Subjects -> BEAUTY CULTURE (Total: 22 journals)
    - BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)
    - PERFUMES AND COSMETICS (2 journals)

BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Achiote.com - Revista Eletrônica de Moda     Open Access  
American Journal of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Corps et culture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Studies in Fashion & Beauty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Dress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Fashion and Textiles     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Flavour and Fragrance Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ground Breaking     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cosmetic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Materiali di Estetica     Open Access  
Media, Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Mind Culture and Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Parallax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Professional Beauty     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Transactions of the Burgon Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ZoneModa Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
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Media, Culture & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.846
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-4437 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3675
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • In memoriam: Enrique Bustamante Ramírez

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      Authors: Philip Schlesinger
      Pages: 981 - 983
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Volume 43, Issue 6, Page 981-983, September 2021.

      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T12:16:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211040526
      Issue No: Vol. 43, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Mediatisation and the construction of what is morally right and wrong in
           contemporary business

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      Authors: Magnus Frostenson, Maria Grafström
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The recent discussion on mediatisation prompts questions about how it arises and how social spheres are marked by it. In this article, we use business as an example of a social sphere to show that the production of normativity by and through the media is a central aspect of mediatisation. The empirical case of the article is the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Six specific techniques were used by the media to construct the case as an instance of corporate misbehaviour that met public recognition. The techniques are instrumental in forming the predicament of a modern mediatised business sphere, it is argued.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T11:42:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211048369
       
  • Keep it Oakland: e-commerce meets social justice

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      Authors: Tamara Kneese
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the labor involved with the upkeep of social media accounts for Oakland-based brick-and-mortar boutiques and their digital storefronts, particularly as businesses move their wares online during shelter-in-place amid the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Focusing on independent shops in Oakland, California, particularly those which are part of Oakland’s Indie Alliance – a coalition of independent small business owners – this article explores the role of shop workers in producing the authentic aesthetics of themselves and store accounts as a replacement for brick-and-mortar shops. How do small-scale shop owners and clerks make platforms, which were not designed with their needs in mind, work for them' How does sellers’ performance of the local interface with a global digital marketplace and platform infrastructures' In what ways do existing racial hierarchies and structural inequalities affect shop personnel’s experiences of platforms and apps meant to facilitate business transactions' I focus on the Oakland Indie Alliance’s Covid Recovery and Repair funds, which employ social media and crowdfunding platforms or payment apps to provide assistance to local businesses, particularly those which are BIPOC and/or immigrant owned, connecting commercial and social justice oriented goals.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-10-07T12:40:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211048342
       
  • Time for a change: women, work, and gender equality in TV production

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      Authors: Susan Milner, Abigail Gregory
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses Acker’s concept of inequality regimes to analyze qualitative research findings on work-life balance and gender equality for women in British television production. Female survey respondents, focus group participants, and interviewees spoke of their subjective experience of gendered work practices which disadvantage women as women. These findings build on existing research showing gender disadvantage in the industry, leading to loss of human capital and a narrowing of the range of creative experience. They also show that growing numbers of women are seeking alternative modes of production, at a time of increased awareness of inequality. Such alternatives suggest that change is possible, although it is strongly constrained by organizational logics and subject to continued resistance, in line with Acker’s framework of analysis. Visibility of inequalities is the key to supporting change.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T12:49:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045525
       
  • Internet blackouts in Meghalaya: A case of emerging complexities in the
           digital age

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      Authors: Alexander Lewis Passah
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The paper is rooted in the observations from the two internet blackouts witnessed in Meghalaya in 2018 and 2019. The state is located in the North Eastern region of India and this study focuses on the Khasi population residing in the East Khasi Hills District. The study explores the complex role social media has played in information dissemination in the digital age. India currently leads the world in terms of internet blackouts and it has been imposed 538 times in the country. This phenomenon has become a reoccurring trend over the last few years with the rise in digital communications and technological affordances. The paper addresses the dualistic nature of social media and how it can be empowering on the one hand, and can also be a key contributor to mis(dis)information on the other. The study offers a non-digital centric approach by adopting digital ethnographic methods and offers insights into the social media practices and experiences of the Khasi participants as well as delving into the problematic nature of internet blackouts with respect to Meghalaya. Evidently, social media has become a space in which most individuals carry their identity, aspirations, views, history, and opinions.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T12:45:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045343
       
  • Remembering COVID-19: memory, crisis, and social media

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      Authors: Tracy Adams, Sara Kopelman
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Worldwide, pubic memory initiatives are attempting to memorialize the current COVID-19 crisis whilst it is still ongoing. The Picturing Lockdown collection is one such initiative, led by Historic England (HE), the UK’s statutory adviser on historic environment. Calling out to the public to submit photographed experiences of lockdown to both its website and via social media, HE recruited the public to partake in a national memory-making endeavor. To examine memorialization practices of the present, this research asks: in an era of social media, how is an archive of an ongoing crisis represented' Using a qualitative method for visual and textual analysis, this research compares the official HE Picturing Lockdown archive collection and #PicturingLockdown on Instagram. Analysis reveals tensions in three spheres: the institutional, the temporal, and the spatial. Demonstrating the dynamism and “presentism” introduced by social media, this research illustrates how traditional practices of commemoration are shifting.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T12:15:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211048377
       
  • Marginality and otherness: the discursive construction of LGBT
           issues/people in the Ghanaian news media

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      Authors: Mark Nartey
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, LGBT issues have received substantial media attention and engendered heated public debate in Ghana. This paper analyzes the prejudiced construction of LGBT issues in the Ghanaian news media and how this contributes to a discriminatory discourse that demeans LGBT people and puts them at the periphery of Ghanaian society. The study employs a critical discourse analysis framework and a dataset of 385 articles, comprising news reports, op-ed pieces, and editorials. The analysis reveals that news content on LGBT issues is biased and inflammatory, and it frames LGBT people as expendables and undesirables. This is realized by exploiting three discourses, or forms of othering, that culminate into the (re)production and naturalization of moral panic: a discourse of amorality/immorality and societal destruction, a discourse of alienization, and a discourse of medicalization or pathologization. The paper concludes with a call for a more balanced and ethically/socially responsible news reporting, especially since LGBT issues in Ghana hold implications for national cohesion and security.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T11:00:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045552
       
  • Auto-communicative reconstruction of meaningfulness in musical randomness:
           reclaiming musical order on Facebook

