Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 980 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (155 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (156 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (168 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (152 journals)
    - GENEALOGY AND HERALDRY (9 journals)
    - HUMANITIES (312 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Anuario de Estudios Americanos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comparative American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corpus. Archivos virtuales de la alteridad americana     Open Access  
European journal of American studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of American Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Magallania     Open Access  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Revista de Indias     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trace     Open Access  
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Political Studies Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.428
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1478-9299 - ISSN (Online) 1478-9302
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • From ‘Anomaly’ to ‘Laboratory’' Fratelli d’Italia, Illiberalism
           and the Study of Right-Wing Parties in Western Europe

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      Authors: Gianfranco Baldini
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Once considered an anomaly for its polarized pluralism, then marked, over the last three decades, by frequent alternations between populist and technocratic governments, Italy is now the only country in Western Europe whose coalition government is led by a party usually classified in the populist radical right family, Giorgia Meloni’s Brothers of Italy (Fratelli d’Italia). While this means that the country has finally its first female Prime Minister, understanding the trajectory of the party is important not just for the state of Italian politics but also for comparative politics more in general. Taking stock of the recent literature on Meloni’s party, it appears that the choices made by the Fratelli d’Italia – in Italy and in Europe – can resonate beyond the national borders especially in terms of illiberal ideologies and practices of right-wing parties.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T12:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241231771
       
  • Empirical Political Theory: A Template for a Research Design and a
           Qualified Defense

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      Authors: Nahshon Perez
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Developments in contemporary analytic political theory have called for political theory to situate itself near political science, to pay attention to political institutions, to follow the research output of the social sciences, and to present sensitivity to method. This empirical and methodological turn has brought about a debate regarding the form and desirability of such empirically grounded political theory. We aim, first, to clarify what the empirical turn in political theory implies for research in political theory. We shall situate such empirically grounded political theory in contemporary analytic political theory, in contemporary analytic political theory’s descriptive and prescriptive steps, and also examine how this turn complements contemporary analytic political theory’s evaluative step. Second, to suggest a defense of this empirical development, as if properly understood, it would assist empirically grounded contemporary analytic political theory to achieve its own stated goals. Third, to provide a template for a research design in empirical contemporary analytic political theory.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:49:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241231782
       
  • Pathways to Authoritarian Adaptation: How State–Society Interactions
           Push the Window of Policy Change in China

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      Authors: Chun-chih Chang, Yang Zeng, Xuyi Guo
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Under what conditions might authoritarian states adapt public policies to social preferences' How could social actors push the window for policy change' How might state–society interactions induce policy change as the practice of authoritarian adaptation' This article utilizes a new database of case evidence and the qualitative comparative analysis method to explore the relationship between state–society interaction and policy change as the practical manifestation of authoritarian adaptation in China. The study presents three approaches to policy change: state–society interactive strategies, policy entrepreneurs and the political opportunity structure. The empirical results reveal three patterns of state–society interaction leading to policy change, while submission is not a viable option for society under state suppression. Media presence may impede policy change, and the diverse functions of social organizations should be related to interactive strategies. In addition, social actors may identify political opportunities through multiround interaction, while the role of joint administration in effecting policy change remains unclear. This study offers a novel understanding of authoritarian adaptation.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T10:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241229404
       
  • COVID-19 and Political Trust in Local Governments: Evidence From Nepal

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      Authors: Charlotte Fiedler, Hugo Marcos-Marne, Karina Mross
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has reinvigorated debates about the drivers of political trust. Research so far has mainly focused on national-level institutions, during the early stages of the pandemic and using data from established democracies. However, how does this relationship look like if we pay attention to subnational institutions in non-consolidated democracies, and further away from the initial COVID-19 outbreak' To contribute to this line of research, this article focuses on the local level and explores the association between individuals’ satisfaction with COVID-19 performance and political trust in Nepal. For that, it uses novel data collected via telephone interviews (N = 1400) conducted between 25 April and 24 May 2021, during the second wave of COVID-19. Our main results reveal that satisfaction with local institutions’ COVID-related performance is significantly and robustly associated with levels of political trust at the local level. The association holds even when geographical and time specifications are added, trust towards national institutions or expectations about local governments are included in the analysis and the dependent variable is disaggregated to discard measurement biases. The study thereby provides important insights into the role performance plays for institutional trust beyond the national level and in an unconsolidated democracy.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T12:06:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231220535
       
  • Bulgarian Populist Euroscepticism: The Unavoidable Russian Dimension

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      Authors: Ildiko Otova
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This analysis contextualises Bulgarian Euroscepticism by a spatial-temporal approach. Historical-geographical overlays have their temporal continuities across political regimes, and the location determines the political process. The attitude towards Russia has been crucial in shaping the political system of Bulgaria. The superimposition of factors such as historical and cultural ties, close relationships at the individual level, and economic ties, determined also by geopolitical sites, explain the attitudes towards Russia in Bulgarian society. This analysis does not fit explicitly in any of the familiar Eurosceptic typologies. However, it proposes a typologisation of Bulgarian populism and uses it to locate Bulgarian Euroscepticism along the Europe–Russia axis, demonstrating the importance of historical and geographical contexts or temporal overlaps and locations to the understanding of the national specificities of Euroscepticism.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T06:56:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241228097
       
  • On the Term “Environmental Refugee”: Normative Assumptions and
           Empirical Realities

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      Authors: J Matthew Hoye, Gustaf Hednäs, Michael Rowland, Umang Sodhi, Jaroslaw Kantorowicz
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Activist groups debate the complex connection between climate change and migration but generally agree on the normative value of describing those migrants as “environmental refugees.” They argue that using such a term, even though unrecognized under international law, might increase the urgency of this issue in the eyes of the public. Does the term do the normative work that has been assumed' To our knowledge, the idea has not been subject to empirical confirmation. In this research note, we present data from two experimental surveys conducted in the UK and the Netherlands (N = 2261) directly addressing that question. The findings significantly undermine the assumption that “environmental refugee” is normatively persuasive outside activists and academic circles. We demonstrate that using “environmental refugees” frames compared to “environmental migrants” does not increase the urgency of the climate migration problem in the eyes of the public, and as our results show, such frames may slightly lower perceptions of urgency. Yet, this result is rather negligible.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T11:32:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241226614
       
  • From Objectivist Bias to Positivist Bias: A Constructivist Critique of the
           Attitudes Approach to Populism

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      Authors: Seongcheol Kim, Aurelien Mondon
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article undertakes a critique of the attitudes approach to populism, predicated on survey-based operationalisations of populism as a set of attitudes. Our critique is threefold: first, the move of reducing ‘the elite’ to ‘the politicians’ in survey items – beginning with the foundational Akkerman scale – is at odds with the constructivist underpinnings of Mudde’s ideational definition that this literature largely draws on, where ‘the people’ and ‘the elite’ are understood as contingent constructions that can take on a wide range of meanings depending on the ideological permutation. Second, our corpus linguistics-based overview of empirical patterns within the ‘populist attitudes’ literature indicates a skewed focus on the far right within this literature, contrary to the ideological variability of populism following the ideational definition. Third, the reliance on public opinion surveys points to the danger of reifying public opinion and attributing objective qualities to ‘the people’ as such. In assuming categories such as ‘the elite’ to stand for determinate referents such as ‘the politicians’ in survey-based operationalisations, the positivist bias of the attitudes approach paradoxically mirrors the objectivist bias (following Sartori) of early populism research that reduced the identity of ‘the people’ in populism to determinate socio-structural categories such as the peasantry.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T11:30:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231225403
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Giorgos Venizelos, Populism in Power: Discourse
           and Performativity in SYRIZA and Donald Trump

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      Authors: Petar Bankov
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T12:08:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241227781
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Marianna Griffini, The Politics of Memory in the
           Italian Populist Radical Right. From Mare Nostrum to Mare Vostrum

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      Authors: Laura Montecchio
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T12:21:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241228090
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Philip Fehling, Hans-Jürgen Burchardt, Taxation
           and Inequality in Latin America: New Perspectives on Political Economy and
           Tax Regimes

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      Authors: Jorge Garcia-Arias
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T12:20:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241226612
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Emily B Finley, The Ideology of Democratism

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      Authors: Zsolt Nagy
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T09:31:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241227785
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Tobias Cremer, The Godless Crusade: Religion,
           Populism and Right-Wing Identity Politics in the West

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      Authors: Nazar Syvak
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T09:26:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241227784
       
  • Who Runs in the End' New Evidence on the Effects of Gender, Ethnicity and
           Intersectionality on Candidate Selection

