Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 980 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (155 journals)
    - CLASSICAL STUDIES (156 journals)
    - DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION STUDIES (168 journals)
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    - HUMANITIES (312 journals)
    - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Anuario de Estudios Americanos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comparative American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corpus. Archivos virtuales de la alteridad americana     Open Access  
European journal of American studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of American Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Magallania     Open Access  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Revista de Indias     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trace     Open Access  
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Political Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.485
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0032-3217 - ISSN (Online) 1467-9248
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • ‘No Participation Without Representation’: The Impact of Descriptive
           and Substantive Representation on the Age-Related Turnout Gap

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      Authors: Davide Angelucci, Luca Carrieri, Marco Improta
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies have extensively demonstrated that young people vote less than older ones. However, the magnitude of this age-related gap varies across different contexts: While in some countries, the gap is remarkable and increasing over time, in others, it is quite modest, and it has remained constant. This article investigates some of the factors that might explain this variability. In particular, it examines the impact of different types of representation (descriptive and substantive) on the age-related gap in turnout. It does so by relying on a dataset that combines individual-level data with information concerning the age composition of national parliaments and party system emphasis on specific issues. Overall, the dataset covers 57 elections and 19 West European countries. Results show that when young people are descriptively represented, the age-related gap in turnout is significantly reduced. The same effect occurs when party systems place relatively more emphasis on postmaterialist issues.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T04:00:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217241229316
       
  • What Drives Opposition to Social Rights for Immigrants' Clarifying the
           Role of Psychological Predispositions

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      Authors: Carlo M Knotz, Alyssa M Taylor, Mia K Gandenberger, Juliana Chueri
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Why do people oppose granting social rights to immigrants' Previous research indicates that psychological predispositions such as authoritarianism or ethnocentrism are strong drivers, but our understanding of their roles is still incomplete. This is in part because studies have not yet systematically tested different psychological variables against other, but also in part because some other potentially important predispositions such as implicit bias and social dominance orientation have so far been overlooked. We address this gap using original data from survey experiments conducted in six countries (Denmark, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States). We find consistent effects of ethnocentrism and social dominance orientation, a less robust effect of authoritarianism and no effect of implicit bias. In substantive terms, we find that a belief in ethnocentric stereotypes and a desire for dominance are the central factors driving opposition to immigrants’ social rights.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T08:59:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217241228456
       
  • Take Five' Testing the Cultural and Experiential Theories of Generalised
           Trust Against Five Criteria

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      Authors: Michael Kumove
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Is generalised trust stable or changeable' The ‘cultural’ theory argues that trust is a relatively fixed personality trait, while the ‘experiential’ theory contends that life experiences can alter trust during adulthood. But these two theories have been tested using a variety of different criteria whose differences have seemingly never been acknowledged explicitly. In this article, I map out these five different criteria, formulating specific hypotheses for each one and test them on a large and representative longitudinal data set from Australia. As expected, both the cultural and experiential theories appear broadly correct: trust is affected by both early-life factors and adult experiences, but the impact of adult experiences is usually transitory. A broad range of adult experiences seem to affect trust, and trust exhibits high rank-order but low mean-level stability. I conclude by suggesting some new directions for the study of generalised trust.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T11:34:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231224971
       
  • Does Populism Fuel Affective Polarization' An Individual-Level Panel
           Data Analysis

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      Authors: Juan Pérez-Rajó
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Populism and affective polarization speak of a bisected society, and scholars have linked them at the party level. While the relationship between populism and affective polarization can be reciprocal, this article leverages panel data to delve into the causal relationship between populism and affective polarization. First, I posit individuals who become identified with populist parties will hold higher levels of affective polarization. Second, I expect increases in levels of populist attitudes to heighten affective polarization, and this is explained by both the increase of affect towards the ingroup and the decrease of affect towards the outgroup. Using nine waves of a panel survey, results show the importance of differentiating between measures of populism at the individual level, as the increase in populist attitudes appears to fuel affective polarization, symmetrically increasing affect towards the ingroup and decreasing affect towards the outgroup, while the effect of becoming a populist party supporter is more nuanced, as it is different for populist left and right parties.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-03T12:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231224579
       
  • The “Women’s Representation-Corruption Link” and Environmentalism: A
           Cross-National Study

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      Authors: Hannah Salamon
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous studies suggest a relationship between women’s political representation and improved environmental outcomes. Yet, the contexts in which this holds and the mechanisms through which it comes to be remain understudied. This study proposes that women’s impact on political commitments to environmentalism and policy outcomes are moderated by states’ corruption levels. Although women tend to be more environmental, left-leaning, and risk-averse than men, environments of high-corruption restrain, tokenize, and marginalize women representatives, thereby limiting the impact they may have on environmental governance. Time-series cross-sectional analyses of 58 democracies across 15 years show women’s representation is correlated with better environmental outputs and outcomes, but only when corruption levels are low. These findings help broaden our understanding of the relationship between representation and environmental politics and suggest that the interaction of both integrity and inclusivity in governments holds a key to fighting climate change.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T01:08:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231224964
       
  • Reassessing the Role and the Benefits of Junior Ministers in Coalition
           Governments

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      Authors: Ilana Shpaizman
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Junior ministers are very common in coalition governments. Existing research argues that parties assign junior ministers to satisfy the office goals of coalition partners or as a mechanism to manage delegation costs. This article aims to reassess this argument. Using interviews, personal calendars, coalition agreements and an original data set on junior ministers in Israel, it finds that junior ministers are engaged in policymaking either on general issues under the ministry’s jurisdiction or issues that are salient to their party. Although rival junior ministers have the capacity and the incentive to monitor the minister, they do so only on the margins, either because they do not need to, or because they focus on safeguarding their policymaking autonomy. Finally, all junior ministers assist the minister and represent the ministry.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T12:27:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217241227389
       
  • Editor’s Introduction

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      Authors: Monica Brito-Vieira, Graeme Davies, Daphne Halikiopoulou, Sarah Shair-Rosenfield
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T12:18:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217241228397
       
  • Minority Affirmations and the Boundaries of the Nation: Evidence From
           Québec