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      Authors: Madis Järvekülg, Indrek Ibrus
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how music-specific communities on Facebook self-organize in and respond to the digital music ecosystem dominated by streaming platforms such as Spotify and their algorithmic restructuring of music. By building on earlier work on digital platforms as archives, we differentiate between the “old” and “new” orders of music cultures. We also utilize Juri Lotman’s cultural semiotics and his concepts of semiosphere and auto-communication to make sense of communicative self-ordering and memory work by music-related communities on Facebook in Estonia. Based on ethnographic observations and in-depth interviews with local music experts, we demonstrate how communities focused on record collecting, specific music genres or music quizzing work auto-communicatively, build shared memories, identities, and self-organize in order to resist the “new musical order” that has resulted from the datafication and platformization of music markets.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T10:58:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045513
       
  • Careful attunements: the choreographing of care and affective witnessing
           through media practices during, and after, crisis

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      Authors: Caitlin McGrane, Larissa Hjorth, Yoko Akama
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper takes a design anthropology approach to understanding the learnings, challenges and opportunities Victorians adopted to choreograph practices of care in and through media practice during and after the Australian 2019–2020 bushfire crisis. In doing so, we frame our inquiry from a perspective of how individuals and communities care through media practice. The study weaves together experiences around informal and formal crisis communication media – such as the government’s VicEmergency App, Australian and international news media and social media sharing – to map what we call the careful attunements of choreographing care.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T10:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211040952
       
  • Film distribution by video streaming platforms across Southeast Asia
           during COVID-19

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      Authors: Wang Changsong, Lucyann Kerry, Rustono Farady Marta
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic of COVID-19, which forced cinema theaters to close and left exhibitors without revenue over a long period, may have dramatically changed the film business and its future. This paper seeks to examine the changing dynamic of film distribution through video streaming in the Southeast Asia region as a result of the impact of the pandemic. Some films may be chosen for video streaming media platforms as their alternative option for release into theatrical distribution. This pandemic also has changed film-viewing habits and behaviors among audiences. Several news reports have substantiated that Southeast Asian viewers are streaming more online video content due to COVID-19. As a result of the pandemic it appears that there is an accelerated shift to streaming media platforms across Southeast Asia countries. Local streaming platforms feed users their unique and culturally distinctive locally produced content which could be distinguished from that offered by global players. In 2020, some new streaming media platforms were launched for distributing film content to their targeted markets locally and internationally. Through the use of a review of trade and business press as well as interview, this paper attempts to identify and present areas of regional change and regional players which deserve systematic discussion and analysis.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-15T06:45:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045350
       
  • Games and data capture culture: play in the era of accelerated
           neoliberalism

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      Authors: Rowan Tulloch, Craig Johnson
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The last decade has seen the rise of data capture culture. This culture has been most visible, and widely analysed, within the realm of social media; but it is not unique to that form. This article reconceptualises video games as apparatuses for data capture. We situate games within a broader economic and cultural shift towards a new ‘accelerated’ form of neoliberalism where individual choice and agency are pre-filtered and personalised by algorithms based on user data history. Through a survey of the changing role of data in video gaming, this article critically maps a new paradigm for a reimagined games industry driven by a logic of data capture. Gaming promises a unique opportunity for data capture capitalists to mine and commodify player preferences, behaviours and instinctual responses. Arguing that play is a process of uncovering hidden logics, we offer a framework for resisting the data capture hegemony. This is not simply a discussion of gaming, rather this is an attempt to outline the conditions of possibility for a critique of globalised digital culture in which populations are profiled, processed and punished by hidden algorithms of the market that are optimised to construct and reward accelerated performances of neoliberal subjectivity.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-13T01:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211045556
       
  • Infrastructure of life: public address, listening and crowds in the Delhi
           metro and Kumbh

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      Authors: Mehak Sawhney
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Through an ethnographic study of the Delhi metro and Kumbh fair, this article explores the public address system as an infrastructure of life in urban India. Amplified sound is the singular means to address crowds during emergencies which makes it significant for understanding mass mediation and public safety. Since millions of people travel in the Delhi metro every day, and the Kumbh fair is the largest human gathering in the world, human density and scale as a predominant Southern reality is the premise of this research. It offers an intersubjective understanding of crowds through empathy and care, and reveals the life-saving potentiality of infrastructures when the masses are at risk.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T08:50:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211037017
       
  • A digital platform for ethical advertising and hybrid business models for
           

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      Authors: Sergio Sparviero
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article suggests that the adoption of hybrid business models coupled with the establishment of an ethical advertising platform could help counter the emergence of news deserts. The latter are geographic areas and policy issues lacking coverage because of the crisis of the commercial model of news provision. Three clusters of characteristics are used to streamline and compare business models: (1) revenue models, (2) patrons and their motives, and (3) legal frameworks for the incorporation of the organization. Hybrid business models are designed by mixing the principles underpinning the Benefit Corporation or the Low-profit Limited Liability Company (L3C), with the basic characteristics of commercial and non-profit news organizations. The term ethical advertising refers to promotional activities that non-profits and other organizations dedicated to social goals normally undertake, including marketing, fundraising, or public-awareness campaigns. Based on data published by the Internal Revenue Services, this article argues that a digital platform for ethical advertising could face a demand worth over $1 billion a year. Additionally, this platform could effectively match non-profits’ demand for an audience with a pro-social attitude with non-profit and hybrid news organizations’ need for additional revenue streams.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-27T12:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211040676
       
  • Media coverage of COVID-19 state surveillance in Israel: the
           securitization and militarization of a civil-medical crisis

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      Authors: Avi Marciano, Aya Yadlin
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Israel, traditionally known as a nation-in-arms, has been undergoing processes of securitization and militarization from its inception to the present day. While several countries have employed surveillance technologies to tackle the spread of coronavirus, Israel was the only country in the world to authorize its internal security agency to track citizens’ cellphones to deal with this civil-medical crisis. Employing a reflexive thematic analysis to news media outlets, this study examined coverage of Israel Security Agency (ISA) surveillance by four leading Israeli news sites, inquiring into the socio-cultural imageries, and motifs that informed their reports. While two of the sites were mostly supportive and the other two were critical, the coverage as a whole was informed by national security imageries reminiscent of Israel’s nation-in-arms tradition. Our discussion contextualizes these findings within a three-decade tension that has prevailed in Israeli society and culture between securitization/militarization and democratization/demilitarization.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-27T12:11:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211037008
       
