Subjects -> BEAUTY CULTURE (Total: 22 journals)
    - BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)
    - PERFUMES AND COSMETICS (2 journals)

BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Achiote.com - Revista Eletrônica de Moda     Open Access  
American Journal of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Studies in Fashion & Beauty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fashion and Textiles     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Flavour and Fragrance Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ground Breaking     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Cosmetic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Materiali di Estetica     Open Access  
Media, Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Mind Culture and Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Parallax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Professional Beauty     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription  
Transactions of the Burgon Society     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Media, Culture & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.846
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 44  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-4437 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3675
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Chatting with the dead: the hermeneutics of thanabots

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      Authors: Leah Henrickson
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In 2021, the San Francisco Chronicle released a feature article about a man who chose to resurrect his deceased fiancée by training a chatbot system built on OpenAI’s GPT language models on her old digital messages. He then had emotional conversations with this chatbot, which appeared to accurately mimic the deceased’s writing style. This case study raises questions about the communicative influences of thanabots: chatbots trained on data of the dead. While thanabots are clearly not living conversational partners, the rhetoric, everyday experiences, and emotions associated with these system have very real implications for living users. This paper applies a lifeworld perspective to consider the hermeneutics of thanabots. It shows that thanabots exist in a long lineage of efforts to communicate with the dead, but acknowledges that thanatechnologies must be more thoroughly studied for better understanding of what it means to die in a digital age.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T05:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221147626
       
  • South African tabloid coverage of Covid19: The Daily Sun

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      Authors: Tanja Bosch, Herman Wasserman
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Around the world, tabloid newspapers are routinely surrounded by a moral and cultural panic. They are criticised for lowering standards of journalism and privileging sensation above substance, diverting readers from serious news to entertainment, or foregoing ethical principles. However, scholarship about tabloids have also highlighted the ways in which these papers are frequently better attuned to their readers’ everyday lived experience. In South Africa, tabloid newspapers have also received much criticism in the past for their perceived superficial treatment of important news. This article examines South African tabloid newspapers’ coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic, focussing specifically on a case study of the national newspaper the Daily Sun. The national Daily Sun newspaper boasts the country’s largest circulation figures. Through a quantitative content analysis of 1050 online news stories in the Daily Sun, we found that unlike mainstream front-page news reporting which was largely episodic, negative and alarmist, the majority of Daily Sun coverage was thematic and neutral. Daily Sun news coverage countered Covid-19 related misinformation and provided contextual coverage, with a large focus on the social impacts of Covid-19. The analysis concludes that despite the popular discourse of the reporting, Daily Sun reporting on Covid-19 provided readers with access to information and a focus on the micro aspects of the pandemic versus broader political issues and the views of political or scientific elites.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T10:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140514
       
  • Editorial: encounters with Western media theory

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      Authors: Emily Keightley, Eva Cheuk-Yin Li, Simone Natale, Aswin Punathambekar
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Beginning in 2020, the Crosscurrents section of this journal featured 10 provocative essays on the theme of “Encounters in Western Media Theory.” These essays stemmed from scholars’ engagements with various canonical texts in media, cultural, and communication studies that took the Anglophone Global North as a taken-for-granted site for making sweeping theoretical claims. In this editorial, we reflect on the critiques and arguments that scholars have developed to move past debates about “internationalizing” and “de-westernizing” the field of media, communication, and cultural studies. Taken together, the essays published in this themed section grapple with the shifting terrain of academic knowledge production and the potential for redefining practices of reading, citation, and teaching.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T10:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221149821
       
  • The platformization of misogyny: Popular media, gender politics, and
           misogyny in China’s state-market nexus

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      Authors: Sara Liao
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to map out the popular phenomenon of misogyny in the specific techno-social configuration buttressed by China’s state-market nexus. With a case study of a controversy involving the standup comedian Yang Li and the luxury car brand Mercedes-Benz on the microblogging platform Weibo, I highlight the ‘platformization of misogyny.’ The conceptualization refers to the way that a platform is evoked as tools to manufacture and amplify misogyny. Weibo has this effect both through its design, features, and algorithmic shaping of sociality and through its users’ appropriation of its affordances. On top of that, the platform also engenders a form of governance that is deeply enmeshed in the commercialization of internet opinion, suggesting a techno-nationalist mode of state control that is exercised from afar and deeply imbued with patriarchal and misogynistic characteristics.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T05:16:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221146905
       
  • Calls from Beyond the Walls: prison cellphone recordings during the
           pandemic in Lebanon

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      Authors: Chafic Tony Najem
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Forcibly confined in a precarious and overcrowded space amidst the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, prisoners in Lebanon resorted to their smuggled cellphones. They produced and circulated images, videos, and sound bites documenting the dire experiences of living under a failing infrastructure. This article addresses this phenomenon by examining a corpus of ‘prison cellphone recordings’ mediated on social media platforms and Lebanese local news. I adopt the media as practice theory to claim that such fragmentary amateur cellphone media messages are the product of strategic and hybrid prison media practices. In addition, I employ the conceptual notions of hybrid media activism and media witnessing to investigate the political and testimonial function of prisoners’ illicit engagement with digital technologies. I propose a typology of the mediated prison cellphone recordings and argue that these representations serve to mobilize support and relay visual evidence of prisoners lived experiences during the pandemic. Finally, I attempt with this article to instigate an approach to the examination of media from the prison; an approach that prioritizes illicit media practices behind bars and their ‘traces’ in the media.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T10:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221146889
       
  • The establishing of subject positions in Swedish news media discourses
           during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Annica Lövenmark, Jonas Stier, Helena Blomberg
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has dominated the global media since 2020. To a large extent, it is via the news media that the public has learned about the risks, levels of danger, governmental regulations and mandatory actions. This article highlights the subject positions constructed by the Swedish news media from January 2020 to February 2021 in reports about the pandemic. The result shows that citizens can be active-passive or solitary solidarity, these positions appeal to individual accountability, thus potentially shaping and fostering citizens in line with the Swedish government’s wider response to the pandemic. The news media’s images are of self-regulated citizens who govern and discipline themselves and others according to the current discourses, all of which simultaneously evoke fear, togetherness and hope. The ideological dilemmas for citizens are whether to be active-passive or, if necessary, switch to the solitary solidarity subject position.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221147636
       
  • Alt-right and authoritarian memetic alliances: global mediations of hate
           within the rising Farsi manosphere on Iranian social media

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      Authors: Sama Khosravi Ooryad
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the rising Farsi ‘manosphere’ of Iran and the case of online misogynistic, anti-feminist and anti-queer mobilisations across social media platforms and messaging applications. It focuses on memes and memetic figures that are circulated on Iranian social media and proposes the term ‘memetic alliances’ to convey complicated and unforeseen mutations of today’s internet meme culture and online hate culture. Moreover, it unpacks the increasing convergences of seemingly conflicting online and political contexts. Drawing on digital ethnographic fieldwork on selected platforms as well as visual and conceptual analyses of memes, the article theorises that online figurations of hate have memeto-(micro)political qualities that allow for their propagation across numerous contexts. Furthermore, the case of Iran’s emergent Farsi manosphere is arguably not a totalitarian exception unique to the Middle East but is reconfiguring and standing in alliance with the global rise of the right and its online culture wars.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221147633
       