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      Authors: Colin Scott, Antoine Bilodeau, Audrey Gagnon, Luc Turgeon
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Cultural criteria, like language skills and values, are salient features of nationalism discourse, reflecting imagined boundaries that separate ingroup from outgroup member when thinking about the nation. Despite their salience, the relationship between cultural membership criteria and other civic (attainable) or ethnic (ascriptive) national boundaries, along with their implications for intergroup relations, is contested. Using surveys from N = 6448 majority group members in the Canadian province of Québec, we argue cultural boundaries are empirically distinct from civic and ethnic ones. Cultural and civic criteria are both prominent prerequisites for membership into the Québécois national community, but cultural criteria show markedly divergent relationships with outgroup attitudes. The results underline the importance of conceptualizing cultural boundaries as a distinct set of national membership criteria and question the construct validity of blended ethnocultural boundary measures or approaches that aggregate civic and cultural criteria together as equally “attainable” markers of national membership.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T11:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231223400
       
  • Does Schooling Increase Political Belief Accuracy'

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      Authors: Riccardo Di Leo, Marco Giani
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Citizens must hold accurate beliefs about politically relevant facts to preserve democratic representation, accountability and legislation. We theorize that, abstracting from one’s background, schooling per se does not trigger the epistemological sophistication that is necessary to get a grasp of the political world. In this article, we study whether schooling improves the accuracy of factual beliefs about the share of foreigners and unemployed, later in life. We derive an appealing metric of belief accuracy, matching survey respondents’ beliefs with the corresponding real-world datum at the time of the interview in their country, retrieving high levels of inaccuracy in both issues. More educated individuals display higher belief accuracy, most likely due to selection, rather than causality: compelling otherwise-dropouts to stay in school by extending compulsory education does not entail a significant effect on belief accuracy, in both issues. Taken together, cross-sectional and causal estimates suggest that education is necessary, but not sufficient, to contrast inaccurate beliefs.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T11:58:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231222104
       
  • Citizen-Led Democratic Change: How Australia’s Community Independents
           Movement Is Reshaping Representative Democracy

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      Authors: Carolyn M Hendriks, Richard Reid
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Many citizens are frustrated with their democracy, particularly with elected representatives and political parties. In some contexts, citizens have taken steps to disrupt the status quo and push forward their own novel democratic reforms. Research on these ‘citizen-led democratic innovations’ has focused primarily on how political crises mobilise citizens to form social movements that then go on to devise or co-produce novel participatory institutions. This article expands these existing understandings in two novel directions. First, it challenges the assumption that for citizens to lead democratic reform they first need to mobilise a large protest movement. Second, it expands procedural understandings of ‘democratic innovation’ by considering how citizens are innovating in and around the core institutions of representative democracy. The article draws empirical insights from extensive qualitative research into Australia’s Community Independents Movement, which reveals a place-based, locally led political movement pursuing democratic change to improve local representation in national politics.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T11:51:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231219393
       
  • The Group Appeal Strategy: Beyond the Policy Perspective on Party
           Electoral Success

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      Authors: Mads Thau
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Political parties use policy appeals to change their policy images and increase electoral support. Building on the idea that parties’ group images also matter to voters, this article shows that group appeals can benefit parties as well. Combining manifesto data on policy and group appeals covering 50 years, we revisit the shift from class to catch-all politics in Britain and present three findings. First, a vote share analysis shows that the Labour Party benefited from using not just policy but also group appeals to downplay its class image. Second, consistent with a catch-all strategy, survey evidence shows that this boost in Labour support was most prominent outside the traditional base. Third, while group appeals had independent effects, we show how group and policy appeals also interact and reinforce each other. This suggests that non-policy strategies matter to parties’ electoral success on their own but also in combination with policy strategies.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T11:50:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231220127
       
  • The Voter Next Door: Stigma Effects on Advance Voting for Radical Right
           Parties

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      Authors: Hilma Lindskog, Stefan Dahlberg, Richard Öhrvall, Henrik Oscarsson
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the influence of stigmatization on vote choices, little attention has been given to the impact of social stigma on voters’ selection of voting procedures. To bridge this gap, our study focuses on Sweden, where the open-display ballot system at polling stations potentially compromises vote secrecy. Using survey data from the Swedish National Election Studies in 2014 and 2018, we examine the relationship between citizens’ voting procedure choices and their support for a highly stigmatized radical right party, the Sweden Democrats. Our findings reveal that voters of the Sweden Democrats are more inclined to vote in advance, particularly in districts with low general party support, indicating a high level of stigma. We argue that advance voting can be seen as a strategy to safeguard vote secrecy when voting for stigmatized parties within an institutional context featuring public displays of ballots. In addition, our research sheds light on the importance of electoral integrity in maintaining the confidentiality of voters’ choices.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T11:42:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231216305
       
  • Exploring the Causes of Technocratic Minister Appointments in Europe

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      Authors: Jean-Benoit Pilet, Leonardo Puleo, Davide Vittori
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the last decade, the appointment of technocratic ministers has become more common than ever before in Europe. Yet, scholarly attention has mostly focused on the economic determinants that lead to the appointment of such political outsiders in governments. In contrast, political determinants have not been fully examined. This article aims to investigate the role of economic determinants, as well as institutional factors (e.g. electoral system), party-system characteristics (e.g. volatility, polarization) and cabinet-related factors (e.g. intra-cabinet heterogeneity, the strength of populist parties within the government). Using a novel data set comprising data for more than 7000 ministers, including around 900 technocrats, our analysis shows that the share of populist parties within the cabinets has the strongest effect on the likelihood of appointing technocrats in national government. However, institutional-level variables appear to have no effect on the levels of technocratic appointments.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T04:18:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231210129
       
  • Keeping Up With the Joneses' Neighbourhood Effects on the Vote

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      Authors: Eelco Harteveld, Wouter van der Brug
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Voters are affected by cues from their immediate social environment. One of these cues consists of the political opinions available and accepted in people’s neighbourhoods, which are theoretically expected to affect vote choices through direct or indirect forms of communication. We test this assertion by employing a longitudinal design combining fine-grained geo-coded panel data with election results on a uniquely local level in the Netherlands. We assess the effect of the level of support for parties in a neighbourhood (consisting of just 624 households on average) on the vote choices of individuals 5 years later, while controlling for their previous vote choice. We find that the political preferences of neighbours indeed affect respondents’ subsequent vote choice, but only for those voters who feel strongly embedded in the local community. We conclude that, even in the highly fragmented Dutch context, the political choices of citizens can be influenced by neighbourhood effects.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T10:32:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231204849
       
