Subjects -> BEAUTY CULTURE (Total: 22 journals)
    - BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)
    - PERFUMES AND COSMETICS (2 journals)

BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Achiote.com - Revista Eletrônica de Moda     Open Access  
American Journal of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Studies in Fashion & Beauty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fashion and Textiles     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Flavour and Fragrance Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ground Breaking     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Cosmetic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Materiali di Estetica     Open Access  
Media, Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Mind Culture and Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Parallax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Professional Beauty     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription  
Transactions of the Burgon Society     Open Access  
Similar Journals
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Media, Culture & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.846
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-4437 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3675
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • ‘What a funny looking video’: Using allegorical representations of
           technological change to reflect on future digital communication and design
           challenges

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      Authors: Yaron Meron
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents a reflective examination of challenges to design and communication from the current digital revolution, using the prism of a 1980s television advertisement for the Yellow Pages. Originating at the same time as the height of the desktop publishing revolution, the advert illuminates a transitional period in the evolution of digital technology and media communications, marked by changing user practices and experiences. The advert’s storyline follows a young man’s quest to convert an old cine film (of his father) to videotape for his mother’s birthday, in the process showcasing the impending shift from analogue to digital technologies and encapsulating the multifaceted implications and transitional challenges of the period. The hybrid setting of technologies, alongside the tensions, confusion and ambiguities of different stakeholders metaphorically symbolises and can be contrasted alongside, the challenges impacting the design, media and communications industry of the period and can inform reflection on contemporary challenges. Engaging with the narrative, the Yellow Pages advert is used as a creative device which functions as a cultural, historical, narrative lens with which to contrast against contemporary (and future) transitional challenges within the digital revolution.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:16:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241231875
       
  • Navigating the digital age: The gray digital divide and digital inclusion
           in China

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      Authors: Haili Li, Genia Kostka
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Rapid digitalization and an aging population are leading to an increasingly prominent age-based digital divide among the world’s elderly population. This study focuses on China, one of the most rapidly aging and digitalizing countries in the world. Employing a mixed-method approach, this research examines how elderly individuals experience the digital transformation and the associated digital divide. The findings suggest that the elderly interviewees encounter multiple barriers to learning and using digital technologies, which highlights the significant role of social support and networks in facilitating their adaptation to the digital society and lifestyle. Attitudes toward digital engagement and digitalization vary greatly among the elderly, ranging from being optimistic to feeling left behind and having multiple concerns. Our findings further reveal that the Chinese government has implemented numerous digital apps tailored to the demands of the elderly and provided training opportunities to bridge the gray digital divide. This emphasizes the responsiveness and adaptiveness of Chinese authorities in addressing pressing societal issues. However, we identify a gap in digital outreach, as most elderly interviewees have limited awareness of government digital inclusion policies and programs. This article contributes to digital divide research and offers practical implications for countries grappling with the gray digital divide.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:11:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229382
       
  • From studio to screen: The production processes of Polish televised
           football and discursive (re)constructions of race/ethnicity

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      Authors: Arne van Lienden, Jacco van Sterkenburg, Mélodine Sommier, Radoslaw Kossakowski
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we shed light on the relationship between the production processes in televised football in Poland and representations of race/ethnicity. Previous research has extensively explored representations of race/ethnicity in mediated sports texts, but there remains a gap in understanding the production processes and their connection to these representations, particularly in contexts beyond the Anglosphere. In order to address this gap, in this study we conducted interviews with football media professionals and conducted field visits at football media organizations in Poland. Our findings reveal that football media professionals employ various discursive strategies when giving meaning to racial/ethnic diversity in televised football and within the football media workplace, which occasionally incorporate stereotypes. Generally, football media professionals took a color-evasive stance, and argued that they do not speak through racial/ethnic stereotypes in their work. Critical reflections on the production process are also hindered by the everyday practices and dominant working cultures in the football media office, which is constructed and maintained by media professionals as a predominantly White and masculine space. We contextualize these findings in light of previous studies on race/ethnicity in sport media, and the complex discourses surrounding Whiteness in the Polish context.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:07:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229191
       
  • More than keyboard heroes' #ichoosefish, disaster framing, and
           environmental protests in Vietnam

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      Authors: Thai Nguyen Van Quoc, Elen-Maarja Trell, Gunnar Mallon
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates the role of social media in mobilizing environmentalism amid authoritarian restrictions, focusing on the Vietnam coastal pollution of 2016. It contributes to current academic debates by showing how elements that are apparently mundane and irrelevant become the stage for political action within social media. We examined the interface of connective actions (social media activism) – collective actions (protests) and the role of food symbolism in translating digital activism into physical resistance that bridges the distance between rural and urban areas. Data were collected from Facebook and Twitter, as well as semi-structured interviews, policy documents, and national newspapers and broadcasts. Food symbolism, exemplified by #ichoosefish, helped personalize grievances and materialize protest actions amid the government’s countermeasures. The results further show that by using social media, especially Facebook, the activists managed to rationalize their political engagement in a non-participatory context and mobilize protests during political restrictions by arguing that their ‘apolitical’ actions were motivated by food-based grievances associated with personal, environmentalist and nationalist concerns. Food symbolism is thus essential in transitioning from connective actions to collective actions.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T12:24:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229165
       
  • Mapping a pluralistic continuum of approaches to digital disconnection

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      Authors: Morgan Quinn Ross, Alicia Gilbert, Julius Klingelhoefer, Mora Matassi, Lise-Marie Nassen, Sara Van Bruyssel, Alice Verlinden, Douglas A Parry
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The study of digital disconnection – the voluntary non-use of digital media – is a growing research domain characterized by increasingly pluralistic approaches. To map this diverse terrain, we offer an analytical heuristic: a continuum of approaches to digital disconnection. This tool proposes one primary dimension – viewing digital disconnection as individually functional to socially meaningful (ontology) – and two secondary, concomitant dimensions – holding post-positive to interpretivist perspectives on knowledge generation (epistemology) as well as applying quantitative to qualitative methods (methodology). We offer examples of scholarship along the continuum and advocate for the complementarity of different approaches. Although the continuum is not a universal framework, it provides a tool for scholars to review the domain and for digital disconnection researchers specifically to locate themselves on and build bridges across the continuum. We hope that this continuum supports and expands the pluralistic nature of digital disconnection scholarship into the future.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T08:33:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241228785
       
  • Indigenous dance, cultural continuity, and resistance: A netnographic
           analysis of the Palestinian Dabke in the diaspora

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      Authors: Zeana Hamdonah, Janelle Joseph
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Contending with the structural erasure and appropriation of their land, culture, history, and traditions imposed by the settler state, Palestinians have adopted/adapted traditional cultural elements to further their nationalist aspirations and assert their rights as Palestine’s Indigenous people. In the diaspora, Palestinians practice and perform the dabke folkdance, as a tool of anti-colonial memory maintenance and knowledge transfer. In this context, the dabke has been (re)shaped to keep up with the invasive nature of settler colonialism, by evolving to protect indigeneity, resist imagined settler geographies, and represent an embodied landmark of Palestinian existence and history. In this paper, we examine the digital platforms of a diasporic dabke dance academy in Ontario, Canada, highlighting the innovations of using social media to broadcast the teachings and performance of dabke while promoting Palestinian cultural continuity against settler colonialism. We employ the theoretical framework of sumud, a specifically Palestinian mode of steadfast anti-colonial being/becoming to explain that the performance of dance, and the subsequent broadcasting via digital social media platforms is an innovative approach to counter settler colonialism. Cultural and community leaders such as dancers, teachers, and choreographers celebrate Palestinian resilience, resistance, and restoration, while mobilizing global solidarities through social media and dance.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T08:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241228735
       
  • ‘Hypocrite!’ Affective and argumentative engagement on Twitter,
           following the Christchurch terrorist attack

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      Authors: John E. Richardson, Eva Haifa Giraud, Elizabeth Poole, Ed de Quincey
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article intervenes in debates about whether public-facing social media enable the rapid spread of hate speech, or whether these platforms can offer valuable opportunities to contest it. Advancing scholarship on ‘networked counter-publics’ and research emphasising the affective dimensions of digital media, we identify three different modes of counter-public contestation that coalesced on Twitter in the immediate aftermath of the Christchurch terrorist attack. Using a combined keyword and hashtag search, our research project sampled 3,099,138 tweets posted on/about the Christchurch attack and its repercussions, between 15 March 2019 and 15 April 2019. First, we examine two hashtags that trended, approaching these as nodal points for the construction of different affective responses to the terrorist attack. Second, we analyse instances where users quote-tweeted the condolences of politicians, rejecting their sentiments, arguing that the sincerity conditions of the Speech Act (condolence) were not met. Here, we focus on the ways that people invoke a discourse of indignation at either the past actions or current character of the politician, to justify rejecting their statements. Our findings illustrate a need to depart from broad narratives about how the affordances of particular social media platforms lend themselves to the circulation or contestation of hate. Instead, we argue, it is important to develop more situated empirical and conceptual approaches to interrogate how specific relationships between affective publics and structures of feeling enable or constrain political possibilities.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T08:33:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229322
       