  • On losing the “dispensable” sense: TikTok imitation publics and
           COVID-19 smell loss challenges

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      Authors: Adrianna Grace Michell
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The enduring effects of COVID-19 have called into question many of the assumptions upon which media and cultural studies rest, including a fundamental mode of perception: the sense of smell. In dialog with the field of sensory studies, this paper traces digital smell loss (anosmia) communities from pre-pandemic Facebook groups to mid-pandemic TikTok challenges. This article considers digital smell loss communities on TikTok as imitation publics characterized by repetition. Via replicable TikTok challenges, digital smell-loss communities reckoned with the unmooring effects of a seemingly mild symptom. By exploring how formulaic smell-loss challenges generated support and facilitated community-building, this article demands greater attention to a sense often considered ‘disposable’.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:14:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221146904
       
  • Asian sporting masculinities in figure skating: media representations of
           Nathan Chen and Yuzuru Hanyu as rivals

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      Authors: Michelle H. S. Ho, Wesley Lim
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In sport and sport media, figure skating is often perceived as ‘feminine’ and male skaters frequently occupy an ambiguous position, especially for Asian (American) athletes in a historically White-dominated sport. Based on discourse analysis, this article compares how English- and Japanese-language news narratives represent elite male figure skaters Nathan Chen and Yuzuru Hanyu, who are close rivals and skate for the United States and Japan respectively. We demonstrate how English-language media reinforce (U.S.) nationalism by portraying ‘Quad King’ Chen as hypermasculine for his athleticism and ‘Ice Prince’ Hanyu as feminized for his exceptional artistry. Despite being pitted against each other, we argue that in Japanese media narratives, their convivial rivalry and sportsmanship reveal what we call ‘Asian sporting masculinities’, alternative constructions of masculinities complicating monolithic stable understandings of masculinity in or congruous with the West. This study advances critical media and cultural studies by rethinking masculinities in Asian sporting bodies.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140522
       
  • Oppression by omission: An analysis of the #WhereIsTheInterpreter hashtag
           campaign around COVID-19 on Twitter

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      Authors: Tahleen A Lattimer, Yotam Ophir
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Critical to managing a crisis such as COVID-19 is the propagation of information to all vulnerable populations. Despite guidelines regarding communicating with people with differing accessibility needs during crises, some often find their needs unmet. Following a lack of assisted communications for d/Deaf people during the COVID-19 pandemic, a Twitter hashtag campaign, #WhereIsTheInterpreter, was launched in the UK, protesting the lack of accessibility during official press briefings around the epidemic. The campaign received support from across the globe. This study analyzes the discourse around the campaign in tweets published from March 1st, 2020 and September 30th, 2021 (N = 27,021) and analyzed the corpus using the Analysis of Topic Model Network (ANTMN) approach. We identified four major themes of discourse: discrimination, accessibility challenges, communication gaps and barriers, and Deaf rights. We analyze the discourse through the perspective of Critical Disability Theory (CDT) and hashtag activism, and discuss practical and theoretical implications.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T12:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221135977
       
  • TikTok and its mediatic split: the promotion of ecumenical user-generated
           content alongside Sinocentric media globalization

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      Authors: Keith B Wagner
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      TikTok has ousted Google as the world’s favorite online destination in 2021. As China’s first emergent social media app making its mark across the Global North and South, it has prompted a shift in our global mediascape. Following in the footsteps of YouTube and Instagram after it, TikTok is facilitating new identities through User-Generated Content (UGC) while challenging the hegemony of American-led platform culture. UGC analyzed in this article views it unabashedly as a youthful narcissism through which a form of self-reinvention online is created. This is culturally surmised as an intriguing new form of global creativity that I label ecumenical UGC. Yet, scholarship has largely examined TikTok through empirical and content analysis frameworks only, negating the compelling cultural studies issues evinced in this trendy media. In conjunction with discussions of TikTok’s meteoric rise, this article also probes how the Chinese company that owns this app bends several UNESCO media principles, creating its mediatic split with its twin, Douyin operating only in the PRC. By laying out this other path, one detects a shrinkage of cultural globalization in the pandemic era as TikTok becomes a carrier of ‘underglobalization’ flows, a disrupter and provider of algorithmic content, all going under not against older notions of global culture.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T11:59:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221136006
       
  • Functions of background music among prisoners and staff in the Chinese
           prison workplace

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      Authors: Xiaoye Zhang
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Music listening is one of the most popular leisure activities in our lives, and it can also be found in prisons across the globe. However, most research on music in prison are concerned with its rehabilitative functions and not as an everyday activity. This study collected qualitative questionnaires and interview data from 14 prisons to illustrate the soundscape of music listening in Chinese prisons. The main access to music listening happens at the workspace and it is only available in the form of background music. This study considers the various functions of background music for both prisoners and officers. Music curation and access are about power and control, and it reveals a mostly hierarchical yet also dynamic pattern in the Chinese staff–prisoner relationship. Listening to music has also been found to be one of the coping mechanisms for officers and prisoners who share similar working conditions where conformity to authority is inevitable for all.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-24T11:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140520
       
  • The remains of the disappeared: digital melancholia and Ensaaf (justice)

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      Authors: Shruti Devgan
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In March 2019, Ensaaf, a transnational, non-profit organization, launched the project of daily posts on their social media pages consisting of remains or traces of disappeared Sikhs (an ethnoreligious minority community in India and the diaspora), that is, their photographs and biographical details. In this paper, I reflect on the meanings implicit in Ensaaf’s daily work of remembering and circulating remains of the disappearance on social media, specifically Facebook. By creating an archive that circulates regularly and frequently in and through social media, Ensaaf is performing what I call digital melancholia: continuous and ongoing grief work. The medium in which Ensaaf enacts its melancholic attachment with the disappeared leaves its imprint on the meaning of the performance itself. The daily work of melancholia performed in the constantly evolving space of Facebook is a form of “epistemic resistance” against the Indian state’s “necropolitics.”
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-23T11:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140523
       
  • An autoethnography of automated powerlessness: lacking platform
           affordances in Instagram and TikTok account deletions

