Subjects -> MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES (Total: 56 journals)
Showing 1 - 7 of 7 Journals sorted by number of followers
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Archives and Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of the Society of Archivists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Archivaria     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Archival Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Museum Management and Curatorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Museum History Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
RBM : A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Museum Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Heritage, Memory and Conflict Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Museum International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tuhinga     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Curator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the History of Collections     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Metropolitan Museum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Fine Arts Campus     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Museums & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Collections : A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Museum Worlds : Advances in Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ICOFOM Study Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norsk museumstidsskrift     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nordisk Museologi : The Journal Nordic Museology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Museology and Monumental Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Uncommon Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technè     Open Access  
Boletín Científico : Centro de Museos. Museo de Historia Natural     Open Access  
Revista del Museo de La Plata     Open Access  
MIDAS     Open Access  
Revista de Museología : Kóot     Open Access  
La Lettre de l’OCIM     Open Access  
Travaux du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle “Grigore Antipa” (The Journal of “Grigore Antipa” National Museum of Natural History)     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Technology and Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.284
Number of Followers: 34  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0040-165X - ISSN (Online) 1097-3729
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • On The Cover: Invasive Sparrows and the American Bird Box

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      Abstract: [View Cover Image]“English sparrow, male and female, showing the manner in which they take possession of nesting boxes provided for native birds.” This caption describes the subject of this cover essay, an image from a Farmer’s Bulletin article by Ned Dearborn of the U.S. Biological Survey titled “The English Sparrow as a Pest.” Published in 1912, the image appeared more than six decades after the sparrow was first introduced to the United States from Europe. At the time, the bird’s presence was highly controversial. The 1870s saw the outbreak of the “sparrow wars,” a series of published clashes between supporters and opponents.1 By the early twentieth century, government biologists such as Dearborn denounced the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • (Re)thinking Repairs in the Longue Durée

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      Abstract: In 2019, we organized an international conference in Paris titled “Les réparations de la préhistoire à nos jours: Cultures techniques et savoir-faire.” Drawing on Braudel’s idea of the longue durée and by holding sessions at the Musée des arts et métiers and at the Musée de l’air et de l’espace, we wanted to explore the theme of repairs by integrating anthropological, archaeological, and museographic dimensions, an unusual approach in this field of study, and then open up chronological perspectives for the study of these technical practices. Recent historiography has tended to focus on the contemporary period, aiming to “rethink this decline-and-fall story” of repair in the industrial economies of the “throw-away ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Between Innovation and Resistance: The Role of Guilds in Early Modern
           Italian Ribbon Manufacturing

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      Abstract: From the late sixteenth century to the long eighteenth century, European and American markets saw the influx of thousands of silk ribbons, serving diverse needs across social groups amid a consumer revolution on both sides of the Atlantic. These colorful goods were distributed via ships and the baskets of traveling salespeople, reaching fairs, markets, shops, and homes. As French inspector of manufactures Jacques Savary des Brûlons noted in his Dictionnaire universel du commerce, ribbons were uniquely susceptible to the vagaries and whims of fashion, leading merchants and producers to charge a premium for innovative designs that “enlivened and supported creative genius.”1 The nurturing of this creativity within ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bird Boxes and Sparrow Traps: The Technological Regulation of Avian Life
           in the United States

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      Abstract: In 1869, the following poem, titled “The Sparrow,” was published as part of an advertisement for the Rockhill and Wilson clothing company in Philadelphia, depicting scenes of everyday life in the city: “This is the diligent sparrow, / who lives in a bird-box so narrow; / he gobbles the worm, / who no longer can squirm / on his web, from the trees of the city.”1 A few years before this publication, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) had been introduced to the United States via New York. The birds had spread across the country, following boxcars of grain along the railroad system.2 Sparrows were initially welcomed into towns and cities as pleasant avian companions that preyed on unwanted insects. But within a few ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scrapbooks as Sites of Technology: The Women’s Institute and the
           Material Culture of 1960s Rural England

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      Abstract: In August 1966, the front page of the national British publication The Observer celebrated one of the winners of a community scrapbook competition held to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the Women’s Institute, a rural women’s organization founded in 1915 to organize activities focused on domestic labor, handicrafts, agriculture, and food production for working and middle-class rural women.1 In 1964, the National Federation of Women’s Institutes invited its members to participate in a national competition where they encouraged individual branches to create a permanent “record of the village or district” in the form of a scrapbook. The members of Radwinter branch in Essex, as reported in The Observer ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Crucibles of Craft: Home Workshops and Leisurely Striving in
           Twentieth-Century U.S. Woodworking Magazines