  • Disinformation after Trump

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      Authors: Yiping Xia
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Disinformation research surged in the wake of the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election of Donald J. Trump. This essay reviews three book-length contributions published in 2020 and 2021. In doing so, I try to identify key developments in the field of disinformation research, and to contemplate next steps that may be of specific interest to readers of this journal. First, researchers are increasingly moving beyond a narrow obsession with technology in explaining and addressing disinformation. Second, not all authors reviewed here are convinced of the efficacy of media literacy education and fact-checking. Finally, considering limitations of the books reviewed here, I highlight the need for studies on marginalized communities and the Global South, as well as the potential of an embodied approach that may benefit a number of current perspectives on disinformation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T05:15:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211040684
       
  • Sensing the human: biometric surveillance and the Japanese technology
           industry

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      Authors: David Humphrey
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the Japanese biometrics industry and its discourse, with a focus on the language of biometric ‘sensing’ that has shaped its development over the past two decades. Rooted in the ubiquitous computing boom of the early 2000s, the language of sensing reimagines biometric technology as a mediator between the digital and the human, laying the foundation for biometric surveillance’s expansion into everyday settings such as retail ones. In these newer settings, biometric surveillance is promoted as a means for collecting data on human affect and behavior to be used for marketing and other applications. I argue that this growing ambiguity of biometric surveillance re-articulates a convergence between production and consumption, while it also informs safe society discourses and the shifting role of embodiment within digital culture.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-16T10:42:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211036996
       
  • Infrastructures for media ‘extension’: licensing trade expos and the
           production of media distribution

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      Authors: Dario Lolli
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on licensing – the practise of brand ‘extension’ – to investigate global media distribution as it contingently emerges from the infrastructural spaces of professional trade events. Licensing expos are not only aesthetic, legal and financial compounds that ‘produce’ media distribution by coordinating the exchange of economic assets and the provision of adaptations, ancillary goods and ‘scripted experiences’ for global blockbuster films and media franchises. They are also sites where diffuse forms of power circulate within and against the bodies of their attendees through assemblages of data, objects, architectures and repeatable technical standards. Through multi-sited participant observation at these affective infrastructures, the paper argues that the production of media distribution is inseparable from the production of subjectivities – of the professionals that make these events as well as the active audiences whose behaviours they aim at envisioning, preempting and shaping.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T10:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211037003
       
  • Look at me, I’m on TV: the political dimensions of reality
           television participation

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      Authors: Bethany Klein, Stephen Coleman
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      It has been over 20 years since the reality television genre attracted the attention of fans, critics and scholars. Reality programmes produced high viewing figures, suggesting a strong appetite for the form; critics dismissed the programmes as mindless and the participants as desperate for fame; and scholars assessed the formats, audiences and meanings of reality television, offering a complex, if rarely celebratory, account. While some commentators and scholars made connections between vote-based formats and electoral systems, or between opportunities afforded audiences for the deliberation of social issues and the idealized public sphere, the civic dimension of participation itself has not been explored. In this article, we take a closer look at reality television participants, drawing on press interviews and coverage in order to highlight how participants enact representative performances that might supplement more formal modes of democratic representation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T10:21:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211036979
       
  • Traumatic past in the present: COVID-19 and Holocaust memory in Israeli
           media, digital media, and social media

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      Authors: Liat Steir-Livny
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic began in 2019, spread to the rest of the world in 2020 and still holds nations in its grip in 2021. There is scant research on the way it has affected Holocaust awareness. Based on scholarly work on Holocaust awareness in Israel, the top-down memory of the Holocaust in the media and the vernacular Holocaust memory on social media, this article analyzes the ways the Holocaust became a frame of reference in Israel for the interpretation of the COVID-19 pandemic and the newest link in a long chain of using the Holocaust as a prism for other topics in Israeli society. The article centers on the evolution of the COVID-19 – Holocaust references and the role of media and social media in it. It shows that the initial panic created a wave of comparisons between the Holocaust and the pandemic in the media and social media. In the second half of the year, as the restrictions and two more lockdowns became part of life, references to the Holocaust changed – negative reactions to COVID-19 government regulations and law enforcement were compared on social media to Nazi acts. The Israeli media did not create these comparisons but reported them widely and contributed to their circulation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T10:30:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211036997
       
  • The criminal trial as a live event: Exploring how and why live blogs
           change the professional practices of judges, defence lawyers and
           prosecutors

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      Authors: Lisa Flower, Marie-Sophie Ahlefeldt
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Live blogging from legal trials has become one of the most accessible ways in which the public can gain direct insight into legal proceedings, particularly in countries where television cameras are denied entry into the courtroom. Whilst live blogging constitutes an important way of ensuring the transparency and openness of legal processes and documents – a principle known as open justice and a key component of many democratic societies – the risks stemming from opening up the courts not only to more immediate and detailed scrutiny, but also to a larger, virtual audience are lesser known. A deeper understanding of how a legal trial’s transformation into a live event due to live blogs has impacted on the legal sphere is therefore needed. The aims of this article are thus twofold: to show how live blogs are changing legal professionals’ work practices and to discuss what it is about live blogs that leads to these changes in professional practices. The analysis draws on qualitative interviews with legal professionals in Sweden and Denmark and finds that live blogs increase reflection in professional performances stemming from an awareness of performing to a virtual audience. Surveillance thus leads to performance adjustment. Live blogs also lead to changes in professionals practices and transform the audience/participant boundary into a fluid one most notably regarding the Danish respondents in comparison to those in Sweden. The article also suggests a hierarchy of liveness with live blogs considered to be less intrusive than televised trials.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T12:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022730
       
  • Representing the victorious past: Chinese revolutionary TV drama between
           propaganda and marketization

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      Authors: Yingzi Wang, Thoralf Klein
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the changes and continuities in TV representations of Chinese Communist Party’s revolutionary history and interprets them within the broader context of China’s political, economic and cultural transformations since the 1990s. Drawing on a comparative analysis of three state-sponsored TV dramas produced between the late 1990s and mid-2010s, it traces how the state-sanctioned revolutionary narratives have changed over time in response to the Party’s propaganda imperatives on the one hand, and to the market-oriented production environment on the other. The paper argues that while recent TV productions in the new century have made increasing concessions to audience taste by adopting visually stimulating depictions and introducing fictional characters as points of identification for the audience, the revolutionary narratives were still aligned with the Party’s propaganda agenda at different times. This shows the ongoing competition between ideological and commercial interests in Chinese TV production during the era of market reforms.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T12:50:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022721
       
