Subjects -> MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES (Total: 56 journals)
Showing 1 - 7 of 7 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acervo : Revista do Arquivo Nacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archivaria     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Archives and Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 97)
Boletín Científico : Centro de Museos. Museo de Historia Natural     Open Access  
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Museology and Monumental Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Collections : A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Curator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Heritage, Memory and Conflict Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ICOFOM Study Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Archival Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Conservation and Museum Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Curatorial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Fine Arts Campus     Open Access  
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Museum Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of the History of Collections     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of the Society of Archivists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
La Lettre de l’OCIM     Open Access  
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Metropolitan Museum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
MIDAS     Open Access  
Museum and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Museum Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Museum Anthropology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Museum History Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Museum International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Museum Management and Curatorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Museum Worlds : Advances in Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Museums & Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Museums Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Nordisk Museologi : The Journal Nordic Museology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norsk museumstidsskrift     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBM : A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Revista de Museología : Kóot     Open Access  
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Museo de La Plata     Open Access  
Technè     Open Access  
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Travaux du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle “Grigore Antipa” (The Journal of “Grigore Antipa” National Museum of Natural History)     Open Access  
Tuhinga     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Uncommon Culture     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Technology and Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.284
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0040-165X - ISSN (Online) 1097-3729
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • The Global Industrial Now

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      Abstract: Despite much talk of a postindustrial world, we are still living in industrial times. The COVID-19 pandemic presents powerful reminders of how dependent our lives and well-being are on industrial production and global supply chains. The majority of consumer products, manufacturing components, and industrial materials used in Europe and the United States are produced on other continents. Many European and North American communities no longer bear visible signs of industrial activity; one can aspire to eat local produce and celebrate local craft culture but cannot opt to consume locally sourced electronics or pharmaceutical products. In Berlin, Amsterdam, New York, Paris, and Baltimore, we take deindustrialization as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Energy Workarounds: Designing Coals for the Japanese Steel Industry,
           1895–1911

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      Abstract: In the second half of the nineteenth century, Japan underwent a tectonic political and social shift. It started as a relatively isolated agrarian economy in the twilight of the Tokugawa period (1600–1868) and became Asia's first industrial power over the course of the Meiji period (1868–1912). The news of Qing China's defeat in the first Opium War (1839–42) had caused shock waves in Tokugawa Japan, and it became clear that the country would need to harness the might of steam engines and gunboats if it wanted to maintain sovereignty and territorial integrity. Beginning in the 1840s, both the central government and domain lords embarked on military reforms that went hand in hand with acquiring military equipment ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Tale of Two Mills: Socio-Technological Integration in Meiji Japan,
           1868–1912

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      Abstract: As the first Asian nation to industrialize, Japan's nineteenth century industrial development and experiences with technology transfer have attracted the attention of many historians seeking to explain Japan's successes and failures as examples for developing countries.1 Scholars have long been disentangling the "myths" of Japanese economic development to forge a greater understanding of its nuances.2 The perspective on socio-technological integration and systems building demonstrates that notions of success and failure are of limited interest without nuanced thinking about why some technologies flourish in new cultural settings and others do not, under what circumstances technologies are appropriated, and for what ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Widespread Enthusiasm: Grassroots Participation and Regional Variation in
           Early Japanese Patenting, 1885–99

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      Abstract: After Japan established a patent system in 1885, "patented" (senbaitokkyo 専売特許) soon became a popular advertising catchphrase. Anyone who bought a well-known newspaper on March 23, 1886, would spot an advertisement with an impressive illustration of a man, seemingly a likeness of the "inventor" holding his invention, a useful "patented" cooking gadget to prevent food from burning and sticking to utensils.1 Under the "inventor" was a picture of another patented product, a unique kettle with an integrated trivet, along with phrases describing it as an "economical kettle" and "patented for ten years."2 At the bottom of the advertisement was a small picture of a bat with the phrase "registered trademark." The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • When Energy Efficiency Begets Air Pollution: Fuel Conservation in Japan's
           Steel Industry, 1945–60

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      Abstract: Japan's economic collapse in the immediate aftermath of World War II brought a new wave of anxiety regarding its arguably limited natural resources.1 Resource worry was not new to Japan. Scholars, bureaucrats, engineers, and military officers during the Meiji era (1868–1912) were already alarmed by perceived resource scarcity. Unlike Britain's industrial revolution, Japan lacked domestic coal reserves to build its heavy and chemical industries by shifting from wood to coal.2 How a nation could build an industrial base in the face of an energy handicap of that nature continued to be a source of worry in the interwar period and only intensified after Japan's defeat in World War II.Incendiary raids in the final months ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lost Rivers: Tokyo's Sewage Problem in the High-Growth Period,
           1953–73