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      Authors: Marc Debus, Noam Himmelrath
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Candidate selection within parties is a key stage in the political process and provides an important frame for the degree of representation of social groups in parliaments. We seek to develop a better understanding of the effect of intersectionality on candidate selection processes. We do so by examining the effect of candidates’ key socio-demographic characteristics, like their gender and ethnic background, on their chances of getting nominated by their party. We argue that features of the ideological background of the respective nominating party matter for the chances that women and aspirants with an ethnic background win the nomination as their party’s district candidate. We make use of novel data from the 2021 German federal election that provides detailed information on the candidate selection processes of all major parties in the 299 election districts. By doing so, we apply existing theoretical expectations to an untested case and find that female competitors and aspirants with an ethnic background face difficulties being nominated, in particular in the case of parties with rather traditionalist societal policy positions. We also find that intersectionality matters: female aspirants of ethnic minorities are even less likely to be nominated by ideologically traditional parties.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T09:22:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299241226616
       
  • Introducing a Conceptual Map of Political Elites’ Responses to Different
           Types of Uncertain Phenomena

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      Authors: Barbara Vis
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Political elites—like ministers or members of parliament—face numerous phenomena that are characterized by uncertainty. Uncertainty ranges from resolvable to radical, whereby the former can be removed with more or better information, but radical uncertainty cannot. Remarkably, little is known about political elites’ responses to such phenomena, both theoretically (what responses are likely') and empirically (which responses do political elites display'). This “New Ideas” contribution addresses the theoretical lacuna by presenting a multidisciplinary conceptual map of possible responses to radical and resolvable uncertainty. These responses influence political elites’ effectiveness in solving problems and, thus, how representative democracies function. The article also sketches how to identify the responses empirically.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T12:04:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231222847
       
  • Religion, Perceived Unfairness, and Political Protest: Empirical Evidence
           From East Asian Countries

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      Authors: Wen-Chun Chang
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Religion is considered to have different aspects of influences on political protest, and some have argued that religious participation often mobilizes collective political actions by enhancing individuals’ civic skills and political efficacy. By contrast, religious values and beliefs that emphasize the importance of traditional norms and conformity tend to reduce individuals’ propensities to participate in political protest. The influences of religion on individuals’ attitudes toward coping with injustice and unfairness can be critical for explaining their propensities to participate in political protest. Using data from the fourth wave of the Asian Barometer Survey, this study investigates the role of perceived unfairness in shaping the link between religion and political protest in 13 East Asian countries. In accordance with the arguments of mobilizing and conforming effects, we find that religious attendance increases individuals’ propensities to engage in political protest, while religiosity has a negative effect on political protest. In particular, the results show that the perceived unfairness of income distribution mediates the indirect effects of religion on political protest. They also present that religious affiliations mitigate perceived unfairness and indirectly reduce individuals’ propensities to participate in political protest. Nevertheless, the direct effects of religious attendance on mobilizing political protest are stronger.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T10:18:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231225401
       
  • Factions and the Redistributive Effects of Reform in Japan

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      Authors: Matthew M Carlson, Masaki Nakabayashi
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Campaign finance and other political reforms often have redistributive consequences when they improve the position of one group over another. When potentially redistributive reforms are debated or passed, groups may resist or support such reforms depending on their belief about whether the reforms will be advantageous or not to their own position. In dominant party systems such as Japan, we expect that major reforms will have heterogeneous effects for different factions within Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). In 1975 and 1994, reformers in Japan introduced major changes that they hoped would reduce corruption and strengthen political parties over factions. In this article, we empirically investigate the asymmetrical impact of the reforms on the total amount of revenue and contributions disclosed by factions in the LDP. We find that the 1975 reform had significant redistributive effects, including a relatively adverse impact on the faction linked to Tanaka Kakuei in terms of total revenue. The 1994 reforms, in contrast, reveal that the Tanaka faction did the best among the factions in collecting revenues and consolidating its power.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T10:59:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231220538
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Patrick Diamond, The British Labour Party in
           Opposition and Power, 1979–2019: Forward March Halted'

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      Authors: Ugur Tekiner
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T11:39:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231222850
       
  • Economic Insecurity and the Rise of Anti-Immigrant Sentiments: The Role of
           Labor Market Risks and Welfare Deservingness Perception

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      Authors: Jaewook Lee
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Globalization and technological advancements pose a threat of job loss for native-born citizens, potentially leading to blaming immigrants for economic hardship. This sentiment hinges on the perception that foreign-born residents are not contributing to the host society, often combined with discourse portraying immigrants as competitors regarding welfare benefits. Nevertheless, we have limited knowledge about how labor market risk to job loss is related to anti-immigrant sentiments in tandem with their assessment of the welfare state, such as the deservingness of beneficiaries. Drawing on the European Social Survey, this study examines the relationship between labor market risks, deservingness perception, and anti-immigrant attitudes. First, the extent to which individuals are exposed to job-displacing transformations is negatively associated with a perception of immigrants’ contribution to the host society. Second, in contrast, the perception that welfare recipients are deserving is positively associated with an attitude toward immigrant contribution. Third, the association between the labor market risks and the devaluation of immigrants’ contributions is stronger among individuals who emphasize the deservingness of beneficiaries. We argue that economic insecurity combined with frustration with the fairness of the social welfare system can drive anti-immigrant attitudes.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T06:45:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217188
       
  • Contesting European Union From the ‘Heart of Europe’: A Peculiar Case
           of Polish Populist Euroscepticism After 2015

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      Authors: Natasza Styczyńska
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Poland is an interesting example of a country in which a Eurosceptic government was elected by citizens who on the whole declare their commitment to European Union membership and trust in the European institutions. Notwithstanding, due to country-specific factors, Poles are prone to populist and anti-elitist rhetoric. Poland, similarly to other countries in the region of Central and Eastern Europe, serves also as a case study of how populism can be merged with Euroscepticism, which can be observed particularly on the right side of the political arena and enhanced by nationalism. The article focuses on Poland as a peculiar example of a country in which a populist Eurosceptic government was elected by citizens who on the whole declare their commitment to European Union membership but are prone to populist rhetoric and identity politics.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T03:46:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231218661
       
  • AUR – The Electoral Geography of Romanian Conservative Nationalism

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      Authors: Claudiu Crăciun, Andrei Țăranu
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      In December 2020, Romania held elections for its new Parliament amid the pandemic crisis. The voter turnout was historically low, at 31.84%. The Alliance for the Union of Romanians, a new party, won 9% of the vote, making it the fourth largest party in the Parliament. Having received only 0.29% of the votes in the local elections held 2 months prior, Alliance for the Union of Romanians’ success was unexpected. To explain this outcome, we analyse its programmatic choices, political strategy and symbolic and electoral geographies. The pandemic crisis allowed the consolidation of a nationalist and conservative constituency originating in the 2018 constitutional referendum to ban same-sex marriages. Romania’s example shows that a nationalist-conservative radical party can become viable if extra-political groups, networks and organisations are willing to lend significant local support to it.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T11:18:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217876
       
  • From Representative to Represented Mini-Publics: How Mini-Publics’
           Outputs are Shaped by Representation

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      Authors: Nino Junius
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Research has shown that deliberative mini-publics have the potential to mitigate some of the deficiencies of contemporary representative democracy. To this end, mini-publics are becoming increasingly connected to other institutions of the democratic system so that their outputs can be transmitted to policy-makers. This article argues that the literature has underappreciated that mini-publics’ outputs are not simply transmitted from one institution to another. Instead, the transmission of outputs from mini-publics to other sites in the democratic system is always mediated by representation, which necessarily transforms outputs to some extent. The article identifies the following three main reasons for this: mini-publics’ representatives must interpret, perform, and negotiate outputs. Drawing on a least-likely case-study of Agora’s representation of the Brussels Citizens’ Assembly, it illustrates how these issues are pervasive even when representatives are primarily interested in the literal and faithful transmission of mini-publics’ outputs. The findings highlight how representatives struggle with representing mini-publics’ outputs.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T10:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217619
       
  • Climate Justice and Political Feasibility

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      Authors: Malte Frøslee Ibsen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that rising economic inequality and the decline in political trust across Western countries have systematic normative implications for Western governments’ pursuit of climate justice. The article argues that it is an essential but neglected task of nonideal political theory to identify political feasibility constraints on the pursuit of climate justice and reflect on how to overcome them. The article identifies two feasibility constraints in contemporary Western countries, the inequality constraint and the legitimation constraint, as important elements of a nonideal theory of climate justice. It argues that the French Gilets Jaunes (yellow vests) movement arose as a form of bottom-up motivational resistance to President Macron’s decarbonization policies, precisely because those policies did not take sufficient heed of the inequality and legitimation constraints. Furthermore, the article sketches elements of a roadmap for a feasible pathway for Western governments to decarbonize and observe their citizens’ duties of climate justice and argues that the framework of feasibility constraints offers a coherent, novel and urgent rationale for adopting redistributive measures such as the Carbon Fee and Dividend and participatory-democratic measures such as Citizen Assemblies as component parts of a feasible pathway to a decarbonized economy.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T11:04:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217193
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Swati Srivastava, Hybrid Sovereignty in World
           Politics: Cambridge Studies in International Relations