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      Authors: Carolina Are
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Situated within the field of platform governance studies, this paper shares findings from an ‘autoethnography of automated powerlessness’, drawing from the researcher’s disempowering experience of being a heavily moderated social media user. Using theoretical frameworks blending affordances and World Risk Society theories, this paper contextualises my experiences of moderation of my pole dance instructor, activist and blogger account @bloggeronpole from February to October 2021 within social media’s broader de-platforming of nudity and sexuality, finding fallacies within platforms’ own affordances, which lack mechanisms to aid or rehabilitate de-platformed accounts. With little to no information from platforms about the details of their moderation, qualitative, ethnographic and autoethnographic explorations of their governance are all users currently have to fight and understand their puritan, patriarchal censorship of nudity and sexuality, which are often conflated with risk. This study concludes with recommendations for different options for better, more equal and community focused moderation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-12T11:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140531
       
  • The algorithm knows I’m Black: from users to subjects

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      Authors: Daniel Meyerend
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In October of 2018, several Black Netflix users took to Twitter to air their grievances about images in movie thumbnails featuring Black actors with minor roles, even when the movie itself was a majority white cast. In response to these critiques, Netflix claimed that because users are not asked about their racial identity, it is impossible to personalize the individual Netflix experience using identity markers. This article explores the interplay between algorithmic cultures and representations of race, examining the identity and voices of users and how their agency is affected within algorithmic systems. Users are seeking agentic traction in these algorithmic spaces, and this research begins to address how Black users are positioning themselves to make sense of the digital constraints placed on them. Black subscribers of Netflix heavily critiqued the algorithms used to advertise content to them, and I examine how Netflix constructs Black users as Black subjects in order to keep them engaged with the platform.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T11:33:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140539
       
  • My journey with western theory in the university in Africa

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      Authors: Khanyile Mlotshwa
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, I recount my experiences with western media theory. Working on my PhD thesis marked my turn to decolonial theory. I used the creolisation strategy of putting critical western Marxist theories in conversation with African, black and Latin American decolonial theories. I worked on my PhD thesis under conditions informed by the Rhodes Must Fall (RMF), the Fees Must Fall (FMF) and other broader protests in South Africa whose connecting thread was the demand for the decolonisation of both the academy and public life. It is my conviction that, although work has already begun, there is still a lot of work to be done in decolonising the disciplines of journalism, media and cultural studies.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T11:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140510
       
  • Legalization of press control under democratic backsliding: The case of
           post-national security law Hong Kong

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      Authors: Francis LF Lee, Chi-kit Chan
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      During democratic backsliding, the state can curtail press freedom through the legalization of press control, that is, the establishment and utilization of legal instruments for the purpose of controlling the media and journalistic work. Drawing upon the literature on authoritarian rule of law, this article emphasizes that legalization of press control has to be examined by paying attention to both the conspicuous and subtle measures that constitute the legal minefield for journalism, the evolution of official discourses that aim at legitimizing the laws and their implementation, and the changing politics of self-censorship as journalists and the society react to emerging legal risks. The empirical analysis focuses on Hong Kong after the establishment of the National Security Law in June 2020. The article offers an updated analytical account of press freedom in Hong Kong and the conceptualization of a process possibly observable in other authoritarian states or hybrid regimes.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T06:51:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140525
       
  • ‘They don’t need us’: affective precarity and critique in
           transnational media work from the margins of ‘Cultural China’

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      Authors: Siao Yuong Fong
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Creative labour studies has yielded much critical insights from workers’ experiences of ‘precarity’ and ‘self-exploitation’ with increasing neo-liberalization. This important work’s overwhelming focus on the critique of neoliberalism based on Euro American case studies risk overlooking insights that can be gained from other socio-geopolitical contexts. Drawing on a mix of ethnographic observations and interviews with transnational media producers in Singapore working at the margins of the mainland Chinese media industry, this paper teases out how intersecting cultural, economic and geopolitical power relations manifest in transnational creative labour working under the shadows of both the West and a rising China. Expanding on conceptions of emotional labour and precarity as serving neoliberal structures, I highlight how these producers’ experiences go beyond the economic connotations of precarity to capture what I call affective precarity – a felt sense of spatial-temporal dissonance confronting marginalized media workers. I also consider how such emotional labour can constitute a form of critique.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T06:30:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221140478
       
  • What’s not talked about: a content analysis of health issues in
           Black-oriented magazines

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      Authors: Teairah Taylor
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Black-oriented magazines have been a staple of Black communities for decades. Essence magazine, in particular, places a strong emphasis on targeting and empowering the Black woman. Essence often covers health issues in their publications alongside other popular issues being discussed in Black communities. Given the prevalence of health articles in Essence, I conducted a content analysis to assess how the magazine discusses the relationships between health, power, and race. The findings suggest that Essence magazine leverages its cultural and popular position to engage in discussions about health issues with its readers in culturally relevant ways that engage and empower Black women. At the same time, given Essence’s global platform, the magazine walks a tightrope between being an ‘easy-read’ popular magazine and an outlet that discusses pressing health-related issues.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T12:40:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221135980
       
  • Border countervisuality: smartphone videos of border crossing and
           migration

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      Authors: Yener Bayramoğlu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how smartphone videos produced by migrants during border crossings challenge Eurocentric visualizations of borders. Implementing video analysis and iconographic interpretation, I explore three interrelated aspects of the smartphone videos: (1) By circulating videos via digital platforms, migrants create a countervisuality of border crossing that destabilizes the visual politics that shape current border regimes. (2) Unlike journalistic, humanitarian, or surveillance-oriented visual images produced from above, from a safe distance, from rescue or patrol ships, migrants’ smartphone footage puts their own narratives at the center of visualization. (3) Whereas Eurocentric visualizations of migration and borders aim to elicit affects and emotions such as pity, empathy, fear, or panic, migrants’ smartphone videos depict emotions such as joy and happiness after successful border crossings. These affective visualizations of individual migration stories confound binary representations of migrants as either victims or invaders. I argue that the shaky smartphone videos with their wandering focus and disordered mode of vision create a productive vantage point for seeing and sensing a world that is unimaginable for the normative, focused lens that structures views projected by journalism, humanitarian appeals, political mobilization, and surveillance technologies.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T08:57:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221136013
       
  • Against masculinised hypercorrection' Renegotiating the everydayness
           and ordinariness of postfeminism on Chinese TV

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      Authors: Min Xu, Shiyu (Sharon) Zheng
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In the past decade, there has been a significant rise in urban women-themed TV dramas in China, some of which have generated substantial public discourse on femininity. While Western women-centred TV and cinematic productions have been discussed intensively, much less attention has been paid to Chinese TV series and their audience reception. This article highlights the usefulness of studying audience response to the women-centred TV series produced in China over the past decade, especially those focusing on single women as main characters. By examining these widely-viewed TV series and their audience interpretation, this article aims to investigate the ordinariness and everydayness through which a postfeminist sensibility manifests in a non-Western context. As the research shows, these women-centred TV series reveal the diverse dimensions of urban women’s everyday lives. However, Chinese audiences express strong opposition to masculinised hypercorrection and the fetishisation of the gynandroid in such TV series. Many Chinese viewers prefer to see a realistic representation of Chinese women who have autonomy and the right to be imperfect. The findings shed light on gender-related debates in China today and contribute to discussions about the everydayness of postfeminism from an audience’s perspective.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T08:31:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221135994
       