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      Abstract: On the back cover of the May/June 1969 issue of Flying Chips, American machinery manufacturer Rockwell pitched the firm’s table saw as an “unwinding machine.”1 Anyone could buy the saw and claim workshop freedom at home after a long day of bowing to the wishes of bosses, clients, or customers. Yet where would an amateur woodworker put the saw' How would he—rarely she—make ready the other tools of a trade he did not ply for a living' Where could converts who set up a “shop” during the twentieth-century hobby boom turn for reassurance and advice' Publications serving leisure-time woodworkers, largely American, provided technical guidance and struck a helpful, friendly tone that had mostly been absent from earlier ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Visualizing Black Telephone Users: Technological Whiteness and Racial
           Exclusion in Bell System Advertising

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      Abstract: In 1965, Ramon S. Scruggs, a public relations executive at American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), sent a scathing memo to his boss about the racial backwardness of American advertising. “No segment in America has done so much to make Negro Americans the ‘invisible men’ as the advertising industry,” he wrote. “Much of the inability of white America to accept the Negro as a citizen or the Negro to see himself as a contributing citizen is due to this exclusion from all areas of information media.”1 As the civil rights movement gained momentum, leading American corporations, almost all of them helmed by white men, struggled to meet the demands of Black citizens for equality and dignity. AT&T, the nation’s de facto ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rays of Death and Visions of Life: Ultrasound Narratives, Risk
           Evaluations, and Prenatal Imaging

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      Abstract: In October 2013, the Medical Faculty of Lund University announced that ninety-year-old gynecologist Bertil Sundén had been awarded the honorary title of professor by the Swedish government. Sundén had been nominated by the Royal Physiographic Society in Lund. Their motivation for nominating him was not that he had been an international pioneer in the use of ultra-sound for diagnostic purposes—although he had—but that he had played a crucial role in establishing diagnostic ultrasound as a “clinical routine method,” at the Women’s Clinic at Lund University Hospital and subsequently throughout Sweden.1Today, ultrasound is indeed a routine procedure. As a result, few people think twice about its safety. In its 1998 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Historiography: Why Should Historians Pay More Attention to Philosophy of
           Technology'

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      Abstract: What is and should be the relationship between the history of technology and the philosophy of technology' Both fields emerged in the second half of the twentieth century, at a time of great faith in technology, viewed primarily as a product of modern science. Both fields defined themselves as distinct from their more mature cousins, the history of science and philosophy of science, and both felt marginalized within their parent disciplines, history and philosophy.For historians of technology, these feelings of marginalization have largely faded. Technology is widely accepted as a field of historical research, deserving a place in standard surveys of American and world history.1 But the philosophy of technology ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Da Vinci Medal Address: Material Political Economy

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      Abstract: This sketch of what I call material political economy hopefully draws out salient features of not just my own recent work but also that of others, especially in the history of technology.1 It explains and discusses automated, ultrafast “high-frequency trading” (HFT) in finance and the automated auctions of digital advertising opportunities that happen billions (possibly even trillions) of times daily.Those are examples from modern technologies, but there is nothing new in studying what I am calling material political economy.2 “Materiality,” as the term is used in this article, encompasses physical phenomena of all kinds, including human beings’ very material bodies, and refers not only to matter’s solid state or ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Microhistories of Technology: Making the World by Mikael Hård
           (review)

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      Abstract: In the preface to his new book, Mikael Hård describes how his approach to the history of technology has evolved over the decades. He started out with a conviction that nineteenth- and twentieth-century history could be captured by terms like industrialization and mechanization. Later, though, he came to argue that those concepts were too abstract to do justice to the complexity of history. He then became interested in the notion of globalization but questioned its macroperspective, which tended to hide particularities from historical view. His new book documents in impressive ways how the history of technology has evolved as a field, and it shows the exciting avenues open to historians of technology today.In his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Diffusion of “Small” Western Technologies in the Middle East:
           Invention, Use and Need in the 19th and 20th Centuries by M. Kupferschmidt
           (review)

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      Abstract: This book deals with the transfer of technological objects from Europe and the United States to Istanbul, Cairo, and other Middle Eastern cities. In size, these objects range from socks and light bulbs to pianos and cars. Kupferschmidt refers to them as “small” in quotation marks—to distinguish them from massive projects such as railways and hydroelectric dams, the construction of which depended, as Daniel Headrick argues in The Tentacles of Progress (1988), on imperial states’ core political and economic interests. But how should we think historically about the transregional and transcultural diffusion of everyday technologies, as well as novelties in cases where, despite Western dominance, imperialism was hardly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Moving Crops and the Scales of History by Francesca Bray et al (review)