  • Mimicking the mimics: problematizing cover performance of Filipino local
           music on social media

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      Authors: Carljohnson Anacin, David Baker, Andy Bennett
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The performance of cover songs in popular music has long been a subject of critical discussion and debate due to the artistic, social, cultural, and commercial issues that covers raise. In non-Western societies, most popular songs covered by artists are Anglo-American, a situation which implicitly privileges Western music and reinforces both the “west and the rest” trope and the cultural imperialism thesis. Taking American amateur artists and their online videos performing Filipino popular music as case studies, this article examines how social media platforms facilitate and problematize center-periphery relations in popular music through a diffusion of cultural products “from the rest to the west.” Moreover, we show that more than the promise of audience reach, the phenomenon reflects how these cover artists embody cultural and social situatedness in Filipino culture. As they mimic the mimics, they also embody an identity in motion.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T12:16:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029888
       
  • From audiences to data points: The role of media agencies in the
           platformization of the news media industry

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      Authors: Ida Willig
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Media agencies have become one of the key actors in the contemporary media industry: by channelling marketing budgets to some media and some platforms and not to others, media agencies play an important role in creating the digital media infrastructure and laying the tracks of the public sphere. Yet we know very little about these commercial middlemen between advertisers and audiences, what they do, and how we should understand their role in the digital media ecology. This article discusses the role of media agencies in relation to platformization with a focus on the news media sector. Based on interviews, publicly available material and trade journals, the article depicts an industry deeply engaged in digitizing, tracking and commodifying media audiences, while at the same time aware of ethical challenges of the digital media infrastructure. This leads to a call for more political attention and critical research on the democratic implications of the new value chains between platforms, advertisers, audiences, media agencies and news media as well as the many tech companies providing derived digital services and products.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T05:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029861
       
  • How propagames work as a part of digital authoritarianism: an analysis of
           a popular Chinese propagame

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      Authors: Matthew Ming-Tak Chew, Yi Wang
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      “Propagames,” or games with propagandistic content, have been emerging in the past two decades. They operate as a part of digital authoritarianism, together with other forms of new soft propaganda, to legitimate populist authoritarian states around the world. The contemporary democratic struggle against global authoritarian resurgence will require knowledge on how propagames and other digital propaganda work. But knowledge on propagames is seriously lacking compared to the voluminous scholarship on politically progressive, educational, and serious games. This study fills this research gap by analyzing the most popular propagame in China, Kangzhan Online (War of Resistance against Japan Online), and gamers’ reception of it. We begin with theoretical explorations of how to define propagames, how to demarcate them from other games with political content, and what role they play in digital authoritarianism. We eclectically borrow from four frameworks to analyze Kangzhan Online: the dual-process perspective, imaginary world studies, the sociology of collective memory, and the sociology of emotions. Our data include participant observation in the game for 3 months, formal interviews of 30 gamers, informal interviews with dozens of gamers, and documentary data from the official forum and the Chinese game media. The data were collected in 2009, 2010, and 2019.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T05:03:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029846
       
  • Agency and servitude in platform labour: a feminist analysis of blended
           cultures

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      Authors: Sai Amulya Komarraju, Payal Arora, Usha Raman
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Digital labour platforms have become important sites of negotiation between expressions of micro-entrepreneurship, worker freedom and dignity of work. In the Global South, these negotiations are overlaid on an already fraught relationship mediated by the dynamics of caste and culture, to the usual politics of difference. Urban Company (UC), an app-based, on-demand platform in India that connects service providers offering home-based services to potential customers, lists professionalised services that have hitherto been considered part of a ‘culture of servitude’, performed by historically marginalised groups afforded little dignity of labour. Such platforms offer the possibility of disrupting the entrenched ‘master-servant’ relationship that exists in many traditional cultures in the Global South by their ostensibly professional approach. While service providers now have the opportunity for self-employment and gain ‘respectability’ by being associated with the platform, UC claims to have leveraged AI to automate discipline in everything the providers do. Using interviews with UC women service providers involved in beauty work and software development engineers, this paper explores the agency afforded to service partners in both professional and personal spheres. Further, we propose the term blended cultures to think about the ways in which algorithms and human cultures mutually (re)make each other.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T11:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029890
       
  • Zimbabwean news media discourses on the intersection of abortion,
           religion, health and the law

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      Authors: Stacy Simelokuhle Nyathi, Mthokozisi Phathisani Ndhlovu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Even though abortion has a long history, it remains predominantly contentious due to religious, medical and legal constraints. For instance, in Zimbabwe, abortion is illegal except under limited circumstances. This has resulted in women resorting to unsafe abortion procedures, leading to an increase in individuals and groups calling for the liberalization of abortion laws. It is against this background that this article uses qualitative content analysis and rhetoric analysis to explore how Zimbabwean daily newspapers frame abortion in relation to religion, health and the law. It contends that the newspapers in question assume conflicting positions as the Chronicle largely condemns abortion while the Daily News boldly calls for its decriminalization. The NewsDay and The Herald, on the other hand, relatively tolerate abortion even though in some instances they condemn it. These findings demonstrate the active role of the news media in arguing for and against abortion to influence policy making.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T06:21:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029885
       
  • Transgender identity management across social media platforms

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      Authors: Justin Buss, Hayden Le, Oliver L Haimson
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Transgender people use social media for identity work, which takes place over time and across platforms. In this study, we interviewed 20 transgender social media users to examine transgender identity management across the social media ecosystem. We found that transgender social media users curate their social media experiences to fit their needs through creating accounts on different platforms, maintaining multiple accounts on individual platforms, and making active decisions about content they post, networks they are connected to, and content they interact with. In this way, transgender people’s social media curation is not limited to their own identity presentations, but also involves curating the content they see from others and whom they include in their networks. Together, these two types of online curation enable transgender social media users to craft social media worlds that meet their social and self-presentational needs.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-27T07:31:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211027106
       
  • Overseas media, homeland audiences: examining determinants of newsmaking
           in Deutsche Welle’s Amharic Service