  • A new algorithmic imaginary

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      Authors: Christian Schulz
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The algorithmic imaginary as a theoretical concept has received increasing attention in recent years as it aims at users’ appropriation of algorithmic processes operating in opacity. But the concept originally only starts from the users’ point of view, while the processes on the platforms’ side are largely left out. In contrast, this paper argues that what is true for users is also valid for algorithmic processes and the designers behind. On the one hand, the algorithm imagines users’ future behavior via machine learning, which is supposed to predict all their future actions. On the other hand, the designers anticipate different actions that could potentially performed by users with every new implementation of features such as social media feeds. In order to bring into view this permanently reciprocal interplay coupled to the imaginary, in which not only the users are involved, I will argue for a more comprehensive and theoretically precise algorithmic imaginary referring to the theory of Cornelius Castoriadis. In such a perspective, an important contribution can be formulated for a theory of social media platforms that goes beyond praxeocentrism or structural determinism.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T01:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221136014
       
  • Crowdfunding (as) disinformation: ‘Pitching’ 5G and election
           fraud campaigns on GoFundMe

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      Authors: Greg Elmer, Sabrina Ward-Kimola
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that the current disinformation studies literature lacks any sustained analysis of a crucial element in any communication campaign – its sources of funding. The paper argues that crowdfunding platforms are arguably better networked and ‘cross platform enabled’ than most social media sites to spread disinformation. And that disinformation actors have weaponized crowdfunding to amplify and sustain the spread of their grievances and forms of disinformation. The paper offers a rich qualitative study of a set of election fraud and 5G themed campaigns on the GoFundMe crowdfunding platform. The study questions how networked content and financial appeals in the crowdfunding pitch can contribute to the disinformation literature and potential solutions.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T01:30:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221136009
       
  • Scrutinising South African media companies’ strategies for Generation
           Z’s news consumption

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      Authors: Lucky Brian Dlamini, Glenda Daniels
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This research scrutinises the strategies that three of South Africa’s largest mainstream media companies, namely, Media24, Independent News and Media, and Arena Holdings use to attract younger audiences, particularly Generation Z. The main question under focus is: Are South African media companies innovating adequately in their news media content and platforms to attract young audiences' The research examines the issue from both the discourses of the digital news editors of the media companies and a sample of young people interviewed about their news consumption. The rationale for this study is that Generation Z as active users of the various forms of the media have the potential to influence the way in which the media package and disseminate news. Therefore, it is important to study this rising segment of audiences as young people’s consumption behaviour and spending patterns shape the businesses of media institutions to adjust their news strategies quickly.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-12T06:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221135979
       
  • Decolonising public service television in Aotearoa New Zealand: telling
           better stories about Indigenous rurality

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      Authors: Susan Fountaine, Sandy Bulmer, Farah Palmer, Lisa Chase
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In settler-colonial countries like Aotearoa New Zealand, television programmes about rurality are fundamentally entwined with the nation’s colonial history, but how this context impacts on locally made, public service television content and production is seldom examined. Utilising data collected from interviews with programme makers and a novel bi-cultural friendship pair methodology, we examine how a high-rating mainstream programme, Country Calendar, conceptualises and delivers stories about Indigenous Māori and consider the extent to which these stories represent a decolonising of television narratives about rurality. The findings highlight the importance of incorporating Indigenous voices and values, the impact of structural limitations and staffing constraints on public service television’s decolonising aspirations, and challenges reconciling settler-colonialism with the show’s well-established ‘rosy glow’. While rural media are often overlooked by communication scholars, our study demonstrates the contributions they might make to the larger task of decolonising storytelling about national identity.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T11:36:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221127363
       
  • Gender, party and performance in the 2020 New Zealand general election:
           politicking on Facebook with Jacinda and Judith

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      Authors: Karen Ross, Susan Fountaine, Margie Comrie
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      New Zealand’s 2020 General Election campaign was unusual, though not unprecedented, in featuring women as both Prime Minister (Jacinda Ardern, Labour) and Leader of the Opposition (Judith Collins, National). To explore the extent to which gender, party and style intersected in their social media positioning, we analysed all posts made on the two Party Leaders’ public Facebook pages. We found both quantitative (post frequency and composition, main topic and policy issues, audience reactions) and qualitative differences (tone, presentational style) but importantly, our research suggests that neither woman ‘performed’ gender in normatively stereotypical ways.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T10:06:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221127366
       
  • Envisioning a credit society: social credit systems and the
           institutionalization of moral standards in China

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      Authors: Jing Wang, Hongmei Li, Weiai Wayne Xu, Wei Xu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      China’s Social Credit System (SCS) has been widely considered a centralized surveillance project, whereas recent research found multiple scoring systems co-existing in various fields at multiple administrative levels and in diverse forms. Despite the broadened view toward the complexity of SCS, these research projects continue to focus on SCS mainly as political and digital control mechanisms. Instead, this paper is interested in the social and cultural meanings of SCS constructed in the media, both at the national and local levels. Based on the analyses of news reports since the year 2003, when the term SCS was officially coined, this paper examines the historical narratives about SCS, including its rationales, stakeholders, and intended goals/tasks. It argues that the SCS construction has been a societal project anchored in a distinct moral orientation of financial credit. While credit systems are often used to classify consumers and financial subjects in Western contexts, the case of Chinese SCS shows that the moral dimension of financial credit scoring has enabled its spread into other non-financial domains. Also, the institutionalization of such moral standards is considered an effective approach to addressing various socio-economic and ethical issues that have long baffled economic development and social justice in China’s reform era.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T10:01:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221127364
       
  • Fake digital identity and cyberbullying

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      Authors: Arkaitz Lareki, Jon Altuna, Juan-Ignacio Martínez-de-Morentin
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to determine whether or not there is an association between creating fake user accounts and engaging in behaviors deemed to constitute cyberbullying. A quantitative research methodology was used with a clear descriptive and interpretative intent. The sample comprised 1989 adolescents aged between 10 and 17 years from five regions in Southern Europe, who completed an online questionnaire. The results reveal that adolescents aged 16 years were the ones who engaged most in cyberbullying actions. Those who created false profiles tended to engage in more behaviors linked to cyberbullying. Adolescent social media users were mainly older boys who engaged more in cyberbullying behaviors. Relatively few adolescents claim to engage regularly in behaviors linked to cyberbullying. The study concludes that there is an urgent need to provide adolescents with training in the responsible use of digital technologies at an earlier age, before they begin using them assiduously.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T09:41:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221126081
       
  • Sugar and spice (and everything nice'): Japan’s ambition behind
           Lolita’s Kawaii aesthetics