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      Abstract: Early modern Edo, the seat of the Shogunate and the political capital of early modern Japan, was a city of water. Rivers and canals crisscrossed the metropole, connecting its various commercial centers. As early modern Edo became modern-day Tokyo and grew into an industrial center, its rivers and riparian landscape virtually disappeared. In 1909, Tokyo's rivers totaled only 2,108 km in length, a mere shadow of Edo's former rich hydraulic landscape from 1844 to 1848 (figure 1).After the Meiji period (1868–1912), the destruction of waterways continued at such a steady pace that at present only 905 km remain; 57 percent of Tokyo's rivers have been filled in or converted into concrete-lined and/or covered conduits.1 In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Glamorized Exploitation: Visual Images of Meiji-Period "Factory Girls"
           (jokō)

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      Abstract: [View Cover Image]Between late May and early July 2021, Empress Masako of Japan made several visits to the Momijiyama Imperial Cocoonery at the Imperial Palace in the center of Tokyo, to perform rituals associated with sericulture. These rituals, created by Empress Shoken in the Meiji period (1868–1912), include feeding mulberry leaves to 30,000 silkworms, harvesting the cocoons, cutting them to help the silk moths emerge, and separating the female moths so that they can lay eggs on special cards. This ritual culminates in a ceremony (goyōsan osame no gi) marking the end of the annual sericulture season.Sericulture long predates the Meiji period. Before it became a burgeoning cottage industry in the late Edo ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How Curators and Archivists Responded to the Pandemic

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      Abstract: In our previous Public History sections, historians have critically reviewed several genres of the public history of technology. In this section, we invited public history practitioners to report firsthand on their experiences with online experiments in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The cases highlight institutions' self-reflection about their mission, their resilience in the face of adversity, and their creativity in broadening their online audience.We asked museum and archival professionals in France, India, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg to reflect on different institutional responses to COVID-19. What lessons have they learned in the pandemic environment that will continue to influence how they ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Creating an Online Community: Corona in the City

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      Abstract: Please tell us briefly about your background.I trained as a historian. I have been a curator at Amsterdam Museum since 1995 and involved in the many changes at the museum, including technology: switching from analog to digital to achieve the museum's first online presence, then website stories. Amsterdam Museum was the first Dutch museum to produce a storytelling platform in 2003. That leading platform on one of the city's neighborhoods still exists—The Memory of East [Amsterdam] (Het Geheugen van Oost)—and now forms part of The Memory of Amsterdam (Het Geheugen van Amsterdam), an online platform.1I studied philosophy and am now a lecturer, editor, and researcher, focusing on cultural internationalization and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reaching Out: How the Pandemic Impacted Knowledge Production and
           Dissemination in India

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      Abstract: Explicating the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on the world, in March 2020 Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari predicted in his widely circulated Financial Times column, "Many short-term emergency measures will become a fixture of life. That is the nature of emergencies. They fast-forward historical processes." He added, "Decisions that in normal times could take years of deliberation are passed in a matter of hours. Immature and even dangerous technologies are pressed into service, because the risks of doing nothing are bigger. Entire countries serve as guinea-pigs in large-scale social experiments."1 How far is this true for people working in archives, libraries, and museums as places of knowledge ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Beyond the Museum Walls: The Pandemic and the Prototypes Exhibit at the
           Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers

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      Abstract: In 2003, the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research commissioned the National School of Arts and Professions (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, CNAM) to develop a national network safeguarding the scientific and technical heritage of public and private research: PATrimoine Scientifique et TEchnique Contemporain (PATSTEC).1 The network established regional task forces to identify, safeguard, collect, catalog, and digitize scientific instruments, know-how, and testimonies from the past seventy years, as few heritage professionals, historians,Fig 1Poster advertising the Protoypes exhibition. (Copyright Musée des Arts et Métiers-CNAM.)and sociologists have studied this period.2 French public ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Collecting Middle-Class Memories' The Pandemic, Technology, and
           Crowdsourced Archives

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      Abstract: Future historians writing about the COVID-19 era will have to deal with an unprecedented amount of source material. It is safe to say that the current pandemic will be documented unlike any other before. Among the many initiatives to preserve material about COVID-19, crowdsourced online archives stand out because their content is published immediately.1 This paper draws on submissions to our Luxembourg platform covidmemory.lu and similar platforms in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland to discuss three interlinked fields of interest to historians of technology. First, we describe how contributors experienced the absence of various mundane technologies during the first lockdown. The second part explores how ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Soul of Technology

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      Abstract: On an occasion like this it is useful to look back to origins. I've had an abiding interest in what I dub the "first generation" of historians of technology, inventors of our field in its modern form. A great generation by any measure, several of their names appear on the list of SHOT Leonardo da Vinci medalists. I admire and have written about a number of them, but three giants, who respected one another's work and shared common goals, stand out: Swiss art and architecture historian Sigfried Giedion (1888–1968), Harvard economic historian Abbott Payson Usher (1883–1965), and historian and culture critic Lewis Mumford (1895–1990). My interest was not only a matter of historiographic curiosity. Their books were ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Society for the History of Technology Awards and Fellowships 2021

