Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 1023 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (155 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (156 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (168 journals)
    - ETHNIC INTERESTS (166 journals)
    - GENEALOGY AND HERALDRY (9 journals)
    - HUMANITIES (341 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 28 of 28 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
American Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Anuario de Estudios Americanos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Comparative American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corpus. Archivos virtuales de la alteridad americana     Open Access  
European journal of American studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Globe : revue internationale d’études québécoises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Iberoromania     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of American Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
London Journal of Canadian Studies     Open Access  
Magallania     Open Access  
Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Revista de Indias     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trace     Open Access  
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Political Studies Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.428
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1478-9299 - ISSN (Online) 1478-9302
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1162 journals]
  • Measuring Epistemic Deliberation on Polarized Issues: The Case of Abortion
           Provision in Ireland

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jane Suiter, David M Farrell, Clodagh Harris, Philip Murphy
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This paper compares the debate quality in the plenary sessions of an Irish Citizens’ Assembly and an Irish parliamentary committee to assess the epistemic effects of public deliberation on a contentious subject: abortion. The unusual occurrence of a similar process of detailed discussion on the same topic in different institutions at around the same time (in 2016–2017) allows us to compare the deliberative capacities of these institutions and thus contribute to discussions on the appropriateness of an increasingly debated democratic reform: assigning political offices by lot. We suggest that the epistemic effect of deliberation on abortion should facilitate nuanced multi-layered discussion that is both ‘deeper’ in being based on multi-faceted arguments and ‘wider’ in terms of a more accommodative view. We anticipate that these effects should be more pronounced in the more deliberative, less polarized, environment of a citizens’ assembly rather than in a parliamentary committee. The analysis deploys the psychological concept of ‘cognitive complexity’. We find that members of the Citizens’ Assembly demonstrate a deeper cognitively complex grasp of the subject matter. In contrast, experts and parliamentarians tend to adjust their mode of delivery at a parliamentary committee reflecting the conflictual and strategic aspects of political debates in such a forum.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T11:52:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211020909
       
  • Tactical Voting and Electoral Pacts in the 2019 UK General Election

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonathan Mellon
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The Brexit cleavage continued to define politics in the 2019 general election. This posed a challenge for parties and voters on each side of the debate: how to coordinate in favour of their side in each seat. In this note, I examine the extent to which party (electoral pacts) and voter (tactical voting) coordination affected the outcome of the 2019 general election. On the voter side, I find that tactical voting was only slightly more prevalent than in previous election cycles. On the party side, I find that neither the Unite to Remain pact nor the Brexit Party’s withdrawal of candidates against incumbent Conservatives noticeably affected the results. Holding the structure of preferences in 2019 constant, Labour would probably have won a handful of additional seats in England and Wales (three on average but only one clear gain) by joining the Unite to Remain pact. The effect of the pact is limited because Labour successfully won over many Remain supporters from the other parties during the campaign. This meant that voters of the other Remain parties were only modestly more likely to prefer Labour over the Conservatives by the end of the campaign, and the pool of minor party voters was generally small in Labour’s target seats. The Liberal Democrats would have received around eight additional seats if Labour had joined the pact (again holding preferences constant).
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-19T12:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211027423
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Daniel Bensaïd, The Dispossessed

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Igor Shoikhedbrod
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T09:37:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211031861
       
  • Book Review: François Burgat, Understanding Political Islam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sümeyye Sakarya
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:13:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211031859
       
  • Book Review: Jack Holland, Selling War and Peace. Syria and the
           Anglosphere

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ben Wellings
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:09:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211030764
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Justin Yifu Lin and Yan Wang, Going Beyond Aid:
           Development Cooperation for Structural Transformation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Veysel Tekdal
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T12:23:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211030773
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Alan Haworth, Totalitarianism and philosophy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Porkkodi Ganeshpandian
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T12:22:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211030763
       