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      Authors: Téwodros W Workneh
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Historically, the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia’s (FDRE) media environment faced a state apparatus that had been hostile to journalism practice. In particular, government-sponsored intimidation, jailing, and censorship of journalists paralyzed non-state journalistic institutions. With the political establishment’s hostility toward non-state press incapacitating credible journalism internally, foreign-based international and diasporic news outlets have enjoyed considerable following by Ethiopians. In the absence of reliable domestic news sources, Germany’s public international broadcaster Deutsche Welle (DW), alongside the Voice of America, has become arguably the most sought-after source of news in Ethiopia. Through data generated from interviews with newsroom staff, document analysis, and workflow observation, the purpose of this study is to examine newsmaking determinants in DW’s Amharic Service. The study identifies three major factors that influence newsmaking practices at DW Amharic, namely ideological determinants, geographic determinants, and audience-generated determinants. Ideological determinants mainly ascribe to the tensions between the host (Germany) and homeland (Ethiopia), emerging principally from the former’s mission of ‘a democratic export’ and the latter’s resistance to it. Geographic determinants enhanced journalistic safety at the expense of eyewitness reporting and sourcing triangulation. Finally, in engaging with audience-generated determinants, findings reveal how partisan political groups attempt to exert pressure on coverage and the mechanisms the newsroom implemented to navigate externally generated challenges of journalistic autonomy.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-27T07:30:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022724
       
  • More than a sex crime: a feminist political economy of the 2014 iCloud
           hack

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      Authors: Stephanie Patrick
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the media framing of and relations to the 2014 iCloud hack, wherein hundreds of female celebrities’ private photos were stolen and distributed online. In particular, I problematize the reading of this event as merely signalling the misogyny of ‘toxic’ online cultures and contextualize it as part of a larger political economy of female celebrity. I argue that, while the growth in feminist discourses emanating from both the mainstream media and celebrity women is encouraging, it perhaps occludes the broader power relations that extend across both new and traditional media, ensuring maintenance of the status quo. This event exemplifies problems with a popular form of feminism that seeks inclusion into these systems, rather than wider systemic change. Therefore, in addition to examining the celebrity and/or her audience as the site of political (feminist) work, I call for an excavation of the systems in which she is embedded and her relations to the means of media production and profit.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-27T07:28:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022713
       
  • Why journalism’s default neglect of temporality is a problem

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      Authors: Barbie Zelizer
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers the role of temporality in institutional settings, with particular emphasis on the positioning and impact of temporal choices—or their absence—in journalism. It first discusses why temporality is relevant to institutions like journalism and considers its two interrelated dominant manifestations in the news: nowness and firstness. It then addresses temporality in the current US coverage of the Trump administration. Finally, it considers the need for journalism’s reset, arguing that the combined effect of nowness and firstness promotes temporality’s neglect in the news and prevents the continual updating of the journalistic mindset from occurring.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211015846
       
  • Muslim like us: mobilizing minority identities in popular Australian
           entertainment media as sites of transnational representation

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      Authors: Benjamin Nickl
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of sustained interest in the mobilization of Muslimness beyond generic and hence immobile identity tropes, I consider how Australian mainstream television and film productions work to challenge and disrupt essentialist representations of Muslimness. Case studies feature two television series and a feature film, examined through the lens of transnational mobility theory and in the context of mediated anti-racism. The productions I discuss, ‘The Spice Journey’, ‘The Mosque Next Door’, and ‘Down Under’, all turn on intra- and inter-communal mobility of Muslim identities. They are part of a larger trend in popular media productions in current Australian film and on television, which reacts to Islamophobic sentiments in the country by drawing attention to embodied multiple subjectivities. Findings suggest that Australian entertainment media can add meaningful input to the diverse and complex negotiations of culture and identity among Muslims in Australia but may sidestep other forms of racism like anti-Indigeneity in the process.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022729
       
  • Beyond platform capitalism: critical perspectives on Facebook markets from
           Melanesia

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      Authors: Geoffrey Hobbis, Stephanie Ketterer Hobbis
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for a need to move beyond studies of platform capitalism and inter-capitalist struggles to also account for inter-economic struggles, the platformization of longstanding primarily non-capitalist societies, the same kind of societies that have conceptually inspired discussions of platforms as hi-tech gift economies. Based on longitudinal ethnographic fieldwork on digital transformations among the horticulturalist Lau of Malaita, Solomon Islands, we analyse horticulturalist adoptions and adaptations of Facebook. Specifically, we consider how informal bush markets are being digitized through online Buy and Sell groups. We show how Solomon Islanders use Buy and Sell Facebook groups to continue moral economic practices that emphasize the accumulation of wealth not in a capitalist, but in a relational sense, where economic activity primarily serves the creation and affirmation of relationships. Our findings, thus, challenge universalizing claims about the nature of platforms as one that is necessarily about the commodification, in a capitalist sense, of all social relations. Simultaneously, they call for more research on experiences of platformization at the margins of global capitalism and the ways in which not-so-average users are making platforms their own.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:57:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022714
       
  • Recognition for resistance: Gifting, social media, and the politics of
           reciprocity in South Korean energy activism

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      Authors: Su Young Choi
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for adopting the theoretical lens of gift exchange and reciprocity into the study of social movements and social media in an attempt to widen the horizon of the field of protest and media beyond its technological orientation. This lens invites us to see how protesters can build a movement strategically through the practice of gifting and the principle of reciprocity, and how such practices intersect with socially situated usages of digital media technologies to mediate and facilitate the politics of reciprocity. Based on an ethnographic analysis of energy activism in South Korea, the study suggests four necessary conditions for movement-building through culturally and technologically mediated forms of gift and reciprocity: pursuit of inclusive and open-ended alliances, prohibition of negative exchange, commitment to mutual interest aligned with shared movement goals, and the maintenance of voluntary and creative participation in gift exchange.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:41:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022715
       
  • Japanese scandals and their production

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      Authors: Igor Prusa
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This treatise conflates cultural sociology, media theory, and Japanese philology in order to better understand the way media scandals are produced in contemporary Japan. In cultural sociology, scandal is understood as a social performance between ritual and strategy. In my previous research I focused on the ritual aspect, analyzing Japanese scandals as dramatic public performances of confession, exclusion, and reintegration. In this treatise, I focus on the strategy aspect, approaching scandals as symbolic products of media routines and journalistic practices. The former part of this treatise examines how the actor-network of power circles co-defines the way scandals emerge and unfold in Japan. The latter part focuses on the role of Japanese media organizations in the process of transforming leaks into scandals.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022718
       
  • Netflix audience data, streaming industry discourse, and the emerging
           realities of ‘popular’ television

