Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
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    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
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    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
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    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Food Research and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gesunde Pflanzen     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
International Journal of Consumer Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Consumer Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Consumer Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Consumer Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Consumer Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
Journal of Islamic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Marketing Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the Association for Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Major Gifts Report The     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Consumer Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.992
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1469-5405 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2900
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • I am a virtual girl from Tokyo: Virtual influencers, digital-orientalism
           and the (Im)materiality of race and gender

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      Authors: Esperanza Miyake
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      By focussing on Imma – a virtual influencer from Japan – this article provides a critical examination of Japanese raciality and gender within the context of virtuality, (im)materiality and digital consumption. This piece has two key concerns. Firstly, the article proposes the idea of semiotic immaterialism as a way to theorise the ‘virtual influencer’, a relatively new phenomenon in ‘the West’ to emerge from the consumer-driven world of social media and online influencers. Here, the discussion will focus predominantly on the various racialised and gendered (im)materialities involved in the digital consumption of virtuality, and its relationship to prosumerist practices online. Secondly, this study also problematises the ways in which ‘Western’ popular media texts present Japanese virtuality to consumers. It is argued that these constitute digital-Orientalist discourses of racialised and gendered Japanese Otherness. How does virtuality complicate the idea of (im)material consumption' How do virtual influencers challenge and/or reinforce normative ideologies of race and gender' Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the study addresses these questions through textual analyses conducted on Imma’s Instagram images and captions, alongside ‘Western’ popular media texts about Imma. Ultimately, it is argued that Imma, as a virtual influencer, represents how the (im)materiality of Japanese race and gender is materialised through the digital- and self-Orientalist commodification of Japanese virtuality.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T07:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221117195
       
  • Flaneuring the buyosphere: A comparative historical analysis of shopping
           environments and phantasmagorias

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      Authors: Federico Castigliano
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This paper proposes a comparative historical analysis of shopping environments, focusing on the aesthetic experience they offer to the consumer and underscoring their nature as phantasmagorias. At a time when digital disruption, exacerbated by the recent pandemic, has dramatically changed social habits and the cityscape, this research aims to investigate the impact of technological and social transformations on the buyosphere and the practice of shopping. The approach's original perspective looks at the close correlation between the flâneur and the consumer, examining how retail spaces in the modern metropolis have developed. The shopping experience is shown as a social ritual with complex facets, where the urban walker and the cityscape have gradually transformed, giving symbolic meaning to architectural forms and human identities. The findings of this study call for considering the opportunities and threats of the present scenario. The shift to the virtual realm has created new forms of phantasmagoria, such as the immersive experience in the brand's universe combined with omnichannel strategies. At the same time, the “retail apocalypse” and the reduction of spaces for wandering may risk limiting social encounters, the freedom of movement, and the individual's ability to interpret urban reality, elements that once defined the practice of flânerie.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T12:58:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221111454
       
  • Journal of Consumer Culture

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      Authors: Sidonie Naulin
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.

      PubDate: 2022-06-21T06:49:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221108918
       
  • The evolving moral economy of indebtedness in Chile: resignifying credit
           and debt in the oldest neoliberal society

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      Authors: Alejandro Marambio-Tapia
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Credit is ubiquitous in the life of Chilean households, the oldest neoliberal society. It is a key feature in the budgeting, shopping, and consuming practices of families. Consequently, to be indebted is a normal expectation in Chile. Families engage with the ‘necessary evil’ of credit in different ways, representing a massive, regular use of credit as short, medium and long-term leverage tools, with store cards being the main source of credit for lower and moderate income families in general. Moral obligations together with conventional and unconventional financial knowledge accompany the everyday situated economic practices of families.Addressing both the normalisation and the moralisation of credit, I attempt to make the case for the ongoing resignification of credit and debt and the evolving moral assessments of indebtedness, focusing on moderate and low-income households, namely those who embrace credit during recent decades. This article contributes to the discussion about the meaning of debt, to understand the financialisation of everyday life by looking at situated economic practices, and to recognise the social, moral and relational foundations of the economic practices. From the coming of the expansion of credit, households have learnt to deal with economic rationalities and internal and external moral judgements in order to justify their use of credit. Together with structural factors, this develops indebtedness assessments from detachment to naturalisation, placing credit and debt in the centre of ‘decent life’ expectations.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T07:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221100383
       
  • Book Review: Fashioning China: Precarious creativity and women designers
           in Shanzhai culture

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      Authors: Shiyu (Sharon) Zheng
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T07:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221107065
       