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      Abstract: Four renowned historians of technology have delivered a wonderful and inspiring collection of crop histories. The book is important for more than just that. While the heart of Moving Crops is historic, stringing together a wealth of cases from different parts of the world, its central purpose is conceptual and historiographic: to demonstrate that much of the existing global history of crops, materials, and technology more generally is distorted.Indeed, crops are the central topic to present a new approach to material artifacts and commodities that, as the authors put it, are the stuff of rooted global history. The choice for crops is for a purpose. Inspired by the French Annales school historians focusing on ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Technology in Southeast Asian History by Suzanne Moon (review)

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      Abstract: Thanks to several available syntheses (e.g., D. Edgerton, The Shock of the Old, 2006; J. E. McClellan and H. Dorn, Science and Technology in World History, 2015; A. Ede, Technology and Society, 2019; A. Pacey and F. Bray, Technology in World Civilization, 2021), an instructor has a good collection of textbooks to choose from for a history of technology survey course. Suzanne Moon’s book is a welcome addition to these instructional resources and nicely complements existing introductory books on Southeast Asian history (e.g., D. R. SarDesai, Southeast Asia, 2018; P. Church, A Short History of South-East Asia, 2017; B. Andaya and L. Andaya, A History of Early Modern Southeast Asia, 1400–1830, 2015; M. Osborne ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Engineering Trouble: US-Chinese Experiences of Professional Discontent,
           1905–1945 by Thorben Pelzer (review)

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      Abstract: In this detailed and thorough study, Thorben Pelzer recounts the experience of the first American-trained Chinese civil engineers in China from 1905 to 1945. His main argument is that these engineers built their profession and self-image against their inability to live up to their professional values and serve the state, which resulted in structural discontent. Each of the seven chapters—with the exception of the first, which introduces the protagonists with short biographies of five of them, namely Wang Jingchun, Yang Baoling, Tan Zhen, Xue Zhuobin, and Ling Hongxun—illustrates one aspect of this discontent throughout the period studied.The Chinese engineers trained in the United States were politically motivated ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • African Environmental Crisis: A History of Science for Development by Gufu
           Oba (review)

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      Abstract: Historian and environmental scholar Gufu Oba’s African Environmental Crisis is an excellent analysis of the unfolding and longevity of the “African environmental crisis hypothesis” (AEC) during the colonial and postcolonial periods in East Africa, a hypothesis that located the causality of environmental degradation on African peoples and Indigenous forms of land-use systems. Oba draws out the history of this hypothesis to show how it was constructed at various moments under colonial empires in East Africa since the nineteenth century and how it emerged at the intersection of environmental change, colonial development schemes, and scientific knowledge production under empires. The significance of the AEC was how it ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Cyborg Caribbean: Techno-Dominance in Twenty-First-Century Cuban,
           Dominican, and Puerto Rican Science Fiction by Samuel Ginsburg (review)

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      Abstract: Recent years have seen a remarkable surge in speculative fiction from the Caribbean. This is not without precedent, of course. The unfathomable violence of the plantation complex and the brutal estrangements of colonial society have long pushed Caribbean authors toward fabular, allegorical, and irrealist forms of representation, from the “marvellous realism” of Alejo Carpentier or Jacques-Stéphen Alexis, for example, to the genre-defying novels of Wilson Harris or Simone Schwarz-Bart. But since the turn of the century, a rich seam of explicitly science fiction work has appeared by writers as diverse as Karen Lord, Stephanie Saulter, Rita Indiana, Tobias S. Buckell, Curdella Forbes, Cadwell Turnbull, Kacen ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mexican Icarus: Aviation and the Modernization of Mexican Identity,
           1928–1960 by Peter B. Soland (review)

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      Abstract: Peter B. Soland’s Mexican Icarus explores the intersection of culture, technology, and celebrity in modernizing Mexico. The author notes that it is “the first monograph-length, scholarly analysis of aviation development in Mexico” (p. 16). He considers how the aviation industry, and aviators in particular, played a key role in the reconstruction of the Mexican state and society following the 1910 revolution. The strengths of Mexican Icarus lie in Soland’s narratives of the people (mostly men, as he acknowledges) who championed aviation; their biographies serve as framing for a larger national narrative of how elites and average people interpreted the importance of flight. For example, Soland writes about Emilio ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Let There Be Light: How Electricity Made Modern Hong Kong by Mark L.
           Clifford (review)

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      Abstract: The way historians approach the subject of electrification has undergone significant changes over the last several decades. The initial focus on inventors and inventions gave way to the broader considerations of technology transfer and system building, which shaped what came to be known as the modern large networked system. Recently, the field expanded to include considerations of the social and cultural impacts of electrification in the heartlands of technological development in the Western world and relative peripheral cities. Indeed, the most exciting and insightful works on the history of electrification often come from studies on former colonial cities and countries in which engineering ambitions were deeply ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Modernity at the Movies: Cinema-Going in Buenos Aires and Santiago,
           1915–1945 by Camila Gatica Mizala (review)

