Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)

Showing 1 - 16 of 16 Journals sorted alphabetically
Combustion and Flame     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Disaster Recovery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Fire and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Fire Safety Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Fire Science Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fire Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
FirePhysChem     Open Access  
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Wildland Fire     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Similar Journals
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International Journal of Wildland Fire
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.242
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-8001 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5516
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Mapping the ethical landscape of wildland fire management: setting an
           agendum for research and deliberation on the applied ethics of wildland
           fire

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dyllan Goldstein, Eric B. Kennedy
      Abstract: Dyllan Goldstein, Eric B. Kennedy
      Decisions in wildfire management include important ethical dimensions: how should we resolve competing trade-offs and priorities' In this paper, we provide a roadmap to different ethical issues involved in wildfire, argue for discussing these more explicitly, and suggest the need for further research to support fair and equitable management decisions.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-09-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22020
       
  • Collective action for managing wildfire risk across boundaries in forest
           and range landscapes: lessons from case studies in the western United
           States

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      Authors: Heidi R. Huber-Stearns, Emily Jane Davis, Antony S. Cheng, Alison Deak
      Abstract: Heidi R. Huber-Stearns, Emily Jane Davis, Antony S. Cheng, Alison Deak
      Actors must collectively manage wildfire risk across administrative, conceptual, organisational and other boundaries in fire-prone landscapes. We interviewed practitioners in five cases across the western United States, identifying how actors were engaging in collective action to address wildfire risk, organised through a typology of actor functions and boundary-spanning features.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21168
       
  • Automated classification of fuel types using roadside images via deep
           learning

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      Authors: Md Riasat Azim, Melih Keskin, Ngoan Do, Mustafa Gül
      Abstract: Md Riasat Azim, Melih Keskin, Ngoan Do, Mustafa Gül
      This paper presents a framework for automated identification of fuels in an area by analysing roadside images using a convolutional neural network. The results show that the framework has the potential to automate the process of fuel classification, which can complement the current practice of visual inspection and aerial monitoring.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21136
       
  • More smoke today for less smoke tomorrow' We need to better understand
           the public health benefits and costs of prescribed fire

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      Authors: Benjamin A. Jones, Shana McDermott, Patricia A. Champ, Robert P. Berrens
      Abstract: Benjamin A. Jones, Shana McDermott, Patricia A. Champ, Robert P. Berrens
      As we scale up the use of prescribed fire in the US, we need a better scientific understanding of how the health costs associated with its smoke in the present compare to the future benefits of reduced wildfire smoke exposure. Research is called for on the public health benefits and costs of prescribed fire.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22025
       
  • Estimating visitor preferences for recreation sites in wildfire prone
           areas

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      Authors: Sophia Tanner, Frank Lupi, Cloé Garnache
      Abstract: Sophia Tanner, Frank Lupi, Cloé Garnache
      This study investigates visitor preferences for tree cover, waterbodies and visual evidence of past fire at recreation sites in a Southern California national forest. Findings show that water and tree cover are highly valued, and fire impacts depend on vegetation type, fire intensity and time since the fire.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21133
       
  • Sand and fire: applying the sandpile model of self-organised criticality
           to wildfire mitigation†

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      Authors: Joshua E. Gang, Wanqi Jia, Ira A. Herniter
      Abstract: Joshua E. Gang, Wanqi Jia, Ira A. Herniter
      The sandpile model uses accumulating sand grains to approximate net fuel deposition. When a collapse occurs, it spreads, simulating the spread of fire. Data from both a sandpile model simulation and an analysis of historical forest fire data suggest that prescribed burning reduces the risk of destructive wildfires.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22017
       
  • The process of vegetation recovery and burn probability changes in
           post-burn boreal forests in northeast China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xuezheng Zong, Xiaorui Tian
      Abstract: Xuezheng Zong, Xiaorui Tian
      The recovery process and corresponding fire likelihood of post-burn boreal forests were identified. Soil depth and slope played important roles in vegetation recovery. Most burned areas recovered and showed low burn probability 20 years post burn.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22033
       
  • Wildfire response of GPS-tracked Bonelli’s eagles in eastern
           Spain

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      Authors: Sara Morollón, Juli G. Pausas, Vicente Urios, Pascual López-López
      Abstract: Sara Morollón, Juli G. Pausas, Vicente Urios, Pascual López-López
      We studied the wildfire response of GPS-tracked Bonelli’s eagles. We used kernel density estimators and movement parameters comparing individuals’ behaviour before, during and after a wildfire. We only saw an immediate negative effect in the first days of the wildfire. This could be an adaptation to wildfires in Mediterranean areas.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22018
       
  • Physicochemical characteristics controlling the flammability of live Pinus
           banksiana needles in central Alberta, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rodrigo Campos-Ruiz, Marc-André Parisien, Mike D. Flannigan
      Abstract: Rodrigo Campos-Ruiz, Marc-André Parisien, Mike D. Flannigan
      We tested the flammable properties of Pinus banksiana living needles in a laboratory. Needles ignite faster the older they are, influenced mainly by their form. Their chemical makeup affects the speed, energy released during combustion and consumption velocity. Our study showed that, surprisingly, moisture content was not the main factor controlling their flammability.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22008
       
