Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)

Showing 1 - 16 of 16 Journals sorted alphabetically
Combustion and Flame     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Disaster Recovery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Fire and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fire Safety Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Fire Science Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fire Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
FirePhysChem     Open Access  
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Wildland Fire     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Similar Journals
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International Journal of Wildland Fire
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.242
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-8001 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5516
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Shifting conflict into collaboration: peatland fires mitigation in the
           biosphere conservation transition zone in Sumatra, Indonesia

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      Authors: Rijal Ramdani, Eko Priyo Purnomo
      First page: 1103
      Abstract: Rijal Ramdani, Eko Priyo Purnomo - Volume 31(12)
      From the current study, we can learn how a conflict over access to peatland water sharing, causing annual peatland fires in the transition zone of biosphere conservation, can be turned into collaboration. The collaborative activities have reduced the village’s vulnerability to the fire.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(12)
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22066
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 12 (2022)
       
  • Detecting burnt severity and vegetation regrowth classes using a change
           vector analysis approach: a case study in the southern part of Sumatra,
           Indonesia

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      Authors: Nitya Ade Santi, I Nengah Surati Jaya, Muhammad Buce Saleh, Lailan Syaufina, Budi Kuncahyo
      First page: 1114
      Abstract: Nitya Ade Santi, I Nengah Surati Jaya, Muhammad Buce Saleh, Lailan Syaufina, Budi Kuncahyo - Volume 31(12)
      This paper reports that burn severity and vegetation regrowth can be classified well using change vector analysis (CVA). CVA using an NDVI and NDBI approach was superior to the dNBR method as indicated by the accuracy difference between both methods.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(12)
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21190
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 12 (2022)
       
  • Neighbourhood bushfire hazard, community risk perception and preparedness
           in peri-urban Hobart, Australia

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      Authors: Chloe H. Lucas, Grant J. Williamson, David M. J. S. Bowman
      First page: 1129
      Abstract: Chloe H. Lucas, Grant J. Williamson, David M. J. S. Bowman - Volume 31(12)
      Neighbourhood concern about bushfire in Hobart mirrors biophysical measurements of local bushfire risk. But residents underestimate the risk to their homes from fuels on their own property, and overestimate risk from nearby bushland and neighbouring properties. This research highlights the importance of communicating and facilitating collective neighbourhood-scale bushfire preparedness.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(12)
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22099
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 12 (2022)
       
  • Strategies to reduce wildfire smoke in frequently impacted communities in
           south-western Oregon

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      Authors: Richard L. Graw, Bret A. Anderson
      First page: 1155
      Abstract: Richard L. Graw, Bret A. Anderson - Volume 31(12)
      This paper presents a technique for reducing wildfire smoke in frequently impacted communities. It combines the use of frequent air pathways into communities along with targeted fuel treatments within these pathways to reduce the duration and concentration of wildfire smoke.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(12)
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22071
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 12 (2022)
       
  • Converging and diverging burn rates in North American boreal forests from
           the Little Ice Age to the present

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      Authors: Raphaël D. Chavardès, Victor Danneyrolles, Jeanne Portier, Martin P. Girardin, Dorian M. Gaboriau, Sylvie Gauthier, Igor Drobyshev, Dominic Cyr, Tuomo Wallenius, Yves Bergeron
      First page: 1184
      Abstract: Raphaël D. Chavardès, Victor Danneyrolles, Jeanne Portier, Martin P. Girardin, Dorian M. Gaboriau, Sylvie Gauthier, Igor Drobyshev, Dominic Cyr, Tuomo Wallenius, Yves Bergeron - Volume 31(12)
      Warning: This article contains terms, descriptions, and opinions used for historical context that may be culturally sensitive for some readers.
      Our research highlights declining burn rates in North American boreal forests during 1700–1990 but rising burn rate trends at northwestern sites during 1980–2020. We suggest that atmospheric conditions and regional changes in land use like fire exclusion and suppression were important drivers behind the multi-century declining trend.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(12)
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22090
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 12 (2022)
       
  • Development of gas signatures of smouldering peat wildfire from emission
           factors

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      Authors: Yuqi Hu, Guillermo Rein
      First page: 1014
      Abstract: Yuqi Hu, Guillermo Rein - Volume 31(11)

      Systematic comparisons and statistical analysis of emission factor (EF) data from the literature show that the EF ratio of CO2 to CH4 presents the best gas signature for early detection of smouldering peat fire from flaming fires and the burning of various wildfire fuels in the field.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire - Volume 31(11)
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21093
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 11 (2022)
       