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      Authors: Mansour AlMuaili
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T12:01:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217637
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Clare Birchall and Peter Knight, Conspiracy
           Theories in the Time of Covid-19

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      Authors: Adam John Koper
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T08:56:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231217650
       
  • Conspiracy Everywhere

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      Authors: Russell Muirhead, Nancy Rosenblum
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Conspiracy seems to be everywhere, and not only in the United States, where the “rigged election” conspiracy led a US president to reverse the results of a national election. We consider what is distinctive about contemporary conspiracism and argue that the prevalence of fact-free conspiratorial narratives marks a shift from what Hofstadter called the “pedantic” style of conspiracy theory. We show how conspiracism today threatens democratic institutions and sketch how the articles in this volume (on conspiracism) advance our understanding of conspiracy and democracy.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-02T11:07:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231212165
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Mayur S Suresh, Terror Trials: Life and Law in
           Delhi’s Courts

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      Authors: Vipanchika Sahasri Bhagyanagar
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T12:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231213266
       
  • Take the Streets or Take the Parliament' Political Participation Choices
           of Radical Left Individuals

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      Authors: Svenja Krauss, Sarah Wagner
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Voters across Europe have become increasingly polarised on both ends of the political spectrum in the last decade. While radical right parties were able to mobilise voters on their salient topics, radical left parties were only sporadically successful. In this article, we analyse why radical left parties fail to benefit from increasing polarisation by examining their potential voter base. Radical left individuals should have a lower incentive to participate in elections to change the status quo because of their suspicion towards authorities in general and the government more specifically. Instead, they should engage in status quo -busting grassroots activities to enforce revolutionary, rather than evolutionary, change. Our hypotheses are put to an empirical test by relying on data from the European Social Survey. We include respondents from 17 Western European countries from five rounds of the European Social Survey. The results have important implications for our understanding of the demand side of the political extremism wave.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T01:06:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231204708
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Patrick A Mello and Falk Ostermann, Routledge
           Handbook of Foreign Policy Analysis Methods

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      Authors: Mustafa Gökcan Kösen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-22T06:32:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231206721
       
  • Voting for the Future: Electoral Institutions and the Time Horizons of
           Democracy

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      Authors: Sarah Birch
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The urgency of climate change has prompted political theorists to consider how democracy might be reconfigured to cope with the future challenges that our current social and economic practices will generate. There have been in recent years numerous promising proposals for how political systems might be reformed so as to make them more forward-looking. This article offers an assessment of a number of such proposals that touch on elections. The main contribution of the article is to bring together suggestions put forward by political theorists and evidence from empirical social science that is of relevance to these suggestions.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-22T05:22:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231204550
       
  • Presidential Activism in Sub-Saharan Africa: Explaining Variation Among
           Semi-Presidential Countries

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      Authors: Sophia Moestrup, Thomas Sedelius
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to explain variations in presidential activism in semi-presidential countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Africa is one of the continents where semi-presidentialism is most prevalent, but the dynamics of intra-executive relations are severely understudied. The four case studies discussed here—the Democratic Republic of Congo, Niger, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe—belong to the premier-presidential subtype. In this exploratory study, we aim to examine how institutional dimensions of premier-presidentialism interact with contextual factors to explain variations in presidential activism among Sub-Saharan African countries. In addition to fundamental contextual differences among the two pairs of countries, francophone and lusophone, there are specific institutional factors associated with the design and operation of premier-presidentialism that contribute to greater presidential activism in the two francophone cases. Taken together, these contextual and institutional factors skew effective executive power heavily toward the president in our francophone countries. We also find that the degree of political institutionalization matters for the impact of presidential activism on intra-executive conflict and government policymaking capacity. The article increases our understanding of the operation of semi-presidentialism in this understudied region, underscoring the importance of both contextual and constitutional factors for explaining variations in presidential activism in Africa.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T09:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231204555
       
  • Geographical Dimensions of Populist Euroscepticism

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      Authors: Roch Dunin-Wąsowicz, Kira Gartzou-Katsouyanni
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The appeal of populism has been explained by individual preferences expressed along two dimensions: a left-right economic dimension and a cosmopolitan-traditionalist cultural dimension. However, this distinction has been contested by recent studies pointing out that economic and cultural factors reinforce each other in linking structural transformations, like globalisation and technological change, to populist political outcomes. Given the spatially uneven character of the effects of structural transformations, our contribution argues that ‘place’ should be a central category in the analysis of Eurosceptic populism. By focusing on place, it becomes easier to understand how material and identity-related factors interact in triggering a demand for populism, and how this interaction sets the ground for the reception of populist narratives in different locations. We set out a research agenda for improving our understanding of the political implications of local socio-economic trajectories in Western European left-behind areas, places in Central and Eastern Europe struggling since transition into democracy begun, Southern European locations hit by the Eurozone crisis, and beyond.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T11:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231201810
       
  • Populism Analytical Tools to Unearth the Roots of Euroscepticism

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      Authors: José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Populist leaders around the globe magnify pre-existing frustrations and dramatise crises to erode confidence in elites and institutions. They adapt their othering and blame attribution discourses to specific geographical realities to take advantage of local problems and prejudices. Most Eurosceptic parties apply a similar populist logic of articulation simplifying political problems, morally delegitimising their political adversaries and supranational institutions, appealing to an idealised and somewhat homogeneous notion of society as well as presenting popular sovereignty as threatened by Brussels and mainstream parties. Populism literature has developed theories and measurement tools that are very useful to explain the emergence of Eurosceptic movements and to what extent their narratives resonate with citizen’s pre-existing attitudes and/or contribute to shaping them. This article shows the value of using populism as an epistemic framework to analyse Euroscepticism and understand how parties tailor their messages (supply-side) to trigger specific beliefs and behaviours (demand-side) in the inhabitants of different geographic contexts.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T10:02:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231201075
       
  • What’s Wrong With Extreme Wealth'

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      Authors: David V Axelsen, Lasse Nielsen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The expansion in the wealth of the extremely wealthy has received much attention in recent public and academic debate. In political theory, the phenomenon has only recently begun to be scrutinized. This article builds on these preliminary steps, exploring the normative reasons we have to worry about extreme wealth. Looking at the issues, first, through a distributive lens, we reveal that the excess wealth of the extremely wealthy compounds the injustice of inequality and insufficiency, making the situation distinctly unjust. Through a relational lens, we see that extreme wealth may create societal segregation, which poses distinct threats to solidarity. Finally, when the two previous perspectives interact, the particular ways in which the wealthy can influence society, change rules and norms and bend existing regulation to their advantage open up the possibility of vicious societal feedback loops.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T12:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231195453
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Ajay Gudavarthy, Politics, Ethics and Emotions
           in ‘New India’

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      Authors: KS Sanjana
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T01:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231201809
       
  • Why Do Politicians Not Act Upon Citizens’ Deliberations'
           Evidence From Iceland

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      Authors: Valgerður Björk Pálsdóttir, Sergiu Gherghina, Paul Tap
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Politicians are expressing increasing support for deliberative practices around the world. However, knowledge about their actions beyond expressing support is scarce. To address this gap in the literature, this article aims to explain why politicians do not pick up the results arising from deliberative practices and integrate them into their policies. Our analysis focuses on the 2019 deliberation in Iceland as the most likely case in which we would expect such a process to occur. We use original data from 25 semi-structured interviews conducted in 2021 with Icelandic MPs elected at the national level, which also cover all the party leaders of the eight parliamentary parties in the 2017–2021 term in office. The reflexive thematic analysis finds that, irrespective of their ideological affiliation, politicians are critical of deliberative practices both in procedural and substantive terms. They display a strong belief that political representation achieved through elections must be the rule of the democratic game. As such, deliberation is considered redundant since citizens already have many ways to participate in representative democracy.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-09-09T01:10:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231197157
       
  • The Multiverse of Taiwan’s Future: Reconsidering the
           Independence–Unification (Tondu) Attitudes

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      Authors: Fang-Yu Chen, Austin Horng-En Wang, Charles KS Wu, Yao-Yuan Yeh
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      For decades, scholars have constructed various ways to measure Taiwanese public opinion on the nation’s future, the independence–unification (Tondu) question. While existing surveys find that Taiwanese people become more likely to support independence, the majority still favors the “status quo” option. Existing measurements have a number of weaknesses. For instance, most do not inform citizens what the “status quo” means, nor do they specify when and how independence and unification will manifest in reality. We propose a new approach to measuring citizens’ preferences of the nation’s future by specifying five mutually exclusive options on the independence–unification spectrum and field a nationwide survey to illustrate the validity of the new typology. Compared with traditional measurements, our method has more substantial explanatory power for several key political issues in Taiwan.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T09:28:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231193572
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Ajay Gudavarthy, Politics, Ethics and Emotions
           in ‘New India’