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      Abstract: Modernity at the Movies sheds light on a largely unexplored facet of film history: the intricacies of exhibition and audience reception. The book addresses key questions: How did early film audiences perceive the advent of this technology' How did they experience going to the cinema in the early days' How did companies build their businesses around the exhibition of movies' How did the government and civil society actors react to the content of the films' Camila Gatica Mizala skillfully reconstructs the social customs surrounding cinema-going and the interaction of early audiences with the burgeoning technology of cinema. She compellingly argues that for the inhabitants of Buenos Aires and Santiago, the act of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hollywood’s Embassies: How Movie Theaters Projected American Power
           Around the Globe by Ross Melnick (review)

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      Abstract: This is a bold work of substantial proportions, setting out as it does to reframe our understanding of Hollywood as an overseas actor and purveyor of U.S. soft power. It does so by focusing like never before on the global network of cinemas owned and run by the major U.S. studios, instead of on the films themselves. In doing so, Melnick brings to light the all-encompassing, full-spectrum package that Hollywood delivered for nine decades to audiences around the world. The author refers early on to his work as “the first political, cultural, and industrial history of Hollywood’s foreign ownership and operation of hundreds of cinemas” (p. 2). The cinemas, with their architectural and ornamental splendor and their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Communications in Turkey and the Ottoman Empire: A Critical History by
           Burçe Çelik (review)

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      Abstract: Burçe Çelik’s book represents a novel and bold contribution to the field of Turkish studies by providing a comprehensive two-century-long history of telecommunications. Instead of focusing on individual networks, she introduces a conceptual framework that unifies singular networks within a temporal continuity. This contribution brings to mind Horwitz’s Communication and Democratic Reform in South Africa (2006), as Çelik adds topics of ownership and the development of material telecommunications infrastructure to the discursive analysis of communication. Her study is also in close resonance with the accounts of other critical Turkish communication scholars like Haluk Geray and Funda Başaran. The strength of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Media Ruins: Cambodian Postwar Media Reconstruction and the Geopolitics of
           Technology by Margaret Jack (review)

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      Abstract: It is still common today for news coverage, film, and much human rights scholarship to depict Cambodia as a broken, corrupt, authoritarian, violent, dysfunctional, and amnesiac cultural and political space. Such tropes risk the reproduction of pathologizing and flattening representations of Cambodia that present a helpless country whose postgenocide present is inescapably defined and trapped by its own violent history. In Media Ruins, Margaret Jack offers an important corrective to these tendencies by developing a historical account of the material relations within and with media infrastructures across Cambodia’s multiple historical transitions and conflicts. Jack does so with an emphasis on contingency, a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In the Land of Marvels: Science, Fabricated Realities, and Industrial
           Espionage in the Age of the Grand Tour by Paola Bertucci (review)

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      Abstract: Paola Bertucci’s book is a well-written and engaging study about a 1749 visit to Italy, the land of “marvels,” by the “intelligent traveler” Jean Antoine Nollet, a French “philosopher . . . [and] a man of true worth” (p. 25). Those visiting Italy in the period often came armed with stereotypes that presumed Italians were more prone than most to believe in the “marvelous” over the “truth,” and Nollet was no different. It was an era of “fabricated realities” with a contemporary craze for electrical cures, and Nollet aimed to undermine those he saw as impostors. It is this debate, over four chapters, an introduction, and a conclusion, that Bertucci seeks to examine.In fact, the manuscript diary of Nollet that lies at ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Collective Wisdom: Collecting in the Early Modern Academy ed. by Anna
           Marie Roos and Vera Keller (review)

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      Abstract: In January 1742, a mummified ibis was presented at a meeting of the Egyptian Society in London, then carefully dissected a few days later. During another session, a mummy was opened by one of the members, Charles Pococke, who made hypotheses regarding the chemical components of the pigments used for coffins as well as the embalmment techniques. This is one of the numerous narratives that are scattered throughout the volume Collective Wisdom, edited by Anna Marie Roos and Vera Keller, the result of three conferences that brought together scholars from different countries and thematic horizons.At the core of most of the eleven contributions, finely put in a wider historiographical perspective by the introduction ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scientific Advice to the Nineteenth-Century British State by Roland
           Jackson (review)

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      Abstract: For anyone interested in the history of scientific advice and government, the past three or four years have delivered an endless stream of gobbets, thanks in large part to the eloquence of the United Kingdom’s political elites. In July 2020, while planning the reopening of the British economy following its first COVID-19 lockdown, the then chancellor of the exchequer, Rishi Sunak, was reported to have identified the real challenge to be “about handling the scientists, not handling the virus.” It later came out that the government’s chief scientific adviser referred to Sunak as “Dr Death, the chancellor.” The recent public inquiry into the U.K. government’s handling of the COVID crisis has revealed a huge lack of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Franklin Ford Collection ed. by Dominique Trudel and Juliette De Maeyer
           (review)