  • Consuming the city: People-watching and dialectics of everyday urban life

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      Authors: Mark Jayne
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Since being established at the vanguard of thinking about urban life during the late-eighteenth century, generations of theorists have opened-up sightlines, tackled blind-spots, and responded to challenges of theorizing and researching ‘seeing and being seen’. This paper contributes to that work by bringing into focus everyday experiences of people-watching. Drawing on auto-ethnographic/-biographic research from the UK, I sketch out the theoretical, empirical and methodological terrain needed to account for this mundane and often unspoken practice. In doing so, I outline how a research agenda focused on people-watching, consumer culture and dialectics of everyday life, politics, and imaginations adds-value to understanding of the complex and heterogeneous ways cities are consumed.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T11:19:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221103403
       
  • Men becoming fighters: Exploring processes of consumer socialization

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      Authors: Risto Moisio, Mariam Beruchashvili
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      The current paper examines how men are socialized to the ideal of fighter masculinity in the context of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), a combat sport mixing ground fighting and striking. Such work is timely because the fighter masculinity ideal underlies consumer cultural fascination with MMA, evident in advertising and branding of numerous fight promotions, lifestyle clothing and accessory brands, news and media channels, and fitness gyms. The theoretical focus on fighter masculinity addresses the paucity of research on how consumer identities are socialized. Utilizing long interviews with male amateur practitioners of MMA, the current research elucidates identity socialization as a multi-influence process that unfolds over an extended period in men’s lives. The findings uncover four novel consumer identity socialization processes: awakening, sanctioning, glamorizing, and incorporating, each associated with distinct socialization contexts and influences that enhance the resonance of fighter masculinity. This research also highlights the need to broaden consumer socialization frameworks in line with the post-cognitive notion of cultural enculturation.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T08:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221088920
       
  • Prosumer activism: The case of Britney Spears’ Brazilian fandom

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      Authors: Otávio Daros
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      The key argument of this article is that fan communities create, in their own way, a kind of prosumer media activism. Through a netnographic approach, I analyze aspects of fan labor and value creation, self-organization and entrepreneurship, agency and exploitation in an online discussion forum about the American singer Britney Spears in Brazil. Based on this case study on social networking, I develop the argument that it is possible to see digital fandom as a stage for a commodified cyberactivism, in which some social actors in the role of prosumers, on the one hand, exercise their freedom and find, more than gratification, ways to project themselves individually in society. But, on the other hand, they are subject to exploitative relationships, such as unpaid work, to promote the personality whose concrete relationship with their lives often does not go beyond media practices.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T07:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221103411
       
  • Cultural stratification in the UK: Persistent gender and class differences
           in cultural voraciousness

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      Authors: Tally Katz-Gerro, Oriel Sullivan
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This paper adds to the literature on cultural stratification by revisiting cultural voraciousness, nearly two decades after it was first introduced as a measure of cultural participation designed to capture inequalities in the pace and variety of cultural activities. Specifically, using the UK 2014–15 Time Use Survey, we compare measures of cultural voraciousness in the UK in 1998 and 2015, focussing in particular on the way cultural voraciousness is associated with both gender and class. We find continuity over time in the patterns of relationship between cultural voraciousness, gender and class, which are not explained by income or hours worked. While women at the bottom of the class scale are still the most disadvantaged in terms of unequal access to cultural participation, high level managerial women now equal equivalent men in their voracious cultural participation. We conclude that not only is cultural voraciousness still useful in depicting cultural inequalities delineated by gender and class, and not only do gender and class gaps in cultural voraciousness persist over time, but also that there is evidence for accentuated class inequality over time in cultural voraciousness among men and among women.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T01:42:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221100388
       
  • Lifestyles of enough exploring sufficiency-oriented consumption behavior
           from a social practice theory perspective

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      Authors: Maren I Kropfeld
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement requires absolute reductions of consumption levels, which implies changing consumption behavior toward more sufficiency-oriented practices. So far, these practices have mostly been researched in the areas of mobility and household-related activities. Therefore, this paper reviews sufficiency-oriented practices in other areas of consumption. A configurative literature review rendered eight relevant studies investigating nine different sufficiency-oriented consumption practices, seven of which related to clothing consumption. By aggregating and structuring the practices’ elements, insights into the materials, competences, meanings, and rules connected to sufficiency-oriented lifestyles could be made. In the area of clothing especially, high quality, durable, and repairable products as well as the ability to reflect critically on one’s consumption behavior are the basis for engaging in sufficiency-oriented practices. Tools and shared spaces as well as community events facilitate practices that encourage modal shifts of consumption or contribute to product longevity. The meanings behind these practices stretch from altruistic, environmentally conscious motivations such as a great concern for the environment to more egoistic or economic-related motives such as saving money. First implications of using social practice theory as a heuristic to research consumption behavior indicate that sufficiency-oriented practices offer various angles and opportunities, not only through consumer education but also by providing the right materials, spaces, and skills, to support more environmentally friendly “Lifestyles of Enough”.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-05-15T12:18:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221095008
       