  • Toward a Rational Civil Society: Deliberative Thinking, Civic
           Participation, and Self-Efficacy among Taiwanese Young Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ming-Lun Chung, Ken Ka-wo Fung, Eric MP Chiu, Chao-Lung Liu
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      To explore the mechanisms that foster rational, communicative, and actionable citizenship, this research proposes a mediation as well as moderation research framework that links deliberative thinking, political self-efficacy, social capital, and civic participation. Data from 865 Taiwanese university students are analyzed with structural equation modeling, showing a positive association of deliberative thinking to political self-efficacy and civic participation, as well as a positive association between them. Moreover, the association between deliberative thinking and civic participation is significantly and positively mediated by political self-efficacy. When background factors are controlled, only social capital is identified to be moderating any associations between variables in this study. The established association between deliberative thinking and political self-efficacy and that between deliberative thinking and the non-electoral, as well as community-based dimensions of civic participation, are significantly weaker among those possessing less social capital, while such differences are not significant in the case of gender and household income. Based on these findings, the relative roles of deliberative thinking, political self-efficacy, and social capital in promoting effective deliberative democracy will be discussed.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T11:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211024440
       
  • The Electoral Connection Revisited: Introduction to the Special Issue

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Corentin Poyet, Mihail Chiru
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction to a symposium: ‘The electoral connection revisited: personal vote-seeking efforts’
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T11:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211022954
       
  • Does Electoral Reform Change MPs’ Behavior' Evidence from
           Romania

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mihail Chiru
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The article illustrates that legislators’ constituency orientation can be enhanced through electoral system personalization, even in political systems that have used the party-centered closed list proportional representation for several elections. Leveraging a quasi-natural experiment, created by the 2008 electoral reform in Romania, the study investigates the frequency and determinants of parliamentary questions dealing with constituency issues and whether the reform has stimulated different forms of responsiveness toward constituents. The analyses run on a matched sample of legislators show that while the reform has not modified the proportion of all constituency questions, it has increased substantially the share of questions inspired by allocation responsiveness. Moreover, the effects of some determinants of constituency orientation changed after the reform: previous socialization in local politics loses its significance while we also observe an increased negative effect of non-local candidatures.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T10:29:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211022565
       
  • The Strange Silence of Latin American Political Theory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cristian Pérez-Muñoz
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Political theorists affiliated with Latin American and Caribbean academic institutions rarely publish in flagship journals or other important outlets of the discipline. Similarly, they are not members of the editorial boards of high-ranking, generalist or subfield journals, and their research is not included in the political theory canon of what students from other regions study. The aim of this article is not to explain the origins of this silence—though some possibilities are considered—but to describe some of the ways in which it manifests and why it matters. I argue that the exclusion or omission of Latin American and Caribbean voices is a negative outcome not only for Latin American and Caribbean political theorist but for the political theory subfield at large. In response, I defend a context-sensitive approach to political theory, which has the potential to provide greater voice to Latin American and Caribbean scholars while improving theoretical analysis of Latin America and Caribbean.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T11:29:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211023342
       
  • Foreign Direct Investment Liberalization in Communist Regimes: A
           Theoretical Model Based on the Comparison Among China, Cuba, North Korea,
           and Vietnam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexander Kriebitz, Raphael Max
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      What are the driving factors for foreign direct investment liberalization in formerly communist countries' Previous research explains foreign direct investment liberalization as a function of the intensification of international commerce and democratization; however, the likes of China, Cuba, North Korea, and Vietnam hardly fit into this narrative. The following contribution makes a theoretical argument about the causes of foreign direct investment liberalization in communist authoritarian regimes with highly centralized and closed economies. We argue that foreign direct investment liberalization is caused by external shocks materializing in policy adaptations. The degree of foreign direct investment liberalization depends on the balance of power between actors who favor liberalization and actors who stand to profit from rent-seeking economies. The relative power of both factions determines the magnitude and type of foreign direct investment liberalization. We test this theoretical argument using case studies, which include China and Vietnam as representatives of gradual transitions and Cuba and North Korea as representatives of traditional rent-seeking economies.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T10:09:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211020911
       
  • Labour Input Logic of Street-Level Bureaucrats: Evidence from Chinese
           Market Supervision Commission