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      Abstract: In this unique assembly of the key writings of American poly-math and philosopher Franklin Ford (1849–1918), Dominique Trudel (Audencia Business School) and Juliette De Maeyer (University of Montreal) have provided scholars with an invaluable resource. Namely, they have curated and placed into critical context, via an open-access publisher, Ford’s most important, surviving work on communication technology, as expressed via journalism, markets, transportation, and government. Furthermore, this work is from a formative moment in the creation of the modern field of sociology—specifically, media sociology—and the broader study of technology itself.Ford was a brilliant, if eccentric and mysterious, figure—with part of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Technology and the Common Good: The Unity and Division of a Democratic
           Society by Allen W. Batteau (review)

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      Abstract: Technology and the Common Good provides an ambitious but sometimes loosely argued synthesis that combines critical perspectives on technology with Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel Prize–winning analyses of the political economy of shared resources. In her 1990 book Governing the Commons and subsequent research, Ostrom examines how, despite the “tragedy of the commons” predicted by rational choice theory, communities have in fact found ways to manage shared goods, whether natural resources, shared spaces, or more metaphorical commons such as knowledge. Batteau aims to build on Ostrom’s work by highlighting the critical role modern technology has played in both creating and governing the physical and metaphorical commons of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nazi Volksgemeinschaft Technology: Gottfried Feder, Fritz Todt, and the
           Plassenburg Spirit by John C. Guse (review)

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      Abstract: In this book, John C. Guse, historian and former director of the American School of Paris, studies the National Socialist (NS) concept of Volksgemeinschaft, NS ideology, and technology. He claims, and justifiably so, that—unlike science, which was underrated by many NS ideologues—technology was of crucial importance in “Nazi” thought and action. The book cover displays a propaganda poster of a German family next to their cherished Volkswagen a company that exists to this day, despite its obvious resonance with the NS concept of Volksgemeinschaft. He claims that technology was of crucial importance not only economically and militarily in order to meet the brutal war agenda; it also crucially underlined the NS ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Cult of Creativity: A Surprisingly Recent History by Samuel W.
           Franklin, and: The Creativity Complex: Art, Tech, and the Seduction of an
           Idea by Shannon Steen (review)

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      Abstract: Creativity is encouraged in everyone, except accountants. Accountancy aside, society seemingly cannot have enough of creativity. According to the World Economic Forum’s The Future of Jobs Report 2023, the second most sought-after skill of employers is “creative thinking” (out sought only by “analytical thinking”). Two recent volumes, Samuel W. Franklin’s The Cult of Creativity and Shannon Steen’s The Creativity Complex, explore the roles and exploitations of creativity in the United States. Both monographs historicize the notion of creativity (in line with recent scholarship such as A. Reckwitz, The Invention of Creativity, 2017; T. Beyes and J. Metelmann (eds.), The Creativity Complex, 2018; W. P. McCray, Making ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Dangerous Art of Text Mining: A Methodology for Digital History by Jo
           Guldi (review)

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      Abstract: In The Dangerous Art of Text Mining, historian Jo Guldi explores the application of text mining in historical research. Text mining, a method for quantitatively analyzing digitized text, is utilized by Guldi to examine British parliamentary records. The approach is portrayed as a dual-edged sword, embodying both art and hazard. Guldi characterizes text mining as an art that demands specialized expertise and flexible methodologies, aligning with historians’ heuristic and hermeneutic techniques. At the same time, she warns of its dangers, such as the potential for algorithms to foster overgeneralizations, amplify biases in data, and yield conclusions that overlook historical complexities and the nuanced ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Family Planning Association and Contraceptive Science and Technology
           in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain by Natasha Szuhan (review)

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      Abstract: Natasha Szuhan’s objective in this history of the Family Planning Association (FPA), a leading organization in the British contraceptive arena, established in 1931 and absorbed into the NHS during the 1970s, is to highlight the FPA’s role in demystifying and legitimizing contraception and sex as medical and social phenomena (p. 1). Drawing on the archives of the FPA held in the Wellcome Collection and dialoguing with the recent expansive wave of scholarship on contraceptive technologies, markets, and expertise in Britain during the central decades of the twentieth century (including Claire Jones, The Business of Birth Control, 2020; Jessica Borge, Protective Practices, 2020; and Caroline Rusterholz, Women’s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Radiophilia by Carolyn Birdsall (review)