  • Symbolic power of sports journalists as challenged by external recognition
           of women’s sports performance

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      Authors: Robin Guyot, Fabien Ohl, Lucie Schoch
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines journalists’ working experiences to understand how they hinder the recognition of female footballers’ performances. It relies on 16 semi-structured interviews with Swiss sports journalists on Swiss French-speaking television. Guided by Pierre Bourdieu’s theory, the study shows that advancements in the recognition of women’s football are promoted by a combination of external actors’ economic and political powers, while hindrances arise from internal factors within sports journalism. The embodied norms, routines and professional practices of journalists – that define performance as physical capital and naturalize hierarchies between women’s and men’s football – are disrupted by the credit (i.e. symbolic capital) given to women’s football by the Swiss football league and sponsors for political and economic reasons. This specific case of football enhances our understanding of the cultural and social factors that hinder the recognition and appreciation of performances by women in sports. Further, the study largely highlights how texts and their symbolic power are embedded in the social conditions of information production.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T08:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229170
       
  • Contesting the intermediary power: How Chinese MCNs interact with
           platforms, creators, and advertisers

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      Authors: Weiyu Zhang, Tong Tong
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      China currently has the largest Multi-Channel Networks (MCN) market in the world and developed a multi-layered ecosystem, which presents unique insights into our understanding of platforms as infrastructures. Through 18 semi-structured interviews and the walkthrough method, we found that Chinese MCNs can be divided into the following categories: (1) Live-streaming guilds, (2) E-commerce MCNs, (3) Agency MCNs, and (4) Old media MCNs. We also found that Chinese content platforms have not fully monopolized the intermediary power because they rely on Chinese MCNs to take on the risks of professional content production. In response, the intermediary risks of MCNs are also transferred to creators who work for MCNs. MCNs can help creators to game the algorithm and monetize their content, but can also exploit creators and leave them unprotected. The ambiguous roles played by Chinese MCNs point to an uncertain future for content platforms’ infrastructuralization at large.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T12:52:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241229306
       
  • Remembering Marielle Franco: Haunting online presence and the
           memorialization of resistance on social media

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      Authors: Raiana de Carvalho
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Social media has transformed how we construct collective memory, with increased opportunities for dispersed individuals and groups to participate in collective remembrance. With the ever-changing nature of social media practices, the field of critical memory studies begs for more research on the role of digital media in memory construction. Based on a critical rhetorical analysis of YouTube and Instagram archives, I examine how social media is used to remember Marielle Franco, a Brazilian black queer city councilwoman killed in 2018 by former police officers. Specifically, I argue that two communication strategies – mediating a resistant specter and mediating something-to-be-done – are articulated on social media in the construction of a haunting online presence of Marielle. I further suggest that this digital memorialization is consequential for how Brazil remembers the racial, gendered, and social injustices that inform Brazil’s past, present, and possible future. The analysis contributes to previous literature on cultural memory by articulating the notion of haunting online presence as a heuristic tool to theorize about public mourning, digital memory, and activism.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T10:29:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241228734
       
  • How “original” are Netflix Original films' Mapping and understanding
           the recycling of content in the age of streaming cinema

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      Authors: Eduard Cuelenaere
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines Netflix’s recycling content strategies in the era of streaming cinema. It starts from the assumption that because of the different institutional logic at work in the land of SVODs, the affordances that recycled content brings may not be as effective (and necessary) as it has been in Hollywood. Using a database-centered approach, we analyze 658 Netflix Original films. Between 2015 and 2022, Netflix released 440 non-recycled Originals, showcasing a commitment to offering a high quantity of niche films. The dataset equally shows that the percentage of recycled films (33%) follow a linear upward pattern, highlighting the persistence of conservative content strategies. More specifically, (re-)adaptations constituted the biggest chunk of recycled content (68%), as these allow the streamer to quickly fill its catalog with recyclable IP. Netflix’s inclination toward sequels (16%), spin-offs (6%), and prequels (2%) aligns with its sequelization strategy, while also leveraging its own IP. Remakes (8%) play a less significant role, likely due to the relatively young age of Netflix’s content library. The article concludes that Netflix may, in fact, be less of a disruptive force to the film industry in terms of the diversity of its content creation, prompting further recycling of existing properties.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231224081
       
  • Remembering a disastrous past to imagine catastrophic future(s) on social
           media: The expected Istanbul earthquake

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      Authors: Erol Gülüm
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how collective memory of the 1999 Marmara earthquake frames collective thinking of “the expected Istanbul earthquake” through numerous catastrophic earthquake scenarios posted on the prominent Turkish social media platform called Ekşi Sözlük for nearly two decades. The article first integrates memory, media, and disaster studies to theorize how a looming catastrophe is (re)imagined in retrospect. It then analyzes earthquake scenarios using representative samples to illustrate how the oscillatory dynamics and acts of disaster memory shape the future thinking of a not-yet-come threat within a Turkish social media ecology.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:08:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437241228724
       
  • Paralympic Broadcasting in Sub-Saharan Africa: Production Politics and the
           Reimagined Postcolonial

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      Authors: Emma Pullen, Mufunanji Magalasi, Jessica Noske-Turner
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games was broadcast for the first time on free to air (FTA) television across 49 territories in Sub-Saharan Africa. This article charts the story of this historic development and marks the first study to explore Paralympic broadcast production beyond the cultural specificities of Global North/Western-centric media practices, infrastructure availability and disability discourses. Drawing on an integrated qualitative dataset, including interviews with key individuals from the International Paralympic Committee, TV Media Sport (the broadcast partner) and one national Sub-Saharan broadcaster (Malawi Broadcasting Corporation), this article documents the challenges, logic and politics behind the Sub-Saharan African Paralympic broadcast. In so doing, we consider the extent to which these articulated with epistemic differences, underlying neocolonial sentiments and (mis-)understandings of the geopolitical contours and disability politics of the Sub-Saharan African region. We consider the important role national Paralympic broadcasters may play in the sustainable development of the broadcasts across this region, particularly in relation to its pedagogical value for harnessing progressive localised disability politics, disability activism, and social justice.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:06:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231225033
       
  • Struggling for the right to struggle: Cultural workers’ labour
           rights and unions

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      Authors: Hoyoung Kim
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how writers in the South Korean broadcasting industry have collectively struggled against their precarious working conditions and faced distinctive difficulties in taking their collective actions, including unionization. Based on semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 23 research participants, this paper examines why and how these South Korean writers have established various forms of collective worker organization: from a professional association to informal grassroots communities, to a women-only trade union, to two unions of media workers who are freelance or on contract. I argue that the activism of these writers reflects the intersection of different identities, ranging from women to freelancers to cultural workers and that their activism promotes the idea that working creatively, autonomously and equitably should be recognized as a basic labour right.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:05:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231225031
       
  • Towards a theory of participatory diplomacy via the Eurovision Song
           Contest

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      Authors: Jessica Carniel
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The Eurovision Song Contest is officially a non-political event but has nevertheless been a useful tool for participating nations’ public and cultural diplomacy strategies. While Eurovision’s diplomatic utility for states is subject to much scholarly attention, little attention has been paid to how fans and audiences participate actively in these processes as political agents and actors. Drawing upon the frameworks of public diplomacy and participatory culture, this article puts forth the portmanteau concept of ‘participatory diplomacy’ to explain and explore how Eurovision illuminates a particular intersection of public diplomacy and participatory culture wherein the audience actively participates in its cultural platform to shape its political message and meaning.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T04:55:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231224080
       
  • Passing on the “whistle”: Users’ creative engagement with platform
           censorship in an online relay campaign in China

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      Authors: Xiaoping Wu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The advances and proliferation of social media technologies have not only empowered Chinese users with more opportunities for opinion expression and public participation, but also provided the censors with increasingly sophisticated means to monitor and control the public discourse. In this game of cat and mouse, Chinese censors and users are intertwined with each other as new forms of censorship and counter-censorship stimulate both sides to further develop tactics to compete with each other. Drawing on (social) media discourse analysis, this study examines the strategies users adopted in an online relay campaign to keep a censored article alive on WeChat Public Accounts. The analysis highlights three major forms of creative strategies including textual reproductions, multi-semiotic and multimodal reproductions, and technically encoded forms. It also underscores platform censorship as a particular level of censorship where the platform takes responsibility for removing sensitive or perceived sensitive posts and content. This study adds to the growing literature that examines creative strategies of censorship engagement and a more nuanced understanding of the multi-layered online censorship mechanism in China.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T10:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231219132
       