  • Party–Interest Group Ties and Patterns of Political Influence

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      Authors: Maiken Røed, Elin Haugsgjerd Allern, Vibeke Wøien Hansen
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Organizational ties between political parties and interest groups are common in contemporary democracies, but little is known about the political effects of such ties. This article examines whether the strength of organizational ties between parties and interest groups affects the probability of (1) interest group influence on parties, (2) party influence on interest groups, and (3) mutual party–interest group influence in decision-making. Using novel interest group survey data from six democracies, we are the first to systematically examine the relationship between organizational ties and perceived and attributed influence across multiple policy areas. The findings indicate that one-sided influence is more likely when the actors have stronger ties but that such ties also increase the likelihood of influence going both ways. Close party–interest group relationships hence likely involve give-and-take across policy issues. These findings shed important new light on the role of parties and interest groups as intermediaries in democracies.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-12T10:39:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231202596
       
  • Children or Migrants as Public Goods'

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      Authors: Paul Bou-Habib, Serena Olsaretti
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Why, and to what extent, must taxpayers share the costs of raising children with parents' The most influential argument over this question has been the public goods argument: Taxpayers must share costs with parents because and to the extent that child-rearing contributes toward public goods by helping to develop valuable human capital. However, political theorists have not examined the public goods argument in a context in which replacement migration is available: If replacement migration can provide valuable human capital more efficiently than child-rearing, can the public goods argument still justify a taxpayer obligation to share the costs of child-rearing' This article argues that there are importantly different versions of the public goods argument, and that on a plausible version of that argument, it can withstand the replacement migration challenge under most circumstances.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T10:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231199556
       
  • The Elusive Effect of Political Trust on Participation: Participatory
           Resource or (Dis)incentive'

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      Authors: Ebe Ouattara, Eefje Steenvoorden
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Although political trust has long been linked to political participation, its effects remain elusive. Trust in political institutions may enhance levels of participation, diminish political engagement, or yield distinct effects depending on the activity. This article examines these diverging effects through a rational choice framework, with which we theorize and test whether political trust functions as a resource or a (dis)incentive to participate. Specifically, we assess the direct effects of political trust on intended participation and its moderating effects on outcome-related motivations and activity type. To this end, we use a factorial survey experiment in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom to isolate the effects of outcome-related motivations and to disentangle participation from the effectiveness of action and the effect of activity type, factors that remain confounded in existing survey measures of participation. Overall, our findings suggest that political trust operates as a (dis)incentive, rather than a resource spurring participation.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T09:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231194820
       
  • Post-Truth is Misplaced Distrust in Testimony, Not Indifference to Facts:
           Implications for Deliberative Remedies

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      Authors: Diana Popescu-Sarry
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      How should we deliberate with citizens who entertain post-truth beliefs in democratic societies' This is a central question for those interested in wielding the epistemic potential of democratic deliberation against post-truth. Yet, the strength of proposed deliberative solutions depends on the accuracy with which post-truth is diagnosed. Taking seriously the connection between epistemic diagnosis and deliberative remedy, this paper looks at the motivations provided by non-vaccinating parents for their beliefs and argues for an understanding of post-truth as misplaced distrust in testimony, as against a standard view of post-truth as indifference to fact. Second, the paper argues this new diagnosis of post-truth renders ineffective deliberative strategies aiming to harness the power of impersonal reason and accuracy, of the kind recently defended by Simone Chambers. Instead, combating post-truth as the paper defines it is effectively accomplished through employing bridging rhetoric.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T08:20:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231194822
       
  • The Paradox of Information Control Under Authoritarianism: Explaining
           Trust in Competing Messages in China

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      Authors: Chengli Wang, Jiangnan Zhu, Dong Zhang
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      To steer public opinion, autocracies prioritize state media reports of political news while marginalizing commercial and foreign media. Can this dominance guarantee people’s trust in state media news' We contend that rumors, circulated via informal channels and resistant to state information control, present a formidable challenge to public trust in state media news. Our two survey experiments in China pitted news of varying information quality (e.g. informative/detailed reports vs cursory mentions of events) from state media sources against rumors, showing that state media news can retain high levels of trustworthiness only if its information quality is high; however, low-quality state media news resulting from information control diminishes its trustworthiness and prompts people to believe rumors. Low-quality rumors have more negative effects than high-quality rumors on news trustworthiness and citizens’ satisfaction with government policies. Thus, information control can paradoxically erode trust in state media, which often represent the government in autocracies.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T11:33:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231191399
       
  • No Virtue Like Resilience: Machiavelli’s Realistic Justification of
           Democracy

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      Authors: Carlo Burelli
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Is democracy a realistic political ideal' This article historically recovers and normatively assesses Machiavelli’s intuition that democratic institutions are realistically desirable in virtue of their resilience. The article takes inspiration from Machiavelli’s work in two ways. Methodologically, it argues that there is a distinctive realist normativity based on political virtues, that is, those skills that are instrumentally required to thrive in politics. Substantively, it probes Machiavelli’s idea that the most important political virtue, for both individuals and institutions, is resilience: the ability to continuously adapt to new circumstances. Machiavelli observes that democratic regimes are very resilient because, while individuals cannot change their character to adapt to new circumstances, democracies can just change the individual in charge. The article then refines Machiavelli’s intuition by building on the contemporary distinction between stability and resilience. It claims that authoritarian regimes are more stable, and yet less resilient. Democracies are instead characterised by a continuous flux of political outputs, which makes them seemingly wavering, and yet better equipped to experiment with unconventional adaptations. The two different literatures thus complement each other. The debate on resilience usefully clarifies and systematises Machiavelli’s intuition. Conversely, Machiavelli’s work reveals the salience of resilience in politics, and shows why it counts as a realist political value.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T11:25:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231191396
       
  • Education and Voter Response to Principled Trade-Offs in Muslim
           Democracies

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      Authors: Nathanael Gratias Sumaktoyo, M Tahir Kilavuz
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      We contribute to the policy trade-offs literature by focusing on a principled trade-off that juxtaposes a widely desired objective with a moral belief and by examining how education conditions voters’ responses to this trade-off. Through survey experiments in Indonesia and Tunisia, we examine how voters respond to a liberal initiative to relax alcohol restrictions to raise revenue for social security and a conservative initiative to tighten alcohol restrictions even if it decreases social security revenue. We find that voters opposed the liberal initiative and that more educated voters supported the conservative initiative more than their less educated counterparts. These findings highlight the powerful constraints of moral beliefs even in the context of a trade-off with a common good and support the socialization perspective of education that portrays education as an institution that socializes individuals in the society’s dominant values—whether liberal or conservative—as opposed to simply a force for liberalization.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T07:17:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231187212
       