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      Authors: Sana Shah
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-30T06:52:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231195460
       
  • Children, Voting, and the Meaning of Universal Suffrage

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      Authors: Harry Pearse
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Although universal suffrage is a broad franchise model, it allows for exclusions provided they are robustly justified. In practice, therefore, suffrage is never universal. Every modern democracy operates with its own exclusion principles, but they are all bounded by some sort of age exclusion screening for competence. However, there is another way to conceptualise universal suffrage – a conceptualisation that finds credence in existing international treaties, and which better fulfil democracies governing promise of political equality. In this model, inclusivity and universalism remain the default, and franchise exclusions are subjected to more rigorous testing. To demonstrate the potential of this framework, I apply it to questions of children’s suffrage, arguing that the theoretical grounds for excluding children are insufficient to overturn the default principles of universalism and inclusion.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-29T07:13:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231195454
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Rahul Ranjan, The Political Life of Memory:
           Birsa Munda in Contemporary India

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      Authors: Alok Ranjan
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T07:12:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231195458
       
  • Ignore, Rebut or Embrace: Political Elite Responses to Conspiracy Theories

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      Authors: Zim Nwokora
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The attention to and concerns about conspiracy theories have increased in recent years, fuelled by a surge in conspiratorial discourse during the Donald Trump presidency in the United States. Responding to this development, the scholarship on how democracies should deal with conspiracy theories has focused on what new regulations and institutions ought to be introduced to tackle its threats to democracy. In this article, I consider this practical question from a different angle by exploring the discursive strategies that are available to political elites when they encounter a conspiracy theory. I flesh out three general strategies – ignore, rebut and embrace – and identify the circumstances that shape when each strategy should be used in order to maximize the effects of discourse as an anti-conspiracy mechanism. This perspective thereby aims to reveal the elements of skill and nuance that are required of a politician who seeks to engage a conspiracy theory in a way that advances democratic values.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T07:10:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231193570
       
  • Informal Power and Short-Term Consequences: Country Presidents and
           Political Parties in Romania

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      Authors: Sergiu Gherghina, Paul Tap, Raluca Farcas
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Country presidents and their political parties have strong connections along partisan lines. However, it remains unclear how this relationship unfolds when country presidents have to be non-partisans and formal ties are not permitted. This article seeks to address this gap in the literature and analyzes how country presidents use informal powers to maintain an influence in the life of their (former) political parties. We use Romania as the most likely case where we would expect such powers to occur and matter, because the country’s constitution bans the country’s president from being a party member once they are elected to public office. We compare the behaviour of the two Romanian country presidents who have each served two complete consecutive terms in office in the post-communist period. Our analysis covers the 2004–2022 period and focuses on the following four dimensions: electing successors, prime ministerial appointments, inclusion in coalition agreements and parties’ electoral performance.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T10:34:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231187220
       
  • Euroscepticism and Local Far-Right Mobilization via Telegram in Light of
           the Fundamental Transformation of the Public Sphere

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      Authors: Johannes Kiess
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Saxony remains a hot spot for far-right mobilization making it a prominent case for studying Neonazi-networks as well as broader issues of challenges for democracy. Local and regional mobilization has intensified during the political contestation of migration 2013ff. with Dresden’s PEGIDA becoming a benchmark for regional regressive movements. During the pandemic, we observed yet another uptick in far-right mobilization, again deeply rooted in local networks that existed before the crisis and leading to a specific dynamic distinct from other regions in Germany. To explain this phenomenon, it is important to consider regional and local characteristics of identity formation, perceptions of ‘winner-and-loser’ dichotomies, and the broader challenges of global and European inequalities. As this contribution argues, here lie yet idle potentials for the comparative study of Euroscepticism and place.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T09:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231190731
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Michaelangelo Anastasiou, Nationalism and
           Hegemony: The Consolidation of the Nation in Social and Political Life

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      Authors: Jacopo Custodi
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T12:20:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231191428
       
  • Ideas, Policy Feedback and the American Political Economy

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      Authors: Daniel Béland
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      In their volume The American Political Economy, Jacob S. Hacker et al. seek to renew the study of American political economy (APE) through a direct engagement with other areas of political science, including and especially comparative political economy (CPE). In the introduction of their volume, they lay out the foundations of APE as both a field of research and an approach to American politics that seeks to contribute to the study of the United States as well as to the broader discipline of political science. In this review essay, I will discuss the APE as an intellectual project to stress its key assumptions and its potential contribution to the study of politics and public policy, in the United States and beyond. Then, I will discuss two key issues that, while not explicitly central to APE as developed in The American Political Economy, could help enrich this novel approach. These two issues are policy feedback, a concept already prominent in the institutionalist tradition APE draws on, and the role of ideas in politics, which in recent decades has gained more currency in the study of politics, public policy and CPE.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T11:27:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231191431
       
  • Does Race Affect Public Evaluations of Constituent Messages in Local
           Government Meetings' Results from an Experiment

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      Authors: Bai Linh Hoang
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Constituents in the United States have used local public meetings in recent years to shape policy on some of the most high-profile race-related issues. However, public meeting participation remains less studied relative to other modes of participation. This study investigates the extent to which race shapes the way a message is heard and evaluated by the public audience and the degree to which its impact depends on the issue of the message. To carry out the study, I set up a 2 × 3 experiment containing six short treatment videos in which I manipulated the race of the actor/speaker (Black or White) and the message issue (innocuous service request, race-related policy, and race-neutral policy). Subjects were randomly assigned to watch one of the six videos and then asked to evaluate the message in the video. The early results of this study show that unlike previous studies revealing racial bias in a range of political contexts in the United States, race exerts neither independent nor conditional effects on the evaluation of the message as reasonable. I discuss the limitations and implications of these findings and useful considerations to think about in expanding this study.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T10:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231187225
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Luke Billingham and Keir Irwin-Rogers, Against
           Youth Violence: A Social Harm Perspective

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      Authors: Ruth Woolsey
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-03T11:16:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231191425
       
  • Does Simulating Financial Equality Reduce the Political Donations Gender
           Gap'

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      Authors: Jesse Mehravar, Christopher Alcantara, Jason Roy
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      A variety of research has found strong evidence that men are more likely to donate to political parties and candidates relative to women. Yet studies of other kinds of political participation have observed a shrinking gender gap. What explains this variation' One possible explanation comes from several studies that report women are more likely to donate to nonpolitical groups when told they have been entered into a monetary draw. Does simulating resource equality also reduce the political donations gender gap' To answer this question, we analyse original Canadian data from two surveys that asked participants how much they would give to a federal (survey 1)/provincial (survey 2) political party if they were given CDN$100. Contrary to our expectations, we find no gender gap at the federal level and a positive gap favouring women at the provincial level.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T07:47:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231188336
       
  • Confrontational or ‘Statespersonlike’ Style' Examining Finnish and
           French Presidents’ Public Speeches and Messages, 2000–2020

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      Authors: Maarika Kujanen, Vesa Koskimaa, Tapio Raunio
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Presidents can use public speeches for a variety of purposes from rallying support for their initiatives to attacking their opponents or building societal consensus. Contrary to general expectations regarding dual executive systems, this article suggests that presidents in semi-presidential regimes can benefit politically and in terms of popularity from ‘statespersonlike’ behaviour, and thus, they should generally refrain from negative and contentious statements. Examining the tone and content of formal speeches and informal messages of Finnish and French presidents from 2000 to 2020, the study shows that under varying constitutional frameworks and general practical expectations, the presidents in both countries by and large employ a ‘statespersonlike’ style in their speeches. Presidential speeches primarily express a positive tone, and they contain few references to other state institutions and economy and other governmental domains. Instead, presidents typically seek to portray themselves as guardians of national interest, with foreign policy and national unity emphasized in the speeches.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T11:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231188605
       
  • Commissioned Book Review. Matthew Smith, The First Resort: A History of
           Social Psychiatry in the United States

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      Authors: Matthew Thomas Johnson, Elliott Aidan Johnson
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T05:40:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231189983
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Ramona Coman, The Politics of the Rule of Law in
           the EU Polity, Actors, Tools and Challenges

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      Authors: Gisela Hernández
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T11:15:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231187221
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Mihaela Mihai, Political Memory and the
           Aesthetics of Care: The Art of Complicity and Resistance