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chunna Li, Jun Yang
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      The theory of street-level bureaucracy and its relevant data have proven the expected duties of the frontline staff of local government may be excessive but their time spent working remains quite low. Using data from participatory observations of street-level officials in a Chinese city, this study reveals the logic of this labour input paradox. Organizational climate incentive and promotional incentive jointly influence the time allocation of street-level bureaucrats. The organizational climate incentive reflects the weak incentive characteristic of the maintenance function of labour; promotional incentives have a strong impact on motivation, which is characteristic of the promotional function of labour. These findings reveal the costs of the New Public Management movement in an organization lacking an effective promotion mechanism and a positive organizational climate incentive. This is a snapshot of the dilemma faced by China’s public organization reforms, but it is also a problem other country must solve.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T10:09:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211021511
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: S Fleming, Leviathan on a Leash: A Political
           Theory of State Responsibility

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Juliane Liebsch
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T10:08:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211021513
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Andrew Gilbert, International Intervention and
           the Problem of Legitimacy: Encounters in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Cullen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T10:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211021519
       
  • In The Shadows: Conservative Epistemology and Ideological Value

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dean Blackburn
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article intervenes in the debate about the nature of conservatism. Some contributors to this debate have claimed that this ideology can be defined as an adjectival disposition. They claim, that is, that a conservative possesses an attitude towards shared values rather than a distinct set of substantive values. The following discussion interrogates this account of conservatism and concludes that it can only be coherent if we ignore the epistemological limits of conservative thinking.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T07:36:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211014393
       
  • The Effect of Mayoral Gender on Gendered Budget: Evidence from South Korea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hoyong Jung
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Politicians’ individual traits can influence policy outcomes. A local mayor has authority over the budget process and can affect the municipal budget allocation. This study empirically examined whether the mayor’s gender affected the gendered budget in Korean cities between 2016 and 2020. Across various econometric designs, our results revealed little evidence that mayoral gender (women, in this case) affects the formulation and execution of the gendered budget. The results imply that the effects of female representation through a female leader are dependent on various socioeconomic contexts.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:34:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211021517
       
  • Rethinking Moving beyond Deterrence: A Partial Replication Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eitan Alimi, Gregory Maney
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      We assess Dugan and Chenoweth’s Rational Choice-based argument regarding moderating effects of indiscriminate conciliatory state actions on levels of terrorist attacks in Israel-Palestine, utilizing data drawn primarily from declassified security records on Israeli state actions during the First Intifada (1987–1992). This type of data source, we argue, contains a more accurate ratio of conciliatory to repressive actions than Dugan and Chenoweth’s media-based data, given state authorities’ attempts at concealing repressive actions while publicizing conciliatory actions during times of intense conflict. We discuss differences in results—including, most centrally, no support for the hypothesized effect of conciliatory state actions—highlighting the theoretical payoffs of examining the Political Process–related factor of varying levels of state control over the political environment.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211014011
       
  • The Evolution of New Party Systems: Voter Learning and Electoral Systems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nasos Roussias
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      How do new party systems evolve over time' This article argues that party system evolution requires the solution of coordination problems that voters face in early elections; this happens through a learning mechanism. Elections reveal information to voters, who update their beliefs about party viability and the distribution of voters’ preferences and adjust their behaviour. The institutional setting, however, strongly conditions the pace of learning. Restrictive electoral systems (single-member district) accelerate learning through the harsh penalties they impose on miscoordination, while permissive ones (proportional representation) prolong it. Testing the argument on a district-level dataset in new democracies provides ample support; voters learn to cast fewer wasted votes over time and this happens faster in single-member district systems. The findings point to a trade-off between consolidation and representation; while party system evolution is facilitated by restrictive electoral systems, the presence of distinct social groups in the political arena is better served by permissive ones.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T11:42:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211014394
       
  • Book Review: Neve Gordon and Nicola Perugini, Human Shields: A History of
           People in the Line of Fire

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mai Anh Nguyen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T11:42:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211013694
       
  • Book Review: David Coen, Alexander Katsaitis, and Matia Vannoni, Business
           Lobbying in the European Union