  • Martín-Barbero’s style

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      Authors: Omar Rincón
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In Latin America, Jesús Martín-Barbero is a pop star and a beloved scholar with thousands of followers captured by his original way of thinking, imagining, and researching the relations between communication, culture, and politics. This essay explains five characteristics of Martín-Barbero’s style: (i) his reflections about expressions of popular and mass culture such as music, telenovelas, fairs, and celebrations; (ii) his gaze at and from local territories, identities; (iii) his innovative way of thinking from the Global South while in conversation with Western philosophy; (iv) his proposal for a theory of mediations as a way to understand cultural interactions and the production of social meaning; and (v) an intellectual passion that led him to engage daringly in political issues in society. As one of his students and colleagues, the essay ends with my own notions of what a communication researcher should do/be.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T10:26:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231217167
       
  • Tasks, sacrifices and digitized rituals: interpellating the Indian subject
           through rites of nationalism

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      Authors: Sangeet Kumar
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay advances the concept of ritualized nationalism in order to understand the rise of right wing populism in India. It analyzes Narendra Modi’s strategy of assigning tasks and seeking sacrifices from citizens in the name of nation building to understand how it has helped make nationalism a pervasive phenomenon that is unprecedented in India’s history. The essay utilizes the theory of rituals to claim that the prescribed formats of Modi’s tasks and assignments allow those actions to be distinct and mark the doer as “nationalists” in the digital domain as opposed to those not participating. This has further helped foster and inculcate a nationalistic subject who emerges from the ritual of completing the assigned tasks and publicizing its evidence on social media as an agent who embodies the jingoistic and muscular form of nationalism prevalent in India today. By showing how this process plays out across a series of assigned tasks and sacrifices during Modi’s era, the essay hopes to both add to explanations about the rise of right wing nationalism in India while also showing that each global iteration of populist nationalism has a distinct trajectory and motivation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T12:29:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214190
       
  • Hermeneutics for an anti-hermeneutic age: What the legacy of Jesús
           Martín-Barbero means today

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      Authors: Nick Couldry
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article, after discussing the obstacles to the initial reception of Martín-Barbero’s work on mediation in Europe, analyses its importance to contemporary media research in terms of three factors: mediation, inequality and complexity. Far from being less relevant today, those insights, and Martín-Barbero’s overall insistence on a hermeneutic approach to understanding culture are of huge relevant today in an age when the automation of cultural production and data extraction is characterized by an anti-hermeneutic drive.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-25T10:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231217176
       
  • Between the divine and digital: Parsing Modi’s charismatic avatar

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      Authors: Swapnil Rai
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the production of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s saintly charismatic avatar and the mediations of this avatar that seek to bestow him with exceptional authority. It shows how Modi’s avatar is being incarnated along three intersecting axes. The first axis comprises the broader historical, cultural and religious discursive frameworks that construct Modi as an incarnate charismatic leader. It focuses on his strategic invocation of Mahatma Gandhi through political and persona branding. Next, it unveils how Modi’s charismatic avatar is shaped through embodied performances and the management of bodily optics. Finally, it analyzes the platforming of Modi’s charismatic avatar, which takes place through organized public relations machinery operating in digital realms. Together, these mediations work to advance a Moditva-oriented populist politics that promotes ideological salvation for the nation via a leader whose persona and authority are conceptualized in divine terms undermining the pluralist and inclusive tenets of the Hindu religion.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-25T10:08:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214200
       
  • LGBT+ mainstreaming on strictly come dancing: Queering the norms of
           ballroom dancing

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      Authors: Yen Nee Wong
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper proposes that LGBT+ mainstreaming on reality television programme Strictly Come Dancing creates space for audience demand for radical, authentic representations of same-sex desire and intimacy, both of which challenges normative representations of ballroom dancing. Integrating concepts of normativity and authenticity explored in existing scholarship, I argue against the encountering through a defensive stance, of reality TV’s normalization of queer narratives to promote authentic, inclusive representation. Focusing on dance-themed British reality TV programme for family entertainment, I draw on a queer reading of 285 newspaper articles on Strictly Come Dancing’s same-sex dance partnerships and 35 interviews with LGBT+ equality dancers in the United Kingdom, to conclude that active engagement with mechanisms of normalization can open up spaces for a reclamation of queer representation in its authenticity. The article makes a contribution to media and cultural studies and queer television scholarship through a troubling of anti-normativity, proposing a working with normativity to achieve queer inclusivity.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T04:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231219141
       
  • Mediating emergencies: Defining the relationship between intimate and
           distant disaster communication models

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      Authors: Robert Lazarus
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Disaster communication mediates how people respond to emergency situations. With the rise of new technologies, emerging media practices are being promoted by the state to govern communities at-risk. This article examines emergency smartphone applications rolled out in Australia during the 2020 black summer bushfires. An autoethnographic analysis of the author’s personal experience of sheltering in and evacuating from the coastal town of Mallacoota is employed to assess how current forms of disaster communication mediate emergencies. Focus is placed on the impact of disaster communications on people’s perception of community resilience. The two primary sources of information accessed by people during the bushfires – the state and close relations, construct a theoretical framework for comparing different models of communication. A comparative methodology that draws on archival material and critical discourse investigates the extent to which competing sources of information generate a productive conflict. I develop a model that defines distant transmissions and intimate exchanges for the shifting media histories of disaster communication, and argue the relationship cultivated by competing forms can generate resilience when disaster strikes.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T04:55:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231217655
       
  • Personalization of politics through visuals: Interplay of identity,
           ideology, and gender in the 2021 West Bengal Assembly Election Campaign

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      Authors: Debopriya Shome, Taberez Ahmed Neyazi, Sheryl Wei Ting Ng
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Visual messaging is a cornerstone of campaign strategies of political parties and candidates that can complement and amplify the effects of the written/spoken word. Through a thematic analysis of the Facebook ads of the two main political parties during the 2021 West Bengal assembly elections in India, this paper shows the interplay of identity, ideology, and gender in the visual communication strategies of political parties on Facebook as they tried to mobilize voters in an intensely polarized context. Both the incumbent and the opposition parties framed issues in their visual campaigns that were culturally situated; these issues centered around identity and ideology while simultaneously emphasizing strong leadership with gendered rhetoric. Our findings contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of political personalization, highlighting the intricate interplay between gender, ideological inclinations, and cultural identity, all of which profoundly influence the personalization process in the context of an intensely polarized election campaign.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T04:53:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214189
       
  • The habitus of misogyny: Bourdieu and the institutionalization of sexist
           abuse in the video games industry

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      Authors: Joshua Foust
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Sexism in video games is widespread, but most studies focus on sexism in representation and/or in play. Few studies examine sexism as a practice of production. The 2021 lawsuit by California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) against Activision Blizzard for pervasive sexual harassment and abuse highlighted several misogynist practices at one of the largest video game companies in the world. This study uses a directed qualitative analysis of the DFEH lawsuit to understand the practice of misogyny and sexism in the video game industry, using Activision Blizzard as an exemplar. Informed by Pierre Bourdieu’s theories about cultural fields of production, it argues that sexism is a core value, a habitus, of the industry, and suggests areas for further research.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T09:04:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231219383
       
  • ‘I’m also slightly conscious of how much I’m listening to
           something’: Music streaming and the transformation of music listening

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      Authors: Michael James Walsh
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on Erving Goffman’s microsociology, this article explores the networking of music streaming technologies and their convergence with social media. Acts of privatized music listening that were once seamlessly secluded in back regions like the home and therefore removed from the view of others can now become presented more widely in front region contexts. Reporting on in-depth qualitative interviews with users of music streaming and how they perceive their musical listening has been altered, I investigate some of the affordances of streaming as it contributes to an unravelling or collapsing of demarcations between front and back region activity. As a result, users of streaming services describe how they become mindful of how they undertake their music listening and how these technologies consequently require careful management.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T09:00:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231219142
       
  • Neo-anachronism' The coiled temporalities of South-South media flows

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      Authors: Marwan M Kraidy
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article mobilizes Jesus Martín Barbero’s magnum opus, Communication, Culture, and Hegemony, towards a better understanding of the contemporary global success of Turkish television drama, known as dizi, in Latin America, the land of the once-mighty telenovela. Hilighting Martín-Barbero’s centrality to my own intellectual project on the transnational connection and transcultural resonances between the Middle East and Latin America, I draw on preliminary fieldwork in Argentina and Mexico, where Turkish dizi have been hits, to revisit Martín-Barbero’s pivotal conceptualization of mediaciones and accounts for forces of global media competition, aesthetic mimicry, and the fundamental problematic of South-to-South relations that got a new lease on life with the success of dizi in Latin America. Ultimately, I probe Martín-Barbero’s “precious anachronism” to elaborate a notion of “coiled temporality” that emerges between different geocultural zones through the consumption of narrative television fiction.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T08:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231217168
       