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      Authors: Kanchan Panday
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T12:30:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231188603
       
  • Routine Presidential Activism by Going Public under Semi-Presidential and
           Parliamentary Regimes

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      Authors: Mažvydas Jastramskis, Lukas Pukelis
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Presidential research commonly focuses on the most prominent cases of going public by presidents in semi-presidential regimes: such as expressing a lack of trust in the cabinet members. However, it is also important to understand the day-to-day functioning of semi-presidential republics and routine efforts by the presidents to insert themselves into government decisions. Moreover, presidents in parliamentary republics may also try to influence the government through the power of the public word. In this article, we conceptualize going public as an instance when a president weighs in on the performance of the cabinet and/or individual minister in the media. We analyze the focus and intensity of these instances in semi-presidential (Lithuania) and parliamentary (Latvia) regimes. Our main finding is that on average, presidents are more routinely active in public under semi-presidentialism. We also find that the intensity and focus of presidential attention on the cabinet are highly correlated to the media attention. Furthermore, presidents go public more often during the first year of their terms and pay more attention to foreign and defense policy than to other areas. Our results tend to support the presidency-centered arguments that emphasize the institutional prerogatives and political culture in the explanation of presidential activism.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T12:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231185453
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Ken M. P. Setiawan and Dirk Tomsa, Politics in
           Contemporary Indonesia: Institutional Change, Policy Challenges, and
           Democratic Decline

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      Authors: Firmanda Taufiq, Ahalla Tsauro
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-14T06:33:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231187223
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Robinson Woodward-Burns, Hidden Laws

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      Authors: Christopher R. Hallenbrook
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-14T06:31:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231187222
       
  • Testing Causal Inference Between Social Media News Reliance and (Dis)trust
           of EU Institutions With an Instrumental Variable Approach: Lessons From a
           Null-Hypothesis Case

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      Authors: Martin Moland, Asimina Michailidou
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Given the well-documented negativity bias and attitudinal entrenchment associated with sharing and debating news in social media, a reasonable and already substantially investigated assumption is that those getting news about the European Union (EU) mostly from social media would be more sceptical of its institutions than others. Empirical research on this topic has thus far largely deployed experimental and observational methods to investigate this assumption. We contribute to the existing literature with an instrumental variable approach well-suited to establishing causal relationships in non-experimental data. However, we find no blanket causal relationship between relying on social media for news about the EU polity and becoming less trustful of its institutions. EU policies aiming to tackle negative effects of social media news consumption, therefore, need to be tailored to different demographic groups.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-11T07:08:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231183574
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Daniel Lee, The Right of Sovereignty: Jean Bodin
           on the Sovereign State and the Law of Nations

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      Authors: Charlie Bradley
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T01:17:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231186331
       
  • Presidential Activism and Success in Foreign and Defence Policy: A Study
           of Portugal’s Premier-Presidential Regime

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      Authors: Octavio Amorim Neto, André Anselmo
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates presidents’ foreign and defence policy activism under Portugal’s premier-presidential system from 1982 to 2021. First, the article discusses the extant literature on intra-executive conflicts in semi-presidential systems. Then, it provides an overview of Portugal’s experience with semi-presidentialism since 1976 and the powers of the Portuguese president. The third section describes all significant foreign and defence policy presidential interventions from 1982 to 2021 that resulted in disputes with the prime minister. This section estimates presidents’ and prime ministers’ ex-ante preferences over the issues at stake. We verify which preference is closest to the ex-post content of the policy implemented – if it is the president’s, it counts as a presidential win. We identify the formal and informal means by which presidents acted. Informal means are essentially going public tactics. In addition, we inductively pin down the necessary and sufficient conditions under which presidents intervene and succeed. The article’s main findings are two: first, the president’s second term, absence of a strictly unified executive and a majority cabinet are separately necessary but jointly sufficient for presidential interventions to occur; second, formal powers are a necessary but insufficient condition for presidential victory. Finally, we speculate on the policy, institutional, and electoral consequences of presidential activism.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T01:13:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231183575
       
  • Young Non-Voters and Ethnic Tribune Politics in Northern Ireland: Beyond
           Apathy and Engaged Scepticism

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      Authors: Dean Farquhar
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about young non-voters’ appraisals of ethnic tribune politics in Northern Ireland. This article draws attention to how some young non-voters in Northern Ireland actively challenge such representational strategies, while others are reluctant to express critical views regarding party politics, despite their interest in a range of broadly political issues and dissatisfaction with aspects of social life. The article accounts for these findings by reworking existing conceptualisations of youth political engagement to include consideration of those who are not apathetic, engaged sceptics or conservatives. This permits a more nuanced understanding of the position of youth within the Northern Ireland electorate.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-29T08:30:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231183287
       
  • Party Discipline in Latin America: The Role of Party Ideology

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      Authors: Patricia Otero-Felipe, Leticia M Ruiz Rodríguez
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Party discipline is an area that has received considerable attention in the party cohesion literature. While existing comparative research has predominantly focused on the institutional environment that impacts party discipline, we know less about its relationship with party-related variables. In this article, we explore the effect of party ideology on legislators’ perceptions of party discipline in Latin America. The difficulties for parliamentary groups to act cohesively in Latin America make party discipline and its study a major task. We argue that party ideology shapes the perceptions of legislators vis-à-vis their relative autonomy and the resulting ability of the party to be cohesive. To perform the analysis, we have constructed a database containing the responses of 1272 parliamentarians from 71 political parties in 17 countries across the 2011–2022 legislatures. In addition to party-related variables, we have included individual- and system-level variables. The results suggest that Latin American parliamentarians belonging to left-wing parties tend to conform to party discipline more frequently than those of the right wing.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-22T12:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231176699
       
  • Class Inequalities and Participatory Democracy: Assessing the Impact of
           Social Inclusion Tools in (Rural) Citizens’ Assemblies

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      Authors: Patricia García-Espín
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Recent research has examined the effectiveness of inclusion tools aimed at encouraging greater involvement of disadvantaged social groups in local deliberative institutions. Most research, quantitative and qualitative, tends to examine positive outcomes, although results are frequently ambivalent. This research begins by arguing that analytical frameworks should consider the limitations of inclusion tools and that greater attention should be given to alternative approaches to inclusion (material/symbolic, formal/informal, focused/general). Based on these theoretical points, the study focuses on the views and experiences of working-class people and smallholder farmers in relation to their participation in open rural assemblies (concejos abiertos) in the Basque Country (Spain). The research employed an ethnographic methodology involving 20 observations of assemblies/events and 55 in-depth interviews conducted between 2012 and 2015. Three inclusion tools were identified as key to the functioning of the assemblies: “administrative and technical support” for engaging with the bureaucratic processes, a legal “right to paid work leave” for board members, and the use of “multi-disciplinary boards.” The study examines the effectiveness of these tools in motivating and facilitating the involvement of participants from disadvantaged social class positions, presenting novel findings in the case of paid work leave and multi-disciplinary boards. The importance of informal practices and procedures for reducing material constraints are emphasized as well as the identification of some limitations of inclusion tools in a context of predominant elitist paradigms.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T09:05:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231179081
       
  • Challenges for Political Science Research Ethics in Autocracies: A Case
           Study of Central Asia

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      Authors: Neil Collins, Elaine Sharplin, Aziz Burkhanov
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The imperative to conduct research ethically has been firmly established. Biomedical and applied research in the Global North has dominated the development of an ethical framework based on four broad principles: respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice. The prevailing research ethics can become significant constraints to political scientists focussing on non-democratic settings. The appropriateness of these codes in guiding political scientists’ research, especially in authoritarian contexts of Central Asia, is examined. The article outlines the need for a more culturally and contextually nuanced approach to research ethics and an understanding of the discipline-specific ethical dilemmas for researchers within political science.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T06:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231153074
       
  • Does Anxiety Make Us “Informed” Citizens' The Mediating Role of
           Information-Seeking and Internal Political Efficacy in Forming Political
           Attitudes

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      Authors: Ekaterina Romanova, Myiah J Hutchens
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Emotions are inseparable from political decision-making. This idea has been especially strongly supported for negative emotions. The current study examines the role of anxiety in forming political attitudes using data from a nationally representative American National Election Studies survey (N = 5900). Our path analysis highlights a significant indirect relationship between anxiety and political participation through two mediators: information-seeking tendencies and internal political efficacy. By examining the unique role of anxiety in political decision-making, our study provides a more nuanced understanding of how negative emotions can impact democracy.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T05:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231179090
       
  • The Politics of Path-Creation: Theory-Building of Social Policy Reform in
           Post-Economic Crisis Indonesia