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Claire Godet
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T11:42:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211021007
       
  • When Would a State Crack Down on Fake News' Explaining Variation in
           the Governance of Fake News in Asia-Pacific

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ric Neo
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article sets out to explain national variation in the governance of fake news; it asks, under what conditions would governments pursue securitization in order to address the threat of fake news' Through a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis of 24 countries in Asia-Pacific, this article explores multicausal explanations behind why some countries have moved to securitize fake news—framing it as an existential threat and justifying the passing of laws that curtail civil liberties—while others do not. The analysis yields two main findings. First, although prevailing political arguments emphasize the threat of fake news to society and national security as justification for the securitization of fake news, this condition is neither necessary nor sufficient in causally accounting for the decision to crackdown on fake news. Conversely, crackdowns on fake news occur more frequently in countries less affected by fake news. Second, the analysis provides a set of two distinct, theoretically and empirically relevant causal pathways explaining the decision to crack down on fake news; the first pathway shows how non-democratic states without media freedom and which are relatively less affected by fake news instrumentalize the issue to restrict freedom of speech further; the second pathway shows how non-democratic states experiencing economic growth and political turbulence with proximate elections attempt to restrict freedom of speech. The findings suggest that implementations of broad legislation may not be an optimal approach, given that they appear to be more motivated by political circumstances than by the objective resolution of the problem.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T10:35:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211013984
       
  • Corrigendum

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T02:30:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211013010
       
  • Commissioned Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gabriel Honrada, Daniyal Ranjbar
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T10:22:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211007991
       
  • Personalised Representation in a Weak and Party-Controlled Legislature:
           Policy Responsiveness in the French Parliament

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Corentin Poyet
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      There is growing interest in personal representation and policy responsiveness in the European literature. The current scholarship mainly focuses on strong legislatures. This article aims to contribute to the discussion about policy responsiveness by investigating the least likely case, France. It asks whether French MPs engage in policy responsiveness, and if they do, how responsiveness interacts with party agenda and electoral vulnerability. Drawing on written parliamentary questions asked by French MPs from 1997 to 2007 (N = 1172), the article shows that MPs’ behaviour is strongly affected by their district features. Moreover, the article shows that party agenda conditions the impact of district features. MPs are more likely to engage in policy responsiveness when the issue is also essential for the party. In other words, policy responsiveness is not independent of the party agenda. The article thus contributes to a better understanding of the personalisation of political representation and its relationship with political parties.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T10:20:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211007987
       
  • Commissioned Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Beccaro
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T12:02:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211007989
       
  • Commissioned Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Luke
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T12:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211007984
       
  • Negativity and Political Behavior: A Theoretical Framework for the
           Analysis of Negative Voting in Contemporary Democracies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Diego Garzia, Frederico Ferreira da Silva
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Recent developments in Western societies have motivated a growing consideration of the role of negativity in public opinion and political behavior research. In this article, we review the scant (and largely disconnected) scientific literature on negativity and political behavior, merging contributions from social psychology, public opinion, and electoral research, with a view on developing an integrated theoretical framework for the study of negative voting in contemporary democracies. We highlight that the tendency toward negative voting is driven by three partly overlapping components, namely, (1) an instrumental–rational component characterized by retrospective performance evaluations and rationalization mechanisms, (2) an ideological component grounded on long-lasting political identities, and (3) an affective component, motivated by (negative) attitudes toward parties and candidates. By blueprinting the systematic relationships between negative voting and each of these components in turn, and suggesting multiple research paths, this article aims to stimulate future studies on negative voting in multi-party parliamentary systems to motivate a better understanding of the implications of negativity in voting behavior in contemporary democracies.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T08:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211000187
       