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      Authors: Natalie Ngai
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The global media and marketing phenomenon of Lolita fashions has charmed many with their kawaii (cute) aesthetics. This study argues that the kawaii aesthetics not only allows one to perform non-conforming femininity playfully, as previous studies have suggested, but it also embodies racial and national ideologies. This study uses an intersectional, transnational approach to investigate the retail catalogs of Lolita brands and fan publications. Findings reveal that Lolita marketing in Japan artfully appropriates whiteness through the kawaii aesthetics, which renders whiteness/Westernness less threatening and covers up Japan’s ambition to surpass the West with a spectacular and innocent mask. When kawaii aesthetics is repackaged for the Western market, the over-representation of whiteness is replaced by a fantasy of cross-racial sisterhood, subtly celebrating the superiority of the East Asian race. I call for an awareness of the appropriation of whiteness outside the United States and an intersectional reading of ‘postfeminist’ glamor.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T07:28:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221126082
       
  • CORRIGENDUM to “The criminal trial as a live event: Exploring how and
           why live blogs change the professional practices of judges, defence
           lawyers and prosecutors”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T07:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221116076
       
  • Ideal technologies, ideal women: AI and gender imaginaries in Redditors’
           discussions on the Replika bot girlfriend

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      Authors: Iliana Depounti, Paula Saukko, Simone Natale
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      There is extensive literature on how expectations and imaginaries about artificial intelligence (AI) guide media and policy discussions. However, it has not been considered how such imaginaries are activated when users interact with AI technologies. We present findings of a study on how users on a subreddit discussed ‘training’ their Replika bot girlfriend. The discussions featured two discursive themes that focused on the AI imaginary of ideal technology and the gendered imaginary of the ideal bot girlfriend. Users expected their AI Replikas to both be customizable to serve their needs and to have a human-like or sassy mind of their own and not spit out machine-like answers. Users thus projected dominant notions of male control over technology and women, mixed with AI and postfeminist fantasies of ostensible independence onto the interactional agents and activated similar scripts embedded in the devices. The vicious feedback loop consolidated dominant scripts on gender and technology whilst appearing novel and created by users. While most research on the use of AI is conducted in applied computer science to improve user experience, this article outlines a media and cultural studies lens for a critical understanding of these emerging technologies as they become embedded in communication and meaning-making.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-20T06:32:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221119021
       
  • Between existential mobility and intimacy 5.0: translocal care in pandemic
           times

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      Authors: Earvin Charles B Cabalquinto, Monika Büscher
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has reconfigured every social, political, economic and cultural aspect of modern society. Millions of people have been stuck in lockdown within and across borders, national and regional terrains, in their homes and worse places. At this time of unprecedented change and ‘stuckedness’, digital communication technologies have served as a lifeline to forge and nurture communication, intimate ties and a sense of continuity and belongingness. But being stuck and simultaneously virtually mobile has brought many difficulties, tensions and paradoxes. In this paper we discuss first insights from a study with 15 members of the older Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) population in Victoria, Australia to explore experiences of being physically stuck and virtually mobile. We find practices of translocal care – ways of caring for distant others through digital technologies, has been made more complex by the pandemic and shaped by two dynamics: networked collective ‘existential mobility’, and a quantification of feeling that we call ‘intimacy 5.0’.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T10:07:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221119295
       
  • Influencers as ideological intermediaries: promotional politics and
           authenticity labour in influencer collaborations

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      Authors: Johanna Arnesson
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Though politics and promotion have never been completely separate, the convergence between the two spheres is increasingly prominent in today’s digital culture. To broaden our understanding of such promotional politics in social media, this paper examines commercial collaborations between four Swedish influencers and two private companies that offer services enabled by specific neoliberal reforms during recent decades, and how they strive to present these services in a way that attracts an affluent but socially conscious middle-class. It argues that the political potential of influencers might not always be as spokespersons for a cause or party, but rather as ‘ideological intermediaries’ who promote a lifestyle to be inspired by, and aspire to. The analysis identifies the discourses that influencers draw on to achieve the promotional and ideological outcomes of commercial collaborations, as well as the authenticity labour that they perform in the texts. Further, the paper analyses how notions of authenticity also impact audiences’ interpretation and politicization of the collaborations, in the comment sections to the sponsored blogposts.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T06:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221117505
       
  • Framing post-disaster collective action as ‘good news’:
           Possibilities and tensions

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      Authors: Sally Carlton, Sylvia Nissen, Jennifer HK Wong
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the development and implications of positive news media coverage of a crisis volunteer group across a decade of disaster responses. We investigate the case of the Student Volunteer Army in Aotearoa New Zealand, a group that has been positioned as a potential blueprint for youth-led disaster response. Drawing on in-depth interviews and news media sources, we trace how a distinct framing of the group as ‘good news’ consolidated across successive disasters, initially in media reporting and then through active cultivation by the group. The findings demonstrate the potential for positive media coverage of disaster volunteerism to assist people’s recovery and provide crisis volunteer groups with important leverage to further their operational abilities and challenge exclusionary power structures in post-disaster environments. However, our analysis also warns that simplifying accounts of post-disaster collective action to create ‘good news’ can produce internal tensions within crisis volunteer groups and reinforce the hierarchies and inequities that characterize disaster response.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T06:21:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221117502
       
  • Platform governance at the margins: Social media creators’ experiences
           with algorithmic (in)visibility

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      Authors: Brooke Erin Duffy, Colten Meisner
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      While champions of the “new” creative economy consistently hype the career possibilities furnished by YouTube, Instagram, TikTok, and the like, critics have cast a spotlight on the less auspicious elements of platform-dependent creative labor: exploitation, insecurity, and a culture of overwork. Social media creators are, moreover, beholden to the vagaries of platforms’ “inscrutable” socio-technical systems, particularly the algorithms that enable (or – conversely – thwart) their visibility. This article draws upon in-depth interviews with 30 social media creators – sampled from historically marginalized identities and/or stigmatized content genres – to explore their perceptions of, and experiences with, algorithmic (in)visibility. Together, their accounts evince a shared understanding that platforms enact governance unevenly – be it through formal (human and/or automated content moderation) or informal (shadowbans, biased algorithmic boosts) means. Creators’ understandings are implicated in experiential practices ranging from self-censorship to concerted efforts to circumvent algorithmic intervention. In closing, we consider how the regimes of discipline and punishment that structure the social media economy systematically disadvantage marginalized creators and cultural expressions deemed non-normative.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T11:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111923
       
  • The stories that tell us: Smartphones and discursive reconstitution of
           transnational intimacy among migrant mothers

