Subjects -> PALEONTOLOGY (Total: 43 journals)
Showing 1 - 21 of 21 Journals sorted alphabetically
Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ameghiniana     Open Access  
Annales de Paléontologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Carnegie Museum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Boreas: An International Journal of Quaternary Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Comptes Rendus Palevol     Open Access  
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Facies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fossil Record     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geobios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ichnos: An International Journal for Plant and Animal Traces     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Paleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Marine Micropaleontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Novitates Paleoentomologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Quaternary     Open Access  
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Palaeontographica A     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palaeoworld     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Paläontologische Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Paleobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
PaleoBios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Paleontological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Papers in Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal  
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Quaternary Science Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue de Micropaleontologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia (Research In Paleontology and Stratigraphy)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spanish Journal of Palaeontology     Open Access  
Swiss Journal of Palaeontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zitteliana     Open Access  
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Paleontological Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.383
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0031-0301 - ISSN (Online) 1555-6174
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Foreword

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Yuka the Mammoth, a Frozen Mummy of a Young Female Woolly Mammoth from
           Oyogos

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      Abstract: A short review of the results of 10 years of interdisciplinary study of Yuka, the frozen mummy of a young female woolly mammoth from Oyogos (Oyogos Yar, Ust-Yansky ulus, Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Russia) and its significance for studying the biology and ecology of Mammuthus primigenius (Blumenbach, 1799) is given.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • First Occurrence of a Gomphotheriid (Proboscidea, Mammalia) from the
           Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

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      Abstract: A species of gomphotheriids were firstly discovered from the Kidong Formation from Myongchon County, North Hamgyong Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). Although the tusk is broken and two of the teeth are so deeply worn, the new material displays some mandibular and dental feature combinations that might belong to the known species of either Gomphotherium (probably G. subtapiroideum) or amebelodontids. This discovery not only extends the geographic of the gomphotheriids, but also fills a blank in the gomphotheriid study in DPRK.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • An Unusual Cladid (Crinoidea, Echinodermata) from the Pennsylvanian of the
           Staritsa District (Tver Region)

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      Abstract: The cladid crinoid Kholokholnyacrinus ilkhovskyi gen. et sp. nov. is described based on a very large cup from the Pennsylvanian (Kashirian Regional Substage, Smedva Formation) of the Rzhev–Staritsa Volga Region. The new taxon is characterized by a complex of morphological characters in the structure of the crown and arms, such as a disarticulated basal circlet, very low brachials in close contact with each other and with anal sac plates, fixed proximal arms, etc., by which it differs strongly from most other cladids. The uniqueness of the morphological characters indicates that the new genus should be assigned to a new family of cladid crinoids. Paleoecological aspects and systematics of the new crinoid genus are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Paleogene Molluscan Communities in the Kopet-Dagh Basin, NE Iran

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      Abstract: Molluscan fossils have long been considered as an essential group for the paleoecological interpretations of the Paleogene stratigraphic successions. The distribution of bivalve and gastropod fossils in the Kopet-Dagh Mountains’ Paleogene successions, Chehelkaman and Khangiran formations, has been studied in this research. The fossil contents of the investigated intervals are categorized into four paleo-societies. They include Turriteline (gastropods of subfamily Turritellinae, by Allmon, 2011)—Pycnodonte community at the top of Chehelkaman Formation representative the terminal part of the Upper Paleocene, Flemingostrea–Ferganea community representing the lower layers of the Lower Eocene deposits and base of the Khangiran Formation, assemblages of Turkostrea spp., defining the middle part of the Early Eocene and Sokolowia community indicating the Lutetian—early Priabonian age for the upper part of the Khangiran Formation. Besides, the first appearance of Ferganea ferganensis previously had been reported only from the Upper Eocene–Oligocene deposits, is recorded from the Early Eocene, here. The faunal contents approve a shallow foreshore environment during Paleogene sequences' deposition in the Kopet-Dagh Basin. Accordingly, three regressive and two transgressive phases were proposed for the Kopet-Dagh basin’s Paleogene deposits in Iran.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Two Coils in the Morphology of Myelodactylids (Crinoidea, Disparida): the
           Morphogenetic Basis of Their Formation and Adaptation Potential