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      Abstract: Just in time to mark radio’s first century in many countries, Carolyn Birdsall’s Radiophilia is a particularly welcome and original addition to the scholarship of both radio studies and broadcasting history. This ambitious book introduces a new concept, “radiophilia,” understood as the attachment to or love for radio, and goes on to successfully unravel its various constitutive elements from the early days of the wireless to today, in multiple geographical contexts.To undertake this task, the book often balances between overarching questions and concrete examples and is split into four chapters, simply named “Loving,” “Knowing,” “Saving,” and “Sharing.” This rather unusual approach of one-word progressive verbs as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Learning with Light and Shadows: Educational Lantern and Film Projection,
           1860–1990 ed. by Nelleke Teughels and Kaat Wils (review)

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      Abstract: The second of three books spawned by the nationally funded B-Magic collaborations between six universities in Belgium, arriving just after Sabine Lenk and Natalija Majsova’s Faith in a Beam of Light (2022; reviewed in the July 2023 issue of this journal) and before Kurt Vanhoutte and Leen Engelen’s The Magic Lantern in Leisure, Entertainment and Popular Culture (forthcoming), this volume with its two companions also announces the new Media Performance Histories series, as part of the Techne collection at Brepols Publishers. Concentrating on the classroom use of projected images in Belgium, this anthology follows its funded mandate with brief excursions to Switzerland, Britain, and Austria, which are academically ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Planetarien: Wunder der Technik—Techniken des Wunderns [Planetariums:
           Miracles of technology—techniques of wonder] by Helen Ahner (review)

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      Abstract: The first optomechanical planetarium was opened in 1925 as part of the Department of Astronomy in the new building of the Deutsches Museum in Munich. The projection method for a dome-shaped screen had been developed in the previous years by the Carl Zeiss company in Jena together with Dyckerhoff & Widmann AG, which specialized in shell constructions made of reinforced concrete. Today, the classic projectors in planetariums around the world have been mostly replaced by digital fulldome systems. Since then, there has been a renewed historical interest in this approximately hundred-year-old technical invention; examples include research by Charlotte Bigg and Katherine Boyce-Jacino. In these works, it is above all the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Meilensteine der Rechentechnik: Band 1: Analog- und Digitalrechner,
           Automaten und Roboter, wissenschaftliche Instrumente,
           Schrittfür-Schritt-Anleitungen [Milestones in computing technology:
           Volume 1: Analog and digital computers, automata and robots, scientific
           instruments, step-by-step instructions], and: Meilensteine der
           Rechentechnik: Band 2: Erfindung des Computers, Rechnerbau in Europa,
           weltweite Entwicklungen, zweisprachiges Fachwörterbuch, Bibliografie
           [Milestones in computing technology: Volume 2: Invention of the computer,
           computer construction in Europe, worldwide developments, bilingual
           technical dictionary, bibliography] by Herbert Bruderer (review)

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      Abstract: When reviewing a publication, a lot depends on expectations, and this is particularly true in this case. Anyone who is, as the reviewer was, deceived by first impressions and expects a comprehensive two-volume encyclopedia, compiled according to objective criteria, could be disappointed. However, anyone expecting the collected findings of Herbert Bruderer, a recognized expert in historical calculation techniques, will be rewarded with an incredibly rich and detailed work. In two bulky volumes with a total of over 2,000 pages, the author covers a wide range of historical tools for calculating.The first volume focuses on mechanical devices and their functioning, context of creation, and preservation in museums and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How Computers Entered the Classroom, 1960–2000: Historical Perspectives
           ed. by Carmen Flury and Michael Geiss (review)

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      Abstract: Exactly how did computers enter classrooms across the world in the 1960s through the 1990s' Were the practices and processes of this innovation similar from school to school or country to country' How Computers Entered the Classroom, 1960–2000 is a welcome addition to the historiography of educational media and technology. Across the introduction and nine cases/chapters is a consistent, focused engagement with the historical problem of computational innovation in schools and classrooms. Despite the cultural and linguistic differences from case to case—France, Hungary, Latvia, Sweden, West Germany, Switzerland, UNESCO, the European Community (EC), and the OECD—the book achieves a remarkable consistency.In the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Philosopher of Palo Alto: Mark Weiser, Xerox PARC, and the Original
           Internet of Things by John Tinnell (review)

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      Abstract: Historical research has provided an important understanding of how and in which social and cultural contexts today’s digital media and their infrastructures have emerged. Two definitive contributions are Fred Turner’s From Counterculture to Cyber-culture (2006), which centers on the Whole Earth Network, and Patrick McCray’s The Visioneers (2013), which explores space colonies and nanotechnologies in close relation to the developmental contexts of the digital era. Both studies incorporate personal approaches along with a broader social and cultural contextualization. The Philosopher of Palo Alto by John Tinnell follows a similar approach, concentrating on Mark Weiser (1952–99), a computer scientist and chief ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Eye of the Master: A Social History of Artificial Intelligence by
           Matteo Pasquinelli (review)