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      Authors: Barui K Waruwu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The growing phenomenon of transnational families where the mothers work abroad has reinvigorated the debate on the fluidity of contemporary families. Family is no longer defined as household-bound, and family obligations are constantly negotiated. Research shows migrant mothers utilize communication technologies, most recently smartphones, to (re)constitute family intimacy and maternal identity from afar through everyday family practices. However, most research has focused on the material reconfiguration of family practices, essentially sidelining the discursive workings of intimacy and identity via mobile media. To address this gap, this ethnographic study draws on the narrative theories, particularly the small stories approach, to examine the narratives of Indonesian mothers in Hong Kong as embedded in their smartphone communication. The participant observation and narrative interviews with 25 migrant mothers revealed that maternal storytelling on smartphones is routine, eclectic, and personalized. These enable migrant mothers to craft and tell family stories to (1) rationalize distance and (2) bolster family resilience. This article concludes by reflecting upon the authorial privilege in constructing family narratives on mobile media. The implications on our understanding of the contextualizing power of narrative and power dynamics underlying mediated family communication are discussed.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T12:37:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111907
       
  • Towards the engagement economy: interconnected processes of
           commodification on YouTube

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      Authors: Jacob Ørmen, Andreas Gregersen
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A dominant way for digital platforms to generate revenue has been through the sale of audiences to advertisers encapsulated by the idea of the attention economy. This model has been challenged in recent years due to competitive and political pressures on platforms. In this paper, we use YouTube as a case to understand how processes of commodification are changing on digital platforms. We demonstrate that YouTube furthers the commodification of content, audiences and creative labour by cultivating commercial interactions, standardising exchange mechanisms and constructing systems of trust. The platform enables producers and retailers to sell digital and physical goods to users, advertisers to capture audiences’ interest and brands to establish partnerships with producers. In sum, we show how YouTube not only monetises attention but commodifies all forms of engagement through its marketplaces with consequences for the precarity of users and producers on the platform.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T12:50:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111951
       
  • Framing safety of women in public transport: A media discourse analysis of
           sexual harassment cases in Bangladesh

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      Authors: Seama Mowri, Ajay Bailey
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyzes the role of print media in framing incidences of sexual harassment in public transport; particularly in the context of Bangladesh, where gender-based violence is highly prevalent in the public sphere. This article uses Douglas’ cultural theory to reflect on media practices and its institutional power to reframe the social problem through risk and blame attribution. We conducted a discourse analysis of 71 news articles extracted from four of the widely circulated and influential newspapers of Bangladesh. Our findings reveal that the hegemonic discourse of gender-based violence in public transport is systemic and/or primarily reliant on legal recourse. By contrast, discourses presenting sexual harassment as symptomatic of broader gender inequality is less frequent. Moreover, these media platforms belong to an assemblage of patriarchal social-power holders that collaborate with established law and order to facilitate a blame game, thereby relieving the same stakeholders of ownership and accountability. Given the power of news media in constructing meta-narratives of safety (and nudging policymakers), journalists must tread responsibly on issues of blame, women’s safety, and their rights to the city.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T12:40:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111913
       
  • Mainstream media use for far-right mobilisation on the alt-tech online
           platform Gab

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      Authors: Mario Peucker, Thomas J Fisher
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Far-right movements tend to have an ambivalent relationship with mainstream media. On the one hand, they often express animosity towards traditional media, accusing them of spreading ‘fake news’ and being part of a hostile conspiracy against ordinary (white) people. On the other hand, this often antagonist perception of the media does not stop far-right actors from using mainstream reporting for their ideological online messaging. This contradictory relationship is situated in a broader societal context shaped by, among other factors, widespread mistrust towards the media, an increasingly polarised media landscape and the recent proliferation of a hyper-partisan online media ecosystem at the far-right fringes. Against this contextual backdrop, this multimethod study analyses over 45,000 posts from Australian users of the far-right alt-tech online platform Gab to examine the use of mainstream media sources for their ideological messaging. This is complemented by a qualitative in-depth analysis of 298 posts that share mainstream media content, identifying posting patterns of incorporating or reframing mainstream media outputs that seek to communicate far-right ideologies within the ideologically charged online community on Gab.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T06:28:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111943
       
  • Commercialising potential as a critical factor of differential media
           management: a cultural zoning study of China’s regulation of mukbang and
           online eating disorder communities

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      Authors: Sijun Shen
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to research on China’s (differential) media regulations by studying China’s management of mukbang and online eating disorder communities, both of which feature binge eating in varying media forms. China tolerates the former insofar as the content is modulated and monetised but has completely eradicated the latter. This research draws on Luzhou Li’s cultural zoning to address China’s differential regulations that expedite media products’ monetisation while upholding the Party’s socialist legacy. The article demonstrates commercialising potential in participants’ capacity and willingness to be monetised and absorbed by the internet industry and argues that this is a critical factor contributing to China’s differential governance of the two media forms. The research adds nuances to China’s internet and censorship research by highlighting the multiplexity and adaptivity of China’s censorship with new cases.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:47:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111950
       
  • Normative foundations of media welfare: Perspectives from the Nordic
           countries

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      Authors: Peter Jakobsson, Johan Lindell, Fredrik Stiernstedt
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      What does media welfare mean from a normative perspective' The notion of media welfare and “the media welfare state” has mainly been used descriptively, to depict the particular way in which the media are organized in the Nordic welfare states. In this article, we explore media welfare from a normative perspective. Our intention is to open up a discussion about the normative and political implications of the notion of media welfare and to bring the concept into the contemporary discussion on normative perspectives regarding the media.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111914
       
  • Algorithmic power and African indigenous languages: search engine
           autocomplete and the global multilingual Internet

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      Authors: Peter Chonka, Stephanie Diepeveen, Yidnekachew Haile
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Predictive language technologies – such as Google Search’s Autocomplete – constitute forms of algorithmic power that reflect and compound global power imbalances between Western technology companies and multilingual Internet users in the global South. Increasing attention is being paid to predictive language technologies and their impacts on individual users and public discourse. However, there is a lack of scholarship on how such technologies interact with African languages. Addressing this gap, the article presents data from experimentation with autocomplete predictions/suggestions for gendered or politicised keywords in Amharic, Kiswahili and Somali. It demonstrates that autocomplete functions for these languages and how users may be exposed to harmful content due to an apparent lack of filtering of problematic ‘predictions’. Drawing on debates on algorithmic power and digital colonialism, the article demonstrates that global power imbalances manifest here not through a lack of online African indigenous language content, but rather in regard to the moderation of content across diverse cultural and linguistic contexts. This raises dilemmas for actors invested in the multilingual Internet between risks of digital surveillance and effective platform oversight, which could prevent algorithmic harms to users engaging with platforms in a myriad of languages and diverse socio-cultural and political environments.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221104705
       
  • Transcending Instagram: Affective Swedish hashtags taking intimate
           feminist entanglements from viral to ‘IRL’