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      Authors: Tauchid Komara Yuda
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Institutional scholarship highlights policy as a frozen landscape, explaining its reluctance to depart from the predetermined trajectories. However, this argument needs to be reassessed to better capture the reality of the Indonesian social policy reform, most notably in healthcare. The reform involved sudden and radical changes from a segmented and decentralized model to a more integrated and inclusive one—outside the critical juncture of the 1998 economic crisis—creating a patchwork of old and new ideas and features within policy institutions. Empirical interview data show that path-creation changes in healthcare reform are characterized by a deviation from the path followed as an institutionally embedded principle. This deviation was made possible due to the considerable influence of academics-turned-senior bureaucrats (policy entrepreneurs), who capitalized on the widespread distrust of the ruling government to drive the desired reform. In addition, the success of Obamacare as a populist healthcare program amid the capitalist US system also undermined the legitimacy of policy actors’ previous attempts to reject reform. This article helps clarify the development and application of the path-creation theory, comparing it to established theories to reduce ambiguity.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-14T08:42:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231176949
       
  • Policy and Populism: Analysing Support for Die Linke

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      Authors: Edward Goodger
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Defining ‘radical left’ political actors by their challenge to contemporary economic norms, this article draws the example of Die Linke in Germany and analyses explanations for this party’s support. Two theories are tested. First, the policy-proximity account, building off the Downsian spatial model and tested with three policy dimensions relating to economics, cultural policy, and migration policy. Second, the populism-based account, which defines this as a conflict between ‘the people’ versus ‘elites’. Using German Longitudinal Election Survey data, this article carries out a large-N analysis of support for Die Linke. It uses multiple linear regression to test how far support for this party is explained by proximity between voters and the party, or by levels of populism among voters. Results showed greater support for Die Linke from proximal voters on each dimension; however, highly populist voters were not found to be more supportive of Die Linke. The article concludes in favour of a policy-proximity explanation but suggests the party’s well-established nature may have altered voters’ policy preferences, potentially leaving a reverse causal relationship and leaving in doubt the role of policy-proximity on radical left support.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T05:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231177285
       
  • Using Qualitative Inquiries to Analyse the Dynamism of Factionalism

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      Authors: Rebecca Kerr
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      When exploring assessments of factionalism, there is the tendency to rely on quantitative assessments based upon an institutionalised and consciously organised group. However, to rely solely on the assessment of factionalism as such undermines and dismisses much of the intra-party dialogue which facilitates, encourages or could undermine party cohesion and unity. Quantitative analysis can rely on quite static understandings of the faction; however, this research understands factionalism as dynamic and changeable dependent on a range of internal and external variables. The fluidity of the faction is demonstrated in the ways in which the faction can adopt or drop ideological positions dependent on the appetite of intra-party groups and the electorate. Its dynamism is also reflected through the different typologies of factions that exist. The dynamic forms that the faction take are exemplified through the case study analysis of the Labour Party within the UK. The Labour Party also provides an interesting analysis in understanding the wide range of external factors that factions must negotiate. This includes, but is not limited to, the changing ways in which we understand party allegiance, identity and voting patterns. Factionalism is ultimately an interpersonal event, and to accurately capture this detail, qualitative assessments are necessary.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T05:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231177283
       
  • Unleash Britain’s Potential (To Go Negative): Campaign Negativity in the
           2017 and 2019 UK General Elections on Facebook

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      Authors: Patrícia Rossini, Rosalynd Southern, Emily Harmer, Jennifer Stromer-Galley
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Negative campaigning has long concerned scholars because of the potential effects on the electorate and on democracy. Most scholarship has focused on single-election studies in the United States, whereas less is known about how campaigns go on the attack in the UK, and few compare two elections. Drawing from a dataset of Facebook posts by parties and leaders in Great Britain during the five weeks of campaigning in the 2017 and 2019 General Elections (N = 3560), we use supervised machine learning to categorise posts as negative campaigning and distinguish between attacks focused on issues and attacks on candidates’ images. Our findings show that the 2019 election was more negative than in 2017, and that larger parties were more inclined to adopt attacks as a campaign strategy. Moreover, we found that party accounts posted more attack messages than leader accounts and were more focused on attacking based on issues, rather than personal character or image. Finally, we found that attack messages elicit stronger engagement from audiences, with attack messages receiving more attention, particularly attacks on image.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T10:39:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231171308
       
  • Fair-Weather Voters: Personality and Vote Switching Intentions

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      Authors: Scott Pruysers, Julie Blais
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      While numerous explanations for vote-switching have been proposed (e.g. declining rates of partisanship, ideological shifts, partisan ambivalence, change in policy preferences), far less work has examined the personality profile of people more likely to engage in this behaviour. In Study 1, we examined the relationship between both general (i.e. openness, conscientiousness) and antagonistic (i.e. psychopathy, narcissism, Machiavellianism) personality traits and the intent to switch one’s vote in a large sample of Canadian citizens, while controlling for several established correlates such as age, income and political interest. Of all personality traits, only individuals higher in openness reported a greater intent to engage in vote switching. Despite our expectations, Machiavellianism, a trait characterized by its strategic nature, was unrelated to vote switching intentions. In Study 2, we addressed several methodological reasons for why antagonistic traits may have been unrelated to vote switching intentions in Study 1 by examining the traits at the facet level and utilizing a new measure of Machiavellianism among a separate sample of Canadian citizens. Here again, we found little evidence for a relationship between antagonistic traits, including Machiavellianism, and vote switching intentions.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T12:39:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231174756
       
  • Electoral Competition and Strategic Intra-Coalition Oversight in
           Parliament: The Case of the Bipolar Belgian Polity

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      Authors: Benjamin de Vet
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Although research has highlighted how parties use parliamentary tools to monitor coalition partners and ensure that they loyally execute compromises, the role of electoral competition in intra-coalition oversight is less well documented. Do coalition parties actually ‘police the bargain’ or do they rather use their tools to publicly target and potentially discredit parties with whom they will eventually compete for votes' Although generally difficult to disentangle, this study focuses on the unique Belgian polity, where Flemish and francophone parties govern together in a federal cabinet but compete electorally in two separate party systems. Multivariate analyses of MPs’ use of parliamentary questions between 1995 and 2018 (N = 30,661) confirm that coalition partners are particularly scrutinized when they are ideologically distant or control salient portfolios. Contrary to expectations, however, electoral competitors are not targeted more intensively, nor does direct electoral competition decrease the relative importance of ideological divisiveness or issue salience. These findings provide new insights into how and to what extent parliaments serve as arenas for intra-coalition governance.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T06:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231168276
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Scott Radnitz, Revealing Schemes: The Politics
           of Conspiracy in Russia and the Post-Soviet Region

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      Authors: Serghei Golunov
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T05:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231172441
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Paulo Alfonso B Durante, Francesco Jose BS
           Leandro and Enrique Martinez Galan, The Palgrave Handbook of Globalization
           with Chinese Characteristics: The Case of the Belt and Road Initiative

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      Authors: Punsara Amarasinghe
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-09T07:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231172443
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Martin Steven, The European Conservatives and
           Reformists (ECR): Politics, Parties and Policies

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      Authors: Matthew E K Schlachter
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T10:13:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231173593
       
  • Diplomacy Versus Politics: Two Mutually (In)Dependent Systems

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      Authors: Andreas Nishikawa-Pacher
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Diplomacy is often presented as subordinated to politics as if it merely received politically willed ‘inputs’ to produce politically structured ‘outputs’. However, diplomacy often deviates from political instructions. It can even operate almost without any political considerations whatsoever. This observation gives rise to a sense that politics and diplomacy operate as two separate systems that are mutually dependent and yet simultaneously independent from each other. To illuminate this relationship, the present paper draws from Modern Systems Theory (especially Parsons and Luhmann) to argue that politics and diplomacy engage in double interchanges: (1) they stimulate each other through premises for actions like ‘foreign policy goals’, and (2) they implement each other such that diplomatic happenings can be booked as political successes and vice versa. The discussion section outlines how the autonomy of the two systems varies empirically – such as in the case of politically appointed diplomats – and how extreme cases of autonomous operations (apolitical diplomacy or adiplomatic politics) face negative sanctions.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-04T10:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231169860
       
  • Patterns of Party Positioning in Referendums in Switzerland

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      Authors: Eike-Christian Hornig
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Parties play an important role in the study of direct democracy, but mainly as independent variables. To start investigating the way in which parties position themselves in referendums, a new framework is presented and tested for plausibility. As case study the complex but well observed case of Swiss Direct Democracy was chosen. First, a differentiated understanding of what a party position in a referendum process is leads to the identification of four different stages of positioning for Swiss parties. The main message of the theoretical framework is that positioning logics of different parties in one vote can be similar when there are underlying mechanisms applying to all parties. Four ideal type models of party positioning show how. To explore their plausibility, an original data set of 162 single positions of five Swiss political parties in 37 national referendums between 2015 and 2019 is compiled. Using qualitative methods, first results show that Swiss parties’ positioning in referendums is not as strongly dominated by policy as one could expect,given the strong polarization of the party system. In consequence, this demands for an update of our understanding of the interplay of direct democracy and political parties as a two-way channel.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T05:45:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231165455
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: René Glas, Sybille Lammes, Michiel de Lange,
           Joost Raessens and Imar de Vries, The Playful Citizen: Civic Engagement in
           a Mediatized Culture

