Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
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    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
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    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
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    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Food Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gesunde Pflanzen     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
International Journal of Consumer Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Consumer Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Consumer Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Consumer Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Consumer Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
Journal of Islamic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marketing Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Major Gifts Report The     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
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Journal of Consumer Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.56
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0700 - ISSN (Online) 0168-7034
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • An Analysis of Finnish Debtors Who Defaulted in 2014–2016 Because of
           Unsecured Credit Products

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      Abstract: Abstract Consumer credit has become an important element of the economy despite the negative effects: Over-indebtedness has wide-ranging repercussions affecting consumers and society as a whole. We analysed the debt judgements (N = 4,095) of Finnish district courts from 2014 to 2016, as well as administrative data on debtors. Our focus was on the position of consumers on the credit market and their consumption-related problem debts, namely instant loans, extensive consumer credit, and credit-card as well as distance-selling indebtedness. Regarding the four credit products, first we considered the average amount of outstanding debt and then we looked at the sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the debtors. The results revealed that the average outstanding debt (€) varied according to the credit product and that the highest average amount originated from extensive consumer credit. Instant loans and distance-selling indebtedness caused debt problems especially among low-income young adults, adverse selection seemingly being one factor behind instant-loan-related debts. Extensive consumer credit and credit-card indebtedness were behind debt judgements against older consumers with a good socioeconomic position and numerous previous loans. This is a moral-hazard situation whereby borrowers may have more information about their total amounts of debt than the lenders. We suggest that, in many cases, debt problems reflect an abundant supply of consumer credit, which seems to foster asymmetric information, the consumer’s position and competence to act in the credit market, as well as various overall risk factors. The findings highlight the need to strengthen consumers’ financial skills and for loan products that meet the needs of low-credit-rated consumers. Moreover, lenders should act responsibly in the current credit market.
      PubDate: 2022-08-13
       
  • Rocking the Boat: Loot Boxes in Online Digital Games, the Regulatory
           Challenge, and the EU’s Unfair Commercial Practices Directive

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      Abstract: Abstract The loot box, a feature of online video games, contains randomised virtual items of importance to gameplay. Comparisons are drawn between chance-based loot boxes and the legal and psychological definitions of gambling, leading to concerns that the format may be an unregulated form of quasi-gambling. Globally, several jurisdictions have intervened to control the loot box, some applying national gambling laws, while others have implemented more general rules, an alternative described as “consumer protection”. In 2020, a study commissioned on behalf of the EU Parliament recommended that loot boxes and in-game purchasing systems be regulated from a “consumer protection” perspective. This paper questions firstly whether the debate on product-specific rules for loot box games was conducted in reverse, commencing with a set of potential solutions, while research on harms is still at an early stage. It interrogates the “consumer protection” route, critiquing proposals that borrow from the conceptually and structurally distinct areas of gambling law and consumer protection law, without first resolving the tensions between them. The paper proposes that an alternative paradigm of “player protection” may be the better route towards solving the regulatory puzzle of loot boxes. The paper secondly argues for the EU and its Member States to adopt an interim approach, relying on existing legislation to tackle immediate concerns and facilitate testing of remedial measures, but which leaves the door ajar to alternative options, including regulation under national gambling law frameworks. It examines the UCPD as an immediate solution and considers how the updated UCPD Guidance addresses questions of potentially exploitative game design.
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
       
  • AI in Search of Unfairness in Consumer Contracts: The Terms of Service
           Landscape