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      Authors: Michael L Wayne
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Using the media industry studies approach, this article provides a history of the industrial discourses surrounding Netflix’s audience data. From Netflix’s entry into the streaming market in 2007 until late-2018, the company did not publicize information about viewership. During this time, executives’ public discussions of proprietary data are understood in relation to multiple organizational goals: differentiating the streaming platform from the traditional television industry, denigrating traditional television industry practices, and deflecting criticism. In late-2018, the company began selectively publishing viewership numbers for a small number of original titles to highlight the popularity of the platform’s original content. Although the company maintains its anti-transparency policies, the shift toward selective data releases has significant implications regarding Netflix’s relationship with the traditional television industry. This analysis concludes with a discussion of streaming audience data that situates in the emerging realities of ‘popular’ television in the context the medium’s broader transformations and continuities.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022723
       
  • Virtual reality and celebrity humanitarianism: Rashida Jones in Lebanon

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      Authors: Bimbisar Irom
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The paper brings together two segments of contemporary humanitarian practice – celebrity advocacy and virtual reality (VR) – in order to more fully comprehend the relationship between emergent technologies and humanitarian advocacy efforts. Numerous VR documentaries intended to immerse audiences into the full experience of “distant suffering” have been crafted for audiences in the global North. Between 2015 and 2019, the United Nations invested in at least 21 VR documentaries covering crisis situations around the world. VR’s popularity is premised on the promise of bringing spectators and “distant sufferers” together through immersive experiences. Performances of humanitarian advocacy use traditional representational tools of Western humanitarian discourse. This leads to the question whether advocacy efforts using immersive VR flatten real and material differences that exist between sufferers and spectators in safe zones through the “illusion of co-suffering”' To what extent do such experiences risk “improper distance” by translating the irreducible alterity of other lives into familiar terms'
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:41:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022725
       
  • A market-based rationale for the privacy paradox

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      Authors: Opeyemi Akanbi
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Moving beyond the current focus on the individual as the unit of analysis in the privacy paradox, this article examines the misalignment between privacy attitudes and online behaviors at the level of society as a collective. I draw on Facebook’s market performance to show how despite concerns about privacy, market structures drive user, advertiser and investor behaviors to continue to reward corporate owners of social media platforms. In this market-oriented analysis, I introduce the metaphor of elasticity to capture the responsiveness of demand for social media to the data (price) charged by social media companies. Overall, this article positions social media as inelastic, relative to privacy costs; highlights the role of the social collective in the privacy crises; and ultimately underscores the need for structural interventions in addressing privacy risks.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-05-22T10:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211015843
       
  • Anatomy of a precarious newsroom: precarity and agency in Syrian exiled
           journalism in Turkey

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      Authors: Yazan Badran, Kevin Smets
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the precarisation of journalistic work by looking at the case of Syrian exiled journalists in Turkey, whose professional and personal lifeworlds are underpinned by multiple layers of precarity. The article builds on data collected during a 3-month-long period of participant observations at the newsroom of Enab Baladi, a Syrian news outlet based in Istanbul, Turkey. It develops a relational notion of precarity through insights from the growing body of work on precarity in the journalistic field, as well as research on precarity and migration. It proposes a multidimensional understanding of the ‘precarious newsroom’ that takes into account the people, organisation and place, as a way to map how different layers of precarity, and responses to them, are articulated, experienced and negotiated. Our research underlines the complex anatomy of the precarious newsroom as a paradoxical place and an amalgamation of precarity and agency.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T11:48:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211011556
       
  • Work, play, and precariousness: An overview of the labour ecosystem of
           esports

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      Authors: Mark R Johnson, Jamie Woodcock
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Professionalised competitive digital gaming or ‘esports’ has grown to a point where millions of dollars are being awarded in competitions watched globally by tens of millions of viewers. Previous analyses of the phenomenon have examined the role(s) of labour in esports performed by various actors – players, tournament organisers, sponsors, game developers – but these have yet to be unified into a ‘big picture’ of esports labour, especially when considering the relationships between the labour performed by different esports actors. In this paper we therefore present a comprehensive overview of the labour that different actors within the emerging Esports ecosystem perform, and how they intersect and influence each other in order to contribute to the existence of this highly contemporary phenomenon. In doing so we show that the rapid growth of Esports has created new labour processes and forms of work, transformed existing ones, yielded new career options, and tremendous profits to be made by a range of involved actors. Esports’ emerging position as a major global industry both within gaming and within contemporary media more broadly demands close attention to its work, its workers, and who is winning and losing in this dynamic media space.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T11:47:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211011555
       
  • Toward a non-binary sense of mobility: insights from self-presentation in
           Instagram photography during COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Gloria Yan Dou
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, I investigate how Instagrammers re-construct themselves as agentive and digitally mobile despite their physical immobility during the early COVID-19 pandemic. By examining four types of post that emerged or became popular during this period, I delineate how Instagrammers take subject positions to negotiate their (im)mobile selfhood in the online-offline nexus. I contend that as the Instagrammers negotiate their own invisibility and sociality during the lockdown, their physical bodies are reconfigured digitally as part of their multimodal self-presentation, troubling the traditional (im)mobile divide. While this study illuminates the democratic potential of Instagram, it also contemplates the extent of an individual’s agency on a global scale.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T10:19:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211008734
       
  • Whitewashing diverse voices: (de)constructing race and ethnicity in
           Spanish-language television dubbing

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      Authors: Laurena Bernabo
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      When television programs are translated for global audiences, languages are changed, but so too are constructions of diverse identities. Characters who are Black, Indigenous, or people of color (BIPOC) undergo transformations in order to be intelligible outside of their original national contexts; such transformations might reinforce these characters’ difference or eliminate it, effectively whitewashing BIPOC voices. This article unpacks this phenomenon by investigating the translation of diverse characters through the lens of the many industrial norms and constraints that shape the dubbing industry. Using the international Fox hit Glee (2009–2015) as an entry point for exploring the role of dubbing in Latin America, this study complicates conventional notions about global media’s imperialist and hybridizing implications by tracing political economy and industrial practices onto the dubbing of Black, Latinx, and Asian television characters.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T08:52:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443721999932
       
  • Fat women, performance and subversive commodification on Ghanaian reality
           television

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      Authors: Rashida Resario, Akosua K Darkwah
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Critics of weight loss reality shows often present the contestants as victims of commodification and exploitation without any form of agency. This paper seeks to contest this one-sided view of such shows. It draws on interviews with the producers and 19 contestants in the first season of a dance reality show in Ghana, the Di Asa show, as well as recorded video performances online. We argue that indeed the show was organised in a manner that commodified the contestants for purposes of improving the ratings of the private television station that hosted the show. However, to read these contestants purely as commodified objects misses half the story. We demonstrate that these contestants participated in the show with parallel motives to that for which the producers created the show, and were successful in their endeavours. They thus engaged in what we call subversive commodification, a situation where the object of commodification actively takes part in the commodification process to gain benefits that accrue solely to them and not the subject of commodification.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T05:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443721999925
       