  • Scripting Disability as the ‘New’ Bollywood: Pitching, reflecting,
           researching and negotiating

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      Authors: Priyam Sinha
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I explore the role of screenwriters and dialogue writers within the more extensive filmmaking process of New Bollywood. Drawing on ethnographic data, I foreground the creative tools, research and negotiations that prompt screenwriters to conceptualise and pitch character arcs that feature disability while positioning the writer as central to diversify film genres. By building on scholarship on production cultures, scripting and disability studies, I draw upon factors that navigate the writer’s gaze from non-hereditary filmmaking networks to foreground disabilities in scripts and character arcs in efforts to strategise that they do not classify as reductive pathologisations and supercripping cultures. This article pays close attention to the conditions, identity politics, biases and situated vulnerabilities of writers that shape the assemblages of scripting disability rhetorics. The data from semi-structured interviews, with an explicit focus on three films and their script ideation and production pedagogies, illustrate these interlinkages and insights.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T06:14:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214635
       
  • The possibilities Jesús Martín Barbero left for us to understand
           Latin America

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      Authors: Amparo Marroquín Parducci
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay analyzes the Ph.D dissertation of Jesús Martín-Barbero, written in 1972 in Louvain, Belgium. Equipped with Paul Ricoeur’s explorations on how a text is constructed and Paulo Freire’s insistence on the emancipatory nature of the communicative action, Martín-Barbero centered his scholarship on the urgency to study and understand Latin American popular cultures. Martín-Barbero’s dissertation centers the great problem of academic analysis on language as the subject that acts in the world. To explore the connection of language and action, Martín-Barbero proposes three historically situated language devices that allow individuals to position themselves and move toward praxis: myth, prophecy, and poetry.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T10:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231217161
       
  • The geopolitics of disease prevention: Military analogies against COVID-19
           in Hong Kong, Taiwan, beyond

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      Authors: Eva Cheuk-Yin Li, Po-Han Lee
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military metaphors have been used intensively and excessively against the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide since its outbreak in 2020. In this article, we consider “war” and “military” analogies as keywords to approach the pandemic culture by examining the use of war metaphors at the time of COVID-19 and its relationship with selective “war” memories in the first year of the global outbreak of the pandemic. Specifically, we underpin the heterogeneity of such use of metaphors and their relationships with geopolitics, collective memory, and nationalism. We examine the contexts in which these war frames against COVID-19 were articulated and their affective and discursive implications to geopolitics outside of a Western-centric context through two case studies in East Asia – Hong Kong’s bottom-up military analogies in the post-Anti-ELAB era and Taiwan’s biopolitical nationalism against China. Our discussion underscores the significance of contexts in considering the purpose and impact of military metaphors against COVID-19, and also other diseases and even disasters of all kinds in the future, by highlighting the geopolitical trajectories outside of North America and Europe, where regional war memories and military tensions are referenced to inform local definitions of security, safety, and securitization practices.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T10:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231216444
       
  • Roots and trajectories: Essays on the legacy of Jesús Martín-Barbero in
           global communication studies

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      Authors: Clemencia Rodríguez, Patrick Murphy
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      “Roots and Trajectories: Essays on the Legacy of Jesús Martín-Barbero in Global Communication Studies” is an introduction to this special collection for Media, Culture & Society’s Crosscurrents. Our introduction serves to contextualize and frame the role of Martín-Barbero’s theoretical roots and epistemological gaze in the essays authored by Omar Rincón (Colombia), Amparo Marroquín Parducci (El Salvador), Marwan Kraidy (Lebanon) and Nick Couldry (United Kingdom). This introduction positions Martín-Barbero’s work as strong evidence of Latin America’s own epistemological and theoretical formation, as we remind our colleagues in the Global North of the need to dialogue with the South in an effort to de-Westernizing communication theory.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T10:39:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231215700
       
  • A gathering with fire: Exploring the audience reception of internet memes
           about Belfast riots

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      Authors: Martin Lundqvist
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study sheds light upon how memes about rioting in present-day Belfast are read by their audiences. As such, it answers to a distinct research gap in the meme studies literature, which has mostly shied away from in-depth engagements with audiences, favouring instead the intertwined concepts ‘imagined audience’ and the ideological ‘directionality’ of memes. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 19 respondents in Belfast, I develop four themes on how they read memes about political violence. The findings indicate that the concept ‘imagined audience’ is reductive at best, which was evident in this study as interviewees did not blindly follow the ideological ‘directionality’ when reading a meme. Moving beyond this reductive view allowed me to unpack how meme audiences place value in the pop-cultural form of the meme; their take on its ‘imagined author’; how they perceived the meme as a site for identity work, and their emotional engagements with memes.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-20T11:22:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231219154
       
  • Are video streaming services offering incomplete entertainment'

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      Authors: Pınar Ergin
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, in which I focus on the changing possibilities of media entertainment, I examine the increasingly individualized viewing experience through the elements of enjoyment and fun. I argue that video streaming services, born out of the collapse of the public space concept and presented as an industrial option, focus on providing enjoyment, exclude fun, and fail to provide a complete entertainment environment. I coin the term “incomplete entertainment” to describe the viewing experience that takes place in this medium, characterized by isolation, and the absence of social interaction.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T09:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231216443
       
  • The Datafication of Migrant Bodies and the Enactment of Migrant
           Subjectivities: Biometric Data, Power and Resistance at the Borders of
           Europe

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      Authors: Roza Tsagarousianou
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The article engages with biometric data gathering technologies as part of migration infrastructures for the monitoring and control of migration. It explores power and agency by paying attention to the complexity of readings, interpretations, and storytelling of illegalised migrants in the Moria and Kara Tepe camps, in the Island of Lesvos in Greece, as they received their bureaucratic legal papers and discussed developments in their ‘cases’. Borrowing from feminist and feminist security studies scholarship, the article argues for an understanding of data gathering and sharing infrastructures as material. It suggests that the datafication of migrants’ bodies constitutes a manifestation of power that ‘enacts’ the migrant body as a subject of power but also produces counter self-subjectifications. The article also suggests an understanding of subject agency as the ‘capacity to act’ within contexts of power. Such a position on the agency of illegalised migrants allows us to examine the emergence of solidarities and alliances and to understand and contextualise not only actions that seem to be questioning and rejecting power, but also those that accept it and internalise it as a strategy of survival and of bettering one’s life chances.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T06:02:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214193
       
  • Reawakenings to the improbable: Offerings of the limit situation for media
           theory in a disorderly world

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      Authors: Amanda Lagerkvist
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The global pandemic threw the world in all its asymmetries and diversities into a limit situation without known coordinates. This article suggests that in its aftermath there is actually a call and an opportunity for more than rethinking existing keywords in the field. It argues that the crisis was “improbable” in the meaning of the word offered by Amitav Ghosh who traces a common sense forged by probabilistic science, that expelled the unthinkable from the modern imaginary. Tracking down this regime of certainty, the essay offers a discussion on the place or displacement of the disorderly, the uncertain, and the disruptive in media theory. It submits that reawakening to the improbable, in light of Karl Jaspers’ philosophical anthropology of the limit situation, offers a fruitful conceptual avenue ahead. Apart from introducing the concept of the (digital) limit situation, the article offers a conversation between existential media studies, critical disability studies, feminist STS, and the environmental humanities, by also inviting an extended family of unruly concepts, including dismediation and deferral. It concludes that limit situations can be transformative also for media theory, if we dare to seize them, by means of existential modes of transversal listening to ghostly pasts never fulfilled.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T05:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231216440
       
  • Archives of/as resistance: On the justice potential of eyewitness image
           records documenting the Syrian conflict

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      Authors: Kari Andén-Papadopoulos
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      What are the new possibilities of enacting justice through the vast archives of digital eyewitness images and self-representations produced since 2011 by the grassroots Syrian opposition movement amidst both a nascent revolution and a war entailing gross human rights violations' Based on in-depth interviews with 15 anti-regime Syrian video activists, my article considers how the image makers themselves narrate the role and meaning of these archival records in efforts to reckon with Syria’s tormented past and build a more just future. I thus seek to recognize the ongoing agency of the Syrian media activists who struggled, by centering them and their wishes in the current debate about the role that this new type of activist-fueled “human rights records” can play in helping to build roads to justice and healing in Syria.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T06:27:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231214164
       
  • Editorial of crosscurrent themed section mediating gender in digital
           China: Post-2020s discourse and representation

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      Authors: Eva Cheuk-Yin Li
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This editorial introduces a themed section that focuses on the production of gender discourse and representations in the midst of tightening social and cultural control in China’s entertainment industry and digital media landscape. In various ways, the two articles featured case studies that exemplify how the production of gender discourses and representations in this context emerges from the interplay of state control, the market, and the digital realm and unfolds against the rise of platform capitalism and techno-nationalism. Both articles center on the intricate and sometimes contradictory configurations of gender within China’s state-market nexus.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T09:56:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231204795
       