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      Authors: Astri Moksnes Barbala
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how affective hashtags on Instagram can contribute to forming intimate feminist entanglements transcending the digital sphere, resulting in offline demonstrations and rallies. In tracing the use of three Swedish hashtags emerging in the wake of #metoo, all surrounding women’s experiences with sexual harassment and violence, it is argued that affective hashtags can be a central component for explaining how social media-based campaigns can surpass online spaces and transition into more traditional forms of non-mediated feminist activity. Drawing from a 3-year immersion in feminist communities on Instagram, the article shows how hashtags here are reconceptualized into ‘affect triggers’, intimately entangling human and nonhuman entities along the way. It is suggested that a combination of feminist affect theory and insights from science and technology studies (STS) may offer a fruitful methodology for providing insights into the political potential of affect in forming augmented feminist realities.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T12:40:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111930
       
  • Pixel politics and satellite interpretation in the Syrian war

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      Authors: Fiona A Greenland
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The pixel is a fundamental element of contemporary visual culture, with pictorial and perceptual properties that affect the interpretation of the digital composition as a whole. Despite its importance, however, the pixel remains a neglected object of analysis in cultural sociology and critical media studies. To advance a framework of pixel studies I present a hermeneutical approach. Empirically, I focus on the pixel’s political and socio-technical dimensions through satellite images of violence in the Syrian conflict zone (2011–2017). Through interviews and observations, I study the satellite programmers, technicians, archeologists, and anthropologists who comprised an interdisciplinary effort to interpret satellite pictures of archeological damage and other forms of cultural violence during the war. Their interpretations, some of which were the basis for consequential decisions by US policymakers, involved isolating as few as two pixels on the screen. To explain what this entailed, I draw on theories from Alberto Romele and Don Ihde to situate the pixel within a hermeneutic circle through which satellite images were ‘read’ at different levels. My findings have implications for broader sociological and media studies critiques of the epistemic status of digital media in light of their deep interrelations of politics, technology, and people.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T11:42:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221077169
       
  • Mediated forensics and militant evidence: rethinking the camera as weapon

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      Authors: Patrick Brian Smith, Ryan Watson
      First page: 36
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on new media technologies and practices that are reshaping how human rights media activism is practiced, disseminated and received. Through an examination of two works by the research agency Forensic Architecture, we examine how these new technologies and practices aim to reframe and deploy forms of raw media evidence in human rights struggles and broader modes of political activism. We also consider how these nascent forms of activist media practice are indebted to the broader legacies of radical documentary practice, particularly through the theoretical lineage of the “camera as weapon.” The new technological and aesthetic strategies being developed and utilized by these groups are radically reshaping investigatory methodologies and collaborative practices across contemporary human rights, documentary, and new media practice. Ultimately, within these new ecologies of media practice, raw forms of media evidence are reframed and redeployed; entering into larger assemblages and ecologies to examine – and concomitantly resist – formations of political power and state violence. This is a practice that we term “mediated forensics.”
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T11:31:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221088954
       
  • Straight and cisgender actors playing queer and trans characters: the
           views of Australian screen stakeholders

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      Authors: Rob Cover
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A concept of visibility frames much scholarship and public writing on LGBTQ+ representation in film and television, and underpins diversity reporting and inclusivity measurement. Although visibility is often depicted as a social good, there is a growing critical interest in asking if there are different kinds of visibility, and how these might be differentially valued. This paper reports insights gained from interviews with Australian stakeholders involved in the production of screen entertainment with LGBTQ+ content. The study found that stakeholders are motivated by to create texts that make LGBTQ+ stories and characters visible. The range of approaches to visibility was, however, nuanced and diverse: some understood any LGBTQ+ representation as valuable, while others discussed visibility in contexts of character depth, anti-stereotyping, and visibility tempered by concepts of human dignity. Although visibility is perceived diversely, it remains a significant lens by which creative artists involved in LGBTQ+ texts understand their work.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T06:42:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221104701
       
  • Techno-cultural domestication of online Tarot reading in contemporary
           China

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      Authors: Han Fu, Yihan Li, Francis LF Lee
      First page: 74
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the contemporary popularization of Tarot reading on China’s prominent online video platform Bilibili. It tries to make sense of the cultural and political import of the phenomenon through the conceptual lens of techno-cultural domestication, defined as a process in which a non-native cultural artifact or practice becomes embedded in and tamed by a techno-cultural arena in a receiver country. Based on digital ethnography and textual analysis, the article presents how Chinese online Tarot diviners constructed their participatory ritual by drawing upon the symbols of Western occultism and the technological affordances of Bilibili, especially the function of danmu. However, Tarot divination was also brought in line with dominant social values and state ideologies. It ultimately became a form of ‘sheer entertainment’ promoting common sense ideas, an image of a good Chinese citizen, private solutions to life’s challenges, and a positive social atmosphere.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221104700
       
  • Careful consumption and aspirational ethics in the media and cultural
           industries: Cancelling, quitting, screening, optimising

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      Authors: Maura Edmond
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      We are witnessing an era of increased intensity of consumer activism (and its discontents) within the arts, cultural and media industries. Ethical, radical, activist and even ‘woke’ consumer interests are now actively catered to across almost all goods and services, from food, fashion and fast-moving consumer goods to tourism, transport and finance. The aim of this paper is to analyse another field where these practices have recently focussed – the media and cultural industries. Drawing on interviews with 20 self-identified feminist and ethical consumers, this article examines how hyperconscious ethical consumption of cultural and media content is lived out and experienced as careful consumption. How are these careful audience activities described, rationalised and understood by the interview participants' What deliberative processes do they undertake and how does that guide them to certain conclusions about what media, art and culture they are willing to watch or not, where they draw the line, and why' This article shows how perceptions of consumer choice, responsibility and culpability are being channelled into an aspirational ethics, involving forms of self-improvement, self-care and self-control such as screening and filtering content, ‘cancelling’ and boycotting media, and attempts to correct, optimise and diversify our tastes and interests.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T02:05:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221099615
       
  • Travel blogging, professionalism, and the changing boundaries of knowledge
           production

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      Authors: Ivy Ashe
      First page: 108
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Bloggers have long been seen as challenges to journalistic authority. This study focuses specifically on professional travel bloggers and their own self-understandings of what it means to be a professional. Is this understanding distinct from the professional structures that guide journalism' How might these different self-understandings impact the knowledge produced by each group of media workers' The implications of this project are particularly important given that people rely on travel media to help construct their own understandings of distant locations. It is crucial to understand the epistemic foundations of that location-based knowledge. Findings from this purposive survey sample indicate that travel bloggers’ specialized knowledge comes largely in the form of self-marketing and creating a recognizable brand. In keeping with previous findings from blog content analyses, showcasing authenticity is also seen as crucial for blogging success.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T02:08:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221099617
       
  • Making sense of the invisible: cognitive mapping, affective realities and
           the Irish/Northern Irish Border