  • A case-study ofwildland fire management knowledge exchange: the barriers
           and facilitators in the development and integration of the Canadian Forest
           Fire Danger Rating System in Ontario, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Colin B. McFayden, Colleen George, Lynn M. Johnston, Mike Wotton, Daniel Johnston, Meghan Sloane, Joshua M. Johnston
      Abstract: Colin B. McFayden, Colleen George, Lynn M. Johnston, Mike Wotton, Daniel Johnston, Meghan Sloane, Joshua M. Johnston
      We describe the barriers and facilitators for knowledge exchange for wildland fire management elicited from a case study of the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System development and implementation in Ontario. These findings can help guide the development and implementation of future innovations for wildland fire management.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22015
       
  • Wildland fire prevention: the impact of the Modifying Industrial
           Operations Protocol on the growth of industrial forestry-caused wildland
           fires in Ontario, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kevin Granville, Douglas G. Woolford, C. B. Dean, Colin B. McFayden
      Abstract: Kevin Granville, Douglas G. Woolford, C. B. Dean, Colin B. McFayden
      Ontario’s Modifying Industrial Operations Protocol aims to limit wildland fire risks associated with forestry operations. We empirically investigated how the distribution of incremental growth between discovery and final sizes of industrial forestry-caused fires have changed over time, finding evidence suggesting that fires tend to grow less under current regulations.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-08-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22074
       
  • Professional wildfire mitigation competency: a potential policy gap

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      Authors: Rebecca K. Miller, Franz Richter, Maria Theodori, Michael J. Gollner
      First page: 651
      Abstract: Rebecca K. Miller, Franz Richter, Maria Theodori, Michael J. Gollner
      Construction and landscaping professionals are generally not required to obtain credentials indicating their competency in mitigating the risk of structural damage in a wildfire. We discuss implications of this policy gap and propose a solution to bolster competency of professionals in wildfire protection as communities further expand in fire-prone areas.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22012
       
  • Recent change of burned area associated with summer heat extremes over
           Iberia

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      Authors: Virgílio A. Bento, Ana Russo, Célia M. Gouveia, Carlos C. DaCamara
      First page: 658
      Abstract: Virgílio A. Bento, Ana Russo, Célia M. Gouveia, Carlos C. DaCamara
      Wildfires and heatwaves in summer are connected. Our results concerning the Iberian Peninsula show that together with more extreme heat events observed in the region, an increase in burned area was also found in the month of June, while a prominent decrease in such events was found in September.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21155
       
  • Event-based quickflow simulation with OpenLISEM in a burned Mediterranean
           forest catchment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: D. C. S. Vieira, M. Basso, J. P. Nunes, J. J. Keizer, J. E. M. Baartman
      First page: 670
      Abstract: D. C. S. Vieira, M. Basso, J. P. Nunes, J. J. Keizer, J. E. M. Baartman

      Recently burnt areas tend to produce strong runoff responses but predicting such responses still poses a major challenge. Here, the runoff predictions of OpenLISEM were assessed for a completely burnt 10 ha-catchment. Optimised model inputs varied markedly between the 16 runoff events, with initial moisture conditions being of limited relevance.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21005
       
  • Fuel loads and fuel structure in Austrian coniferous forests

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mathias Neumann, Lena Vilà-Vilardell, Mortimer M. Müller, Harald Vacik
      First page: 693
      Abstract: Mathias Neumann, Lena Vilà-Vilardell, Mortimer M. Müller, Harald Vacik
      Fuel has been measured for the first time in Austrian coniferous forests. We found considerable difference in fuel by region and forest type, with low-productivity forests having the least fuel. Dense forests have more dead needles and woody fuel, but less herbs and grass, compared with open-canopy forests.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21161
       
  • Predicting the fine fuel moisture content in Dalmatian black pine needle
           litter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nera Bakšic, Darko Bakšic
      First page: 708
      Abstract: Nera Bakšic, Darko Bakšic
      Laboratory measurements of equilibrium moisture content and response time of dead black pine needles were used to modify the Canadian hourly fine fuel moisture code. Incorporating species-specific data increases the accuracy of fine fuel moisture content prediction, which is a key parameter in many fire behaviour and danger rating systems.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21092
       
  • Rivers up in smoke: impacts of Australia’s 2019–2020
           megafires on riparian systems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: K. A. Fryirs, N. Zhang, E. Duxbury, T. Ralph
      First page: 720
      Abstract: K. A. Fryirs, N. Zhang, E. Duxbury, T. Ralph

      Fifty percent of all riparian vegetation along 29 394 km of stream in coastal catchments of NSW, Australia, was burned in the 2019–2020 summer with 29% experiencing extreme or high-severity burns. Novel ecosystems have likely been created, requiring a new approach to riparian vegetation management to prepare for future catastrophic fires.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-06-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22046
       