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      Abstract: The highest recognition from the Society for the History of Technology is the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, presented to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the history of technology, through research, teaching, publication, and other activities. Andras Beck (formerly of the Hungarian Academy of Arts) designed the medal, which shows Leonardo's head modeled after the artist's self-portrait. The reverse design is (in the words of the sculptor) "the basic sources of energy: water, wind, and fire." A certificate accompanies the medal.Suzanne Moon, University of OklahomaSuzanne Moon richly deserves the 2021 Leonardo da Vinci Medal.For ten years, she did pioneering work as editor-in-chief of Technology ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Economics and Engineering: Institutions, Practices, and Cultures ed. by
           Pedro Garcia Duarte and Yann Giraud (review)

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      Abstract: As economists' role in managing society has grown, Nobel Prize winners and science studies scholars alike have noted that economics resembles engineering. The association is sometimes pejorative; economists, like engineers, claim objectivity but serve corporate interests. At other times it is triumphant; economists, like engineers, craft intricate and beautiful systems. But it is most often a recognition of pragmatism; economists, like engineers, intervene in complex ever-changing environments. In this essential collection, Pedro Garcia Duarte and Yann Giraud assemble an international team that moves beyond metaphor to historicize the economics-engineering nexus.The volume is the result of a conference at Duke ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Acque di Terraferma: il Padovano [Inland Waters: The Padua Province] ed.
           by Pedro Garcia Duarte and Yann Giraud (review)

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      Abstract: Public and scholarly debates on environmental management generally stem from extreme climate events. Indeed, this volume is the result of a collaborative project between a local authority, the Veneto Region, and academia, the University of Verona, in the aftermath of a flood. The event triggering the contributions collected in Acque di Terraferma is the so-called "Ognissanti flood." Starting on October 31, 2010, the north-eastern provinces of Italy were hit by a combination of intense precipitations and sirocco winds that melted fresh snow and overwhelmed the complex hydrological network. By November, several rivers had inundated an area of 140 square kilometers, affecting 130 municipalities; thousands of people ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Gone to Ground: A History of Environment and Infrastructure in Dar es
           Salaam by Emily Brownell (review)

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      Abstract: Emily Brownell's Gone to Ground is a brilliant, landmark study of Dar es Salaam in the 1970s and 80s. This often-overlooked period of Tanzania's history is usually narrated as mere prelude to neoliberal reform. Reeling from a series of economic shocks, the socialist government doubled-down on the ideal of centralized, state-led development. It commissioned a new, planned capital in the center of the country, Dodoma, which ended up looking a lot like an American suburb. Meanwhile, the rapidly growing, coastal metropolis of Dar es Salaam was vilified as a den of commercial decadence, and the state mounted aggressive campaigns to sweep its teeming "unemployed" back out to the countryside.Brownell's contribution is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Contamination of the Earth. A History of Pollutions in the Industrial
           Age by François Jarrige and Thomas le Roux (review)

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      Abstract: Never has reading a historical study made me feel so sad. This book depicts the extensive pollution of the earth during the industrial revolution, showing that it was the result of conscious policy by entrepreneurs, politicians, and administrators. They knowingly continued or made polluting activities legal. Legislation to protect the environment, nature, and human health failed, as did opponents' attempts to turn the tide. The pessimistic perspective at the end of this book only confirms the bleakness.The study is structured around three eras: An Ancien Régime of Pollution 1700–1830, Naturalizing Pollutions in the Age of Progress 1830–1914, and The Toxic Age 1914–1973. For each period, the authors detail the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Atomgeschäfte. Die Nuklearexportpolitik der Bundesrepublik Deutschland
           1970–1979 [Nuclear deals: The nuclear export policy of the Federal
           Republic of Germany 1970–1979] by Daniel Romberg (review)

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      Abstract: Daniel Romberg's dissertation examines the developments and problems with the high phase of West German nuclear exports in the 1970s. This phase ended with the accident at the U.S. nuclear power plant near Harrisburg in 1979, because the dangers of nuclear power suddenly became clear to a broad public. Nuclear technology exports, which in the Federal Republic of Germany were subject to restrictions in accordance with the Foreign Trade Act, meant two things: (1) the export of nuclear technology, such as nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants, uranium enrichment plants, and plants for the production of fuel struts; and (2) the associated know-how and bilateral agreements on nuclear co-operation, thus the peaceful ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Wretched Atom: America's Global Gamble with Peaceful Nuclear
           Technology by Jacob Darwin Hamblin (review)