  • Consumer parenting, cultural processes, and the reproduction of class
           inequality

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      Authors: Sergio A. Cabrera
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the cultural processes a group of middle-class parents engage in to manage tensions between their classed sense of proper consumer-parenting and their children’s consumer interests and desires. Based on analysis of qualitative data from interviews with parents with young children living in a middle-class neighborhood in Austin, Texas, I highlight the cultural practices through which parents acquiesce to their children’s desires without compromising their own classed consumer norms. Specifically, in this article I highlight the cultural processes through which middle-class parents (1) draw distinctions between spending on objects and spending on experiences, and (2) engage in intra-group “circuits of commerce” through which class actors confer positive shared meanings and moral understandings to otherwise excessive or “bad” consumer spending. Examining the ways in which parents were able to provide many of the “cheap” consumer goods their children desire without compromising their classed consumer norms provides insights into class boundaries in contemporary U.S. society as well as the role of consumerism and consumer culture in the reproduction of class inequalities.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:49:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221095001
       
  • The right to shine: Poverty, consumption and (de) politicization in
           neoliberal Brazil

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      Authors: Rosana Pinheiro-Machado, Lucia Mury Scalco
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the political impacts on the poor’s subjectivity provoked by neoliberal policies such as inclusion through consumption in 21st century Brazil. From 2009 to 2014, we carried out ethnographic research with new consumers in a low-income neighbourhood – Morro da Cruz – in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. We argue that consumption does not necessarily depoliticize human experience, as it is broadly assumed to have done in the scholarly literature on neoliberalism. In a society in which the poor has obtained goods through hierarchical and servile relationships, the possibility of buying things provides a micro sphere for recognition, though not in terms of classic collective action or even hidden subversion. Coupled with the momentum towards a national ‘economic emergence’, status goods became vehicles of an emergent subjectivity, which we conceptualize as ‘the right to shine’. The right to shine are subtle forms of class and racial self-worth, and individual and interpersonal empowerment that revealed interclass defiance.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T10:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221086066
       
  • The consumer, the market and the universal aristocracy: The ideology of
           academisation in England

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      Authors: Tom Hoctor
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In 2018, academies accounted for 72% of all English secondary schools, compared to 6% in 2009. English academy schooling conforms to marketizing trends in international education reform, but Conservative politicians have also attempted to promote particular moral values. This article analyses the tensions between neoliberalism and neoconservatism and applies this analysis to a concrete debate taking place within the Conservative Party in the 2000s and 2010s. It uses arguments made by an illustrative group of Conservative politicians to explore and analyse the tension between these two reform trends. The aim of this article is twofold. Firstly, it will present the key arguments which were marshalled by a selection of thinkers affiliated with the Conservative Party in favour of educational reform. It will do this by analysing Conservative articulations of the failure of state education; the role of the consumer and the relationship between democracy and the market. Secondly, it will explore the degree to which marketizing and traditionalist impulses in education reform should be considered complimentary or contradictory. I will conclude by arguing that the parent-consumer functions as a vanishing mediator between neoliberal and neoconservative ideological positions.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T09:02:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221086068
       
  • Book Reviews: Eva Illouz The End of Love: A Sociology of Negative
           Relations

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      Authors: Alicia Denby
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221085617
       
  • Consumer sovereignty and the Greek economic crisis: (Dis)continuity of
           consumer sovereignty repertoires

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      Authors: Dimitris Lallas
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, I attempt to reformulate the (consumer) action and discourse, as these arise from the discourse of visitors at the biggest shopping mall in Athens. The qualitative data are derived from 20 semi-structured interviews conducted with visitors at The Mall Athens. The cultural-consumer repertoires of the participants, that is, their understanding, evaluation, and justification schemes of their consumer practices and desires, are analyzed from a constructionist point of view. The context of the ten-year-long Greek economic crisis is a promising field for the investigation of the concept, meaning, experience, and performance of consumer sovereignty. Hence, the very concept of consumer sovereignty is empirically “tested,” including its different conceptualizations and performances. In particular, two repertoires of consumer sovereignty arise, namely, the power of free hedonistic choice and the morose rational prudence, while the crisis critically mediates and raises issues of (dis)continuity for these two repertoires.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T01:36:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221086073
       