  • The Justice Argument Against Catholic Integralism

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      Authors: Kevin Vallier
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Catholic integralism claims that governments must secure the earthly and heavenly common good. God authorizes two powers to do so. The state governs in matters temporal, the Catholic Church in matters spiritual. Since the church has the nobler end of salvation, it may direct the state to help enforce church law. The integralist adopts two seemingly conflicting norms of justice: (a) coercion into the faith is always unjust, but (b) coercion to keep the faith is just. But if religious coercion is wrong at the start of the Christian life, why is it permitted after that' The integralist answer is baptism. Baptism serves as a normative transformer: it transforms religious coercion from unjust to just. My thesis is that baptism fails as a normative transformer. I critique Thomas Aquinas’ approach to this question and then adapt gratitude, associative, and natural duty theories of political obligation to repair his argument. These strategies fail.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-25T04:59:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221130169
       
  • Neoliberal Populism: The Case of Pim Fortuyn

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      Authors: Merijn Oudenampsen
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      After Trump and Brexit, a dominant narrative emerged that portrayed the rise of right-wing populism as a backlash to neoliberalism. While it is true that right-wing populism emerged during the heydays of neoliberal globalization in the 1980s and 1990s, the relationship between the two is more complex than often assumed. In a series of countries, right-wing populism emerged with, rather than against neoliberalism. The particular combination of “neoliberal populism,” however, is still underexplored. Studying this political discourse can help us understand the role of neoliberal ideology in the rise of right-wing populism. As a contribution to this end, this article offers an in-depth analysis of the ideological evolution of the Dutch neoliberal populist Pim Fortuyn (1948–2002). It places the development of his ideas against the backdrop of the Dutch neoliberal turn and shows how his populist establishment critique emerged out of a neoliberal critique of the Dutch corporatist welfare state.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-14T12:31:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231185211
       
  • Building Trust in Political Office: Testing the Efficacy of Political
           Contact and Authentic Communication

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      Authors: James Weinberg
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      While a large literature interrogates the causes and consequences of declining political trust in democracies, considerably less work has considered the everyday leadership strategies that might arrest this trend. I tackle this gap as I ask: what can politicians do to build trust' Going beyond the performance perspective current in political science, I suggest that all politicians can build trust by (1) increasing occasions for political contact and (2) utilising authentic political communication. These arguments are developed out of interviews with national politicians in five democracies (N = 51) and tested empirically with observational and experimental survey data gathered from a longitudinal sample of the UK public (N = 705). Attesting to academic work on the contact hypothesis and ‘authentic trust’, as well as the testimony of politicians themselves, these analyses suggest that both strategies carry appraisive potential. These findings contribute conceptually and practically to our understanding of both trust and leadership in politics.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T10:32:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231185706
       
  • The Online Battlefield: How Conflict Frames in Political Advertisements
           Affect Political Participation in a Multiparty Context

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      Authors: Emma van der Goot, Sanne Kruikemeier, Rens Vliegenthart, Jeroen de Ridder
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how politicians’ conflict framing strategies in online campaign advertisements affect citizens’ political participation in a multi-party context. We rely on a unique combination of innovative research methods to do so, including a four-wave panel survey, a content analysis of Facebook browser-tracking data and a mobile experience sampling survey with data donations. All data were collected during the 2021 Dutch general elections. We find that conflict framing can discourage citizens from engaging in low-effort forms of political participation, such as discussing politics, signing a petition and visiting political websites. The results show that conflict frames can demobilize citizens because they lower enthusiasm and are perceived as less informative. Our study provides insights into the potential unintended consequences of using conflict framing as a campaign strategy in a multi-party setting.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-24T08:19:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178105
       
  • Structural Change Through ‘Collective Action as Democratic Practice’:
           Linking Grassroots Democracy With Social Justice

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      Authors: Chikako Endo
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Iris Marion Young argued that tackling structural injustices that arise from complex interactions requires collective, political action. Nevertheless, it remains unclear what kind of collective action leads to social justice and how. This article aims to fill this gap by developing the idea of ‘collective action as democratic practice’ that emphasises crafting democratic institutions from the bottom-up to re-orient structural processes in ways that resist oppression and domination. This departs from Young’s own account of collective action as engaging in communicative action to pressure powerful agents. It also departs from previous attempts to conceptualise structural change through the cumulative, rather than collective, actions of individuals changing their behaviours independently of one another. I argue that my approach is a more promising way to theorise collective action from a structural perspective. This approach has wider implications for understanding the outward-looking political potential of self-organised projects by citizens.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T11:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231182024
       
  • Why Parties Gain Votes When the Public Perceives Them Shifting to the
           Right

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      Authors: James Adams, Luca Bernardi, Lawrence Ezrow, Zeynep Somer-Topcu
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      We combine two dominant approaches to studying how issues influence elections: one that emphasizes parties’ issue positions, and the other parties’ issue ownership. Research from the latter approach shows that voters ascribe greater economic competence to right-wing parties. Based on this finding, we argue that parties enhance their economic issue ownership when voters perceive them shifting to the right. In the following step, we show that perceived rightward shifts of parties also lead to subsequent increases in electoral support. We analyze economic ownership survey data and election outcomes in 15 democracies over the period 1986–2015 that supports the expectations that parties’ perceived rightward shifts result in increases in economic ownership and subsequent vote shares. We also show that the right-shift vote gains are strongest during recessions when voters prioritize parties’ economic competence.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T09:11:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178979
       
  • Campaigning or Not in the 2016 Referendum' UK Environmental
           Non-Governmental Organisations and European Union Membership

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      Authors: Nathalie Berny, Viviane Gravey
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Environmental non-governmental organisations stood out during the 2016 European Union referendum campaign. Despite clear reputational and regulatory risks, they participated in this fraught political debate in sharp contrast to other civil society sectors. This challenges common assumptions that material concerns, and ultimately survival, prevail in campaigning choices. We argue that campaigning choices reflect commitments to values that underpin these organisations’ raison d’être. Drawing on a pragmatist view of organisations, we analyse how external (media, regulatory) and internal (competence, governance processes) pressures shaped the campaigning choices of nine UK environmental organisations. We find that most environmental non-governmental organisations chose to engage, some even officially registering for Remain. Those active at the European Union level were most likely to engage – but also most open to criticism. Overall, environmental non-governmental organisations struggled to adapt their usual expertise-based, elite-focused campaigning style to the referendum which raises questions for civil society’s ability to speak for Europe, and contribute to controversial democratic debates, beyond the United Kingdom.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T09:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178997
       