  • Relationships between building features and wildfire damage in California,
           USA and Pedrógão Grande, Portugal

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      Authors: Simona Dossi, Birgitte Messerschmidt, Luís Mário Ribeiro, Miguel Almeida, Guillermo Rein
      Abstract: Simona Dossi, Birgitte Messerschmidt, Luís Mário Ribeiro, Miguel Almeida, Guillermo Rein
      This paper presents a statistical analysis of two post-fire building inspection databases of wildland–urban interface (WUI) damage in California and Portugal. Results compare considered building features’ relative correlation to damage, and propose the Wildfire Resistance Index: an index applied to the vulnerability of WUI buildings to wildfire ignition and damage.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-23
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22095
       
  • Non-parametric comparative analysis of the spatiotemporal pattern of
           human-caused and natural wildfires in Galicia

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      Authors: M. F. Marey-Pérez, Isabel Fuentes-Santos, Paula Saavera-Nieves, Wenceslao González-Manteiga
      Abstract: M. F. Marey-Pérez, Isabel Fuentes-Santos, Paula Saavera-Nieves, Wenceslao González-Manteiga
      This work analyses human-caused and natural wildfire behaviour in Galicia (Spain) through non-parametric inference techniques for point processes. Our results show that both spatial and spatiotemporal distribution and dependence structure of fires depend on their cause, suggesting a need for different models to predict arson, negligence and natural fire hazard.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-23
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22030
       
  • Disentangling the factors of spatio-temporal patterns of wildfire activity
           in south-eastern France

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      Authors: Jorge Castel-Clavera, François Pimont, Thomas Opitz, Julien Ruffault, Miguel Rivière, Jean-Luc Dupuy
      Abstract: Jorge Castel-Clavera, François Pimont, Thomas Opitz, Julien Ruffault, Miguel Rivière, Jean-Luc Dupuy
      We leveraged Bayesian spatio-temporal modelling to disentangle the contributions of climatic and non-climatic drivers for fire activity in Mediterranean France. We showed that recent fire-weather increase caused the increase of fire probability in the west; but in the east, it was over-compensated by a reduction of escaped-fire probability. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22086
       
  • A dynamic and evidence-based approach to mapping burn potential

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      Authors: Richard van Dongen, Jaume Ruscalleda-Alvarez, Carl R. Gosper
      Abstract: Richard van Dongen, Jaume Ruscalleda-Alvarez, Carl R. Gosper
      Fire management is a crucial part of managing many environments. We present a burn potential model developed using satellite imagery that predicts when an area may be able to ‘carry’ fire. The model accounts for rapid or delayed vegetation cover response since the last burn due to climate variability.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22077
       
  • Deep peat fire persistently smouldering for weeks: a laboratory
           demonstration

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      Authors: Yunzhu Qin, Dayang Nur Sakinah Musa, Shaorun Lin, Xinyan Huang
      Abstract: Yunzhu Qin, Dayang Nur Sakinah Musa, Shaorun Lin, Xinyan Huang

      Smouldering fire in peatland is one of the largest wildfire phenomena on Earth that can burn slowly deep underground without flame. Laboratory experiments on tall peat soil samples revealed burning, propagation and emission physics of deep smouldering wildfires in peatland. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-07
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22143
       
  • Using soil moisture information to better understand and predict wildfire
           danger: a review of recent developments and outstanding questions

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      Authors: Erik S. Krueger, Matthew R. Levi, Kevin O. Achieng, John D. Bolten, J. D. Carlson, Nicholas C. Coops, Zachary A. Holden, Brian I. Magi, Angela J. Rigden, Tyson E. Ochsner
      Abstract: Erik S. Krueger, Matthew R. Levi, Kevin O. Achieng, John D. Bolten, J. D. Carlson, Nicholas C. Coops, Zachary A. Holden, Brian I. Magi, Angela J. Rigden, Tyson E. Ochsner
      Soil moisture is an underused resource for improving fire danger rating systems and fire management worldwide. We review key studies describing relationships between wildfires and in situ, remotely sensed, and modelled soil moisture; describe the potential to incorporate soil moisture into wildfire danger assessments; and identify outstanding challenges and opportunities.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22056
       
  • Future expansion, seasonal lengthening and intensification of fire
           activity under climate change in southeastern France