  • Danish public service online weather from 2005 to 2022: From
           meteorological data and information to leisurely commonality

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      Authors: Henrik Bødker, Sandra Simonsen
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article combines two neglected elements within the history of online news: public service news sites and weather reporting, and it does so by utilising web archives, which – surprisingly – do not figure very prominently in journalism history. The two elements have – in isolation and in combination – at least in Denmark, become increasingly important as the online news sections of the two public service institutions Denmark’s Radio (DR) and TV2 consistently are among the most visited news sites and since reporting on the weather has gained in prominence and more recently, at least on DR TV, has become increasingly educational in its linking to issues of climate change. This article focusses on online news and conducts a historical analysis of the weather reporting on DR.dk from 2005 to 2022. The analysis seeks to balance the coding of journalistic texts with considerations of the online form of journalism, which here broadly means reading the webpage as a text. A key focus in the analysis is how meteorological data have been woven into cultural and social narratives, some of which are linked to climate change.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T12:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231209425
       
  • Always-on authenticity: Challenging the BeReal ideal of “being
           real”

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      Authors: Sarah J Snyder
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the mobile app BeReal, a popular social media platform, and challenges its claim to fame as a uniquely authentic platform. Through a critical analysis of the app’s user experience and an exploration of popular discourse among social media users regarding its design, I seek to assess this claim. BeReal promotes authenticity, or “being real,” through the act of users posting interesting content on demand and in real time. The app enforces this authenticity by imposing restrictions: users can only post once a day, at a specific time determined by BeReal, and in one take. Violating these rules triggers a judgment system that notifies other users when posts are made late or retaken. Despite the platform’s promise of enabling users to express their true selves through its restrictive functionality, I argue that its version of authenticity instead intensifies the need for external curation due to an “always-on” mentality.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T12:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231209420
       
  • Performative censorship: Why some free speech conflicts should be taken
           seriously but not literally

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      Authors: Cherian George
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In some speech-related disputes, censors do not gauge their success by whether the challenged cultural product or practice has been suppressed in accordance with their explicit demands. This article proposes a theory of performative censorship that can help explain this paradox. Building on the concepts of expressive laws and symbolic crusades from legal studies and social movement studies respectively, performative censorship disputes are defined as contentious episodes in which demands for or against speech regulation are expressed partly for the broader objective of gaining recognition for a group’s way of life, dignity or status. Case studies of two highly contentious conflicts are offered: over Confederate statues in the United States and cartoons of Islam’s Prophet Mohammed. The case studies show that movements’ goals and tactics are neither uniform nor static, making them more complex but also presenting opportunities for de-escalation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T06:36:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231203881
       
  • Online misinformation and everyday ontological narratives of social
           distinction

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      Authors: Natalie-Anne Hall, Andrew Chadwick, Cristian Vaccari
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Most research into online misinformation has investigated its direct effects—the impact it may have on citizens’ beliefs and behavior. Much less attention has been paid to how citizens themselves make sense of misinformation as a broader social problem. We integrate theories of narrative, identity, cultural capital, and social distinction to examine how people construct the problem of misinformation and their orientation to it. We show how people engage in everyday ontological narratives of social distinction. These involve making a variety of discursive moves to position one’s “taste” in information consumption as superior to others constructed as lower in a social hierarchy. This serves to enhance social status by separating oneself from misinformation, which is presented as “other people’s problem.” We argue that these narratives have significant implications not only for citizens’ vigilance toward misinformation but also their receptiveness to interventions by policymakers, fact-checkers, news organizations, and media educators.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-17T06:08:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231211678
       
  • The streaming industry and the platform economy: An analysis

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      Authors: Jean K Chalaby
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      As television is embracing a new set of internet-related technologies, the medium is transitioning from broadcasting to streaming. With it, a new mode of distribution has emerged: the streaming platform. This research makes a three-pronged effort to assess their impact on the TV industry: it analyses the way platforms monetize content; it distinguishes types of streaming platforms based on a set of criteria that includes supply-chain arrangements and the way they structure commercial transactions among different sets of participants, and it considers the ownership of streaming services. This article contributes to media and communication studies by combining the platform literature with global value chain (GVC) theory in order to foster our understanding of streaming platforms. It contextualizes streaming platforms in the history of television and analyses how they are transforming the medium.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T12:30:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231210439
       
  • Appearing to disappear: Ordering visibility in a Turkish border spectacle

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      Authors: Aslı İkizoğlu Erensü
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper seeks to question whether and how instrumentalization of refugees by states impacts their media representations, based on the example of a border spectacle that took place in March 2020, when Turkey unilaterally opened its borders to the West, causing hundreds to flock to the land border with Greece and to the coasts of the Aegean Sea. In many ways, this ended up as a failed border spectacle, especially for international publics: Turkey appeared neither as a strong state nor as a benefactor of asylum-seekers. Yet, the paper claims, the spectacle nonetheless led to an ordering of the visibility of asylum-seekers that cannot be captured on the victim-threat spectrum across which they are usually represented. Examining Turkish mainstream TV evening news as well as state agencies’ Twitter accounts, the paper traces how Greece was made hypervisible through the use of three frames (humanitarian, legalistic and moralistic) and asylum-seekers were reduced to extras (figurants) in the process. Such an ordering of visibility facilitated the re-moralization of instrumentalization of refugees and may have accordingly shaped the response-ability of citizens. The figure of the extra enables us to link refugee visibilities to splintering moral geographies of asylum.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T10:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231207758
       
  • By sharing our loss, we fight: Collective expressions of grief in the
           digital age

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      Authors: Valentina Proust
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay explores the potential of digital mourning for activists and social movements, enabling them to navigate the injuries inflicted by hegemonic powers and harness these experiences as a meaningful force for social change. Through a literature review of scholarly works on mourning within digital platforms, the article identifies theories and characterizations that foster critical reflections on the significance of these online instances. Moreover, by presenting three examples of digital mourning activism (Black Lives Matter, COVID-19 protests, and the Arab Spring), the paper highlights the significance of digital platforms as spaces for collective mourning, shaping public opinion, building collective memory, and driving activism beyond the digital realm. Overall, this essay aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of digital mourning as an empowering tool for activism, shedding light on its role in facilitating meaning-making processes and fostering the potential for profound social change in the face of systemic challenges and injustices.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T01:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231207760
       
  • Authentic cult: media representations of cultural consumption and
           legitimization of cultural hierarchies

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      Authors: Marie Heřmanová
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores legitimization strategies related to cultural consumption in the Czech media space by comparing the representations of cultural products in influencer communication on social media and in legacy (print and online) media outlets. Departing from the theoretical debate on the intersection of cultural omnivorousness and the emergence of algorithmic culture, the article poses the question: what strategies do influencers on social media and journalists in legacy media outlets employ to present consumption of cultural products as legitimate, interesting, and cool' Based on qualitative content analysis of 10 Instagram profiles of prominent Czech influencers and culture sections of 10 Czech legacy media, it discusses two main discursive legitimization strategies: (1) the notion of authenticity, used by social media influencers and (2) the notion of cult, used by legacy media in two distinctive ways – as (a) legendary, part of the pop cultural canon and (b) new, contemporary, part of up-to-date cultural savviness.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T12:42:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231203880
       
  • Public service television in the age of subscription video on demand:
           Shifting TV audience expectations in the UK during COVID-19

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      Authors: Catherine Johnson, Lauren Dempsey
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article asks how the rise in use of SVOD in the United Kingdom during 2020 impacted people’s expectations of public service television (PSTV). Drawing on 56 qualitative interviews with 28 UK participants conducted in 2019 and 2020, the article uses the COVID-19 lockdown to explore how disruption to the context of viewing might shape the cultural meanings people attach to PSTV. Challenging dominant approaches that measure audience assessments of public service media (PSM) against normative criteria, this article focuses instead on the processes through which people’s cultural meanings about PSTV are formed. Examining the interplay of their encounters with, expectations and evaluations of television, it reveals the divergent meanings our participants brought to linear and on-demand television. The article concludes by examining the implications of these expectations for PSM policy and for the ways in which we research people’s viewing experiences and choices amidst the rise of VOD.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T09:45:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231203875
       
  • Selling rural China: The construction and commodification of rurality in
           Chinese promotional livestreaming

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      Authors: Lizhen Zhao
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      With promotional livestreaming transforming the digital culture and e-commerce landscape in China, rural streamers take this opportunity to not only harvest economic rewards but also construct rural identities and associated imagery. Employing a digital ethnographic approach, this article closely explored how rural spaces and rural labor activities are constructed and commodified in Chinese promotional livestreaming. I argue that although rural streamers’ creative use of platform-afforded liveness and interactivity enriches Chinese digital culture by making everyday life in rural spaces visible, this constructed rurality is, however, flattened, decontextualized, and romanticized – thus, ready to be commodified and sold to the audience. In addition, agricultural labor is made hyper-visible, generating the possibility for demystifying said labor process, while other forms of labor, mainly affective labor and labor for negotiation with the platforms, are made invisible, undervalued, and exploited, deepening the precarious condition of such platform-dependent labor.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-06T11:07:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231203883
       