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      Abstract: What does automation automate' What is “intelligence” in artificial intelligence (AI)' Or, better, whose “intelligence” is it' These are some key questions animating The Eye of the Master. As Pasquinelli more elegantly puts it, the book investigates “the relationship between labour, rules, and automation” (p. 3), from nineteenth-century industrial automation until the emergence of adaptive artificial neural networks in the late 1950s.The book centers on what Pasquinelli calls “labour theory of automation,” then “labour theory of machine intelligence.” He argues that machine intelligence is not modeled after human intelligence, but after collective labor processes. The first part, “The Industrial Age,” traces the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Science, Technology, and Irish Modernism ed. by Kathryn Conrad, Cóilín
           Parsons and Julie McCormick Weng (review)

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      Abstract: The common misunderstanding regarding the depth of interest that Irish writers had in science and technology has arisen due to the dominant influence of certain iconic figures, such as W. B. Yeats. Yeats’s powerful and evocative imagery depicting scenes of the “sally gardens” and old Irish heroes has overshadowed the broader and more nuanced engagement of Irish writers with scientific and technological themes during the Literary and Cultural Revivals. The focus on traditional and cultural elements in works like Yeats’s has led to an underestimation of the multifaceted exploration of science and technology within the broader landscape of Irish modernist literature. In Science, Technology, and Irish Modernism ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Im Medienlabor der US-amerikanischen Industrieforschung: Die gemeinsamen
           Wurzeln von Massenmedien und Bürokratie 1870–1950 [In the media
           laboratory of US-American industrial research: The common roots of mass
           media and bureaucracy 1870–1950] by Nadine Taha (review)

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      Abstract: In Im Medienlabor der US-amerikanischen Industrieforschung, based on her dissertation, Nadine Taha approaches American industrial research labs from a media studies perspective. In six case studies, partly based on the archives of DuPont, General Electric, and Kodak, the author aims to identify the common roots of mass and telecommunication media and the media of modern bureaucracies. The first technologies that spring to mind are the telegraph, the telephone, and the typewriter. Although all these technologies receive a mention, the six case studies refer to much less apparent technologies, including the paper-based roll film that simplified photography (ch. 2), a photographic sound recording and playback device ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Media and the Mind: Art, Science, and Notebooks as Paper Machines,
           1700–1830 by Matthew Daniel Eddy (review)

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      Abstract: In Media and the Mind, Matthew Daniel Eddy provides an insightful and thorough exploration of student notebooks from Enlightenment Scotland, arguing that these notebooks operated as “paper machines” that facilitated cognitive processing and knowledge management. The study is based on extensive archival material collected from university, school, library, and family archives across Scotland. Eddy structures his argument around John Locke’s metaphor of the tabula rasa, the mind as a blank page, through which Eddy expands on this misinterpreted conceptualization of Enlightenment learning. Drawing on theories from disciplines as varied as anthropology, material culture, and cognitive science, he convincingly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Carbon Technocracy: Energy Regimes in Modern East Asia by Victor Seow
           (review)

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      Abstract: Carbon Technocracy seeks to recast the story of the shift to coal as the primary source of power in East Asia as concomitant and constructive of a techno-political system grounded in the idealization of extensive fossil fuel extraction. The strength of the book lies in the fact that all of the chapters are well researched, well argued, and informative, while speaking to several distinct fields with equal rigor for each.It is hard to overestimate just how large the coal from the Fushun mine loomed in Japan’s colonial energy regime; the extractive complex alone provided an estimated sixth of all of Japan’s coal, metropole and home islands together. In 1915, a decade into the mine’s full-scale development, the mine ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rendered Obsolete: Energy Culture and the Afterlife of US Whaling by Jamie
           L. Jones (review)

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      Abstract: It might be because my family has been watching The Crown, but as soon as I read that George H. Newton and Fred J. Engel-hardt orchestrated the tour of a dead whale around the U.S. Midwest in the early 1880s—and that it became known as the “Prince of Whales”—Jamie L. Jones had sold me on Rendered Obsolete. While this whale is the subject of just one chapter, the Prince of Whales operates as a compelling example of the way Jones thinks about the relationship between whaling and what she calls “fossil modernity” (p. xi).Rendered Obsolete is an interdisciplinary environmental humanities project that engages energy studies, infrastructure studies, media studies, and oceanic studies to model what Jones calls “energy ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Atomic Environments: Nuclear Technologies, the Natural World, and
           Policymaking, 1945–1960 by Neil S. Oatsvall (review)