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      Abstract: In myelodactylids, the coil of the mesostele and the crown with a proxistele coiled in the same plane in the opposite direction result from the two fundamental processes in the evolution of echinoderms, which happened when their free-floating ancestor settled at the bottom and became attached to the ground by the ventral side of the anterior end of the body. The coil of the mesostele emerged due to the tendency of the stem to curve from the ventral to the dorsal side in the larvae, after they became attached, by the ventral side of the preoral lobe, and the growth vector changed from horizontal to vertical. The curvature of the proxistele, together with the crown in the same larval plane but in the opposite direction, from the dorsal side to the ventral, appeared during the paedomorphic delay in the process of elevation (torsion) in the ontogeny of myelodactylids. The coiling of the mesostele and the curvature of the proxistele with the crown in the E‑BC plane determine the conformity of this plane to the larval plane in pentaradiate echinoderms, and the approximate conformity of the E ray to the dorsal side of the larva, and the interray BC to its ventral side. The morphology of myelodactylids shows that their stem in the feeding position stretched along slightly compacted ground, resting on cirri, and the crown extended at a slight acute angle over the stem downstream. In cases of danger, the stem coiled with its lower side inward, so that the crown was protected inside the coil by cirri. The coil of Zuravlicrinus milicinae gen. et sp. nov. from the Silurian of the Urals, and Valimocrinus terentyevi gen. et sp. nov. from the Ordovician of the Leningrad Region, coiled while growing around stems of other crinoids, and could not uncoil. Both genera, as well as Musicrinus Donovan, are known only from stem fragments and are tentatively assigned to myelodactylids. The finding of the genus Eomyelodactylus in China shows its spread far beyond North America. Findings of myelodactylids in Siberia show significant differences from other myelodactylids, allowing them to be assigned to a new genus Imagdacrinus gen .nov.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Coelom Metamerism in Echinodermata

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      Abstract: Within all major taxa of Bilateria, there are forms with coelomic metamerism. This suggests that coelomic metamerism was characteristic of the common ancestor of Bilateria. Among deuterostomes, metamerism is clearly expressed in chordates, and elements of metamerism are present in hemichordates. Do echinoderms have remnants of coelomic metamerism that was inherited from the common ancestor of Bilateria' The coelomic system of echinoderms includes several metameric coelomic rings located along the oral-aboral axis, namely: the axocoelomic ring, the hydrocoelomic ring, 2 to 6 coelomic rings originating from the left somatocoel, and one epigastric ring originating from the right somatocoel. Thus, in echinoderms, there is a dissymmetrical metamerism, derived from the original metamerism of the common ancestors of Deuterostomia and, possibly, the common ancestors of Bilateria. The problem of dexiothetism as the cause for the formation of coelomic dissymmetry in echinoderms is discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Sea Lilies of the Genus Bathycrinus (Crinoidea, Bathycrinidae) from the
           Yap and Palau Trenches

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      Abstract: Two species of the genus Bathycrinus were found in the Yap and Palau trenches. B. longicolumnalis n. sp. differs from other Bathycrinus species in having strongly bent lateral wings on the primibrachials and very elongate mesistele columnals. Ratio of length to diameter in the most elongate columnal is 7.1. The knobby processes are present in B. longicolumnalis sp. nov. from upper hadal zone (6445–7170 m), and they absent in B. kirilli from lower hadal zone (7970–8720 m). A similar difference has been previously noted between the upper and lower hadal Bathycrinus inhabiting the North Pacific trenches: B. rozhnovi and B. longipinnus from the depths 5595–7245 m are with knobby processes, while B. kirilli and B. volubilis from the depths 8175–9735 m lack this processes. The hadal echinoderm fauna of the Palau and Yap trenches includes 19 species. Of these, 15 species are known from the Palau Trench and 10 species—from the Yap Trench.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Morphology, Individual Age, DNA and Sex of the Yuka Mammoth (Mammuthus
           primigenius) from Northern Yakutia, Russia

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      Abstract: A partial carcass of the woolly mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius, named “Yuka Mammoth,” was found thawed from the Pleistocene Yedoma (permafrost) deposits of the Oyogos Yar bluff on the coast of the Dmitry Laptev Strait. Yuka’s AMS calibrated radiocarbon date yielded the date between ~40 100–39 000 calendar years BP. The mDNA analyses demonstrated that Yuka clusters with previously published Siberian woolly mammoths falling into clade 1 and represents ancestral to a haplotype shared by two ~18 500 14C yr old mammoths, including the Yukagir Mammoth that was discovered ~140 km from the Yuka’s site. The hide morphology in the genital area suggests that Yuka was a female. The teeth generation (DP3/dp3-Dp4/dp4) and their state of wear, season of her death (autumn) and confirmed earlier the dental development delay in infants allowed to estimate Yuka’s age as 5.5 yr old juvenile. Yuka’s tusks suggests that yuka was not older than 5.5 years woolly mammoth specimens with the similar dental age. Yuka’s missing body parts and the damage of the hide suggests that it was hunted by cave lions, but she managed to escape into a mudhole, where she died and was partially scavenged.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Traces of Sublethal Injuries in Upper Cretaceous Echinoid Tests from the
           Vicinity of Volsk (Lower Volga Region)