  • Left-Wing Populism and Environmental Issues: An Analysis of La France
           Insoumise’s ‘Popular Environmentalism’

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      Authors: Laura Chazel, Vincent Dain
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article proposes to explore the interaction between populism and environmentalism in the discourse of populist radical left parties, through a case study of Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s parties, Parti de gauche (2008–2016) and La France insoumise (from 2016). While an emerging literature primarily investigated the populist framing of populist radical right parties’ climate (sceptic) discourse, the article analyses how a populist radical left party incorporates environmental issues into its agenda and the extent to which environmentalism and populism concretely interweave. Using mixed-methods, we first show that the logics of party competition and the growing salience of environmental issues led La France insoumise to gradually develop an ambitious green agenda. We then show that there is evidence for a populism/environmentalism nexus that could be defined as ‘green populism’. La France insoumise’s ecosocialist ideology combines to anti-elitism and people-centrism to blame the environmental crisis on the ‘oligarchy’ and to promote a green transition that would protect the people.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-17T06:48:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178631
       
  • Partisanship and Tolerance for Clientelism: Evidence from a Conjoint
           Experiment in Romania

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      Authors: Sergiu Gherghina, Inga Saikkonen
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on electoral clientelism are increasingly focusing on the demand side and explaining how voters react to electoral inducements. However, there is limited research about how candidate attributes and partisanship can determine citizens’ reactions to clientelism. This article therefore tests the relative weight that voters place on candidate attributes and partisanship in their reactions to clientelistic targeting in the context of a new democracy. We use evidence from an original conjoint experiment conducted in 2021 in Romania, where electoral clientelism is frequent. Our findings show that citizens react negatively to clientelistic inducements in general, but the effects vary based on the targeting strategy used by politicians. These negative effects are considerably weaker among co-partisans. This observation is especially relevant when testing the effect of partisanship in a political setting where it is low.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T06:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178994
       
  • Gendering Discretion: Why Street-Level Bureaucracy Needs a Gendered Lens

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      Authors: Catherine Durose, Vivien Lowndes
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Street-level bureaucrats shape policy through using discretion in their interactions with citizens and service users in delivering public services. Discretion allows street-level bureaucrats to bridge between public policy and the complex, individual, human situations they encounter. Drawing on insights from feminist institutionalism, this article establishes gender as a relevant analytical category in understanding discretion. We set out three analytical propositions: street-level bureaucrats work in gendered institutional contexts that shape their discretion; street-level bureaucrats are gendered actors, whose discretion is shaped by their individual gendered dispositions; and street-level bureaucrats’ discretion has gendered effects. We investigate these propositions through a case study of the early implementation of the classification of misogyny as a hate crime among police forces in England and Wales. In addressing this analytical intersection between street-level bureaucracy and feminist institutionalism, we bring a gendered perspective to street-level bureaucracy, and a focus on how rules are interpreted to feminist institutionalism, forging new ground in public administration.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T05:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231178630
       
  • A Theory and Test of Pledge-Based Voting: The Limited but Real Effects of
           Election Pledges on Citizens’ Vote Choice

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      Authors: Troels Bøggild, Carsten Jensen
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Do voters decide on the basis of the election pledges political parties make' Although this is a key assumption in most democratic theories and, seemingly, among parties who issue dozens of pledges during campaigns, the scientific literature does not provide a clear answer to this question. This article develops a theory of pledge-based voting and a research design that allows for studying the electoral effects of pledges in real-time as the campaign unfolds. Based on a novel experimental design embedded in panel surveys administered during and after the 2019 Danish national election campaign (N = 6233), we estimate that the most salient pledges affect vote choice by between 1.1 and 2.1 percentage points averaged across the electorate. While modest, these effects can be decisive in the often highly competitive context of modern elections. The findings have implications for our understanding of political behavior, party politics, and normative theories of democracy.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T10:01:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231179010
       
  • Institutions Are Not Rules: Realigning the Ontology Behind Theories of
           Change

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      Authors: Henrique A Castro
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Historical institutionalism has fruitfully moved beyond its initial focus on institutional effects to incorporate change. I argue, however, that the resulting advances have become misaligned with their conceptual bases. “Institutions as rules” was a useful first approximation, but it cannot accommodate changes in institutionalized practices occurring while sources of law remain the same. I propose reconceiving legal rules (material objects) and institutions (behavioral dispositions) as distinct elements that nonetheless remain fundamentally associated through the belief-shaping actions of specific groups. While rules change with the introduction of officially recognized materials, legal institutions change in response to new beliefs regarding what could pass as officially permissible. Far from a mere exercise in conceptual precision, the proposals draw distinctions that matter for description and explanation. In that regard, I show how the current literature mischaracterizes court-led change and how we might advance on the underexplored issue of collective meaning-making amidst unequal legal expertise.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T05:22:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231179551
       
  • Does Digital Campaigning Make a Difference for Individual Candidates in an
           Open List Proportional Representation System' The Case of the 2019
           Election in Belgium

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      Authors: Gunther Vanden Eynde, Bart Maddens
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article looks at the equalization/normalization problem through the lens of campaign spending and investigates the effect of expenses for digital tools on the electoral result of individual candidates in an open list proportional representation system. A multilevel analysis of the campaign expenses of 1253 serious contenders in the Belgian 2019 concurrent federal, regional, and European elections shows that the investment in both owned Web 1.0 media and paid Web 2.0 media does not have an effect on electoral performance. Investing in traditional tools, by contrast, does have a significant positive effect. While most candidates use digital tools, they invest only a small part of their budget in these, which may explain the absence of a digital expense effect. These findings put the use of digital campaigning in perspective, showing that the effect of paid online tools should not be overestimated, and that the role of traditional campaigning is still dominant.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T05:19:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231179189
       
  • Home Ownership, House Prices, and Belief in Meritocracy: Evidence from
           South Korea and 34 Countries

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      Authors: Seungwoo Han, Hyeok Yong Kwon
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Do home ownership and house prices impact the shaping of individual perceptions on inequality and belief in meritocracy' We argue that home ownership and rising asset prices increase the salience of an individual’s own relative economic position, which in turn facilitates belief in meritocracy. We expect that, when house prices increase, homeowners are likely to strengthen their belief in meritocracy and defend their position by rationalizing that income distribution in society is fair and that economic success and failure are primarily determined by individual efforts. Our analysis of both a Korean panel survey and a cross-national survey finds strong and robust evidence of the asset price effect. Our findings suggest that the housing price effect on economic ideology is a general pattern, which implies that there are social and political consequences to the asset price effect.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T06:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231176677
       