  • Does Federalism Prevent Democratic Accountability' Assigning
           Responsibility for Rates of COVID-19 Testing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John Kennedy, Anthony Sayers, Christopher Alcantara
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Does federalism prevent citizens from holding governments accountable for their actions' The pandemic represents the ideal scenario for testing the effects of federalism on democratic accountability because citizens are highly motivated to hold governments accountable for preventing or failing to prevent the rapid transmission of the virus. Previous research suggests that a number of institutional and political factors complicate the accountability function in federal systems. We add to this literature by assessing the effect of one political factor, exclusivity (measured in terms of policy variation at one level), on accountability. The coronavirus pandemic provides a unique opportunity to assess this factor given the high levels of issue saliency, media attention, and low levels of intergovernmental and interparty conflict it has generated. Drawing on original data from the May 2020 Democratic Checkup Survey and public data from the Canadian National Microbiology Laboratory, our preliminary findings suggest that interprovincial policy variation with respect to coronavirus testing is not correlated with public assessments of the adequacy of provincial testing, and so it seems that Canadians are not able to assign responsibility to the correct level of government despite ideal conditions for doing so.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T09:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211001690
       
  • Sexual Predators in Contest for Public Office: How the American Electorate
           Responds to News of Allegations of Candidates Committing Sexual Assault
           and Harassment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Stark, Sofía Collignon
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Candidate characteristics have an important impact on voter choice, and scandals are found to negatively impact a political campaign. Yet the literature, with its focus on scandals such as financial and (consensual) affairs, has failed to look into how allegations of sexual assault and harassment may impact electability. This study analyzes the effect that allegations of sexual assault or harassment have on the electoral success of American politicians. Using an original survey experiment, we find that, on average, American citizens are less likely to support a candidate accused of sexual assault or sexual harassment. However, not all voters do so to the same magnitude. We find that Democrats are significantly less likely to support a candidate that faces such allegations. Republicans do not strongly penalize candidates facing allegations of sexual assault or harassment, especially if the candidate is identified as a Republican. We analyze open-ended survey responses to offer an explanation for such variation: a propensity to disbelieve women who speak out about sexual assault and harassment explains variations in why some voters may not change their opinion of a candidate based on an allegation.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-04-03T09:00:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921995333
       
  • Book Review: Michael Ryan, The Genetics of Political Behavior: How
           Evolutionary Psychology Explains Ideology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Berfin Çakin
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T09:24:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14789299211001241
       
  • Formal Education and Contentious Politics: The Case of Violent and
           Non-Violent Protest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Patrick S Sawyer, Andrey V Korotayev
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the effect that formal education, as a factor of socio-economic development, has on the intensity and forms of political protest. By way of increased socialization of democratic values, increased cognitive understanding of the society at large, and human capital to participate in protests, increases in a country’s level of formal education should theoretically lead to increased levels of peaceful protest. However, increases in formal education are also theorized to play a mitigating role on the intensity of violent protests (riots) for the previously mentioned reasons as well as the fact that education acts as a strong factor in increasing social mobility. With data from 1960 to 2010 and spanning 216 countries, our empirical tests demonstrate a significant positive relationship between formal education and the intensity of anti-government protests at the early stages of socio-political development and a strong negative relationship between education and riots along the full range of data, with the later stages of development revealing a particularly strong negative correlation.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T05:53:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921998210
       
  • No, Face Masks Aren’t Dehumanizing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen M Utych
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Wearing facial coverings has become a key element in the fight against COVID-19. However, deep partisan divisions have arisen over the adoption of face masks, with Democrats more supportive than Republicans in the United States. Among opponents, a common argument is that facial coverings serve to dehumanize the wearer. Using an experimental study, I find no evidence, using a nationally diverse US sample, that face masks are dehumanizing, whether worn by a White or Black person. In addition, I test for moderation by partisanship, which shows a lack of dehumanizing effects and provides some suggestive evidence that face masks can humanize the wearer, for Democrats, though these effects are small. Under no circumstances do I find evidence that face masks dehumanize the wearer, even among Republican respondents.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T07:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921993764
       
  • What We Need to Do to Deliver Pluralism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gerry Stoker
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      A response to Pluralism and Political Studies in the UK: A Pilot Study into Who Gets What in the Discipline by Brenda Gonzalez Ginocchio, Andrew Hindmoor and Liam Stanley.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T04:46:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921991025
       