  • ‘Block talk’ on Twitter: Material affordances and
           communicative norms

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      Authors: Steffen Krämer, Isabell Otto
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the phenomenon of block talk among Germanspeaking Twitter users, based on a subsample of 1700 tweets from a larger corpus of 380,000 block-related tweets collected between February and December 2021. Block talk refers to users publicly mentioning and conversing about the disconnective practice of blocking, which sometimes stimulates a debate about the legitimate use of blocking while at other times providing an outgroup marker for collective positioning. Through the example of block talk we demonstrate that the platform’s curatorial infrastructure for drawing boundaries between public and private is continuously negotiated, and that this negotiation transforms the meaning of some of the default communicative affordances of the platform but also creates its own routines of making public. On the one hand, we show how users adapt conversational devices such as hashtags, screenshots, and @-mentions in the context of block talk. On the other hand, we present examples of Twitter users’ normative reflections about blocking and discuss them as processes of metapragmatic enregisterment. In the final discussion, we propose to integrate processes of routinized adaptation as well as reflexive enregisterment into a joint process of ‘communicative infrastructuring’.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-06T10:58:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231202164
       
  • Interracial romances and colorblindness in Shondaland’s Bridgerton

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Hanus
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Previous literature has considered Shondaland and portrayals of interracial romances for depicting post-racial and post-feminist utopias. Given mass media’s ability to create/reproduce ideologies, Shondaland’s most popular and most recent installment, Bridgerton, offers an opportunity for assessing narratives related to race and gender. The current study considers these narratives in Bridgerton, as well as the role of colorblind casting techniques for constructing those narratives. The current study uses a critical race theory approach, incorporating Black feminist thought and intersectionality. Season one of Bridgerton reveals three themes as they relate to race and gender, (1) romance, love, and who is worthy of love, (2) the body and historical context, and (3) dark corrupting light. Specifically, Black women are depicted in various positions of power that minimize racism and yet are simultaneously depicted in positions of oppression that serve to naturalize oppression of Black women, offering support for Bonilla-Silva’s colorblind racism in media.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T12:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231198440
       
  • Fake news on social media: Understanding teens’ (Dis)engagement with
           news

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      Authors: Florence Namasinga Selnes
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article takes a qualitative approach to examine the role of fake news in shaping adolescent’s participation in news. Instead of experimental approaches that are common with similar research, the current study expands our understanding of teenagers’ engagement with news on social media using focus groups, interviews in addition to reviewing research reports by the Norwegian Media Authority. The study found that fake news is positively related to teens’ engagement with news. Contrary to reports that younger audiences have weak ties with news brands, this study shows that teens in Norway are led back to mainstream media to corroborate and fact-check news. This negates my initial assumption that fake news was bad because teens’ perspectives show fake news as positively triggering discussions around news encountered on social media. Teens engage with fake news for verification, which drives them off social media toward conventional media. This is good for news and for journalism
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T11:59:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231198447
       
  • Flying the skies to wire the seas: Subsea cables, remote work, and the
           social fabric of a media industry

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      Authors: Iago Bojczuk, Nicole Starosielski, Anne Pasek
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Since the commercial aviation boom in the 1960s and 70s, the subsea cable industry has relied on global air travel for network development, infrastructure maintenance, and market penetration. However, COVID-19 disruptions forced a shift to remote work, challenging traditional travel practices and presenting an opportunity for carbon emission reduction. This study investigates the industry’s response to the “new normal” and its implications for mobility and sustainability. We employ a media industries approach and conduct open-ended interviews with industry leaders to examine the potential balance between remote work benefits and essential in-person aspects, questioning whether the industry should return to pre-pandemic travel levels or embrace remote work’s ecological and financial benefits. Our findings indicate that remote work suitability varies depending on project stage, involved personnel, and the existing social fabric. To facilitate travel-related carbon footprint monitoring for cable consortiums, we developed a calculator to determine the industry’s emissions when adopting remote work. Our interdisciplinary study also emphasizes mobility’s intricate role in subsea cable systems and broader media infrastructure studies. By scrutinizing corporate cultures, communication practices, and transportation infrastructures, we enhance the scholarly comprehension of the social fabric underpinning global digital networks and investigate potential shifts toward a more sustainable media industry.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T08:34:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231198423
       
  • On the Wire: Analysing the evolution of BBC Local Radio, music radio and
           public service broadcasting

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      Authors: James Ingham
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the significance of On the Wire, a BBC local radio programme, that provides a unique lens through which to examine changes in local radio, music radio in general and public service broadcasting. The paper provides a concise history and an account of the On the Wire, along with an explanation of its impact. The paper offers reasons for the programme’s enduring appeal, including its ability to change and adapt, its emphasis on the local in a global context and its innovative approach to audience participation. The paper concludes by positing that the history of On the Wire provides valuable insights for broadcasters in general, highlighting key aspects that radio programmes can learn from its approach. By showcasing the possibilities of what local radio, music radio and public service broadcasting can be, On the Wire sets a positive example for what radio can achieve.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T11:10:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231199636
       
  • ‘Up to you’: Self-help books, depression and the
           reconstruction of reading

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      Authors: Amber E Gwynne
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Like other consumers of ‘low-brow’ genres, self-help readers elicit polarized views in the literature. While little research to date has focused specifically on self-help readers with a history of mental illness, existing commentary reveals a particular tension: on the one hand, clinical researchers report positive outcomes for depressed readers engaged in bibliotherapy programs using self-help books, similar or superior to medication or talk therapy; on the other, scholars of media and culture express misgivings about the quality of self-help texts and highlight the negative potential of therapeutic discourse for individual readers and audiences more generally. By asking what actual readers do with self-help books, however, my research suggests an altogether more complex interaction between readers and the books they choose and use – especially as they navigate experiences of mental illness. Leveraging a reader-response heuristic in which I interviewed a cohort of Australian readers, this paper details some of the ways in which habitual consumers of self-help books describe their own interpretive activities, problematizing previous research that either emphasizes or downplays the significant expertise of vernacular audiences.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T11:57:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231198431
       
  • Metaphors at work: Reconciling welfare and market in Danish digitalisation
           policies

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      Authors: Rikke Frank Jørgensen, Sille Obelitz Søe
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The way in which we describe processes of automation, the digital society and the technology companies that deliver many of its services carry implicit and sometimes contradicting values and ideas about the society envisioned. In this paper, we are interested in unfolding some of the metaphors that guide political discourses on digitalisation in Denmark, particularly those related to the nexus between the welfare state and the market. We propose that metaphorical analysis of policy documents serves to tease out and confront the implicit values and tensions related to how welfare ideologies are reconciled with market logics. This carries important messages about the Danish government’s imaginary of digitalisation and citizens, such as which role citizens are expected to play vis-à-vis digital services and welfare provisions. This paper argues that in contrast to the EU’s declared goal of human-centric digitalisation, the Danish government relies on metaphors that are technology-centric rather than human-centric.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T11:54:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188463
       
  • Attention, ambivalence and algorithms publishers in the era of ubiquitous
           connectivity and expanding platforms

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      Authors: Kari Spjeldnæs, Faltin Karlsen
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article scrutinizes how digitalization influences fiction and non-fiction literature publishers in the era of ubiquitous digital connection. The analysis states how a lack of attention is triggering a sense of urgency for the future of literary reading. Further, the digital transition entails an overarching ambivalence. Key stakeholders in literary publishing are experiencing how media on platform-based streaming services is competing with traditional reading. They perceive a battle for time and question the future of reading. From the perspectives of Bourdieu’s theory, the article reveals how penetrating connectivity is leading to a change in the professional habitus. Continuous busyness and increased professional presence are triggering ambivalence between work-related duties and personal well-being. Moreover, the publishing stakeholders reveal an ambivalence in voicing future expectations. While worried about the future of reading, the professional habitus leans on a promising future for the industry.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T11:56:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231191361
       
  • Re-meme-bering Tiananmen' From collective memory to meta-memory on
           TikTok

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      Authors: Seth Seet, Edson C Tandoc
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre has been enshrined in the collective memory of different social groups globally in various ways, while the Chinese government enforces its own memory of Tiananmen through censorship and revisionism. These result in numerous memories of Tiananmen. Through a qualitative analysis of 27 TikToks posted on 3–5 June 2022, this study examines how Tiananmen is commemorated on TikTok on Tiananmen’s anniversary and what is remembered about Tiananmen. This study found that commemoration posts on TikTok remember the protests, casualties, the Chinese Communist Party leaders’ role, and the historical contexts, oft using the Tank Man image. The posts also remember the remembrance and memory formation of Tiananmen. Through commemorations, memes, and humor, some posts remember the Chinese government’s attempts to recreate the collective memory and other commemoration events. This is best described as meta-memories, where people remember the remembering and possess memory of the memory of events.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T09:59:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231191413
       