  • Climate Sceptics or Climate Nationalists' Understanding and Explaining
           Populist Radical Right Parties’ Positions towards Climate Change
           (1990–2022)

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      Authors: Jakob Schwörer, Belén Fernández-García
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Populist radical right parties are often considered to be the most extreme opponents of climate protection in Western Europe. Others predict a ‘climate nationalism’ among populist radical right parties combining nativism with a pro-climate agenda. Based on a new data set on party positions on climate change, including 485 party manifestos – 76 from populist radical right parties – from the 1990s to 2022 in 10 Western European countries, we find that populist radical right parties are divided but generally less likely to speak out for climate protection than other parties, which rather contradicts the climate nationalism argument. We find that populist radical right parties only became more aware of the issue since 2019 in the face of the mass mobilizations of Fridays for Future and, to a lesser extent, when it became a visible issue within the party system. Thus, we argue that populist radical right parties are forced to talk about the climate when the issue is emphasized by organized actors.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T10:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231176475
       
  • Probing the Effect of Candidate Localness in Low-Information Elections:
           Evidence from the German Local Level

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      Authors: Jan A Velimsky, Sebastian Block, Martin Gross, Dominic Nyhuis
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Candidates with local ties perform better than their rivals without such attachments. We focus on the underlying mechanism of the localness effect and hypothesise that voters prefer local candidates for instrumental reasons, expecting better representation, and for reasons of a shared place identity. To test these expectations, we rely on the unusually detailed ballot for local elections in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Using multi-level regressions of the electoral results of 6503 candidates running in 21 cities in 2014, we confirm the importance of candidate localness for electoral success in low-information elections. Furthermore, we provide insights into the mechanisms behind this relationship. While instrumental motivations are independent of the composition of the electorate, a large share of elderly voters amplifies the identity effect, whereas many young voters, a high residential mobility, and a high population density diminishes this effect.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-27T12:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231173505
       
  • Populist Democrats' Unpacking the Relationship Between Populist and
           Democratic Attitudes at the Citizen Level

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      Authors: Andrej Zaslove, Maurits Meijers
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      It is widely feared that the onset of populism poses a threat to democracy, as citizens’ support for democracy is essential for its legitimacy and stability. Yet, the relationship between populism and democratic support at the citizen level remains poorly understood, particularly with respect to support for liberal democracy. Data measuring citizens’ populist attitudes in conjunction with a comprehensive range of measures of democratic support have been lacking. Using unique data from the Netherlands, we study the relationship between individuals’ populist attitudes and their attitudes towards democracy in three studies. We examine the association between populism and support for democracy and satisfaction with democracy (Study 1), populism and support for liberal democracy (Study 2), and populism and support for majoritarian conceptions of democracy (Study 3). We find that while citizens with stronger populist attitudes are dissatisfied with how democracy works, they are no less supportive of the principle of democracy. Contrary to most theorizing, we find that citizens with higher populist attitudes not less supportive of key institutions of liberal democracy, but reject mediated representation through political parties. At the same time, individuals with stronger populist attitudes are highly supportive of forms of unconstrained majoritarian rule. These findings suggest that the relationship between populism and support for (liberal) democracy is more complicated than commonly assumed.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T12:59:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231173800
       
  • ‘Muscular Unionism’: The British Political Tradition Strikes
           Back'

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      Authors: Mark Sandford
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that shifts in the UK’s territorial management practice in the late 2010s and early 2020s, described by various terms, including ‘muscular unionism’, may be more rhetorical and ideational than substantive. The practices associated with these terms are recognisably part of the ‘British political tradition’, and the changes of the early 2020s can be viewed as reasserting traditional governance practices rather than introducing new ones. The article examines the various phenomena described as ‘muscular unionism’ and suggests that many are relatively ad hoc, low-level initiatives, often rhetorical. There is also much evidence that the UK governments of the 2020s see the ‘Millennium Settlement’, introduced in 1999, as continuing to be a core part of UK territorial management. The clearest break from historical practice comes in the overt, explicit quality of ‘muscular unionist’ rhetoric. The article then suggests that, contrary to some scholarly expectations, this muscular unionist turn may come to be an effective territorial management strategy for the UK government, as it aligns with an Anglo-British imaginary within England that continues to conflate England, Britain and the UK in terms of governance and national identity.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T11:46:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231176474
       
  • Electoral Competition between Social Democracy and the Populist Radical
           Right: How Welfare Regimes Shape Electoral Outcomes

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      Authors: Karl Loxbo
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how the growing competition over immigration and welfare between social democratic parties and populist radical right parties impacts electoral outcomes. The study argues that the historical legacies of the social democratic and conservative welfare regimes influence how voters respond to this competitive struggle. The findings support this argument. In the social democratic regime, populist radical right parties gain more support when they compete over welfare, although Nordic social democratic parties can mitigate this trend by appearing tough on immigration. However, populist radical right parties’ emphasis on welfare is the main source of electoral mobilization, particularly among voters with anti-immigration sentiments. In the conservative regime, the competitive dynamic is less connected to immigration, and populist radical right parties’ welfare discourse appeals primarily to economically vulnerable voters, while social democratic parties lose votes by taking a strict stance on immigration. These results have important implications and suggest that welfare regimes shape voting behaviour differently today than in previous eras.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T06:09:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231173399
       
  • Consent, Background Justice and Patterned Privacy Principles

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      Authors: Molly Powell
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Notice and consent approaches, being the most prevalent legal frameworks, have in recent years come under fire. I suggest they fail because they rest on a historical approach to privacy justice, whereby the justice of a particular state of affairs is a function of whether each transaction on the way was just. Instead, I make use of a background justice framing. Even where consent is present it is inadequate to secure the values at stake. When we only assess the fairness or freedom of individual information transactions, we fail to see the way many can undercut the very values we seek to secure by requiring consent for disclosures in the first place. I propose a patterned principle to regulate the distribution of individual control over privacy, and to set the background against which individual notice and consent can still play a role, albeit a limited one.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-04-27T07:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231167074
       
