Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 Journals sorted alphabetically
Architectural Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Artifact : Journal of Design Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
CoDesign: International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Design Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Interiors : Design, Architecture and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Sustainable Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Interactive Design and Manufacturing (IJIDeM)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Design History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Design, Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Facade Design and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Interior Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Res Mobilis : Revista internacional de investigación en mobiliario y objetos decorativos     Open Access  
Reviews of Human Factors and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.941
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-4951 - ISSN (Online) 0920-654X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Identification of potential inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
           shikimate kinase: molecular docking, in silico toxicity and in vitro
           experiments

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      Abstract: Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the main causes of death from a single pathological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In addition, the emergence of drug-resistant TB strains has exacerbated even further the treatment outcome of TB patients. It is thus needed the search for new therapeutic strategies to improve the current treatment and to circumvent the resistance mechanisms of Mtb. The shikimate kinase (SK) is the fifth enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is essential for the survival of Mtb. The shikimate pathway is absent in humans, thereby indicating SK as an attractive target for the development of anti-TB drugs. In this work, a combination of in silico and in vitro techniques was used to identify potential inhibitors for SK from Mtb (MtSK). All compounds of our in-house database (Centro de Pesquisas em Biologia Molecular e Funcional, CPBMF) were submitted to in silico toxicity analysis to evaluate the risk of hepatotoxicity. Docking experiments were performed to identify the potential inhibitors of MtSK according to the predicted binding energy. In vitro inhibitory activity of MtSK-catalyzed chemical reaction at a single compound concentration was assessed. Minimum inhibitory concentration values for in vitro growth of pan-sensitive Mtb H37Rv strain were also determined. The mixed approach implemented in this work was able to identify five compounds that inhibit both MtSK and the in vitro growth of Mtb.
      PubDate: 2022-12-22
       
  • A combined ligand and target-based virtual screening strategy to repurpose
           drugs as putrescine uptake inhibitors with trypanocidal activity

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      Abstract: Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting nearly 7 million people only in the Americas. Polyamines are essential compounds for parasite growth, survival, and differentiation. However, because trypanosomatids are auxotrophic for polyamines, they must be obtained from the host by specific transporters. In this investigation, an ensemble of QSAR classifiers able to identify polyamine analogs with trypanocidal activity was developed. Then, a multi-template homology model of the dimeric polyamine transporter of T. cruzi, TcPAT12, was created with Rosetta, and then refined by enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations. Using representative snapshots extracted from the trajectory, a docking model able to discriminate between active and inactive compounds was developed and validated. Both models were applied in a parallel virtual screening campaign to repurpose known drugs as anti-trypanosomal compounds inhibiting polyamine transport in T. cruzi. Montelukast, Quinestrol, Danazol, and Dutasteride were selected for in vitro testing, and all of them inhibited putrescine uptake in biochemical assays, confirming the predictive ability of the computational models. Furthermore, all the confirmed hits proved to inhibit epimastigote proliferation, and Quinestrol and Danazol were able to inhibit, in the low micromolar range, the viability of trypomastigotes and the intracellular growth of amastigotes. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-12-10
       
  • The slow but steady rise of binding free energy calculations in drug
           discovery

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      Abstract: Abstract Binding free energy calculations are increasingly used in drug discovery research to predict protein-ligand binding affinities and to prioritize candidate drug molecules accordingly. It has taken decades of collective effort to transform this academic concept into a technology adopted by the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. Having personally witnessed and taken part in this transformation, here I recount the (incomplete) list of problems that had to be solved to make this computational tool practical and suggest areas of future development.
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
       
  • DeepCubist: Molecular Generator for Designing Peptidomimetics based on
           Complex three-dimensional scaffolds

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      Abstract: Abstract Mimicking bioactive conformations of peptide segments involved in the formation of protein-protein interfaces with small molecules is thought to represent a promising strategy for the design of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors. For compound design, the use of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds rich in sp3-centers makes it possible to precisely mimic bioactive peptide conformations. Herein, we introduce DeepCubist, a molecular generator for designing peptidomimetics based on 3D scaffolds. Firstly, enumerated 3D scaffolds are superposed on a target peptide conformation to identify a preferred template structure for designing peptidomimetics. Secondly, heteroatoms and unsaturated bonds are introduced into the template via a deep generative model to produce candidate compounds. DeepCubist was applied to design peptidomimetics of exemplary peptide turn, helix, and loop structures in pharmaceutical targets engaging in PPIs.
      PubDate: 2022-12-03
       
  • Computational investigation of functional water molecules in GPCRs bound
           to G protein or arrestin