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      Authors: Faye Mercier
      First page: 126
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      As Brexit negotiations continue to draw criticism nearly two years on from the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union, many media outlets have concentrated on making sense of what has been dubbed the ‘Brexit circus’. In particular, significant media attention has been directed towards obstacles to Brexit’s progression, such as the issue of the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland and the ‘backstop’ arrangement. Through an examination of different media efforts to explain the border issue, this paper will discuss how conventional reporting methods have been unable to make this issue comprehensible to the individual. This paper will suggest that a hypertextual aesthetic form would provide a more effective means of making sense of the complexity of the border issue and its relationship to global political and economic structures. However, an understanding of the border issue also requires an understanding of the affective reality of life in this region and the history upon which this reality is founded. In this manner, this paper also argues that representational regimes capable of conveying affective realities could contribute important experiential dimensions to efforts to render dominant political and economic structures both cognisable and contestable.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:49:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221111952
       
  • ‘A wedding through a piece of glass’: Transnational Tunisian family
           communication as driver of ICT adoption

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      Authors: Ikram Toumi
      First page: 142
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study focuses on the role of ICT in transnational communication between family members, mainly between elderly parents and adult children living abroad. A semi-structured interview study (N = 32) was conducted during Fall 2015 in three neighborhoods in the city of Sousse, Tunisia. In the study, Skype played a central role in the respondents’ transnational communication and a driving factor of technology adoption. Families used Skype to communicate with their migrant family members and virtually engage in family activities such as cooking and attending wedding events through the screens of their laptops, tablets, and mobile phones. In other words, Skype evolved from a simple online communication medium to a platform for a transnational family space; it assumes a Tunisian identity and essence stemming from the social practices and experiences of the Tunisian users and becomes shaped by their values and traditions.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T06:45:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221099616
       
  • The trouble with ‘quiet advocacy’: local journalism and reporting
           climate change in rural and regional Australia

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      Authors: Gabi Mocatta, Eve Mayes, Kristy Hess, Michael Everitt Hartup
      First page: 157
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Climate activists and environmental communicators stress that addressing the climate crisis requires both global and local advocacy for transformational change-making. While journalists in small, rural communities are known to actively advocate on issues for the common good, there has been little investigation of local media advocacy on climate change in rural Australia: a region at the forefront of global heating. This paper analyses the accounts of local journalists of their media coverage of the School Strikes 4 Climate in rural and regional Australia, as an empirical entry point for a conceptual discussion of local media advocacy in reporting climate change. We find that normative ideas about journalism coupled with polarised community views on climate change hindered these journalists from taking an advocacy stance. We explore and critique the tacit ‘quiet advocacy’ practices used by these journalists reporting on climate in rural and regional Australia.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T11:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221104686
       
  • Trauma and digital media: Introduction to crosscurrents special section

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      Authors: Amit Pinchevski, Michael Richardson
      First page: 178
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Associations between trauma and media theory are longstanding, going back at least to Walter Benjamin’s observations on technology and modernity, which were themselves informed by Freud’s 1920 speculations on war trauma following WWI. A century later, and in the wake of numerous conflicts, catastrophes, and far-reaching technological transformations—and of course the COVID pandemic—it is time to reconsider the relation between trauma and media, digital platforms in particular. While some significant scholarship has noted the intersections of modern media technologies such as photography, film, radio, television, and recently digital and algorithmic media, with the conception and experience of trauma, a more systematic theoretical consideration of the relation between media and trauma remains to be developed. And with the intensifying reliance on new and old media in these pandemic times the question of these relations is increasingly urgent. Moving beyond conceptions of media as representing or inducing trauma, this special section of Crosscurrents explores how (digital) media and trauma shape one another.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T06:45:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221122244
       
  • Melancholic media: virtual reality, traumatic loss, and magic

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      Authors: Hannah Zeavin
      First page: 181
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay concerns itself with the status of ‘melancholic media’, or digital objects in psychic life after trauma on the grounds of three very different cases: Replika (a chatbot with avatar), Deep Nostalgia (the reanimating of family photographs), and Not the Only One (a noncommercial virtual agent). If for Freud, trauma is more than mind can endure; these surrogates both suggest concretization that which is being endured. Instead of directly confronting trauma and its overwhelm, these users might omnipotently reproduce a literal figure of their loss. Rather than examining these human and non-human interactions via the lens of the uncanny, I will return to the status of objects as melancholic media to think about psychic states in relationship to trauma and its multi-temporal aftermath. I trouble what these digital partial revivifications might do to and for psyches.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T09:38:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221126062
       
  • Reconsidering trauma and symbolic wounds in times of online misogyny and
           platforms

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      Authors: Jacob Johanssen
      First page: 191
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides an exploratory discussion of the misogynist online incel community and its discourses around mental health. Incels’ discussion of mental health conditions, trauma and victimhood is outlined in relation to Allen Meek’s development of the concept of the symbolic wound. It is argued that incels’ alleged trauma constitutes the construction of a symbolic wound as a marker of group identity as well as a means of shocking and potentially traumatising others. The concept of the symbolic wound is further developed through the psychoanalytic notion of dis/inhibition which shows how incels are torn between modes of desiring and symbolically destroying women. The collective identity of the symbolic wound and its (non)-relation to trauma can thus be more fragile and contradictory than has been discussed in the literature so far.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T09:04:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221127362
       
  • Drone trauma: violent mediation and remote warfare

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      Authors: Michael Richardson
      First page: 202
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      For people subject to drone war in Gaza, Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere, the violence and trauma inflicted by remotely piloted aerial systems such as the MQ-9 Reaper takes place at a remove from the sensors, networks, algorithms and interfaces that launch Hellfire and other missiles from the air. Brutal death and wounding bely the precision rhetoric, technocratic discourses and technoscientific imaginaries that shroud drone warfare in popular and political debate over its merits. Much has been said about the traumas of drone operators, but less about the traumas produced by drone warfare in those individuals and communities subject to it. In this short article, I pursue the question of how those traumas on the ground are bound up with the media-technological entities, processes and affects that compose the military drone apparatus: sensors, networks, algorithms, interfaces, atmospheres and missiles. My core contention is that the trauma of drone warfare is characterised by the violent mediation of drone systems, which produce an intensive relation between the not-yet of traumatic violence having commenced before it is felt and the already-too-late of that experience.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T06:48:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221122257
       
  • Social media’s canaries: content moderators between digital labor
           and mediated trauma

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      Authors: Amit Pinchevski
      First page: 212
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper takes recent PTSD claims by content moderators working for Microsoft and Google as a starting point to discuss the changing nature of trauma in the context of social media and algorithmic culture. Placing these claims in the longer history of how media came to be regarded by clinicians as potentially traumatic, it considers content moderation as a form of immaterial labor, which brings the possibility to be traumatized into the cycle of digital labor. Therefore, to the extent that content moderators’ trauma exists as a clinical condition, it cannot be taken as an incidental side-effect but as a built-in potentiality. It is about the commodification of traumatic vulnerability itself. The discussion then proceeds to speculate about the possibility of using algorithms to identify potentially traumatic content and what would that mean for the understanding of trauma, especially as a mediated experience.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T11:41:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221122226
       
 
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