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      Abstract: Jacob Hamblin explores the checkered histories of peaceful nuclear technologies in his latest book, The Wretched Atom. He brings attention to the often-dubious efforts by the United States, its allies, competitors, and even international agencies like the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to promote peaceful uses of atomic energy. Hamblin presents his narrative within the context of the Cold War collapse of colonialism, the rise of neocolonialism, and challenges to Western racism. He frames his argument along the lines of a decades-spanning confrontation between Western nations who possess nuclear technologies and non-Western states who own desirable natural resources, while coveting the atom.Hamblin ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Let There Be Light: Engineering, Entrepreneurship and Electricity in
           Colonial Bengal, 1880–1945 by Suvobrata Sarkar (review)

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      Abstract: Within the burgeoning historiography of electricity in the non-West, Sarkar's book stands out as one of the few written by authors educated and working at a non-Western university (Burdwan University, West Bengal). Besides the global audience, the book explicitly addresses local readership with the goal of creating a historical consciousness "for the rejuvenation of the techno-scientific base of India [which] is widely recognized today" (p. 2). Using the case of electricity, Sarkar seeks to understand the "techno-scientific advancement" of a society as reflected in the capacity to educate its youth in institutions to become engineers and entrepreneurs.The book's structure reflects this goal. Sarkar takes us ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cesarean Section: An American History of Risk, Technology, and Consequence
           by Jacqueline H. Wolf (review)

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      Abstract: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the number of women who give birth through cesarean section has grown rapidly, making up 1 in 5, or 21% of all births globally. Moreover, this number is predicted to increase, potentially rising to 29% by 2030 (Keenan, WHO website, June 2021). Cesarean section rates notably vary across countries and regions. In the United States for instance, cesarean births have risen even faster, from 23% in 2000, to 31.7% in 2019 (Martin, National Vital Statistics, 2019).Dr. Jacqueline H. Wolf skillfully examines this historical shift in her new book Cesarean Section that builds upon other work Wolf has authored, including Don't Kill Your Baby (Ohio State University Press, 2001) ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ciencia en transición. El lastre franquista ante el reto de la
           modernización [Science in transition. The Francoist burden and
           modernization's challenge] ed. by Lorenzo Delgado and Santiago M. López
           (review)

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      Abstract: The title of this edited volume plays with the general meaning of "transition" and the more specific meaning in a Spanish context: the mid-1970s political shift from the Francoist dictatorial regime to the current democratic system. This is thus a welcome incursion in the relatively understudied development of Spain's scientific research system within that political and economic transformation.The book's subtitle contains a strong thesis: the Francoist period (1939–75) constituted a "burden" that prevented Spain from properly facing "modernization's challenge." Modernization occurred. By most indicators, in the 1960s, the Spanish economy experienced one of history's most rapid developments. Yet, as the editors' ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Del noventayochismo al desarrollismo. Técnica e ingeniería en España
           VIII [From 1898 to Franco's developmentalism: Technology and engineering
           in Spain VIII] ed. by Manuel Silva Suárez (review)

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      Abstract: The eighth volume in the collection Técnica e Ingeniería en España [Technology and engineering in Spain] covers the first sixty years of the twentieth century in seven chapters written by thirteen authors. Manuel Silva, editor of this collection that encompasses the key aspects of Spanish engineering, has also written the introduction to the volume. He offers an overview of the country's engineering landscape while questioning whether Spanish science and technology participated in the wider Modernization project—the ensemble of socio-cultural changes that took place in the seventeenth century Scientific Revolution, and continued throughout the Enlightenment into the twentieth century. Following this investigation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Versagtes Vertrauen: Wissenschaftler der DDR im Visier der
           Staatssicherheit [Betrayed trust: GDR scientists as targets of state
           security] by Reinhard Buthmann (review)

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      Abstract: When this 1,000-page, 4.6 pound, small print volume arrived in the mail, I was ready to send it back to the review desk. However, given Buthmann's topic—East German scientists as targets of the East German Ministry for State Security—I took a gander at the table of contents and introduction, only to find it was originally twice as long. The book is not intended as an encyclopedia volume or reference work, nor an edited collection or dissertation, yet it has elements of all these genres. Consequently, most readers will likely only dip into the book, rather than read it cover to cover.The volume is divided into four lengthy and substantive chapters, not including the preface, introduction, and conclusion. Each ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Communist Pigs: An Animal History of East Germany's Rise and Fall by
           Thomas Fleischman (review)

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      Abstract: In recent years, scholars of science and technology have noted the emergence of what have been variously conceptualized since the 1970s as "bioeconomics," "biocapital," or "biovalue." Such concepts are generally understood as describing the intensified union between the life sciences and profit-driven enterprises. Academics deploy these concepts as heuristic devices to make sense of a significant shift in modern capitalism whereby increasingly small biological materials such as cells, molecules, genomes, and genes, are being exploited for commercial use. Much of the literature analyzing the biopolitical economy also considers how non-human creatures have been drawn into this capitalization of life. Even though the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sovereign Skies: The Origins of American Civil Aviation Policy by Sean
           Seyer (review)