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      Abstract: Abstract This article explores the potential of artificial intelligence for identifying cases where digital vendors fail to comply with legal obligations, an endeavour that can generate insights about business practices. While heated regulatory debates about online platforms and AI are currently ongoing, we can look to existing horizontal norms, especially concerning the fairness of standard terms, which can serve as a benchmark against which to assess business-to-consumer practices in light of European Union law. We argue that such an assessment can to a certain extent be automated; we thus present an AI system for the automatic detection of unfair terms in business-to-consumer contracts, a system developed as part of the CLAUDETTE project. On the basis of the dataset prepared in this project, we lay out the landscape of contract terms used in different digital consumer markets and theorize their categories, with a focus on five categories of clauses concerning (i) the limitation of liability, (ii) unilateral changes to the contract and/or service, (iii) unilateral termination of the contract, (iv) content removal, and (v) arbitration. In so doing, the paper provides empirical support for the broader claim that AI systems for the automated analysis of textual documents can offer valuable insights into the practices of online vendors and can also provide valuable help in their legal qualification. We argue that the role of technology in protecting consumers in the digital economy is critical and not sufficiently reflected in EU legislative debates.
      PubDate: 2022-07-18
       
  • The Importance of Consumer Authorities for the Production and Maintenance
           of Trust and Social Capital in Consumer Markets

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      Abstract: Abstract Trust is a valuable resource that varies between countries. This paper suggests that consumers’ trust in retailers and service providers, facilitating interactions and transactions between sellers and buyers in impersonal markets, is best understood as generalized trust. The paper is based on 28 037 respondents’ evaluations of consumer conditions in 30 European countries. The material reveals large country-to-country variations in the percentages of residents who trust public authorities to protect their consumer rights. Moreover, there are large differences in the percentages who trust retailers and service providers to respect their rights as consumers. A multilevel path analysis supports the paper’s main hypothesis that fair and effective consumer authorities enhance generalized trust in the markets. The analyses also demonstrate that fair and effective consumer institutions contribute to more equality in the markets. It is argued that consumer markets are important arenas for the maintenance and production of trust and social capital. And that generalized trust produced in markets will probably extend to, and be valuable for, the wider society.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Correction to: Reading a Duty to Provide Accessible Pre‑Contractual
           Information for Consumers with Disabilities into EU Consumer Protection
           Law

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      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Fighting Food Waste by Law: Making Sense of the Chinese Approach

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      Abstract: Abstract The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress adopted the Anti-food Waste Law of the People’s Republic of China in April 2021 to guarantee grain security, conserve resources, and protect the environment. We pursue three research questions: Why has China implemented a law with sanctions to reduce food waste, and why now' Why does the law target the catering industry' To answer these questions, we collected primary data through semi-structured interviews with government officials, as well as secondary data through recorded interviews available online with officials of the Legislative Affairs Commission of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPCSC) and food waste activists, as well as NPCSC conference reports. We find a legal approach with sanctions was necessary since cultural aspects, specifically conventional Chinese dining habits and pop culture, are difficult to regulate through instruments without sanctions. In addition, we find the Chinese law focuses on the catering industry for a few reasons: (1) More waste is generated by the catering industry than households, (2) waste from the catering industry is easier to monitor than household waste, and (3) this was a response to citizen requests collected during the Anti-food Waste Law public consultation process.
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
       
  • In Pursuit of Happiness: Disentangling Sustainable Consumption, Consumer
           Alienation, and Social Desirability

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      Abstract: Abstract This study makes a novel attempt to disentangle the complex relationships between making sustainable purchasing choices and happiness, while also considering the key issues of social desirability and consumer alienation. Analysis of data collected via a survey administered to a representative sample (n = 835) of Japanese consumers suggests that making sustainable purchases does indeed have a positive impact on life satisfaction, or happiness. At the same time, high levels of need for social approval also positively impacts sustainable consumption and happiness. Feeling alienated from the marketplace, however, has a detrimental impact on happiness. These results suggest a more complex picture than is usually portrayed in studies of ethical consumption and life satisfaction, extend our understanding of an intricate set of relationships, and provide insight for policy makers and managers into the ways in which happiness can be encouraged via making sustainable consumption choices and having a more positive perception of business and social norms.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-021-09498-w
       
  • Regulating Borrower Hardship in Australia, Singapore, and Hong Kong:
           Payment Holidays During COVID-19 and Beyond