  • Government–Opposition Relations and the Vote of No-Confidence

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      Authors: Or Tuttnauer, Reuven Y Hazan
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The vote of no-confidence is the primary mechanism through which the principle of government accountability to the legislature – the defining feature of parliamentary democracy – is achieved. Yet, no research has been devoted to its influence on the relations between the government and the mechanism’s main users – the opposition. This article attempts to fill this lacuna by theorising how restrictiveness in the vote of no-confidence influences the opposition’s strategies vis-à-vis the government in legislative voting. We delineate the influence of the vote of no-confidence on the opposition via its preference to pursue more cooperative strategies, as opposed to conflictual ones, distinguishing between the two stages of the vote of no-confidence – initiating and voting. We empirically explore the relation between the vote of no-confidence and the voting behaviour of 59 opposition parties in 16 countries, showing that greater restrictions on both stages of the vote of no-confidence correlate with less conflictual opposition behaviour.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-04-26T10:01:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231168765
       
  • Deliberating Like a State: Locating Public Administration Within the
           Deliberative System

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      Authors: Rikki Dean
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Public administration is the largest part of the democratic state and a key consideration in understanding its legitimacy. Despite this, democratic theory is notoriously quiet about public administration. One exception is deliberative systems theories, which have recognized the importance of public administration and attempted to incorporate it within their orbit. This article examines how deliberative systems approaches have represented (a) the actors and institutions of public administration, (b) its mode of coordination, (c) its key legitimacy functions, (d) its legitimacy relationships, and (e) the possibilities for deliberative intervention. It argues that constructing public administration through the pre-existing conceptual categories of deliberative democracy, largely developed to explain the legitimacy of law-making, has led to some significant omissions and misunderstandings. The article redresses these issues by providing an expanded conceptualization of public administration, connected to the core concerns of deliberative and other democratic theories with democratic legitimacy and democratic reform.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-04-25T08:59:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231166285
       
  • Using Aid to Control Migration

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      Authors: James Christensen, Miranda Simon
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the practice of using aid to control migration, which we refer to as ‘inducement aid’. We examine two potential objections to inducement aid, each of which concerns a message that the practice communicates to two corresponding audiences: would-be migrants and other developed states. We suggest that the first objection has intuitive force but is undermined by a powerful reply. This finding seems to bolster the intuitive appeal that inducement aid might exhibit as a non-compulsory and apparently option-enhancing form of migration control. However, we argue that the second objection, which targets inducement aid in its capacity as a form of development assistance, has greater power. Developing the second objection, we argue that inducement aid threatens the establishment and maintenance of important international norms, thereby risking degrading the options of the world’s poorest people and setting back the cause of cosmopolitan morality.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T09:13:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231162254
       
  • Power and Truth in Science-Related Populism: Rethinking the Role of
           Knowledge and Expertise in Climate Politics

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      Authors: John M Meyer
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Populism is often characterized as a rejection of scientific expertise and a key obstacle to societies’ ability to address the climate crisis today. I challenge this account, arguing for a more inclusive conception of populism and a more critical account of expertise. Consistent with this, I delineate a range of responses to the challenges of climate politics in populist times. In doing so, I have two primary aims: first, to highlight limitations of “anti-populist” responses among proponents of climate change action, and, second, to lean into populist criticisms of elite expertise, by delineating how some challenges to dominant forms of science and elite power are themselves expert knowledge and integral to promising movements that address climate change. This can allow expertise to be distinguished from elitism and to be recognized in caring relations to the subjects of knowledge. Here, expertise is not manifest as separation from the common world, but as immersion in it.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T06:55:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231160370
       
  • David Hume and the Politics of Slavery

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      Authors: Danielle Charette
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      David Hume alluded to the politics of slaveholding throughout his career and was among the first to observe that the republican tradition has an awkward relationship with slavery. This article places Hume’s critique of Roman slavery in conversation with recent debates over “neo-Roman” liberty, paying special attention to Hume’s complaint that some republican advocates for political liberty have also apologized for personal slavery. Most of Hume’s direct comments on slaveholding appear in the 1752 essay, “Of the Populousness of Ancient Nations,” where Hume criticized Roman slavery for its negative effects on population growth. But more was at stake than ancient demography. Even abolitionists who abhorred Hume’s racism still drew upon his argument against ancient slavery—which they read as a commentary on the modern colonies.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T06:53:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231157516
       
  • Populism of the Privileged: On the Use of Underdog Identities by
           Comparatively Privileged Groups

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      Authors: Benjamin De Cleen, Juan Alberto Ruiz Casado
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the use of populism by comparatively privileged groups, a specific type of populism we call the ‘populism of the privileged’. Our argument is not merely that ‘populisms of the privileged’ are also forms of populism, but that they warrant a specific label. We first identify intersections between populism and privilege on the levels of populist actors, support for populism and beneficiaries of populism, which we call populism by, with and for the privileged. We then present a discursive conceptualization of ‘populism of the privileged’. Building on this we develop analytical strategies for the study the ‘populism of the privileged’, zooming in on how ‘the people’ and ‘the elite’ are constructed in such populisms, their sociological directionality, the layeredness of privilege and un(der)privilege, the discursive construction of ‘crisis’ and ‘unmet demands’ and the role of discourses about populism in reproducing the claims of populisms of the privileged.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T06:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231160427
       
  • Reinterpreting Authoritarian Populisms: The Elitist Plebeian Vision of
           State

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      Authors: Dan Paget
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Authoritarian populists offer a vision of state. This ideologically fixed imaginary provides an electoral-authoritarian template for how to shape states once in power. Yet not all those called populists are populist. Some are elitist plebeians. They construct themselves as ‘the moral elite’ above which fights for ‘the people’ below against ‘the corrupt’. I argue that elitist plebeianism contains a distinct vision of government as elected guardianship. Like populists, elitist plebeians advocate extending executive power. Yet they envisage this not as the realization of the people’s will, but as the projection of accountability downwards. To them, divisions of power are acceptable as divisions of guardian labour. Rival opinions are not illegitimate, just irrelevant, but opposition is intolerable. Therefore, studies of populist authoritarianism should be revisited. Elitist plebeian visions of state may have been misread as authoritarian populist ones. I examine President Magufuli (Tanzania) as an exemplar and identify other potential elitist plebeians worldwide.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-22T12:55:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217231154098
       
  • Solving the (False) Dilemma: An Ecological Approach to the Study of
           Opinion Constraint