  • Friction-free authenticity: mobile social networks and transactional
           affordances

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      Authors: Vincent Manzerolle, Michael Daubs
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contextualizes and critically examines the incorporation of transactional features into two popular mobile social media apps: Instagram and Snapchat. It examines how mobile social media acts as an interface between culture and commerce. We situate this interface within a larger political economic context in which tech companies are embracing ‘fintech’ to drive growth. We argue that mobile social media platforms play a unique role in monetising personal data and context awareness through their development of ‘transactional affordance’ – a term we develop to understand new features allowing users to connect content to forms of payment. We argue that the success of these affordances is tied to labour associated with the ‘performative authenticity’ of social-media influencers. Our first case study examines the recent development of ‘shopping’ and ‘checkout’ features on Instagram, and the significance of this feature for the economic growth of parent company Facebook. We then look at how the specific development of augmented reality features on Snapchat serve as the basis for new transactional affordances in everyday contexts. We conclude the paper by arguing that the contextual commerce these phenomena entail signals a shift to a transactional culture in which everyday interactions become opportunities for consumption.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T07:22:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443721999953
       
  • French theoretical and methodological influences on Brazilian journalism
           research

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      Authors: Otávio Daros 
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A significant part of Brazilian journalism research has been influenced by French academic culture. This article reconstructs the last 60 years of journalism studies in Brazil considering the relations established with France since the first scholars at the Institut Français de Presse, but also semioticians, historians, sociologists and philosophers from other institutions. This overview, focused on those who have received French approaches, shows the main trends and challenges that Brazilian scholars have been dealing with developing their own works in methodological and theoretical terms. Each study is commented on within its respective field of knowledge—such as language, sociology, anthropology and history—and then compared with the others. The key argument is that there are several and even conflicting French references that guide the approaches and understandings adopted by journalism researchers in Brazil.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T05:47:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443721999936
       
  • Extensions after Man: Race, Counter/insurgency and the Futures of Media
           Theory

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      Authors: Michael Litwack
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article returns to the geopolitical scene and racial logics that provide the underacknowledged conditions of Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media and, specifically, its well-known proposition that media should be understood foremost as ‘outerings’ or ‘extensions of man’. Attending to the structuring inheritances of racial slavery and the plantation system in this founding statement of mid-twentieth-century media theory, as well as its debt to the literary and intellectual movement of the Southern Agrarians, I consider how the racializing figure of ‘Man’ conserved by the nascent field of media studies was contemporaneously brought to crisis by black (and) anticolonial freedom struggles. Arguing for the need to reread the career of western media theory through its political vocation in attempting to manage this crisis, the article concludes by turning briefly to a revisionary account of media and exteriority also circulated in 1964: the revolutionary intellectual James Boggs’s ‘The Negro and Cybernation’. Boggs’s writings, which situate emergent forms of computing and cybernation within a longer materialist genealogy of race, capitalism and technology, offer both a proleptic critique of the early disciplinary formation of media theory and a divergent set of coordinates for approaching media technology on the terrain of black political struggle.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T07:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443721994532
       
  • Media framing of COVID-19 pandemic in the transitional regime of Serbia:
           Exploring discourses and strategies

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      Authors: Irina Milutinović
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The subject of this study is media discourse on the Covid-19 pandemic in the Republic of Serbia. The study seeks to contribute to the understanding of the communication aspects of the current public health crisis within the transitional (hybrid) regime of Serbia. One of the paper’s objectives is to explore how Serbian media frame the discourse on the Covid-19 pandemic. The second objective is to examine whether journalists produce investigative and analytical contents on this pressing topic independently or just mediate to the public patterns created by the public health crisis management. By applying language analysis and intertextual analysis methods to a sample of 230 media texts, we point to the incoherence of media discourse on the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as to the lack of media independence in an environment of the permanent political campaign.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-07T07:31:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720986003
       
  • Can’t wait to feel better: Facebook Live and the recalibration of
           downtime in tending to the body

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      Authors: Dang Nguyen
      First page: 984
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the temporality of liveness on Facebook Live through the analytical lens of downtime. Downtime is conceptualized here as multiscale: downtime exists in between the micro action and inaction of everyday life, but also in larger episodes of personal and health crises that reorient the body toward technologies for instantaneous replenishment of meaning and activity. Living through downtime with mobile technology enables the experience of oscillation between liveness as simultaneity and liveness as instantaneity. By juxtaposing time-as-algorithmic against time-as-lived through the livestreaming practices of diện chẩn, an emergent unregulated therapeutic method, I show how different enactments of liveness on Facebook Live recalibrate downtime so that the body can reconfigure its being-in-time. The temporal reverberation of downtime and liveness creates an alternative temporal space wherein social practices that are shunned by the temporal structures of institution and society can retune and continue to thrive at the margin of these structures and at the central of the everyday.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T09:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211003458
       
  • “Dangerous organizations: Facebook’s content moderation decisions and
           ethnic visibility in Myanmar”

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      Authors: Jeffrey Sablosky
      First page: 1017
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      On February 5th, 2019 Facebook labeled four Ethnic Armed Organizations (EAOs) in Myanmar as “Dangerous Organizations” thereby formally banning them from using the company’s platform. At the time of the company’s announcement, all four of these groups were in open conflict with the Myanmar military (Tatmadaw) who were themselves in the process of being prosecuted for genocide in the International Court of Justice. As a principle vector for communication in Myanmar, Facebook’s decision directly impacted the ability of these groups to connect with national and international stakeholders during their conflicts with the Tatmadaw. This study looks to examine this decision and other content moderation decisions involving ethnic speech within Myanmar to document Facebook’s evolution from a tool for democratic liberalization to international political authority. While outwardly projecting a stance of neutrality in foreign affairs, this work seeks to demarcate how Facebook’s content moderation practices have transformed the company into a new governmental apparatus freely adjudicating political speech claims around the globe with virtual impunity. Building on scholarly discussions around content moderation and digital governance in media studies, I look to interrogate how Facebook’s positionality affects ethnic visibility in nations beholden to the company for national and worldwide recognition.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T07:39:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720987751
       
  • Queering the Map: Stories of love, loss and (be)longing within a digital
           cartographic archive