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      Abstract: While the history of regulation encompasses a wide historiography, that of the regulation of civil aviation, particularly in the United States, is not so varied. Most of the works are legalistic interpretations that fail to address the reasoning behind the decisions or the consequences. The few scholarly accounts concentrate on the years of the Federal Aviation Administration and focus less on the roots of civil aviation regulation in the early twentieth century. For most historians, the story starts where Seyer leaves off—the creation of the 1926 Air Commerce Act. As such, Seyer provides an invaluable addition to the literature of American civil aviation, complementing the work of others such as Nick Komons.Sean ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reluctant Power: Networks, Corporations, and the Struggle for Global
           Governance in the Early 20th Century by Rita Zajácz (review)

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      Abstract: Can history teach us something relevant for current policies' Rita Zajácz makes a good effort in her study of American policies relating to the communication technologies introduced between 1900 and 1935. The specific problem with wireless radiotelegraphy and radiotelephony was the global and public character of the communication network that carried their signals.With a combination of literature analysis and detailed empirical research on historical sources, Zajácz examines the policies developed by U.S. authorities. She creates an analytical framework for understanding the struggle for network control that applies not only to America's attempts to establish a global telecom network in the early twentieth ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Electrical Palestine: Capital and Technology from Empire to Nation by
           Fredrik Meiton (review)

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      Abstract: Whereas Thomas Hughes's seminal Networks of Power (1983) sets the tone for studying electricity in Western societies, Electrical Palestine offers new insight into this infrastructure in a non-Western and colonial context. Fredrik Meiton excellently demonstrates that the physical materials for electrification both embodied and enacted modern political power. Meiton thus pushes STS scholarship to rethink the critical role of infrastructure in ethnic conflict and nation-building.Although electricity networks were not the only infrastructure under-girding Israel, Electrical Palestine eloquently convinces readers that electricity was the foundational technology in two major ways. Meiton persuasively argues that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Le Canon au Moyen Age et à La Renaissance, 1338–1559 [The cannon from
           the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, 1338–1559] by Emmanuel de
           Crouy-Chanel (review)

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      Abstract: This book by Emmanuel de Crouy-Chanel, a law professor at the University of Amiens, is based on his history thesis, which he defended at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) in 2014. His study aims to trace the evolution of gunpowder artillery, from the first medieval cannons in the 1330s, to modern artillery's age of maturity in the 1550s.The book is mainly an analysis of cannon terminology, thus constitutes a reference work (the absence of an index is therefore regrettable). The author identifies and characterizes chronologically the cannons cited in the primary sources. Each chapter relates the technology of firing to the cannon design, the projectile materials, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cork Wars: Intrigue and Industry in World War II by David A. Taylor
           (review)

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      Abstract: David Taylor's absorbing account of how a seemingly innocuous substance like cork became a critical strategic material during World War II hopefully represents a trend in historical scholarship. Cork Wars is a work of "narrative nonfiction," Taylor writes in an author's note, "combining the fact-finding of journalism with literary techniques to create a dramatic story that is also true." Focusing on individuals whose lives revolved around the cork industry, Taylor places ordinary people at the center of extraordinary events, while still producing significant scholarly work in the fields of science and technology, economic history, national security studies, immigration, and environmental history. History is filled ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Soviet Union's Agricultural Biowarfare Programme: Ploughshares to
           Swords by Anthony Rimmington (review)

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      Abstract: The Soviet Union's secret agricultural biowarfare program has largely existed in a black box. Historians have known of its existence, and of its products, but how the program operated has remained elusive. This is mostly due to a lack of credible sources coupled with an aggressive Russian disinformation campaign. Despite the same lack of formal archival sources as others before him, Anthony Rimmington, in his new book The Soviet Union's Agricultural Biowarfare Programme, constructs a compelling narrative of the Soviet agricultural biowarfare program known as Ekologiya. His access to firsthand knowledge of the program through interviews with former participants makes Rimmington's book an important contribution to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Science of Useful Nature in Central America: Landscapes, Networks and
           Practical Enlightenment, 1784–1838 by Sophie Brockmann (review)

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      Abstract: At the turn of the nineteenth century, Guatemala's administrators and elites characterized their kingdom as a "paradox": at once poor and rich, sitting on the ruins of the long-extinguished civilization of Palenque, yet unable to translate past glories into future prosperity. Geopolitically, it occupied a peripheral space between the powerful viceroyalties of New Spain and New Granada, just as its commercial and intellectual elites sought to carve out a more central and connected space in wider networks of goods and knowledge. Sophie Brockmann's The Sciences of Useful Nature in Central America, spanning the period from the first antiquarian expeditions to Palenque in the 1780s to the dismemberment of the Central ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Underground: The Secret Life of Videocassettes in Iran by Blake Atwood
           (review)

