakeshore vegetation. We demonstrate that detailed investigations of surface pollen as a step prior to fossil pollen investigations can provide useful insights, including understanding the influence of sedimentation rate on modelling results and spatial variations in pollen composition, thus providing guidance for site selection for fossil pollen studies.
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.51
       
  • Glacial deposits and landforms at the terminus of a Laurentide ice stream,
           Oneida Lake, New York, from multichannel seismic reflection data

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zaremba; Nicholas, Scholz, Christopher A.
      Pages: 129 - 146
      Abstract: The deglaciation record of the Ontario Lowland and Mohawk Valley of North America is important for constraining the retreat history of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, end-Pleistocene paleoclimate, and ice-sheet processes. The Mohawk Valley was an important meltwater drainage route during the last deglaciation, with the area around modern Oneida Lake acting as a valve for meltwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean. The Mohawk Valley was occupied by the Oneida Lobe and Oneida Ice Stream during the last deglacial period. Multichannel seismic reflection data can be used to generate images of preglacial surfaces and internal structures of glacial bedforms and proglacial lake deposits, thus contributing to studies of deglaciation. This paper uses 217 km of offshore multichannel seismic reflection data to image the entire Quaternary section of the Oneida basin. A proglacial lake and paleo-calving margin is interpreted, which likely accelerated the Oneida Ice Stream, resulting in elongated bedforms observed west of the lake. The glacial bedforms identified in this study are buried by proglacial lake deposits, indicating the Oneida basin contains a record of glacial meltwater processes, including a 60-m-thick proglacial interval in eastern Oneida Lake.
      PubDate: 2021-11-16
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.53
       
  • Chronology, time averaging, and oxygen isotope composition of harvested
           marine mollusk assemblages from Ifri Oudadane, northeast Morocco

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sanchez; William, Yanes, Yurena, Linstädter, Jörg, Hutterer, Rainer
      Pages: 147 - 161
      Abstract: The archaeological site of Ifri Oudadane, NE Morocco, contains well-preserved marine mollusk concentrations throughout the Epipaleolithic (hunting-gathering) and Neolithic (food production) cultural phases, useful to test hypotheses driving such transition. However, the chronology and stratigraphy of harvested shells is complex due to the confluence of human activity and natural deposition processes. This work first quantifies the age and degree of time averaging of archaeological shells and then estimates sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) from the oxygen isotopes of selected specimens. Thirty-four radiocarbon-dated shells exhibited significant time averaging between 310 to 1170 yr that could not be explained by analytical error alone. This finding illustrates the need for individually dating shells in future paleoclimate investigations aiming for high temporal resolution. Nine isotopically analyzed shells dated to the Neolithic phase, between 5700 and 7600 cal yr BP, indicate that assuming constant oxygen isotopes of seawater, SSTs remained consistently warm, between 20°C and 22°C, that is, 2°C–4°C warmer than today. Results point to warmer conditions during the Neolithic, supporting the hypothesis that the rise of a food production mode of life in NE Morocco could have in part been triggered by warming conditions following the colder 8.2 event.
      PubDate: 2021-11-15
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.60
       
  • Geomorphological, chronological, and paleoenvironmental context of the
           Mousterian site at Roca San Miguel (Arén, Huesca, Spain) from the
           penultimate to the last glacial cycle

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peña-Monné; José Luis, Montes Ramírez, Lourdes, Sampietro-Vattuone, María Marta, Domingo Martínez, Rafael, Medialdea, Alicia, Bartolomé, Miguel, Rubio Fernández, Virginia, García Giménez, Rosario, Turú, Valentí, Ros, Xavier, Baró, Pere, Bernal-Wormull, Juan Luis, Edwards, R. Lawrence
      Pages: 162 - 181
      Abstract: The Roca San Miguel (RSM) archaeological site was occupied during Mousterian times. Here we present a geoarchaeological and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the site. Five stratigraphic units (A to E) formed by different archaeological levels are identified. Three optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages show that Unit A dates to between 169.6 ± 9.1 and 151.9 ± 11.1 ka, during the penultimate glacial period (PGP), and contains numerous signs of recurring hearths. Unit B is unexcavated. Unit C dates to between 118.9 ± 11.5 and 103.4 ± 6.9 ka (late Eemian–marine isotope stage (MIS) 5d) and shows an abundance of lithic remains as well as some faunal elements. Unit C is covered by Unit D, which incorporates materials moved downslope, and is dated at 81.2 ± 4.7 ka. These OSL ages concur with U/Th ages (129.3 ± 1.5 and 123.6 ± 0.6 ka) derived from a flowstone covered by both -C and D- post-flowstone units. Finally, Unit E covers the archaeological site, which was partially eroded during MIS2. The robust and well-constrained chronology of the RSM site and surroundings enables the establishment of its evolutionary model from the PGP to the last glacial cycle. The RSM site is the oldest Neanderthal occupation accurately dated in the Pre-Pyrenean region.
      PubDate: 2021-11-15
      DOI: 10.1017/qua.2021.61
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.231.247.88
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-