  • Happiness in newsroom contracts: communicative resistance for digital work
           and life satisfaction

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      Authors: Errol Salamon
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Digital-era newsworkers in the United States have steadily joined trade unions since 2015. This article examines all 22 collective bargaining agreements (CBAs) of one such union, the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE), which were ratified between April 2015 and June 2022, with an eye toward better understanding employee digital job and life satisfaction. Bringing together critical political economy of media, industrial relations, and labor research, the article argues that the collective bargaining agreement is a communicative means through which digital newsworker unions express employee resistance to particular labor issues. It is also a legal mechanism articulating solutions to these issues that could provide the basis for employee life satisfaction. Grounded in a content analysis, this article finds that the WGAE CBAs incorporate language on workplace rights, newsworkers’ benefits, and limits on management rights, revealing the relative weight of different union solutions to newsworkers’ digital-era grievances. The CBAs also communicatively constitute the conditions for digital newsworkers’ happiness and subjective well-being. By proposing a relational model of digital newsworkers’ CBAs, researchers and practitioners could better understand the language that is needed to communicatively constitute and facilitate happiness in newsrooms, supporting digital job and life satisfaction among newsworkers.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T11:22:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231191353
       
  • Marry or not for democracy and love: Dialogic framing in the Taiwan
           marriage equality movement and countermovement

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      Authors: Yidong Wang, Xiaomei Sun
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Dialogic framing means that the frames are constructed through interaction among multiple parties in a discursive system with socio-cultural specificities. The meaning of a frame is articulated through such dialogic interaction and under constant contestation. We used the marriage equality movement in Taiwan as a case study and demonstrated how dialogic framing could advance the understanding of framing in the digital mobilization of collective actions. Analyzing Facebook posts by opposing advocacy groups, we identified “collective identity” and “rights” as two dominant frames. Marriage equality activists framed legalizing same-sex marriage as a testament to the democratic progress of Taiwan and a validation of gay and lesbian people’s right of love. The countermovement challenged this framing by arguing that equalizing gay love to heterosexual marital love violated the civil rights of the silent majority. The queer critique of marriage as state-sanctioned regulation of sexual citizenship and the very state power being critiqued are also constitutive of the dialogic framing of collective actions for or against same-sex marriage on social media.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T10:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188462
       
  • The value and price of digital media commodities

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      Authors: Jang-Ryol Yun
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Focusing on the fact that digital media commodities are easily reproduced once initially produced, this paper explains, against the backdrop of Marxist insights, just how these commodities are produced, distributed, and consumed in the current digital media environment. Working with Marx’s definition of the value of commodities as the social labor time required for their production, we can thereby define the value and price of reproduced digital media commodities as zero, but the market price of these commodities as in fact constituting the Marxist monopoly price. These determinations are then supported by a review of the ways valueless digital media goods are commodified in a monopolistic real world. The approach here, borrowing from Marx’s research methods, starts from commodity analysis to explain comprehensively the wider political and economic system of capitalism. This viewpoint of the inherent value of media products is foreign to neoclassical economics as well as to mainstream media and communication studies embracing the utility theory of value.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T05:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188464
       
  • Media research and proposals for media change: Notes on a key variable

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      Authors: John Corner
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A significant body of media research internationally involves suggestions for planned change, often as a key point of conclusion. The suggested changes or reforms are placed in the context of perceived deficits in media performance, which may be seen as longstanding or as a result of recent shifts in the broader economy, the political frame or a major disruption such as that brought about by COVID-19. Some research restricts itself to documenting the deficits with possible remedies largely implied. However, other work seeks to go further. Recommendations for change in media structures and practices differ widely in their scale, specificity and also in their level of engagement with the surrounding political, economic and social settings. These settings are the consequence of various planned and unplanned factors interacting over time. This note looks at a number of variables around ideas of planned change in the contexts of current media inquiry, including that of media historiography, taking a few illustrative examples to examine the frameworks within which they are placed. It reviews connections made with levels of the political and economic system and of public evaluations and media uses as well as with the levels of the media industries themselves and their workforces.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T11:07:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231189599
       
  • The political uses of memory: Instagram and Black-Asian solidarities

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      Authors: Rachel Kuo, Sarah J. Jackson
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates how activist organizations wield collective memory as they advance cross-racial solidarity on Instagram. We center digital memory-making in political work by Black and Asian activist organizations as a contribution to understanding social movement communication and online organizing. We study Instagram content from local organizations in Minneapolis (and the Midwest region), Atlanta (and the Southeast region), and national digital organizing collectives between the end of May 2020 to June 2021. This corpus of material includes the summer uprisings for Black liberation following the police murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, as well as the increased visibility of incidents of anti-Asian violence during the COVID-19 pandemic, including a mass shooting at massage parlors in Atlanta. Among our findings is the centrality of memories of internationalist feminist movements to contemporary cross-racial politics.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T06:10:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231185963
       
  • Eating alone as psychological self-care: How the younger generation in
           Let’s Eat survives in neoliberal South Korea

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      Authors: Hojin Song
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      TV dramas that focus on food and eating reflect the popular trend of single culture, with a rising number of single-person households among the younger generation in South Korea. Analyzing Let’s Eat (tvN), the South Korean food drama series that specifically focus on eating scenes, this paper uses the framework of survivalism and the popular discourse of healing to examine how eating alone as a social and cultural phenomenon represents the psychological turn in neoliberalism. In its three seasons, Let’s Eat reflects how eating alone becomes a practice of endurance and resilience that encourages the younger generation to stay positive, even during an enervated state of mind, to bounce back, and to ultimately spring forward. I argue that Let’s Eat reflects how survivalism especially requires the marginalized population of women in precarious employment to reflect and grow confidence without considering the problems of structural inequality. Let’s Eat shows the younger generation’s struggle and lack of societal support, perpetuating neoliberalism’s focus on individual effort and blaming individuals for their enervation.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T09:06:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188445
       
  • “I want to be a bridge”' The digital identity positioning of
           transnational bloggers on Chinese social media platforms: Between ethnic
           differences and cultural affinities

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      Authors: Yuting Liu
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      How do transnational bloggers position their digital identities on Chinese social media platforms' To answer this question, this study builds a coordinate system of digital identity positioning with intensity of ethnic differences and cultural affinities as the horizontal and vertical coordinates. Four digital identities are found: culturalists, individualists, cultural otherness, and cultural admirers. Transnational bloggers may have overlapping or changing digital identities rather than a single, defined identity. This reflects the process and multiplicity of identity formation, which involves negotiation and flow between ethnic differences and cultural affinities. This study traces transnational bloggers in local digital cultural spaces, raises awareness about the types of split identities in the digital age, and provides an analytical framework for digital identities. Considering the transformation of digital society, researchers should continue to investigate new forms of digital identity building in global and local digital cultural spaces: linking actions, ideologies, and experiences in Internet spaces to broader social, cultural, and political contexts.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T06:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188451
       
  • Ritual check-in, shocked immersion, regained stability: A sequential
           typology of news experiences in crisis situations

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      Authors: Hallvard Moe, Torgeir Uberg Nærland, Brita Ytre-Arne
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This short paper discusses people’s news experiences before, during and after societal crisis situations, contributing with a sequential typology outlining the three phases ritual check-in, shocked immersion and regained stability. Theoretically, we draw on classical contributions to media studies and sociology, particularly the concepts of ritual communication and ontological security. Empirically, we build on qualitative interview studies with news audiences in Norway, spanning 5 years and different crisis cases including political turmoil, the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change. We underline the significance of emotional distancing to regain stability, and identify crises lacking start- and endpoints as particularly difficult to navigate. These insights should instigate further debate about our understanding of news audiences in a tumultuous world, particularly relevant to scholarship on news use and avoidance.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T05:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231187967
       
  • The erosion of media freedom in Ghana: A signal democratic
           backsliding'

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      Authors: Paul Achonga Kabah Kwode, George Asekere, Jasper Abembia Ayelazuno
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Ghana is a poster child of the consolidation of liberal democracy in Africa, the signal evidence of which is the freedom of the Ghanaian media as the fourth estate of the realm. However, recent developments in the media landscape of the country, such as sustained death threats, assaults, use of unwarranted brute force, suspicions and murder of journalists seem to mar the democratic image of Ghana. These incidents have raised concerns about the erosion of freedom and independence of the media in Ghana, a situation that is worrying enough to ignite a debate on whether the dark days of the culture of silence are returning to the country under democratic governance. Drawing on qualitative data collected through personal in-depth interviews and grey literature of media attacks and intimidations, the article examines the extent of the erosion of press freedom in Ghana. We argue that media freedom seems to be under increasing threat by elements of the state, despite public rhetoric of freedom of the press. Specifically, the threats are coming from officials of state such as national security operatives, the police and political party supporters. Concluding, the article calls for sustained civic activism against these threats.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T05:54:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231185933
       