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      Abstract: Three species of echinoids Conulus matesovi Moskvin, Echinocorys ovata (Leske) and Micraster corbovis Forbes from Turonian and Campanian deposits of Lower Volga region, with traces of the sublethal injuries in the tests, are described. Such injuries are of particular interest as they are not related to commensalism, predation, parasitism, or other effects of different animals, but are the result of a mechanical collision of echinoid tests with empty shells of inoceramids, which resulted in a foreign object being embedded and remaining in the tests but did not lead to their destruction or the death of the organism. Formation conditions and taphonomic aspects of the occurrences are considered. Possible mechanisms of sublethal injuries are analyzed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • The Plantigrade Segnosaurians: Sloth Dinosaurs or Bear Dinosaurs'

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      Abstract: This article considers the unusual Macropodosaurus gravis tracks from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) locality of Shirkent-1 (Tajikistan). The trackmaker was bipedal and plantigrade. Through a comparison of Macropodosaurus tracks with those of other dinosaurs and by a juxtaposition of track morphology and pes skeletal morphology, it is argued that they belong to an aberrant group of theropods, the segnosaurs. Data on the stratigraphic and geographical distribution of segnosaur tracks are presented. Aspects of functional morphology of the hind limbs are analyzed, as well as the locomotory mode and the possible lifestyle of this group of dinosaurs. Segnosaurs were most likely herbivorous; their possible ecological counterparts are giant ground sloths. The ancestors of segnosaurs were probably facultatively digitigrade and underwent a short-term stage as arboreal, climbing forms, and then reversed to a purely terrestrial lifestyle. Return to plantigrade locomotion in segnosaurs apparently required increased area of support during the slow obligate bipedal locomotion of these heavy theropods.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Multituberculata from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia

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      Abstract: The multituberculate assemblage from the Early Cretaceous Khovoor locality in Mongolia, based on the study of 112 specimens in PIN collection, includes three taxa: arginbaatarid Arginbaatar dmitrievae Trofimov, 1980 (=Monobaatar mimicus Kielan-Jaworowska et al., 1987, new synonym) and two eobaatarids, Eobaatar magnus Kielan-Jaworowska et al., 1987 and Nokerbaatar minor (Kielan-Jaworowska et al., 1987), comb. nov. Both eobaatarid taxa from Khovoor differ from other known eobaatarids by lower incisors with enamel restricted to ventrolateral side. Contrary to the previous claims, in both Eobaatar magnus and Nokerbaatar minor P5 is sectorial tooth, as in other eobaatarids, different in morphology from P4. In Eobaatar and Nokerbaatar gen. nov., there is pronounced sculpture of radiating ridges on the upper premolars, which is partially also present on the upper molars. In Nokerbaatar, there is a ventrolingual groove on the lower incisor and p3 is relatively small, lacking serrations. In Eobaatar, there is a pronounced ventrolingual ridge on the lower incisor and p3 is relatively larger, with serrations. The number of infraorbital foramina is variable in Arginbaatar, with most specimens having two foramina. In Arginbaatar, the cusp ornamentation is poorly developed or absent on upper premolars and absent on upper molars. The sectorial dP5 was likely not replacing by P5. The molars (M2, m1–2) have conical cusps. The p4 is very large and highly variable in size and number of denticles (11–18). It lacks labial cusps and has restricted enamel. The p4 rotates mesioventrally during the ontogeny, which is unique for the Multituberculata. The p2 and dp3 are shed early during the ontogeny. The p3 is fully formed but cannot erupt because it is overhang by p4. In upper dentition, there is a replacement of dP3 by P3. Arginbaataridae are currently known only from Khovoor valley in Mongolia, while Eobaataridae were widely distributed in the Early Cretaceous in Asia and Europe.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Bolboporites: Interpretation Getting Back on Track

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      Abstract: Based on new finds and additional evidence, the interpretation of the enigmatic echinoderm Bolboporites is confirmed; it is a blastozoan echinoderm most likely related to eocrinoids, in which juvenile holdfast, columnals, and reduced skeletal plates of the theca were fused into a single skeletal element, to which a biserial brachiole was attached.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Morphology, Classification and Lineage of the Genera Garumnaster Lambert,
           1907 and Basseaster Lambert, 1936 (Echinoidea: Holasteroida, Urechinina)
           from the Cretaceous–Paleogene Deposits of the Mangyshlak Peninsula

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      Abstract: The taxonomy of the fossil species Garumnaster michaleti, G. (Duncaniaster) luppovi, and Basseaster rostratus from the Lower Paleocene of the Mangyshlak Peninsula has been emended. Based on a comparison of morphological characters and the results of statistical analysis, Duncaniaster luppovi is assigned to the genus Garumnaster. The genera Garumnaster and Basseaster are assigned to the family Garumnasteridae.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • A New Species of Spinaeblattina Hinkelman, 2019 (Insecta, Blattaria,
           Mesoblattinidae) from the Lower Cretaceous of Paektho-Dong, Sinuiju,
           Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