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      Authors: Emma Kirby, Ash Watson, Brendan Churchill, Brady Robards, Lucas LaRochelle
      First page: 1043
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The rise of crowdsourced and participatory digital platforms which aim to make visible the experiences of otherwise marginalised people are significant within the broader landscape of digitally mediated community spaces. One example of such media is Queering the Map, a digital storymapping platform where users anonymously pin ‘queer moments’ and memories to places. While the mediation of affect and intimacy in digital spaces among queer people is increasingly attended to in scholarly work, the cartographic and archival remains hitherto underexplored. Drawing on an analysis of almost 2000 micro-stories geolocated to Australia, in this article we explore various aspects of story contribution that situate Queering the Map as a lively cartographic archive. Rather than necessarily anonymous (as the platform dictates), the posts, we argue, entail various deliberated directions or gestures, encoded for audiences: what we term stories for someone. We highlight these publicly private stories’ connective and affective underpinnings, and the political potentialities (and problems) therein for queer belonging and community-building. In doing so we seek to contribute to scholarship on digital archives, crowdsourcing, and advance conceptualisations of digital intimacies.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T06:15:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720986005
       
  • BTS as method: a counter-hegemonic culture in the network society

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      Authors: Ju Oak Kim
      First page: 1061
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study focuses on the BTS sensation, examining how three entities – digital networks, the K-pop industry, and fandom – have engaged in the production of an alternative global culture. Based on a multimodal critical discourse analysis of this rising cultural act, the current study pays attention to the dialectical interaction of digital transformation and cultural subjectivization in the contemporary music ecosystem. By integrating Manuel Castells’ notion of the network society into Stuart Hall’s articulation of cultural resistance, I consider BTS as a counter-hegemonic cultural formation from the periphery within the network society. I also argue that the BTS phenomenon has not only unveiled the ideological dimension of Korean cultural formations, but has also proposed new possibilities of non-western and peripheral societies and subjects in the globally networked cultural sphere.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-07T07:32:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720986029
       
  • Activist communication design on social media: The case of online
           solidarity against forced Islamic lifestyle

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      Authors: Balca Arda, Ayşegül Akdemir
      First page: 1078
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the relationship between connective and collective group identity through the example of “You Won’t Walk Alone,” a social media platform of solidarity for women suffering from the pressures of Islamic dress code in Turkey. While Turkey has a long history of conservative women’s initiatives against secular institutional code and of secular women against Islamic and misogynist social reactions, the social media platform You Won’t Walk Alone (Yalnız Yürümeyeceksin) illustrates a striking self-reflexivity of women mobilizing against their very own conservative communities. The research is based on multimodal content analysis of the posts including both images and texts in order to grasp to what extent social media offers a genuine public space for anonymous participants of the online platform as opposed to digitally networked movements which primarily reflect personalized agency. We analyze how connective and collective group identity can be correlated in this case in which online participants build solidarity by sharing content anonymously. Hence, this article questions the ways in which activist design of communication affects and shapes activism through this case study.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T10:52:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720986002
       
  • The conquest of the world as meme: memetic visuality and political humor
           in critiques of the hindu right wing in India

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      Authors: Anirban K. Baishya
      First page: 1113
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      With the rise of internet-based digital participatory cultures in India, social networks have become sites of volatile political discourse. As in other countries such as Brazil, China and Russia, this has led to the concurrent eruption of memes in India’s political landscape. This paper examines humorous politicized memes that are deployed to critique the Hindu right-wing in India. Through an examination of the formal nature of the meme and its connection to other visual forms such as the caricature, the visual joke and the graphic novel, I demonstrate how seemingly frivolous objects can hold potential for serious discourse. Employing a mix of visual and textual analysis, as well as a survey of virally circulating memes on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, I forward the concept of “memetic visuality”—a mode of imagining the world and the political community through a series of intertextual connections. I argue that social media communication has led to the eruption of a memetic mode of engaging with political culture in India, in which virally fueled parody and satire infuses seemingly non-memetic objects with meme-like characteristics. In doing so, memetic political discourse in India becomes part of a larger global language of online political discourse.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-01-05T06:53:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0163443720986039
       
  • Traces of orientalism in media studies

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      Authors: Banafsheh Ranji
      First page: 1136
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a response to calls for more reflexivity in media scholarship. It argues that despite various attempts towards challenging the ‘Western-centrism’ of the field (notable among them is the ‘de-Westernisation’ project), media studies has remained highly captive to the distinctions between ‘West’ and ‘non-West’ as the principal starting point for analysis. Building on Edward Said’s concept of Orientalism, and employing Said’s idea of methodological self-consciousness, this paper critically assesses the often taken-for-granted assumptions in media research. It reflects on anecdotal and personal experience, and on observations that I have made in the literature I have consulted, in the queries by colleagues, and in teaching. This article shows how and through which terminology the Orientalist discourse materializes in the field of media research. It reveals how a network of interests is shaped on any occasion when media and journalism in contexts that are deemed ‘non-Western’ are in question. This paper shows that media scholarship is marked by the use of binary terminology, collective terms and generalities, a one-sided relationship between the ‘West’ and ‘non-West’, and the notions of the superiority of Anglo-American research.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T10:58:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022692
       
  • Disconnection for protection (D4P): an addition to the disconnection
           repertoire

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      Authors: Abdul Rohman, Peng Hwa Ang
      First page: 1147
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article responds to Crosscurrent articles (Treré et al., 2020) published in this journal by positing the potential usefulness of Disconnection for Protection (D4P) for calming unrest and managing volatile times. We first use a vignette from Ambon, Indonesia, to illuminate the need for D4P to throttle the spread of mis/disinformation during a communal violence and then discuss the existing repertoire of disconnections. Building on this, we propose temporal/spatial context, information flow, externality, and motivation as constitutive elements of D4P. We elaborate on their terms and conditions and suggest research directions at the end.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:45:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211022689
       
  • Review essay: global and comparative perspectives on media and development

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      Authors: Asif Akhtar
      First page: 1168
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay reviews the works ‘Television and the Afghan Culture Wars’ (University of Illinois Press) by Wazhmah Osman and ‘Media Imperialism in India and Pakistan’ (Routledge) by Farooq Sulehria as recent contributions to the fields of global and comparative media studies. It considers the overlapping themes in these works through ruberics of media imperialism and development in terms of growth of television industry in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan in the broad context of globalization and transnational media flows.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T07:24:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437211029887
       
 
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