  • ‘You’re too smart to be a publicist’: Perceptions, expectations and
           the labour of book publicity

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      Authors: Alexandra Dane, Millicent Weber, Claire Parnell
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The representation of publicists in popular culture appears to have a direct relationship with how publishing sector publicity staff are perceived by their colleagues and peers, having a distinct knock-on effect to work practices and labour conditions. In this article, we explore these perceptions and, through interviews with eight publicists working in publishing houses in Australia, explore how the work of publicity is commonly misrecognised and undervalued. In framing publicists as cultural intermediaries who contribute to the shaping of cultural tastes, we further illuminate the significant gap between the common gendered perceptions of publicists and the realities of their professional practice.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-24T07:14:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188447
       
  • Day of Rage: Forensic journalism and the US Capitol riot

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      Authors: Kelly Gates
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how video journalism produced by the elite press is using forensic techniques and aesthetics as part of the effort to reinvent journalistic authority in a fragmented media and political sphere. I first discuss some earlier moments in which news coverage of events adopted a media-forensic epistemology and style, and then turn to the formation of the New York Times Visual Investigations team, a group at the leading-edge of this type of journalism today. I provide an analysis of one of the team’s investigative reports, a 40-minute account of the January 6 Capitol riot assembled from vernacular video, surveillance footage, police bodycam video, and other non-news source materials. In both its formal aspects and its subject matter, the piece represents an important example for understanding an emerging form of forensic journalism. While the January 6 Capitol riot was not the first time news coverage of a violent event adopted a forensic style and epistemology, the forensic-media coverage of the riot represents a unique conjuncture. A new convergence of media-technological developments and journalist practices shaped how the storming of the Capitol was experienced, investigated, and covered as a media event.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-24T07:11:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188449
       
  • Moderating for a friend of mine: Content moderation as affective
           reproduction in Chinese live-streaming

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      Authors: Fan Xiao
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Bridging the theory of affective labor and reproductive labor, this paper proposes “affective reproduction” as a critical framework to analyze the unpaid work of volunteer content moderation. Findings from this study problematize the one-sided focus on streamers in the extant literature on platform labor vis-à-vis live-streaming. It contends that fan moderators help streamers reproduce the live-streaming atmosphere as friendly, pleasant, and relevant, facilitating Internet celebrities’ money-making. This study contributes to studies of digital labor in two ways: 1) it expands the labor and work perspective to the study of content moderation and discloses the indirect value-generating nature of this work; 2) the designation of moderator in Chinese live-streaming platforms reveals a new form of work organization that exploits digital intimacy, transforming platform users into non-professional, secondary cultural workers. The proposed framework is applicable to various forms of participatory media, in which users are encouraged to manage and regulate their peers.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-24T07:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231188465
       
  • Theorizing and mapping media ownership networks in authoritarian-populist
           contexts: a comparative analysis of Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, and Turkey
           

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      Authors: Gerhard Schnyder, Marlene Radl, Fanni Toth, Melek Kucukuzun, Tjaša Turnšek, Burçe Çelik, Mojca Pajnik
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to contribute to the ongoing discussions on authoritarian populism and the media, from the lens of the political economy of ownership. In contrast to studies that consider the link between media and authoritarian populism by focusing on the discursive structures of populist communication, this study analyses changes in the structure of news media ownership in four European countries that have been subject to authoritarian populism. By employing social network analysis, a methodology rarely used in media ownership research, we reveal how news media ownership concentration as well as changes in ownership structures have provided favorable conditions for the rise and endurance of authoritarian populism. Our study covers ownership developments during the period 2000 to 2020, in Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, and Turkey where authoritarian populist tendencies have been evident, albeit to varying degrees. Conclusions are drawn to illustrate how authoritarian populist actors in the sample countries not only capitalize on prevailing news media ownership structures, but also proactively intervene in ownership relations in order to increase influence over the diffusion of information.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T10:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231179366
       
  • Media practice and class-making: The anticipation of stigma and the
           cultural middle-class habitus

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      Authors: Johan Lindell, Aleksandra Dominika Kas
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between media practices and social inequality has been studied within a range of sub-disciplines in media and communication studies and cultural sociology. In various, more or less direct, ways these studies point to the fact that habitus – the socially formed class specific relations to the social world – generates certain tastes, lifestyles, practices and preferences. When social groups form relatively distinct media practices, and distance themselves from the practices of other groups, they reproduce their social position, and ‘make’ their class. By analysing in-depth interviews with members of an emerging cultural middle-class, this study shows how class-making also manifests in the ways in which people expect that others would ‘look down’ on their media practices. By anticipating stigma from imagined others, the cultural middle-class stays in line with class-specific lifestyles and media practices, thus cementing their distinct character in the social space.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-12T10:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231185966
       
  • “An out gay man in the parliament”: New aspects in the study of LGBTQ
           politicians’ media coverage

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      Authors: Gilad Greenwald, Sharon Haleva-Amir, Amit Kama
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study identifies how three prominent Israeli online newspapers frame gay Members of Knesset (Israeli parliament) and cabinet ministers. 2019 was chosen since the number of gay MKs reached a historic milestone of representation. The study employed a mixed-methods design, combining descriptive statistics, based on a quantitative content analysis, with a thematic qualitative analysis. 1015 retrieved news items constituted the initial database. They were divided into two categories: “Gay relevant” (items explicitly referring to, or mentioning the politician’s sexual orientation); or “Gay irrelevant” (all other items), to thematically focus on the Gay relevant items (N = 159). Six themes were then identified: Novelty; LGBTQ Political Representation; Private Sphere; Homophobia; Community Recognition and Rights; and Incongruity. Findings revealed that elite newspaper coverage is similar to popular ones; cabinet ministers’ framing is more neutral compared to junior MKs; and liberal MKs are framed differently than conservative ones.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-12T09:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231185946
       
  • The manufacture of militarized masculinity in Chinese series You Are My
           Hero (2021)

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      Authors: Roxanne Tan Yu Xian
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The entertainment industry is driven to sell certain commodities transnationally, particularly in a world where borders are becoming increasingly diffused through the access afforded by the Internet. Media content is easily consumed, making cultural exporting fast and easy. Similar tropes and plot have been replicated in the East Asian film and TV industry, perhaps in hopes of replicating the success. This paper looks at the manufacture of ideal masculinities within East Asia, particularly China. From ex-members of K-pop group EXO to the successful TV series, cross-influence of East Asian popular culture is prominent. Through this paper, I look at the influence of K-dramas on the Chinese TV industry and particularly the manufacturing of a militarized masculinity on Chinese TV. Far from portraying brute and fearsome soldiers, ideal masculinity on TV is portrayed as “steely exterior but gentle internally” and thus desirable romantic partners to heterosexual women. By exploring the basic conception of Chinese masculinity, I then discuss representations of militarized masculinity on the silver screen (Wolf Warrior II) and C-dramas, with particular focus on the series, You Are My Hero (2021).
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T12:28:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437231172307
       
  • The platformization of misogyny: Popular media, gender politics, and
           misogyny in China’s state-market nexus

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      Authors: Sara Liao
      Abstract: Media, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to map out the popular phenomenon of misogyny in the specific techno-social configuration buttressed by China’s state-market nexus. With a case study of a controversy involving the standup comedian Yang Li and the luxury car brand Mercedes-Benz on the microblogging platform Weibo, I highlight the ‘platformization of misogyny.’ The conceptualization refers to the way that a platform is evoked as tools to manufacture and amplify misogyny. Weibo has this effect both through its design, features, and algorithmic shaping of sociality and through its users’ appropriation of its affordances. On top of that, the platform also engenders a form of governance that is deeply enmeshed in the commercialization of internet opinion, suggesting a techno-nationalist mode of state control that is exercised from afar and deeply imbued with patriarchal and misogynistic characteristics.
      Citation: Media, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T05:16:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01634437221146905
       
 
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  Subjects -> BEAUTY CULTURE (Total: 22 journals)
    - BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)
    - PERFUMES AND COSMETICS (2 journals)

BEAUTY CULTURE (20 journals)

Showing 1 - 19 of 19 Journals sorted alphabetically
Achiote.com - Revista Eletrônica de Moda     Open Access  
American Journal of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Studies in Fashion & Beauty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fashion and Textiles     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Flavour and Fragrance Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ground Breaking     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Cosmetic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Materiali di Estetica     Open Access  
Media, Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Mind Culture and Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Parallax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Professional Beauty     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Science as Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Rose Sheet     Full-text available via subscription  
Transactions of the Burgon Society     Open Access  
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Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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