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      Authors: François Pimont, Julien Ruffault, Thomas Opitz, Hélène Fargeon, Renaud Barbero, Jorge Castel-Clavera, Nicolas Martin-StPaul, Eric Rigolot, Jean-Luc Dupuy
      Abstract: François Pimont, Julien Ruffault, Thomas Opitz, Hélène Fargeon, Renaud Barbero, Jorge Castel-Clavera, Nicolas Martin-StPaul, Eric Rigolot, Jean-Luc Dupuy
      Projections of fire activity in southeastern France show that very large increases in fire metrics arise mostly from an intensification in the already fire-prone region during the core of the current fire season and only to a lower degree from an expansion of the fire-prone region and lengthening of the season. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22103
       
  • Comparing two methods to measure oxidative pyrolysis gases in a wind
           tunnel and in prescribed burns

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      Authors: David R. Weise, Timothy J. Johnson, Tanya L. Myers, Wei Min Hao, Stephen Baker, Javier Palarea-Albaladejo, Nicole K. Scharko, Ashley M. Bradley, Catherine A. Banach, Russell G. Tonkyn
      Abstract: David R. Weise, Timothy J. Johnson, Tanya L. Myers, Wei Min Hao, Stephen Baker, Javier Palarea-Albaladejo, Nicole K. Scharko, Ashley M. Bradley, Catherine A. Banach, Russell G. Tonkyn
      Oxidative pyrolysis gases were measured in a wind tunnel and small prescribed burns using two analytical methods. Gas composition measured by FTIR spectroscopy differed between wind tunnel and field fires. The relative amount of the primary fuel gases (CO, CH4) was not significantly affected by fire location. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22079
       
  • Short-term effects of the depth of masticated slash after salvage logging
           on fuel and vegetation response

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      Authors: Cristina Fernández
      Abstract: Cristina Fernández
      This study aimed to evaluate how post-fire masticated slash depth affected vegetation regeneration to provide information for forest management planning. The masticated slash depth did not have significant effects on vegetation cover or species diversity 2.5 years after treatments. A lower slash depth favoured pine regeneration.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21107
       
  • Tree spatial pattern and mortality prediction in burned patches of
           Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) forest that experienced a
           mixed-severity wildfire

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      Authors: Jili Zhang, Lifu Shu, Mingyu Wang, Rui Wei, Lizhong Wang, Shuo Wang, Guang Yang
      Abstract: Jili Zhang, Lifu Shu, Mingyu Wang, Rui Wei, Lizhong Wang, Shuo Wang, Guang Yang
      A larch-dominated forest exhibited density-dependent post-fire mortality patterns at short distances and increased aggregation among surviving trees post-fire. A widely used USA tree mortality model performed acceptably for this species. This study could potentially inform management strategies for conifer forests with similar structures and fire regimes.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22057
       
  • Fire propensity in Amazon savannas and rainforest and effects under future
           climate change

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      Authors: Mariana Martins Medeiros de Santana, Rodrigo Nogueira de Vasconcelos, Eduardo Mariano-Neto
      Abstract: Mariana Martins Medeiros de Santana, Rodrigo Nogueira de Vasconcelos, Eduardo Mariano-Neto

      Amazon fire patterns are affected by farming and fires are more common in savanna patches than in forests owing to socioeconomic–environmental factors. By the end of the century, under scenarios with higher emissions, an expansion of fire propensity is expected, resulting in threats to biodiversity, traditional peoples and global human wellbeing.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21174
       
  • Improved laboratory method to test flammability metrics of live plants
           under dynamic conditions and future implications

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      Authors: Timothy S. Miller, Alexander I. Filkov, Trent D. Penman
      Abstract: Timothy S. Miller, Alexander I. Filkov, Trent D. Penman
      The role of live vegetation in altering fire behaviour is increasingly being recognised. To accurately represent the exposure of a live plant to an approaching fire front, a replicable and precise method of testing flammability was developed. It provides a more realistic representation of plant flammability in the natural environment.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21172
       
  • Relating McArthur fire danger indices to remote sensing derived burned
           area across Australia

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      Authors: Sami Ullah Shah, Marta Yebra, Albert I. J. M. Van Dijk, Geoffrey J. Cary
      Abstract: Sami Ullah Shah, Marta Yebra, Albert I. J. M. Van Dijk, Geoffrey J. Cary
      We explored the relationship of the McArthur fire danger classes with the satellite-derived daily burned area The findings suggest that satellite-derived daily burned area may not be a suitable metric for informing McArthur fire danger classes across Australia because it can be subjected to lagged detection.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21108
       