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      Abstract: If a cultural history of magnetic recording technologies as rich as Iran's did not exist, it would be tempting for media historians to invent one. These technologies had an outsize presence in Iran from their earliest days. Iranian engineers in the 1950s and 60s leapfrogged wealthier media industries and pioneered experiments with magnetic sound as a dubbing tool. The phenomenon of audiocassettes, as a vehicle for political speech in the 1970s, was powerful enough to effectively require interdisciplinary work to understand it. It has brought political historians into contact with media studies and cassette-focused podcasters into contact with Iranian political history. The fidelity, adaptability, and portability ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Engineering Hollywood: Technology, Technicians, and the Science of
           Building the Studio System by Luci Marzola (review)

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      Abstract: In her excellent Engineering Hollywood, Luci Marzola examines the largely overlooked history of how Hollywood became Hollywood. No, this is not a story of glamorous movie stars, hot shot producers, or visionary directors, as production-centered approaches to Hollywood history have well documented (T. Schatz, The Genius of the System, 2010, and D. Gomery, The Hollywood Studio System, 2005). The book is not a study of individual films as technological or aesthetic art forms. Nor does the author fix on the innovative role of pristine artefacts like cameras or lenses as others have thoroughly observed (H. M. Raimondo-Souto, Motion Picture Photography, A History, 2007). What this book does offer is a fresh and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Imperial Science: Cable Telegraphy and Electrical Physics in the Victorian
           British Empire by Bruce J. Hunt (review)

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      Abstract: The development of telegraphy through submarine cables in the second half of the nineteenth century was a major episode in economic history, in terms of imperial power, invested capital, financial risk, technological challenges, and the involvement of public opinion. Submarine cables served political and military goals and stimulated the integration of economic and entrepreneurial activities of traders, bankers, insurance brokers, and those engaged in shipping. This winning combination of science and technology on the one hand, and entrepreneurial initiative on the other, fully reflects the leadership of the Western world at the time of imperialism.The first submarine cable was laid on the bottom of the sea ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Measuring Difference, Numbering Normal: Setting the Standards for
           Disability in the Interwar Period by Coreen McGuire (review)

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      Abstract: Historians of technology are likely to come across certain disability technologies in their general reading: prosthetic limbs feature in many histories of war and medicine, not to mention cyborgian fantasies of the posthuman. Less familiar are technologies of invisible or otherwise non-apparent disability, such as the devices that measure and, as Coreen McGuire argues, ultimately define human experiences such as deafness and "breathlessness," or shortness of breath due to a variety of conditions. The technologies in Measuring Difference, Numbering Normal are not as well-known as prosthetics, but they provide powerful examples of the interrelatedness between technology and disability.McGuire's book focuses on ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The History of the International Telecommunication Union: Transnational
           Techno-Diplomacy from the Telegraph to the Internet ed. by Gabriele Balbi
           and Andreas Fickers (review)

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      Abstract: Maintaining global communications networks takes a tremendous amount of work. It requires standardizing telecommunication technologies so that devices at one point in a network—whether a teleprinter, telephone, fax machine, or satellite ground station—can exchange messages with devices at any other point. It also requires a system for sharing the mutually incurred costs of communicating across national borders, using agreed-upon rate structures, set in a common currency. Since the advent of electronic communications in the mid-1800s, an international cohort of technocratic experts has gathered regularly to do this work in one of the oldest and least-studied institutions of global governance: the International ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A New History of Modern Computing by Thomas Haigh and Paul E. Ceruzzi
           (review)

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      Abstract: If one asks students the seemingly banal but thought-provoking question of what a computer is, one often gets an astonished look. Their various answers point to what guides Haigh and Ceruzzi's book, and what makes it so fascinating. "The computer" is an ambiguous device. More than with any other technology, what constitutes a computer has changed frequently and fundamentally. Haigh and Ceruzzi describe these multiple transformations, from a 1940s "self-contained device" to today's technology that is "everywhere and nowhere."When speaking of a "new history" of modern computing, the authors indicate their reference to Paul Ceruzzi's book (1998), which now, more than twenty years later, calls for an update. They aim ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Transnational History of the Internet in Central America, 1985–2000:
           Networks, Integration, and Development by Ignacio Siles (review)

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      Abstract: Historical research on the internet has primarily addressed the most connected countries. However, as Janet Abbate and others have advocated, the histories of the vast global system of integrated computers demonstrate multiple visions around this socio-technical system. In Central America, nonprofit organizations and universities pushed the introduction of computer networks to integrate the region, paving the way to the internet's expansion there. A Transnational History examines how initiatives to connect to early computer networks "unfolded and were developed from the mid-1980s to the end of the 1990s" in a region that deserves more detailed studies on its role in the history of technology (p. 1). Consisting of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Civil Aviation and the Globalization of the Cold War by Peter Svik
           (review)