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      Abstract: Abstract Borrower hardship, while a critical issue, is not often addressed by consumer protection frameworks across the Asia–Pacific. The widespread use of payment holidays during the COVID-19 crisis provides a significant case study on the importance of having borrower hardship provisions as a consumer protection tool. This paper compares the pre-pandemic availability of payment holidays in three Asia–Pacific jurisdictions: Australia, Singapore, and Hong Kong. It evaluates their existing legislative frameworks, as well as regulatory and industry guidelines on borrower hardship, and contrasts this with their use of payment holidays during the pandemic. Where there were existing industry guidelines on borrower hardship, lenders were able to spearhead an industry-wide approach towards payment relief without regulatory intervention by governments. Beyond the pandemic, the paper argues that self-regulation has potential for protecting borrower interests by standardising the scope of, and the procedure for, obtaining hardship relief. It argues that there is a need for a greater prevalence of industry codes of conducts governing lenders’ approach towards borrower hardship across the Asia–Pacific.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09515-6
       
  • Amending China’s Notion of a “Consumer”: Lessons from Comparative
           Analysis of the PRC Consumer Protection Law

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      Abstract: Abstract Who does the law treat as a “consumer” and why does it matter' How should China’s notion of a “consumer” best be articulated within the law and applied in practice' This article will attempt to answer these intriguing questions by first focusing on the approach taken to define a “consumer” in China’s Law on the Protection of Consumer Rights and Interests before examining the legal notion of a “consumer” in comparative perspective, in order to further understand the competing rationales behind the consumer protection law. This article will explore this Chinese definition of a “consumer” to propose how China’s vague and unworkable statutory definition of a ‘consumer’ should be amended in future.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09518-3
       
  • Long-term Energy Cost Labelling for Appliances: Evidence from a Randomised
           Controlled Trial in Ireland

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      Abstract: Abstract Given the longevity of investments in energy-consuming products (such as household appliances, vehicles, and properties), underinvestment in energy efficiency can have long-lasting negative economic and environmental consequences. Previous research has indicated that underinvestment may be due to imperfect information in relation to the long-term benefits of investing in energy efficiency. This paper presents the results of a cluster randomised controlled trial examining an intervention which aims to overcome this information deficit by providing long-term energy cost information on appliances in an electrical retail chain in Ireland. Two treatments are considered: a label showing 10-year energy cost information based on typical usage for four appliance categories (fridge freezers, dishwashers, washing machines, and tumble dryers); and a second treatment which supplements this label with a QR code where consumers can gain personalised cost estimates based on their expected appliance usage. Results indicate that neither of the treatments resulted in an increase in the average energy efficiency of appliances sold. Also, engagement of customers with the QR code was extremely low. Given that the newly designed EU energy labels incorporate QR codes for personalisation, this low usage suggests that this element of the new labels may be ineffective in increasing the uptake of energy efficiency. Finally, a customer survey suggests that while the treatment increased the stated importance of energy efficiency in decision-making, this did not translate into an increase in efficiency of products purchased, i.e., stated preferences for energy efficiency did not translate into revealed purchasing preferences.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09516-5
       
  • Book Notes “Law” 1/2022

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      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09517-4
       
  • The Unreliability of Online Review Mechanisms

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      Abstract: Abstract Online reviews have an undeniable impact on the market and are an important source of consumer information. From a legal perspective, online reviews actively influence consumers’ decisions to enter into a contract. Moreover, online reviews convey pre-contractual information that consumers find relevant and easy to understand, unlike the pre-contractual information disclosed as a result of EU law–based information duties. From this perspective, online reviews could potentially be seen as a complement of the flawed EU law–based information paradigm and regulatory improvement options based on reviews could be explored. However, the unreliability of online reviews is an obstacle that haunts consumers, practitioners, regulators, and academics alike. This unreliability has previously been identified as a reason not to award online reviews a more significant role in the EU law–based regulatory framework of pre-contractual information in consumer contracts. This paper explores the merits of this argument by discussing how the unreliability of online reviews is currently regulated. This paper takes a broad perspective on regulation, focusing not only on EU consumer legislation, but also looking at standardization, soft law, self-regulation, and the role of national consumer authorities. Overall, this paper argues that there are sufficient measures in place to shift the debate from the unreliability of reviews to reviews’ potential role in the protection of consumer informational interests.
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09514-7
       