  • Atmospheric turbulent structures and fire sweeps during shrub fires and
           implications for flaming zone behaviour

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      Authors: Marwan Katurji, Bob Noonan, Jiawei Zhang, Andres Valencia, Benjamin Shumacher, Jessica Kerr, Tara Strand, Grant Pearce, Peyman Zawar-Reza
      Abstract: Marwan Katurji, Bob Noonan, Jiawei Zhang, Andres Valencia, Benjamin Shumacher, Jessica Kerr, Tara Strand, Grant Pearce, Peyman Zawar-Reza
      Multi-modal observations of fire behaviour and overlying atmospheric turbulence were carried out for four wind-driven gorse bush experimental fires. Novel image velocimetry analysis outlined the dynamics and scales of motion of fire sweeps in relation to overlying atmospheric coherent turbulent structures. Results are useful for evaluating coupled fire–atmosphere model simulations. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22100
       
  • Burnt wood management enhances soil multifunctionality at the medium term
           after a large wildfire in north-west Spain

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      Authors: José Manuel Fernández-Guisuraga, Leonor Calvo, Sara Huerta, Elena Marcos
      Abstract: José Manuel Fernández-Guisuraga, Leonor Calvo, Sara Huerta, Elena Marcos
      Post-fire treatment consisting of leaving burnt logs and felled branches in close contact with the forest floor promotes the ability of the soil to sustain high values of multiple functions simultaneously in the medium term after wildfire, as compared to straw mulching application. (This paper is part of a Special Issue that includes papers on research presented at the IX International Conference on Forest Fire Research, Coimbra, Portugal, November 2022.)

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22091
       
  • Autumn precipitation: the competition with Santa Ana winds in determining
           fire outcomes in southern California

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      Authors: Daniel R. Cayan, Laurel L. DeHaan, Alexander Gershunov, Janin Guzman-Morales, Jon E. Keeley, Joshua Mumford, Alexandra D. Syphard
      First page: 1056
      Abstract: Daniel R. Cayan, Laurel L. DeHaan, Alexander Gershunov, Janin Guzman-Morales, Jon E. Keeley, Joshua Mumford, Alexandra D. Syphard
      Autumn precipitation and Santa Ana winds are opposing determinants of fire outcomes in California’s South Coast region. Most of the area burned in autumn through early winter during 1948–2018 occurred from fires started before the onset of precipitation, defined as the first autumn event with 8.5 mm or greater precipitation.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22065
       
  • Themes and patterns in print media coverage of wildfires in the USA,
           Canada and Australia: 1986–2016

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      Authors: Sonya Sachdeva, Sarah McCaffrey
      First page: 1089
      Abstract: Sonya Sachdeva, Sarah McCaffrey
      This paper presents the results of a large-scale analysis of news media coverage of wildfires across 30 years and three countries: the USA, Canada and Australia. It describes the wildfire-relevant topics that are most common and the interrelationships between them in each of these three contexts.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22174
       
  • Suppression resources and their influence on containment of forest fires
           in Victoria

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      Authors: Erica Marshall, Annalie Dorph, Brendan Holyland, Alex Filkov, Trent D. Penman
      First page: 1144
      Abstract: Erica Marshall, Annalie Dorph, Brendan Holyland, Alex Filkov, Trent D. Penman
      Suppression of wildfires can be dangerous and expensive. It is important that we understand the main factors influencing suppression success. Resource allocation, weather, and response times are critical factors influencing suppression because they can affect the size of the fire early on, which is the most important factor influencing containment probability.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22029
       
  • Contemporary (1984–2020) fire history metrics for the conterminous
           United States and ecoregional differences by land ownership

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      Authors: Melanie K. Vanderhoof, Todd J. Hawbaker, Casey Teske, Joe Noble, Jim Smith
      First page: 1167
      Abstract: Melanie K. Vanderhoof, Todd J. Hawbaker, Casey Teske, Joe Noble, Jim Smith

      We present contemporary fire history metrics for the conterminous United States (CONUS) derived from 37 years of the Landsat Burned Area Product (1984–2020) and provide examples of how these metrics can inform decision-making. Fire regimes are diverse across CONUS, but most ecoregions showed more burning on public than private land.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-11-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22044
       
 
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