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      Authors: Marta Gallina
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Since Converse’s paper, opinion constraint has been defined as the degree to which voters hold ideologically consistent opinions across different issues. Yet, scholars have found that opinions departing from the liberal/conservative categories constitute alternative ways of organizing political preferences. This suggests a methodological dilemma: how can we assess the consistency of opinions based on empirical, rather than theoretically predefined, criteria' This article proposes measuring constraint as the extent to which citizens’ policy preferences resemble those of their most preferred political parties (a top-down approach). To do so, it relies on data from the 2019 European Election Studies and the 2019 Chapel Hill Expert Survey. Analyses show that a top-down measure of opinion constraint correlates weakly with pre-existing measures of this concept (discriminant validation). Findings also suggest that well-established hypotheses about the predictors and effects of constraint are confirmed when using the top-down measure (nomological validation).
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T10:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221147774
       
  • Reflective Inclusion: Learning from Activists What Taking a Deliberative
           Stance Means

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      Authors: Andrea Felicetti, Markus Holdo
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers are increasingly recognizing that social movements are crucial for realizing deliberative democratic values. However, this raises two important questions: (1) what actions should count as deliberation and (2) whether we should demand more from activists than merely provoking or encouraging deliberation in a society. Building on current research on activists’ actual engagement with deliberation, we argue that the standard of taking a “deliberative stance” (being respectful, sincere, and public-minded) is a good starting point for addressing both questions. By taking a deliberative stance, movements benefit from deliberation themselves and contribute to deliberative systems. However, we should also acknowledge that forms of deliberation change, and discovering new forms is a crucial part of what movements do for democracy. We propose to adopt a principle we call “reflective inclusion,” which allows us to engage abductively with new actions that might expand and deepen our understanding of what deliberation may look like.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-08T04:58:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221150867
       
  • What Was the ‘Alt’ in Alt-Right, Alt-Lite, and Alt-Left' On ‘Alt’
           as a Political Modifier

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      Authors: Benjamin Moffitt
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      What was the ‘alt’ in alt-right, alt-lite, and alt-left' Tracing these controversial terms’ development over the 2010s, this article interrogates the construction, meaning, and utility of the ‘alt’ modifier in US politics. Contextualizing the emergence of ‘alt’ among wider debates about how to spatially conceptualize anti-system politics beyond the left-right spectrum, it argues that ‘alt’ was used to name a tendency that moved beyond traditional ideological questions about what society should look like, and instead signified a preference about how politics should be done: namely, a rejection of the mainstream norms of political conduct, and an embrace of vulgarity, incivility and an extremely adversarial approach to political opposition. It shows how a popular-cultural understanding of ‘alternative’ was used to give this approach a countercultural sheen, and maps out the cleavages between groups that the alt/mainstream binary opened up. Finally, it considers the legacy of the ‘alt’ modifier in contemporary politics.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T11:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221150871
       
  • Understanding the Conflict of Conflicts: Is Left-Right Conflict a
           Necessary Condition for the Development of New Politics'

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      Authors: Christoffer Green-Pedersen, Conor Little
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      One of the most significant changes in West European politics in the past 40 years is the emergence of the new cultural divide. However, there is substantial variation in how the issues comprising this new divide have manifested themselves in party systems. This raises the question of what mechanisms bring these issues into established party systems. The literature has so far focused on new political parties and critical junctures. This article argues that the left-right structure is a key condition for the integration of new political issues into party competition. Rather than seeing their integration as a matter of the emergence of a new, second conflict, it argues that new issues become central to party competition if the existing conflict structure presents established mainstream parties with vote-seeking or coalition-building incentives to focus on them. The article uses Ireland as a ‘negative case study’ to develop the argument.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T10:44:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221141424
       
  • Compelled Turnout and Democratic Turnout: Why They Are Different

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      Authors: Chiara Destri
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      One strategy in defence of compulsory voting is based on what I call the non-instrumental value of high turnout: the idea that almost-universal participation in elections is valuable per se. This article argues that we do not have democratic reasons to value compelled turnout. First, thanks to an original analysis of the practice of voting, I identify three constitutive rules that make the physical acts of marking and casting a ballot count as proper voting. This preliminary analysis serves to illuminate the fact that the act of voting has democratic value if it is performed in a free and reason-responsive way. Second, I identify political equality and popular control as democratic values that high turnout expresses. Finally, the article rejects the non-instrumental case for compulsory voting because it cannot ensure that people vote in a reason-responsive way and, if they do not, high turnout lacks democratic value.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T09:40:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221148038
       
  • National Attachments and Good Citizenship: A Double-Edged Sword

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      Authors: Lenka Dražanová, Andrew Roberts
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The recent popularity of nationalist movements bears witness to the continued power of national feeling in politics. This article considers the potential relationship between different kinds of national attachments and what we call active and allegiant citizenship—support for democracy, community participation, and prosocial behavior. We analyze these relationships using data from two waves of the European Values Study. We find that a set of attachments often called civic nationalism—including patriotism, national identity, and respect for one’s country’s institutions—are connected with better citizenship on virtually all of our outcomes, whereas ethnic nationalism is frequently connected with worse citizenship. These associations, however, tend to be weaker in the postcommunist states which have a different experience with both nationalism and democracy. The results suggest that national feeling can be a double-edged sword for citizenship.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T09:39:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221145910
       
  • Mobilization, Repression and Policy Concessions in Authoritarian Regimes:
           The Cases of Egypt and Jordan

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      Authors: Nadine Sika
      Abstract: Political Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In 2018 new economic reform measures were implemented in Egypt and Jordan under the auspices of the International Monetary Fund. These measures were met with public outrage in both countries. In Jordan, mass mobilization, demonstrations and strikes took place, lasted for a month and ended in policy concessions. In Egypt, however, only few independent demonstrations erupted, no mass mobilization occurred, and no policy concessions were enacted by the regime. This article seeks to understand, why activists were able to mobilize large numbers of citizens and attain policy concessions in Jordan, while they were not able to in Egypt. I argue that in authoritarian regimes, different types of repressive strategies against activists and their movements impact their ability to develop networks and advance short-term policy concessions. Targeted repression against activists enables the development of formal and informal networks in addition to coalitions, increasing a movements’ bargaining power. However, widespread repression hampers the development of all types of networks, especially formal networks, which impedes activists’ ability to bargain for policy concessions.
      Citation: Political Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T01:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00323217221141426
       
 
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  Subjects -> HUMANITIES (Total: 980 journals)
    - ASIAN STUDIES (155 journals)
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NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (28 journals)

Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Anuario de Estudios Americanos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comparative American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corpus. Archivos virtuales de la alteridad americana     Open Access  
European journal of American studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of American Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal de la Société des Américanistes     Open Access  
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Magallania     Open Access  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Revista de Indias     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trace     Open Access  
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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