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      Abstract: The world was irrevocably changed on July 16, 1945, when the Manhattan Project detonated the world’s first atomic bomb (Trinity) in the desert of central New Mexico. Three weeks later Hiroshima lay in ruins, strikingly demonstrating the devastating power that scientists had managed to wrest from the atom.In the eighty years since Trinity, historians have produced a vast literature documenting how efforts to confront a future of apocalyptic nuclear weaponry utterly transformed society and politics. One major consequence of the nuclear apocalyptic imaginary, as Donald Worster noted, was the rise of environmental consciousness: “The Age of Ecology began on the desert outside of Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • British Nuclear Weapons and the Test Ban: Squaring the Circle of Defence
           and Arms Control, 1974–82 by John Walker (review)

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      Abstract: John Walker’s latest book marks an important study of the complex relationship between nuclear weapons technology, arms control, and questions of nuclear (non)proliferation. It examines British intentions, motivations, aims, and objectives in the negotiations between the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States over a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) from 1974 to 1982. While Lorna Arnold, Richard Moore, Toshihiro Higuchi, and Walker himself in his earlier work have largely focused on the test ban debate of the 1950s leading up to the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, British Nuclear Weapons and the Test Ban sheds light on a thus far neglected aspect of nuclear arms control, or what Walker ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Alternative Modernity of the Bicycle in British and French Literature,
           1880–1920 by Una Brogan (review)

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      Abstract: Over the past three decades, the growing popularity of the bicycle in the Western world has stimulated a flow of historical studies about its technological development and social-cultural significance. Una Brogan’s book is about literary representations of cycling in novels and short stories by some twenty British and French authors in the decades around 1900, when the bicycle changed from an elitist gadget into a means of mass transportation. With the exception of several articles and a volume on the bicycle’s role in film and literature (Raab, “Wheels of Fire,” 2012; Gates, “Vélivre,” 2011; Withers and Shea, eds., Culture on Two Wheels, 2016), Brogan’s study largely covers uncharted terrain.The basic concern of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Dallas Story: The North American Aviation Plant and Industrial
           Mobilization during World War II by Terrance Furgerson (review)

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      Abstract: Today, Dallas is a major hub within the global aerospace network. But until 1940, aircraft design and production in the United States was concentrated on the two coasts. In this book, Terrance Furgerson shows how and why Dallas got its start in the aviation industry on the eve of World War II and how the showcase North American Aviation (NAA) plant, in turn, brought industrial-scale manufacturing into the heart of North Texas. Texas had long been a key region in the nation’s military activities, going back to the state’s incorporation into the United States in 1845. Early innovations in land- and sea-based aviation had been going on at military bases in San Antonio, Corpus Christi, and elsewhere across the state ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dark Star: A New History of the Space Shuttle by Matthew H. Hersch
           (review)

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      Abstract: Dark Star (a title taken from an obscure science fiction movie) is not a comprehensive technical history of NASA’s space shuttle program, nor does it contain much new information. (For that, see the work of Dennis Jenkins.) Rather, it is a scathing critique of what Hersch sees as a project doomed from the start by space agency leaders’ fixation on a winged, reusable rocket plane as the means to drastically reduce the cost of space launch. Conceived as part of the infrastructure of an ambitious post-Apollo space program, it became instead NASA’s last chance to sustain human spaceflight as its budget began falling even before the first lunar landings. In order to save the shuttle, the agency made major design ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Architecture’s Model Environments by Lisa Moffitt (review)

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      Abstract: In contemporary architectural practice, common methods for representing and analyzing airflow include computer-generated simulations and static two-dimensional diagrams. These techniques have limitations, particularly for architects engaged in the early stages of the design process. As architect Lisa Moffitt writes in Architecture’s Model Environments, previously understudied physical models from the mid-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries in Europe and North America may suggest alternative approaches to visualizing and designing with airflow in the present. These approaches are especially resonant at a time of changing climates, evolving relationships to airborne disease, and persisting environmental ... Read More
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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  Subjects -> MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES (Total: 56 journals)
Showing 1 - 7 of 7 Journals sorted by number of followers
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Archives and Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of the Society of Archivists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Archivaria     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Archival Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Museum Management and Curatorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Museum History Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
RBM : A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Museum Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Heritage, Memory and Conflict Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Museum International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tuhinga     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Curator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the History of Collections     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Metropolitan Museum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Fine Arts Campus     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Museums & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Collections : A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Museum Worlds : Advances in Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ICOFOM Study Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norsk museumstidsskrift     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nordisk Museologi : The Journal Nordic Museology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Museology and Monumental Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Uncommon Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technè     Open Access  
Boletín Científico : Centro de Museos. Museo de Historia Natural     Open Access  
Revista del Museo de La Plata     Open Access  
MIDAS     Open Access  
Revista de Museología : Kóot     Open Access  
La Lettre de l’OCIM     Open Access  
Travaux du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle “Grigore Antipa” (The Journal of “Grigore Antipa” National Museum of Natural History)     Open Access  
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