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      Authors: Emma Lauren Brewis
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T01:20:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231172719
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: David Fortunato, The Cycle of Coalition: How
           Parties and Voters Interact under Coalition Governance

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      Authors: Fariha Tabassum
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T01:18:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231172438
       
  • It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over: Interest-Group Influence
           in Policy Implementation

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      Authors: Douwe Truijens, Marcel Hanegraaff
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Current research on interest-group influence in the European Union tends to focus on just one stage of the policy cycle, being agenda setting, the legislative process or (some aspects) of the implementation stage. We argue that this bifurcation of the research agenda is a serious shortcoming, as lobby dynamics may vary throughout different consecutive policymaking stages. As a consequence, lobby gains or losses in the legislative stage can be overturned in the implementation. This research note therefore explores how the influence of interest organisations travels across different stages of the policy cycle, most importantly between the legislative stage and the implementation stage. First, we observe that as policymaking is a continuous rather than a static process, also lobbying tends to stretch beyond the legislative stage. Second, we argue that the specific characteristics of the implementation vis-à-vis the legislative stage may structurally favour business and resourceful organisations over smaller groups and nongovernmental organisationss. Third, we illustrate the plausibility of our argument by means of an in-depth case study: the European Union Industrial Emissions Directive. We conclude with a call for a more integral approach to researching lobby powers throughout the policy cycle and provide a preliminary agenda for future research.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-19T09:07:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231162015
       
  • Outgroup Bias and the Unacceptability of Tax Fraud

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      Authors: Marco Mendoza Aviña, André Blais, Vincent Arel-Bundock, Rita de la Feria, Allison Harell
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      In countries with well-developed welfare state systems, it is often claimed that racial or ethnic minorities impose a heavy burden on social assistance programs without contributing to public goods. In this study, we consider the attitudinal effects of anecdotal reports of tax cheating by minorities. We conduct survey experiments in France and the United States to assess if people react more harshly to tax fraud perpetrated by members of a minority group rather than the majority group. We find no evidence that minority status affects judgments and perceptions about tax fraud, including among those on the right end of the political spectrum. Tax fraud is considered unacceptable regardless of the culprit’s origin.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T06:19:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231162017
       
  • Democracy and the Corruption of Speech

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      Authors: Mark E Warren
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      In the developed democracies, the public discourse of political corruption and conspiracy remains stubbornly pervasive, in spite of the fact that these countries are, comparatively, the cleanest in the world. Everyday talk about corruption expresses a politics of distrust and disaffection, corrodes deliberative responses to political conflict and – most alarmingly – can be mobilized by populist authoritarians who would replace democratic institutions with decisionism. The phenomenon that Rosenblum and Muirhead call ‘the new conspiracism’ – assertions of conspiracies without evidence or even claims that could be refuted – is deepening the discourse of corruption, particularly in the United States. These discourses are expressive rather than discursive: they cannot be refuted because they signal fears and discontents rather than positions within public arguments. Because democracies only work when they channel political conflict into credible speech, these developments corrode the life-blood of democracies. A key problem for democrats today is to diagnose this pathology, identify powers of speech and devise responses that might protect the common pool resource of promise and commitment in speech-based politics.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T12:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231159784
       
  • The Proper Scope of the All-Subjected Principle

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      Authors: Akira Inoue
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article shows that the democratic borders argument is defensible, albeit not in the way Arash Abizadeh proposes. The democratic borders argument depends on the All-Subjected Principle, according to which the exercise of political power is justified only insofar as everyone who is subjected to that power is guaranteed a right to vote. According to the so-called “scope objection,” the scope of the All-Subjected Principle is too broad, however, and therefore, the argument can be refuted by reductio ad absurdum. Here I argue that Abizadeh’s appeal to the narrow-scope interpretation of jurisdictionally circumscribed legal requirements is not a plausible way of defusing this reductio. Instead, I show that the democratic borders argument is successful if the All-Subjected Principle consists of two individually sufficient conditions corresponding to narrow-scope and qualified wide-scope interpretations.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T12:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231160513
       
  • Distinctions With a Difference: Illiberalism and Authoritarianism in
           Scholarly Study

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      Authors: Julian G Waller
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Comparative social science concepts such as “illiberalism” and “authoritarianism” are increasingly common terms of art used in academic and policy debates, yet usage patterns and their substantive meaning vary widely across publications and authors. This article presents parsimonious “best-use” conceptualizations of both constructs, underlining the limitations of current, often widely disparate practices. In doing so, it outlines the reasons why this state of affairs is analytically unnecessary, leading to both conceptual stretching and terminological confusion. Illiberalism can most fruitfully be conceptualized positively and ideationally, capturing a distinct form of ideological reaction against hegemonic liberalism, experienced largely over the last several decades, with a variety of case-specific elements. This definition sits in partial contradistinction with other, sometimes-associated concepts such as anti-liberalism, populism, or conservatism and is not associated with regime-type definitionally. Authoritarianism, meanwhile, is most parsimoniously treated as a residual categorization of political regime vis-a-vis the concept of electoral democracy, which accords with the goals for which most scholars deploy it.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T12:25:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231159253
       
  • Political Parties and Interest Incorporation: A New Typology of
           Intra-Party Groups

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      Authors: Matthias Dilling
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Linking society and politics has been one of political parties’ key functions in democracies around the world. Groups within political parties, like factions, auxiliary organisations and territorial party branches, have been important for parties to build such linkages because they help incorporate voters’, members’ and elites’ interests. However, although intra-party groups have figured prominently in many studies, scholars often encountered difficulties when seeking to distinguish between them. Missing conceptual clarity is consequential because it has made communicating results across studies difficult and thus posed an obstacle to accumulating knowledge. This review brings together the literature on factionalism and party organisation to enhance conceptual clarity. Groups’ organisational pervasiveness and flexibility allow distinguishing between factions, camps, auxiliary organisations and party branches. The article ends with suggestions for how to put the typology to work.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T12:24:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231156556
       
  • Three’s (Not Necessarily) A Crowd: State-of-the-Art Review of the
           Strategic Triangle

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      Authors: Mor Sobol, Yen-Jung Chang
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      In the last four decades, the Strategic Triangle concept has established itself as an eclectic theoretical framework in the research domain of triangular analysis. As international politics has evolved, the literature on Strategic Triangle has followed suit. Specifically, it appears that scholars have succeeded in transcending beyond the ‘traditional’ regional setting and conceptualisation by testing existing theoretical assumptions, developing new models and offering new insights into the dynamics of triangular relationships. Against this background, this contribution primarily aims to provide a state-of-the-art, comprehensive overview of the scholarly literature on Strategic Triangles. This article also seeks to illustrate the existing room for further engagement and analysis of triangular relationships by offering concrete recommendations on how researchers could further develop the Strategic Triangle concept.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T10:45:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231158216
       
  • Europeans’ Attitudes Toward the Goals of Agricultural Policy: A Case of
           Rural–Urban Divide'

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      Authors: Jale Tosun, Simon Schaub, Charlene Marek
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Is there a rural–urban divide in citizens’ views on European Union agricultural policy' We argue that the place of residence influences a person’s attitude toward agricultural policy issues. More precisely, we postulate that rural populations are less likely to view environmental and climate action, and sustainable food production as key objectives of agricultural policy; instead, we hypothesize they are more likely to indicate job growth in rural areas and ensuring a fair standard of living for farmers as key objectives. We analyze data from a Special Eurobarometer survey fielded in 2020 for 24,328 individuals living in 27 European Union member states. Multilevel mixed-effect logit models reveal the place of residence (urban–peri-urban–rural) as a significant predictor of the respondents’ attitudes for almost all dimensions of agricultural policy. The differences are most striking for environmental and climate-related aspects of agricultural policy, as well as for its goal of generating economic growth and jobs in rural areas. From this, we conclude there is a rural–urban divide concerning agricultural policy, which policymakers should be aware of and attempt to address.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-16T09:20:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221149505
       
  • Participatory Institutions and Political Ideologies: How and Why They
           Matter'