  • Supermarket tribes and the temple of Aldi: A comparison between the UK and
           Australia

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      Authors: Daniela Spanjaard, Lynne Freeman
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      This research began as an investigation into consumer responses to the increasing number of supermarket own brands appearing in the grocery aisles of Australia when compared with the United Kingdom (UK) where retailer brands tend to dominate. Where the study ended was with the revelation of consumer ‘supermarket tribes’ and that this connectedness is linked to the consumption space as a way to endorse a lifestyle. We propose that the significance of spatial structure to ordinary practices, such as grocery shopping, may have been previously overlooked due to assumptions around its relative unimportance, when in fact this activity makes a valuable contribution to the culture of consumption. People do not always make economically rational decisions and instead support cultural theories that their lives are fashioned around the consumption experience, which ultimately contributes to their multiple realities. This study reveals that these realities can be made up of a series of fleeting moments as part of a grocery shop from which a perceived uniqueness, or not, is formed, and this is influenced by different market offerings. This was an unexpected outcome. Using a mix of focus groups and ethnographic data, we uncovered the presence of consumer tribes within the UK market, but which were not replicated in Australia. The exception to this was Aldi, where Australian shoppers revealed higher devotion to the store. This article contributes to theory by investigating the presence of consumer tribes for supermarket retailers where the number of different stores, and the type of customer interactions influence the likelihood of such a phenomenon to occur. This is a departure from the conventional retailer perspective and recognising this change to consumer expectations and consumption is important for retailer growth and improved market presence.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:56:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211073080
       
  • Overlaps and accumulations: The anatomy of cultural non-participation in
           Finland, 2007 to 2018

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      Authors: Riie Heikkilä, Taru Lindblom
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      There is a fervent belief that culture is, among other desirable ideals, “good for you.” This has been the baseline of the cultural policies in many countries. Through cultural policies, some forms of cultural participation over others are subvented through public funding, which makes it yet more important to ask which groups intentionally withdraw—or are left out—from which forms of it. We address the debate on cultural non-participation by scrutinizing nationally representative and longitudinal survey data from Finland, a Nordic welfare country with allegedly low social and cultural hierarchies, for years 2007 and 2018. We explore the changes in cultural non-participation by asking whether the main frequencies of cultural non-participation have changed between 2007 and 2018, what forms of different cultural non-participation patterns can be distinguished, and which socioeconomic factors best predict which form of cultural non-participation most in both years. Finally, we ask whether certain everyday forms of participation would compensate or complement non-existing cultural participation. We find three main cultural non-participation patterns: highbrow avoidance, mainstream avoidance, and nightlife avoidance. While the changes in non-participation look small from the macro level, their internal dynamics face a steep change between 2007 and 2018. Especially higher education becomes a continuously more significant factor for any kind of cultural activity. We also show that cultural participation is not compensated by everyday activities as often claimed in the literature, but that cultural and everyday non-participation overlap. Our results indicate that the alleged egalitarianism in Finland does not reach cultural participation: avoiding most forms of participation is more and more related to socio-economic differences reflecting social and cultural hierarchies.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T09:27:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211062052
       
  • ‘He wouldn’t be seen using it…’ Men’s use of male grooming
           products as a form of invisible consumption

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      Authors: Angela Byrne, Katie Milestone
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Skincare products are well-established amongst female consumers. The market for male skincare products is far more recent and little research has been undertaken on this emerging sector. The practice of men using what was traditionally a product almost solely aimed at women poses some interesting questions about changing gendered identities and practices. Themes emerged from a series of interviews with respondents and key informants from industry about men’s use of skincare products. Based on our findings, we explore the importance of age as a factor in terms of men’s willingness to engage with this form of consumption. Our research showed that men are not comfortable talking with others about their grooming practices. We argue that men’s skincare consumption is an invisible form of consumption. As our findings show, men do not tend to speak openly about whether or not they use moisturiser and other facial skin care products. We concur with Hakim’s (2016) analysis about the pressure for men to continually improve their bodies in order to try to obtain market advantage in a cut-throat neoliberal context. However, with the case of skin care products, men may introspectively gaze in the mirror in contemplation of their improved appearance gained from using facial skincare products but they want this consumption to remain invisible to others. This invisible consumption could be viewed as an indication of wider uncertainty about masculinity in late modernity and the continuing trend for men to feel that there are certain aspects of their life that they feel they should keep to themselves.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T07:58:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211066314
       