  • Economics of Consumer Protection: Contributions and Challenges in
           Estimating Consumer Injury and Evaluating Consumer Protection Policy

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      Abstract: Abstract The author examines the role of economics in consumer protection, drawing from her experience at the U. S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which has a dual mandate to promote competition and protect consumers. She compares the long established use of economics in competition law enforcement and policy to the relatively new application of economic analysis to consumer protection policy and law enforcement. She highlights contributions of economists to the development of consumer protection policy at the FTC and describes key questions involved in the economics of consumer protection policy. The focus of this article is on the definition and estimation of consumer injury from deceptive or unfair practices, including approaches to estimate consumer injury from lapses in data security and privacy policies and procedures. The paper brings together different strains of relevant economic literature, leading to a clearer exposition of alternative approaches to estimating consumer injury from an economic perspective. She also addresses, briefly, the debate over the role of behavioral economics in consumer policy, concluding that the appropriate tools for policymakers will vary depending upon their policy goals; policies appropriate to meet the goal of changing consumer choices in a particular direction may differ from policies suitable to meet the goal of improving the consumer information environment.
      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-021-09482-4
       
  • Financial Vulnerability, Financial Literacy, and the Use of Digital
           Payment Technologies

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study is to test the notion that the use of digital payment methods, such as paying with a mobile phone, increases the risk of financial vulnerability. Research from the USA indicates such a relationship, and we study whether this finding can be generalized to other countries. Motivated by recent changes in EU legislation related to financial transactions, we also examine willingness to use social media companies for money transfers along with sharing bank account information with third-party financial services. Exploiting data collected from a representative sample of the Norwegian adult population (n = 2202), we identify differences in financial behaviour and characteristics between users and nonusers of different digital payment methods. In contrast to US studies, we find that mobile payment users were less financially vulnerable than nonusers and those women were more likely users of digital payment technologies than men. Younger generations and those with low financial literacy were more financially vulnerable than others, although we did not find this to be related to the use of mobile payment or other digital payment methods. The results show that there is a need for more research from different countries outside of the USA to obtain an understanding of the consequences of increased digitalization of financial services. In addition, as COVID-19 has shifted a vast amount of spending online and these newer payment technologies have become more available, we need to gain a better understanding of how they influence financial behaviour.
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09512-9
       
  • Reading a Duty to Provide Accessible Pre-Contractual Information for
           Consumers with Disabilities into EU Consumer Protection Law

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper considers whether a duty to provide consumers with disabilities with pre-contractual information in an accessible format, or in an otherwise personalised format, can be read into EU consumer protection law. Such a duty could be regarded as a particular form of reasonable accommodation. The paper explores this issue in the context of three key consumer protection instruments: the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive, the Consumer Credit Directive, and the Consumer Rights Directive. The paper argues that the Directives should be interpreted in light of the EU’s obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) which addresses, inter alia, the accessibility of information. Whilst consumer protection is an area of shared competence between the EU and its Member States, the three Directives examined in the paper largely provide for “full harmonisation,” thereby limiting the scope Member States have for taking action in these fields. In light of this, the paper argues that the EU has, to a large degree, taken on responsibility for complying with the CRPD in these fields, and that the Directives should be interpreted in light of those obligations. The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights can further bolster a human rights compatible interpretation of EU consumer protection directives. The paper also considers the extent to which the Directives allow Member States some residual competences to set requirements concerning pre-contractual information for persons with disabilities. To the extent that such competences exist, the paper argues that CRPD-compatible minimum requirements for pre-contractual information provided to consumers with disabilities should be read into the Directives by the European Court of Justice. Establishing CRPD-compatible minimum requirements in this field would reduce the need for individual Member States to take action to comply with the CRPD, and therefore reduce the risk of divergent national standards which could undermine the internal market goals of the relevant Directives. The paper concludes that a duty to provide a de facto reasonable accommodation, in terms of accessible and additional information, can be read into the Consumer Credit Directive and the Consumer Rights Directive. A more limited duty, concerning only the provision of additional information for persons with disabilities, can be read into the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive. It is unclear whether case law of the Court of Justice can be interpreted as requiring the provision of accessible information under this last Directive.
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09513-8
       