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      Authors: Joan Font, Carlos Rico Motos
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Most of the research about participatory institutions has neglected the analysis of the role played by ideological preferences in their development. Do different political ideologies of governing parties develop different participatory processes' Our starting point is that diverse views on the core values of democracy should lead to different positions concerning the role and expected benefits of citizen participation. This article discusses two main questions. First, in case ideology matters, which is the crucial difference' Is this a matter of “right versus left” or is there a particular party family with special attentiveness to developing participatory institutions' Second, in case any difference exists, how exactly does it translate into the development of participatory institutions' Analyzing data from Spanish municipalities in the period 2003–2010, we show that the party families that had a relevant presence in local administrations in this time frame show more similarities than differences in the participatory activities implemented. However, some relevant differences are found related to the constituencies addressed and mobilized and the type of participatory processes developed.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T10:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221148355
       
  • Poverty Porn and Perceptions of Agency: An Experimental Assessment

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      Authors: Emily Clough, Jill Hardacre, Elizabeth Muggleton
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      For decades, scholars, non-governmental organisations and observers have expressed concern about the use of sensationalised images of people in the developing world in non-governmental organisation fundraising advertisements. They fear that these negative messages, often known as ‘poverty porn’, lead to a perception of people in developing countries as helpless and lacking in agency. Despite this ongoing concern, there has been no empirical assessment of the effect of exposure to these negative messages on the perceptions of people living in poverty in developing countries. Our research employs an online experiment of 450 UK respondents to address this gap. It examines how watching charity advertisements affects people’s perceptions of the agency of those in poverty in developing countries. We find that those who viewed negative portrayals of those in poverty were more likely to rate people in poverty lower on measures of agency. This empirically validates the criticisms of these types of negative advertisements.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T06:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231152437
       
  • Why Do Political Candidates Use Social Media in Election Campaigning' An
           Explanation Offered by a Cost-Benefit Calculation Using Survey Data

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      Authors: Michael Haman
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the use of social media during the 2021 Mexican legislative election. Political candidates were contacted through the email addresses they had listed and sent a questionnaire to fill out. Thus, the research is based on original data directly collected from political candidates. Political candidates commented on their use of social media during the election campaign. The research used closed questions. The assumption was that political candidates would use social media if they felt that the benefits outweighed the costs associated with managing social media accounts. The utility of social media can also lie in the opportunity to gain new votes. The results show that political candidates used social media more if they perceived that it was being used in their constituency. If few voters in a constituency use social media, then the potential utility of using social media declines. Furthermore, they used them more if they perceived that from an economic point of view, managing an account and sending a message were not that costly.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-08T04:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299231152106
       
  • Cooperate But Divided at Heart: Analysis of an Opposition Elite Survey
           During Autocratization

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      Authors: Au Nok Hin, Chan Ka Ming, Ng Ka Lun
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      When opposition elites cooperate to counteract authoritarian incumbents, they often deemphasize their fissures. But behind the scenes of cooperation, will their attitudinal divisions remain' If so, on what dimensions' Though these questions have important implications for the tenacity of cooperation and future political developments, the current literature does not shed much light on them. Our research answers these questions by examining the case of Hong Kong, which has undergone widespread repression. We surveyed district councilors in an autocratization episode in which opposition elites were highly cohesive. Using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov metric, we find that opposition factions share similar economic attitudes. Yet, despite their cooperative behavior, they still hold divided attitudes on the center-periphery and democratization strategies dimensions. These findings contribute to the burgeoning literature on autocratization by highlighting the (in)congruence of opposition elites’ attitudes and behavior.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-04T11:06:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221147460
       
  • Explaining Online Personalized Politics: A Cross-National Comparative
           Analysis of Social Media Consumption of Parties and Leaders

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      Authors: Shahaf Zamir
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The personalization of politics (the process of politicians’ strengthening at the expense of political parties) has long been studied. This study focuses on online personalism in the consumption of political parties and their leaders on Twitter and Facebook and aims to find its explaining factors. Following the normalization/equalization debate, it sets hypotheses regarding the relationship between variables from offline to online personalized politics. Using multilevel analysis of Facebook and Twitter data of more than 140 parties from 25 democracies, it finds that the leaders’ position significantly affects online personalism in most of the consumption aspects of social media. It also shows that country’s offline personalization, leader’s tenure, party populism, party age, party’s governmental status, vote share, and the leadership selection method have effects on some of the indicators for online personalism on the consumption side. It concludes that offline political power is reflected online.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-02-04T11:04:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221147458
       
  • The Hindutva Brand of Populist Politics and the Women Question

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      Authors: Palak Singh, Gopal Krishan Parihar
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study maps the interactions of the Hindutva brand of political populism, which is in rise in India, with the feminist politics and concerns. To study this interaction, the article qualitatively studies the phenomenon of Hindutva-populism and feminist politics and uses the Bhartiya Janata Party, the Hindu-rightist political party, as the site to explore the gendered political culture and the complex relationship that populism and feminism share on the women question in their quest for political and social transformation in India. For this purpose, the article focuses on the broad themes, highlighting the differential visions of both projects, of: the lens through which the problems are diagnosed, the solutions proposed to these problems and the role of the related variables such as power, state and leadership, which puts them in a fundamental clash with each other.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T06:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221146695
       
  • Polarization, Media Professionalism, and Support for Press Freedoms in
           Sub-Saharan Africa: A Report on Early Results

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      Authors: Peter VonDoepp, Daniel J Young
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports on early results of a research project examining popular support for media freedoms in sub-Saharan Africa. Using data from the Afrobarometer surveys, as well as other sources, we specifically examine cross-national variation in support for media freedoms, seeking to account for the national-level factors that affect that variation. Our findings suggest the importance of two factors in particular. The first is the level of polarization in society. Using a novel measure of this factor, we find that higher levels of polarization are associated with lower levels of support for media freedoms. The second factor is the level of professionalism characterizing the media sector. We find that lower levels of media professionalism drive down support for media freedoms. Further research will explore these through the use of multilevel analysis that incorporates investigation of individual-level factors shaping support for media freedoms.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T06:25:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221143681
       
  • The Public Funding of Election Administration: Evidence from a British
           General Election

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      Authors: Alistair Clark
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Administering elections is costly, requiring considerable resourcing. The extent to which election administration is funded can reveal government priorities towards democratic rights and affects every potential voter. Yet, little is known of this crucial aspect of public administration, in any type of democracy. This research innovates by seeking to establish overall levels of variation in public funding of election administration in a national general election, and by applying this to the local level to investigate whether socio-economic, administrative or political factors are more important as drivers of costs. The article deploys a unique dataset which integrates rare government election administration budgeting data, with Census and political data to provide an exploratory analysis from a British general election. It finds that key production costs of voting infrastructure appear to drive funding. While socio-economic and political aspects have less of an impact, levels of ethnic minority voters and regional effects also appear important determinants.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-01-14T04:54:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221148429
       
  • Getting Realistic About Action-Guidance: Moralism, Radical Realism and
           Divisions of Labour

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      Authors: Ben Cross
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Moralists and radical realists both seem to employ a division of intellectual labour to enable their theories to be action-guiding. Moralists typically distinguish between formulating normative principles and devising suitable means for implementing or approximating them. Radical realists, meanwhile, seem to distinguish between the findings of ideology critique and further political theorising informed by these findings. However, radical realist criticisms of the moralist division of labour may suggest a tu quoque objection to radical realism: if the moralist division of labour is defective, why does the same not also hold for the radical realist division of labour' My aim in this article is to answer this question. I identify two distinct radical realist objections to the moralist division of labour, which I refer to as the seminar room objection and the motivation objection respectively. I then argue that radical realists can deal effectively with these objections if they were to be turned against their version of the division of labour. Hence, radical realists can consistently criticise moralist versions of the division of labour while simultaneously employing their own version.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T09:04:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221147459
       
  • When Nations Adapt: National Resilience between State(s) and Identity(ies)

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      Authors: Alon Helled, Carlo Pala
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Nations are resilient and often taken for granted as an analytical category in most social sciences. Academic literature has highlighted the industrial and capitalistic origins of nationalism, espousing the formation of modern statehood as well as the revitalized re-elaboration of ethno-genetic elements into that same modernity, even when ‘imagined’ and ‘invented’. Certainly, the organizational and ideological capacities of nation-states are sociologically ‘grounded’, yet less attention has been given to nations’ capacity to adapt their sociogenetic identity. This article seeks to interpret and contextualize the issue through the theorization of national resilience as a mid-range concept by offering analytical instruments.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T10:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299221144620
       
 
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  Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 980 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (155 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (156 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (168 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (152 journals)
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    - HUMANITIES (312 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Anuario de Estudios Americanos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comparative American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corpus. Archivos virtuales de la alteridad americana     Open Access  
European journal of American studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of American Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Magallania     Open Access  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Revista de Indias     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trace     Open Access  
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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