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      Abstract: Spinaeblattina baekthoensis sp. n. (Insecta, Blattaria, Mesoblattinidae), is recorded from the Third Member of the Sinuiju Formation from Paektho-dong, Sinuiju City, North Phyongan Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). It differs from type species S. myanmarensis Hinkelman, 2019 from Cenomanian North Myanmar amber in breadthwise elliptical pronotum, without sharply curved posterior margin and the shape of dark markings in pronotum. Spinaeblattina yixianensis (Gao et al., 2018) from Barremian sediments of the Yixian Formation differs in forewing coloration and size. This well preserved specimen was collected from the grey mudstones and indicates that the genus extended to the DPRK in the Early Cretaceous and links its fauna with Yixian sediments and Myanmar amber.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Foreword

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Paekthoblatta, a New Predatory Cockroach Genus (Insecta: Blattaria:
           Raphidiomimidae) from the Lower Cretaceous of Paektho-Dong, Sinuiju,
           Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

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      Abstract: Paekthoblatta coreanica gen. et sp. n. assigned to the family Raphidiomimidae was collected from grey mudstones of the Third Member of the Sinuiju Formation from Paektho-dong, Sinuiju City, North Phyongan Province, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). It differs by numerous reticulations in the whole forewing and hindwing with dark strong branches. It broadens the distribution and the diversity of the family Raphidiomimidae.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Problems and Debated Issues in the Concepton Modular Organization: On the
           Example of Lower Metazoa

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      Abstract: The concept of modular organization, proposed quite a long time ago is still not sufficiently advanced. Until now, the concept has not been widely used and cannot be considered as generally accepted. This is partly due to the complexity of the elaboration of the main notions. The notions of “colonial organism” and “modular organism” and the terms “modular organization” and “modularity”, often used as synonyms, and are applied to entirely different phenomena. We call for using the terms “colony” and “coloniality” in their initial meaning. The observation and experimental study of thecate hydroids (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria) illustrates the problems with the correct definition of modules in modular organisms.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Lower Carboniferous Gastropods of Dombar Hills (Viséan–Serpukhovian
           Boundary Beds, Western Kazakhstan)

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      Abstract: An Early Carboniferous gastropod assemblage from the Viséan/Serpukhovian boundary deposits of the Dombar Hills (western slope of the South Urals) is described. The assemblage is interpreted as having inhabited relatively deep-water environments of carbonate deposition on the passive continental margin of Laurussia. The lenses of crinoid limestones with abundant ammonoid shells are interpreted as deposits of mud mounds. The gastropod assemblage is distinguished by a set of specific features: some families, which are common for most Early Carboniferous assemblages, are absent, while most of the species present here are not found in shallow-water deposits of carbonate platforms. The described assemblage has a number of similarities with the older Erdbach assemblage. Several species from the described assemblage are also found in limestones of the same age in the Verkhnyaya Kardailovka deposited in the relatively deep-water carbonate ramp of the Magnitogorsk island arc. All taxa described here are recorded for the first time from the Urals. Of these, one genus Squamoworthenia gen. nov. and two species (Hammatospira cancellata sp. nov. and Stuckenbergispira dombarensis sp. nov.) are new. The other twelve species were previously described from Britain, Belgium, Germany, Ukraine and North America: Straparollus (Straparollus) dionysii Montfort, 1810, Sinuitina (Sinuitina) gratiosa (Koninck, 1883), Hesperiella thomsoni (Koninck, 1883), Agnesia prosseri Hyde, 1953, Ptychomphalina subconoidea (Koninck, 1883), Lunulazona lirata (Phillips, 1836), Glabrocingulum minutum (Zernetskaja, 1983), Dictyotomaria cauchyana (Koninck, 1843), Squamoworthenia duponti, (Holzapfel, 1889), Platyceras vetustum (Sowerby, 1829), Auriptygma naticoides (Holzapfel, 1899), and Soleniscus ventricosus (Koninck, 1881).
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Study of the Early Telencephalon Genes of Cyclostomes as a Way to
           Restoring the Evolutionary History of This Unique Part of the Central
           Nervous System of Vertebrates

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      Abstract: The telencephalon, which provides the highest forms of nervous activity in humans and other animals, is one of the most important innovations of vertebrates. Although this part of the brain has been described in all living vertebrates, its evolutionary origin is still poorly understood. This article discusses one of the possible approaches to studying the expression and functional properties of genes that regulate the early development of the forebrain in cyclostomes (lampreys) as the most archaic representatives of vertebrates. The results of studies of genes such as Anf, FoxG1, and genes of the Noggin family are described.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
 
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