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      Abstract: Those familiar with U.S. aviation history are aware of the role commercial aviation played in asserting national interests across the globe during the twentieth century. For example, Jennifer Van Vleck's work, Empire of the Air, explores how the U.S. government and Pan American Airlines worked together to build a global reach for American interests. That is a tale of globalization told from a Western perspective. Peter Svik's work, Civil Aviation and the Globalization of the Cold War, looks at the globalizing potential of civil aviation from an Eastern Bloc perspective and through the lens of the Cold War. His work examines how the Soviet Union pushed to overcome U.S. resistance to its efforts to globalize the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Empire's Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the
           Transcontinental Railroad by Manu Karuka (review)

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      Abstract: In Empire's Tracks, Manu Karuka reframes the role of the transcontinental railroads in the history of U.S. imperialism. For Karuka, it makes little sense to think of the transcontinentals as binding two halves of an expanding nation, because there is no natural territory of the United States, only colonized territories. The Indigenous nations of the Great Plains understood the transcontinentals as incursions into long established ways of relating to each other and the surrounding environment, replacing those with "ecological and social destruction through the market, constant war, and isolation from existing relationships" (p. 105). In this work, the railroads offer a powerful lens, bringing the intertwined ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Shenzhen Experiment: The Story of China's Instant City by Juan Du
           (review)

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      Abstract: With her equally instructive and highly readable monograph on the urban evolution of Shenzhen, Princeton-educated and Hong Kong-based architect Juan Du aims to dispel a powerful, multilayered myth at the heart of most "rise of China" narratives on the recent past. As the People's Republic of China's original and most prestigious Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and first major window to the outside world after three decades of increasing political and economic self-isolation, Shenzhen has long been stylized as the epitome of the economic reform policies initiated after 1978 by the central leadership under Deng Xiao-ping (1904–97); more recently, it has come to symbolize China's ascent to global power at the turn of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Fishmeal Revolution: The Industrialization of the Humboldt Current by
           Kristin A. Wintersteen (review)

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      Abstract: Kristin Wintersteen's The Fishmeal Revolution tells a transnational story linking the fish of the Humboldt Current to the global food supply. Situated in the Pacific, off the western coast of South America, the Humboldt Current's constant churn of nutrients sustains fish that served as fodder for industrialized meat production in the second half of the twentieth century. Wintersteen's monograph gives both a very broad overview, looking into the longer history of the current from "deep time" to the present, as well as a narrower history of fishing boom towns in Chile and Peru. The story is both local, national, and international, as Wintersteen follows science, capital, regulations, and fishmeal across the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Des nations, des firmes et des montres. Histoire globale de l'industrie
           horlogére de 1850 à nos jours [Countries, companies, and watches: A
           global history of the watch industry from 1850 to today] by Pierre-Yves
           Donzé (review)

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      Abstract: Studies on the history of watchmaking (watches and clocks) are not new. In 1967, Carlo Cipolla showed the link between watchmaking and modernity (Clocks and Culture 1300–1700). His work was continued in 1983 by David S. Landes, who analyzed the emergence of new uses of time as a result of the invention and improvement of the mechanical clock in the West, in Revolution in Time. Pierre-Yves Donzé is a specialist in the global history of industrial companies, and the watch industry in Switzerland and Japan. His book offers a new synthesis of the history of watchmaking from the mid-1800s to the present day. Unlike earlier works by historians in this field, who compared watchmaking in different countries, Donzé focuses ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • That High Design of Purest Gold: A Critical History of the Pharmaceutical
           Industry, 1880–2020 by Graham Dutfield (review)

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      Abstract: This book is all about the long twentieth century of drug making, patenting, and regulating. It offers a fascinating journey into the evolution of one of the major global industries today: the pharmaceutical industry. The large-scale preparation of alkaloids by pharmacist-industrialists alongside the expanding chemical-pharmaceuticals markets laid the foundation for the international pharmaceutical industry in the second half of the nineteenth century. An early success of the burgeoning industry was the international launch of the new drug Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) in 1899. German drug maker Bayer and its marketers positioned Aspirin as a specialty drug and a profit-making, revolutionary pain medicine. Thus ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kalkstein als 'Kritischer' Rohstoff: Eine Stoffgeschichte der
           Industrialisierung, 1840–1930 [Limestone as a 'critical' raw material: A
           material history of industrialization, 1840–1930] by Sebastian Haumann
           (review)

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      Abstract: The quotation marks in the title immediately hint at one of the intriguing questions in this book: how could an abundant material such as limestone become or be considered a critical resource' Many histories of modernization and industrialization have highlighted the development of industrial complexes by focusing on the growth and expansion of core industries in mining, metal working, and chemistry. Sebastian Haumann approaches his narrative from the opposite direction. His resource history is not in the tradition of the actor-network inspired new materialism approach, as he develops a social constructivist account of limestone praxes and how its application became entangled with the introduction of blast furnace ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Builders of the Third Reich: The Organisation Todt and Nazi Forced Labour
           by Charles Dick (review)