  • Recognising Gender: A Response to Gonzalez Ginocchio, Hindmoor and Stanley

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fran Amery
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      A response to Pluralism and Political Studies in the UK: A Pilot Study into Who Gets What in the Discipline by Brenda Gonzalez Ginocchio, Andrew Hindmoor and Liam Stanley.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T04:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921989205
       
  • A Response to Gonzalez Ginocchio, Hindmoor and Stanley

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angelia R Wilson
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      A response to Pluralism and Political Studies in the UK: A Pilot Study into Who Gets What in the Discipline by Brenda Gonzalez Ginocchio, Andrew Hindmoor and Liam Stanley.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T04:44:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921989203
       
  • What Now for British Politics' Reflections on Gonzalez Ginocchio,
           Hindmoor and Stanley

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peter Allen
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      A response to Pluralism and Political Studies in the UK: A Pilot Study into Who Gets What in the Discipline by Brenda Gonzalez Ginocchio, Andrew Hindmoor and Liam Stanley.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T04:40:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920986799
       
  • Pluralism and Political Studies in the UK: A Pilot Study into Who Gets
           What in the Discipline

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brenda Gonzalez Ginocchio, Andrew Hindmoor, Liam Stanley
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      How pluralist is political studies' How are resources distributed across the discipline' In this article, we turn one of the fundamental questions of politics – who gets what, when, and how – back on to the study of politics itself. Our focus is on two areas that are central concerns to pluralism: gender and sub-discipline. We pose two specific questions: What is the gender and sub-disciplinary composition of political studies' And how are various resources – ranging from jobs to prizes – distributed along gender and sub-disciplinary lines' In addressing these questions, we draw on a pilot and partial audit of departments, journals and other key indicators from 1998 to 2018. The article contributes to long-standing debates about the character of political studies and the extent to which the field is pluralistic or not.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T04:15:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920971470
       
  • Going Local: Parliamentary Questions as a Means of Territorial
           Representation in the Italian Parliament

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Federico Russo
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Parliamentary questions are often employed by Members of Parliament to demonstrate their responsiveness to the needs of the constituency. This article takes advantage from this opportunity to study the determinants shaping the constituency focus of Italian deputies. Previous research has shown that the degree to which Members of Parliament devote attention to their geographical district depends on several factors related to electoral incentives, demands coming from citizens and taste-based preferences. By studying the behaviour of Italian deputies elected in three legislative terms with a system giving few incentives to perform constituency service, this article offers new evidence that non-electoral reasons are important to shape the role played by Members of Parliament.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T09:41:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920986798
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Policy Controversies and Political Blame Games

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew George McKenna
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T06:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921990994
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Jan Zielonka, Counter-Revolution: Liberal Europe
           in Retreat

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Magdalena Lorenc
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T05:59:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921991724
       
  • Commissioned Book Review: Kevin Hickson and Jasper Miles, James Callaghan:
           An Underrated Prime Minister

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph Tiplady
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T05:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929921990995
       
  • Radicalizing Rights: Basic Liberties and Direct Action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul Raekstad, Enzo Rossi
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Strikes often lack a reasonable chance of success unless they violate some basic liberties (of contract, movement, etc.). This creates a dilemma for liberal democracies that recognize a right to strike: either the right is toothless, or the basic liberties do not have priority and so are not basic. Alex Gourevitch argues that grounding the radical right to strike in an interest in freedom resolves the dilemma. We point out an ambiguity in this solution: it either does not solve the dilemma, or it tacitly presupposes that there is no dilemma. However, we go on to show that a modified, dynamic conception of the radical right to strike can ground its priority, albeit at the expense of the basicness of certain static basic liberties. What is more, we argue that this generalizes to other forms of direct action, such as the recent Black Lives Matter blockades and those at Standing Rock.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T05:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920984616
       