  • A note on fire weather indices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jason J. Sharples
      First page: 728
      Abstract: Jason J. Sharples
      A variety of fire weather indices have been developed and employed in different contexts ranging from fire behaviour prediction and understanding wildfire potential to identifying conditions conducive to blow-up fires. This paper considers four such indices and proves that they are essentially equivalent measures of fire weather.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-06-20
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21134
       
  • Assessing the predictive efficacy of six machine learning algorithms for
           the susceptibility of Indian forests to fire

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      Authors: Laxmi Kant Sharma, Rajit Gupta, Naureen Fatima
      First page: 735
      Abstract: Laxmi Kant Sharma, Rajit Gupta, Naureen Fatima

      The current study assessed the forest fire susceptibility of Indian forest cover using six machine learning algorithms. This study demonstrates the relationship between forest fire occurrence and forest, climate and topography parameters. These algorithms have a remarkable ability to develop fire susceptibility prediction models using minimal parameters.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22016
       
  • Rate of spread and flaming zone velocities of surface fires from visible
           and thermal image processing

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      Authors: B. Schumacher, K. O. Melnik, M. Katurji, J. Zhang, V. Clifford, H. G. Pearce
      First page: 759
      Abstract: B. Schumacher, K. O. Melnik, M. Katurji, J. Zhang, V. Clifford, H. G. Pearce

      We present two new algorithms that can retrieve rate of spread and flaming velocities of fires from uncrewed aerial vehicles. The thermal tracking is well suited for studying fire–atmospheric interactions whereas the visible image tracking estimates the fire perimeter. Both techniques are available open‐source and may be adapted for operational purposes.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21122
       
  • Modelling initial attack success on forest fires suppressed by air attack
           in the province of Ontario, Canada

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      Authors: Melanie Wheatley, B. Mike Wotton, Douglas G. Woolford, David L. Martell, Joshua M. Johnston
      First page: 774
      Abstract: Melanie Wheatley, B. Mike Wotton, Douglas G. Woolford, David L. Martell, Joshua M. Johnston
      We examined the influence of airtankers on the successful containment of forest fires in the province of Ontario. Three models were developed to estimate the probability of initial attack success based on different information available to the fire management agency throughout the fire response process.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22006
       
  • How interactions between wildfire and seasonal soil moisture fluxes drive
           nitrogen cycling in Northern Sierra Nevada forests

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      Authors: Mary K. Brady, Erin J. Hanan, Matthew B. Dickinson, Jessica R. Miesel, Laura Wade, Jonathan Greenberg
      First page: 786
      Abstract: Mary K. Brady, Erin J. Hanan, Matthew B. Dickinson, Jessica R. Miesel, Laura Wade, Jonathan Greenberg
      To understand how wildfires influence biogeochemical processes in the northern Sierra Nevada, we collected soil samples immediately before and over the course of 10 months following a wildfire. We found that fire and soil moisture interacted to generate pulses of N mineralisation that varied non-monotonically with increasing burn severity.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21064
       
  • Effectiveness of fitness training and psychosocial education intervention
           programs in wildland firefighting: a cluster randomised control trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caleb Leduc, Sabir I. Giga, Ian J. Fletcher, Michelle Young, Sandra C. Dorman
      First page: 799
      Abstract: Caleb Leduc, Sabir I. Giga, Ian J. Fletcher, Michelle Young, Sandra C. Dorman
      A cluster randomised control trial evaluated the effectiveness of two intervention programs across a wildland fire season. Compared with a control group, participating in a psychosocial education intervention program buffered the impact of psychosocial risk factors, while participation in any program yielded a significantly lower incidence rate of injury.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21126
       
  • Anthropogenic fire practices only ‘best’ if they promote a
           large seed buildup: comment on the conservation needs of a fire-killed
           grevillea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Byron B. Lamont
      First page: 816
      Abstract: Byron B. Lamont

      Population modelling of a fire-killed grevillea shows that fire frequency (preferably exceeding 30-year intervals) and the extent of fire coverage (preferably exceeding 60% of the ground surface) are crucial factors in enhancing the conservation status of this species.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1071/WF21160
       
  • Response to ‘Fire practices only ‘best’ if they
           promote a large seed buildup: comment on the conservation needs of a
           fire-killed grevillea’ (Lamont 2022)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michelle McKemey, The Banbai Rangers, John Hunter, Emilie Ens, Nick Reid
      First page: 821
      Abstract: Michelle McKemey, The Banbai Rangers, John Hunter, Emilie Ens, Nick Reid
      In response to Lamont’s critique, we highlight the nuances of modelling and observing population dynamics, the benefits of cross-cultural research and ongoing challenges for fire management. We reinforce our conclusion that cultural fire management supported by science provides the most adaptive approach to support the recovery of the Backwater grevillea.

      Citation: International Journal of Wildland Fire
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1071/WF22089
       
 
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