  • Governing individuals’ imaginaries and conduct in personal finance: The
           mobilization of emotions in financial education

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      Authors: Daniel Maman, Zeev Rosenhek
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Today’s regime of financialized capitalism requires individuals to engage with financial products and services to ensure their financial security and welfare. Within this regime, institutional actors formulate and communicate imaginaries of the future that prompt individuals to embrace particular financial logics, understandings, and practices in managing their personal finance. Financial literacy and education is an important institutional field where such imaginaries are formulated and communicated to the public. This article examines the notions and themes articulated in programs of financial education currently conducted by state and non-state organizations in Israel, considering the ways in which proper conduct in key financial activities (debt and credit, saving and investment, and insurance) is defined, explained, and justified. We argue that, replete with explicit and implicit references to emotions and emotional states associated with practices of everyday finance, these programs mobilize them to govern individuals’ imaginaries of the future and financial conduct according to the model of the desired responsible financial subject. This emotional dimension represents a significant component in the cultural political economy of the constitution of financial subjectivities and the culture of financialization, that naturalizes the behavioral and dispositional requirements and demands that everyday finance poses to the general public.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T07:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211069952
       
  • Shopping while Black: Consumer racial profiling in America

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      Authors: David Crockett
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T06:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211050125
       
  • Platform urbanism in a pandemic: Dark stores, ghost kitchens, and the
           logistical-urban frontier

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      Authors: Aaron Shapiro
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      As demand for e-commerce surged during the COVID-19 pandemic, investors began pouring billions into start-ups promising to accelerate digitization and automation in small-margin, winner-take-all sectors, such as retail, grocery, and dining. I examine two business models that feature prominently in this swell of financial optimism: dark stores and ghost kitchens. Both sacrifice consumer-facing real estate to create logistical spaces for online order fulfillment, and both are predicted to become permanent fixtures of the post-pandemic economic landscape. However, few have commented on the consequences of this future-in-the-making or who is likely to suffer them. The essay therefore anticipates how “going dark” may impact consumers, workers, and urban geographies. I argue that going dark represents a new threshold in the spatial materialities and financial imaginary of platform urbanism, what I call the logistical-urban frontier. I theorize how this frontier threatens historically disenfranchised urban communities, and I conclude the essay with a reflection on the conflicted temporalities of logistical speculation.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T03:49:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211069983
       
  • Between Wellness and Elegance: Yoga Consumption in China

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      Authors: Li Jingwei
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      Yoga has become prevalent as a fitness choice in China. Its commercial development is based on imported knowledge and is also constructed through a traditional way of interpretation, reflecting the localization of an “exotic” body technique. Although the related literature focuses primarily on Western and South Asian societies, the subjectivities of a new yoga “school” require examination for a better evaluation of present theory. By combining historical analysis, personal interviews, and auto-ethnography, this article investigates yoga from different perspectives to illustrate the practice’s social connotations. Particularly, this study shows how yoga has experienced continuous translation and transformation during the interaction of interpreters and learners, and eventually become a consumption category associated with “wellness” and “elegance.” Incorporating ontological anthropology and Pierre Bourdieu’s theory, this article defines yoga as a multi-faceted habitus mediated among scenarios constructed by different actors, which sets with the time lag between the Chinese present and the past originated from the west and India. In this process of cross-cultural practice, yoga reveals two sets of conflicting values that embody the particularities of Chinese discourse.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T11:11:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211062063
       
  • Book review: The end of love: A sociology of negative relations polity

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      Authors: Alicia Denby
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T04:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405221074559
       
  • Remembering summer in the city: Production and consumption of yanqishui in
           twentieth-century Shanghai

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      Authors: Liang Yao
      Abstract: Journal of Consumer Culture, Ahead of Print.
      By investigating the history of how yanqishui, originally a drink for factory heatstroke prevention, changed from welfare in the Mao years to a popular drink in post-socialist Shanghai, this article attempts to show the historical continuity of consumption in modern China and that the understanding of consumption patterns must be rooted in a local context. Using archives, local newspapers, memoirs, and interviews, the article explores the symbolic meanings of yanqishui before China’s 1978 reforms, which have left a deep impression on the Chinese masses and continuously impacted consumption thereafter. It argues that the popularity of yanqishui in contemporary Shanghai, to an extent, represents some kind of nostalgic consumption. However, instead of a nationwide sentiment, the nostalgia is sometimes local. As the biggest commercial center and then an industrial core in China’s modern history, Shanghai left people special memories on yanqishui that have greatly shaped the local consumer culture.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Culture
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T01:27:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14695405211062065
       
 
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