  • ‘It’s a Long Way from Kuusamo to Kuhmo’: Mapping Candidates’
           Electoral Constituencies in the Finnish Open-List Single Preference Voting
           System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Arter
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks an insight into the nature of intraparty competition in an open-list single preference voting system, and it does so by analysing the distribution of votes for Centre Party candidates in the 40 or so municipalities making up the northern Finnish constituency of Oulu in each of the five general elections between 2003 and 2019. It builds on Grofman’s distinction between a geographical constituency and a candidate’s electoral constituency to map the ecology of candidate support in a constituency with (1) a larger than average district magnitude (M); (2) a significantly larger than average territorial magnitude (T); and (3) a substantially larger than average Centre party magnitude (P). Setting M, T and P within a party organisational framework, the article identifies (1) a significant disparity between levels of intraparty competition at district and sub-district levels; (2) several contextual factors that act more as disincentives than incentives to engage in personal vote seeking across the electoral district.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T09:04:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920982509
       
  • Blurring Lines of Responsibility: How Institutional Context Affects
           Citizen Biases Regarding Policy Problems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Douglas Page, Ridvan Peshkopia
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Existing research suggests that individuals assign responsibility for policy problems based on prior biases like partisanship. However, what remains speculation is whether institutions that blur lines of responsibility elicit more biased responsibility-assignment when compared to institutions with clearer lines of responsibility. European Union enlargement provides an opportunity to examine responsibility-assignment for policy problems within multiple countries, where the EU triggers biases (pro- and anti-EU membership) when it works to export the policies required for membership. In surveys of Albania, Bosnia, and Herzegovina and Kosovo, we examine responsibility-assignment to governments for inequality in pay between women and men, which the EU asks prospective members to address. We find that biased attributions of blame for pay inequality are strongest in the Bosnian regions where multilevel governance is the most pronounced, while the unitary governments of Albania, Bosnia’s Republika Srpska, and Kosovo do not yield biased responsibility-assignment. Our results are consequential for multilevel governance.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T08:01:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920982871
       
  • Book Review: Ceren Lord, Religious Politics in Turkey: From the Birth of
           the Republic to the AKP

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yesim Bayar
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T08:01:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920982512
       
  • A Bayesian Measurement of Political Connection and Entrepreneur Preference
           on Trade and Competition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yilang Feng
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how political connection shapes firm owner preference on economic openness and international competition in China, a topic that is getting increasingly relevant today amid China’s trade disputes with its trading partners over the nature of the country’s business-government relations. Politically connected entrepreneurs and their enterprises usually exploit and benefit from their political resources, but this can lead to both supporting and opposing views on expanding trade liberalization. To solve this puzzle, this article proposes a theory that focuses on (1) a selection effect of political connection on firm productivity and (2) trade-related institutional development in China. With survey data on China joining the world trade organization, I develop a modified Bayesian item response theory model to measure political connection and find that Chinese politically connected entrepreneurs held a less supportive view before joining the world trade organization than their less connected counterparts. This suggests an anticipation that the imminent opening would neutralize the privileges of politically connected entrepreneurs. By looking at trade liberalization, this article offers a firm level analysis that political opposition to sustained economic reform may derive from the short-term winners, instead of the losers, in transitional societies.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-15T04:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920978341
       
  • Should We or Should We Not Include Confidence Intervals in COVID-19 Death
           Forecasting' Evidence from a Survey Experiment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jean-François Daoust, Frédérick Bastien
      First page: 302
      Abstract: Political Studies Review, Ahead of Print.
      Forecasting during the COVID-19 pandemic entails a great deal of uncertainty. The same way that we would like electoral forecasters to systematically include their confidence intervals to account for such uncertainty, we assume that COVID-19-related forecasts should follow that norm. Based on literature on negative bias, we may expect the presence of uncertainty to affect citizens’ attitudes and behaviours, which would in turn have major implications on how we should present these sensitive forecasts. In this research we present the main findings of a survey experiment where citizens were exposed to a projection of the total number of deaths. We manipulated the exclusion (and inclusion) of graphically depicted confidence intervals in order to isolate the average causal effect of uncertainty. Our results show that accounting for uncertainty does not change (1) citizens’ perceptions of projections’ reliability, nor does it affect (2) their support for preventive public health measures. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings.
      Citation: Political Studies Review
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T05:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1478929920985686
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.133
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-