  • Influence of European Law on Argentinian Consumer Law

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      Abstract: Abstract This article provides an overview on the social and political contexts of the rise of consumer legislation in Argentina, on the development of consumer law in Argentina and its substance as well as on the potential influence of EU consumer law, the consumer law of other South American countries and from international organizations.
      PubDate: 2022-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09509-4
       
  • Private International Consumer Law in MERCOSUR: The Influence of European
           Regulations on Its Creation

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      Abstract: Abstract This article aims to analyse whether the MERCOSUR rules that comprise Private International Consumer Law, in terms of definition, international jurisdiction, and applicable law, were influenced by existing regulations in the European Union, especially the Rome Convention of 1980 and the Brussels Convention of 1968, later transformed into European Union regulations. To do so, the article examines the Law of MERCOSUR, so that, through descriptive and comparative normative methods, it is possible to highlight to what extent the law produced in MERCOSUR gathers the solutions of European norms and with respect to what aspects it has departed from them, perhaps offering greater protection to cross–border consumers.
      PubDate: 2022-02-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09504-9
       
  • The Impact of Tax Refund Delays on the Experience of Hardship Among
           Lower-Income Households

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      Abstract: Abstract The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) provides substantial financial support to low-income workers in the USA, yet around a quarter of EITC payments are estimated to be erroneous or fraudulent. Beginning in 2017, the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 requires the Internal Revenue Service to spend additional time processing early EITC claims, delaying the issuance of tax refunds. Leveraging unique data, this paper investigates how delayed tax refunds affected the experience of hardship and unsecured debt among EITC recipients. Results indicate that early filers experienced increased food insecurity relative to later filers after the implementation of the refund delay.
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-021-09501-4
       
  • The Car Cushion Hypothesis: Bigger Cars Lead to More Risk
           Taking—Evidence from Behavioural Data

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      Abstract: Abstract Car traffic and accidents involving cars create an enormous societal cost, particularly in terms of negative consequences for public health. Mitigating these effects is a daily concern for public and private institutions and people around the world. At least a subset of accidents is attributable to the amount of risk drivers allow in their driving and in related behaviour like mobile phone use or substance abuse. Our study looks at the effect of car size on risk taking. While literature highlights several behavioural effects of car size, the direction of causality of these effects is not always clear, and empirical evidence is lacking. Two behavioural and consequential studies support that car size affects risk taking in driving and that this increase in risk taking generalizes to other domains as well. Based on these results and in line with literature showing that social stability and security can affect financial risk taking, we propose the “car cushion hypothesis.” This hypothesis suggests that bigger cars make people feel more secure, which affects their behaviour in terms of generalized risk taking. We discuss policy implications aimed at contributing to reducing the societal and public health cost of car traffic.
      PubDate: 2022-02-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-022-09511-w
       
  • Choice Architectures in the Digital Economy: Towards a New Understanding
           of Digital Vulnerability

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      Abstract: Abstract In the digital economy, consumer vulnerability is not simply a vantage point from which to assess some consumers’ lack of ability to activate their awareness of persuasion. Instead, digital vulnerability describes a universal state of defencelessness and susceptibility to (the exploitation of) power imbalances that are the result of the increasing automation of commerce, datafied consumer–seller relations, and the very architecture of digital marketplaces. Digital vulnerability, we argue, is architectural, relational, and data-driven. Based on our concept of digital vulnerability, we demonstrate how and why using digital technology to render consumers vulnerable is the epitome of an unfair digital commercial practice.
      PubDate: 2021-12-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10603-021-09500-5
       
 
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