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      Abstract: One of the biggest, if not the most extensive, builders of infrastructure in twentieth-century Europe was the "Organisation Todt" (OT), the construction arm of Nazi Germany. At its peak, it employed an estimated 1.5 to 2 million European laborers. According to Charles Dick's important book, 185,000 people died while working for the OT. Its laborers constructed roads, railroads, fortifications, and underground factories. The OT plundered resources from Nazi-occupied Europe and set up facilities to extract shale oil and other materials required for the war effort. Given the scale of OT operations, it is remarkable that few scholars have studied this organization.Named after the Third Reich's top engineer, Fritz ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Development History of Ancient Chinese Glass Technology ed. by Fuxi Gan
           (review)

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      Abstract: Ancient glass artifacts are among the world's most important cultural relics, combining art and technology. Although the emergence of faience (glazed quartz) and glass in China is later than in the Near East, Chinese glass has its own special features, such as lead-barium silicate glass, and Chinese eye beads, which lend unique value and charm. The volume Development History of Ancient Chinese Glass Technology is an overview of archaeological findings, scientific analysis, and textual research on ancient Chinese glass all across the nation over different periods in the past 2,500 years. Top scholars in China, including scientists and archaeologists, have made considerable efforts to contribute.The volume begins ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Penser la technique autrement, XVIe–XXIesiècle. Hommage à l'oeuvre
           d'Hélène Vérin [New ways of thinking about technology, 16th–21st
           centuries: A tribute to the work of Hélène Vérin] ed. by Robert
           Carvais, Anne-Françoise Garçon, and André Grelon (review)

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      Abstract: Penser la technique autrement is a collection of articles written as a tribute to French historian of technology Hélène Vérin. The volume includes nineteen essays by her colleagues and friends, and an introduction by the three editors.The diversity of the contributors' disciplines—history, philosophy, sociology, psychology, engineering sciences, management sciences—and of the periods in which they specialize—early modern, contemporary, and recent times—testify to the richness of the exchanges that Hélène Vérin has maintained throughout her career with colleagues from diverse backgrounds. The contributions range from the history of science and technology, to the history of art, plus the history of economics and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial
           Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World by Allison Margaret Bigelow
           (review)

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      Abstract: In this inspiring study, Allison Margaret Bigelow presents an account of the transatlantic transfer of knowledge and language of mining across a wide range of reciprocal settings. Tracing the evolution of knowledge about gold, iron, copper, and silver in Spanish America, Bigelow's focus is a linguistic analysis that highlights how the terminology in mining and in sociocultural hierarchization was entangled and evolved on both sides of the Atlantic.This set of studies on different metal ores shows how much the people of the American territories were part of a knowledge formation that in Europe was the scientific revolution. Mining was the subject of newly formed, practical, and theoretical knowledge, and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Discourses of Vision in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Seeing, Thinking,
           Writing by Jonathan Potter (review)

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      Abstract: Discourses of Vision in Nineteenth-Century Britain explores the coupling of technology and imagination in nineteenth-century Britain, a period in which, as one journalist wrote on the opening of the 1851 Great Exhibition in London: "Our great authors are now artists. They speak to the eye, and their language is fascinating and impressive."The author began this project as a dissertation, examining Victorian literary texts and nonfiction popular writings to explore what role new optical technologies played in how vision was experienced. Innovations in visual and print culture made people conceptualize visual experience in new ways. Potter's goal is "to demonstrate the manner in which technology and imaginative ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Storia Culturale del Made in Italy [The cultural history of "Made in
           Italy"] by Carlo Marco Belfanti (review)

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      Abstract: The term "Made in Italy" refers to a phenomenon whose boundaries, given the complexity of the subject, are blurred and whose definition is not always univocal. Both producers and consumers use this term in many uncontrolled and confusing ways. In recent times, the concept "Made in Italy" has undergone renewed interest as an expression of the desire to set apart Italian products, especially fashion, within a global market. Research on the topic is characterized by two approaches: on the one hand, the economist M. Fortis's work, Made in Italy (1998), traces the power of the term in the production system, and on the other hand, researchers like M. Bettiol connect the success of Italian production to the Renaissance ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Krakow: An Ecobiography by Adam Izdebski and Rafał Szmytka (review)

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      Abstract: Environmental history emerged in the United States in the 1970s and now produces exciting scholarship not just on North America, but on Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Urban environmental history, a growing subfield, developed more recently, with case studies of individual cities shifting emphasis from wilderness and natural resource use to analysis of environmental relationships in specific communities. Krakow: An Ecobiography, edited by Adam Izdebski and Rafał Szmytka, is a rewarding collection of eight chapters exploring a fascinating European city's environmental history across a thousand years. The editors call it Poland's first book devoted entirely to environmental history, and it is the first ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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