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      Abstract: Abstract G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins constituting the largest family of drug targets. The activated GPCR binds either the heterotrimeric G proteins or arrestin through its activation cycle. Water molecules have been reported to play a role in GPCR activation. Nevertheless, reported studies are focused on the hydrophobic helical bundle region. How water molecules function in GPCR bound either G protein or arrestin is rarely studied. To address this issue, we carried out computational studies on water molecules in both GPCR/G protein complexes and GPCR/arrestin complexes. Using inhomogeneous fluid theory (IFT), we locate all possible hydration sites in GPCRs binding either to G protein or arrestin. We observe that the number of water molecules on the interaction surface between GPCRs and signal proteins are correlated with the insertion depths of the α5-helix from G-protein or “finger loop” from arrestin in GPCRs. In three out of the four simulation pairs, the interfaces of Rhodopsin, M2R and NTSR1 in the G protein-associated systems show more water-mediated hydrogen-bond networks when compared to these in arrestin-associated systems. This reflects that more functionally relevant water molecules may probably be attracted in G protein-associated structures than that in arrestin-associated structures. Moreover, we find the water-mediated interaction networks throughout the NPxxY region and the orthosteric pocket, which may be a key for GPCR activation. Reported studies show that non-biased agonist, which can trigger both GPCR-G protein and GPCR-arrestin activation signal, can result in pharmacologically toxicities. Our comprehensive studies of the hydration sites in GPCR/G protein complexes and GPCR/arrestin complexes may provide important insights in the design of G-protein biased agonists.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
       
  • Evaluation of interactions between the hepatitis C virus NS3/4A and
           sulfonamidobenzamide based molecules using molecular docking, molecular
           dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations

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      Abstract: Abstract The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3/4A is an attractive target for the treatment of Hepatitis C infection. Herein, we present an investigation of HCV NS3/4A inhibitors based on a sulfonamidobenzamide scaffold. Inhibitor interactions with HCV NS3/4A were explored by molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and MM/PBSA binding free energy calculations. All of the inhibitors adopt similar molecular docking poses in the catalytic site of the protease that are stabilized by hydrogen bond interactions with G137 and the catalytic S139, which are known to be important for potency and binding stability. The quantitative assessments of binding free energies from MM/PBSA correlate well with the experimental results, with a high coefficient of determination, R2 of 0.92. Binding free energy decomposition analyses elucidate the different contributions of Q41, F43, H57, R109, K136, G137, S138, S139, A156, M485, and Q526 in binding different inhibitors. The importance of these sidechain contributions was further confirmed by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. In addition, the sidechains of K136 and S139 show crucial but distinct contributions to inhibitor binding with HCV NS3/4A. The structural basis of the potency has been elucidated, demonstrating the importance of the R155 sidechain conformation. This extensive exploration of binding energies and interactions between these compounds and HCV NS3/4A at the atomic level should benefit future antiviral drug design.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
       
  • Molecular and thermodynamic insights into interfacial interactions between
           collagen and cellulose investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and
           umbrella sampling

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      Abstract: Cellulose/collagen composites have been widely used in biomedicine and tissue engineering. Interfacial interactions are crucial in determining the final properties of cellulose/collagen composite. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to gain insights into the interactions between cellulose and collagen. It has been found that the structure of collagen remained intact during adsorption. The results derived from umbrella sampling showed that (110) and ( \(1\bar{1}0\) ) faces exhibited the strongest affinity with collagen (100) face came the second and (010) the last, which could be attributed to the surface roughness and hydrogen-bonding linkers involved water molecules. Cellulose planes with flat surfaces and the capability to form hydrogen-bonding linkers produce stronger affinity with collagen. The occupancy of hydrogen bonds formed between cellulose and collagen was low and not significantly contributive to the binding affinity. These findings provided insights into the interactions between cellulose and collagen at the molecular level, which may guide the design and fabrication of cellulose/collagen composites. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
       
  • Galileo: Three-dimensional searching in large combinatorial fragment
           spaces on the example of pharmacophores

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      Abstract: Abstract Fragment spaces are an efficient way to model large chemical spaces using a handful of small fragments and a few connection rules. The development of Enamine’s REAL Space has shown that large spaces of readily available compounds may be created this way. These are several orders of magnitude larger than previous libraries. So far, searching and navigating these spaces is mostly limited to topological approaches. A way to overcome this limitation is optimization via metaheuristics which can be combined with arbitrary scoring functions. Here we present Galileo, a novel Genetic Algorithm to sample fragment spaces. We showcase Galileo in combination with a novel pharmacophore mapping approach, called Phariety, enabling 3D searches in fragment spaces. We estimate the effectiveness of the approach with a small fragment space. Furthermore, we apply Galileo to two pharmacophore searches in the REAL Space, detecting hundreds of compounds fulfilling a HSP90 and a FXIa pharmacophore.
      PubDate: 2022-11-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00485-y
       
  • Examining unsupervised ensemble learning using spectroscopy data of
           organic compounds

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      Abstract: Abstract One solution to the challenge of choosing an appropriate clustering algorithm is to combine different clusterings into a single consensus clustering result, known as cluster ensemble (CE). This ensemble learning strategy can provide more robust and stable solutions across different domains and datasets. Unfortunately, not all clusterings in the ensemble contribute to the final data partition. Cluster ensemble selection (CES) aims at selecting a subset from a large library of clustering solutions to form a smaller cluster ensemble that performs as well as or better than the set of all available clustering solutions. In this paper, we investigate four CES methods for the categorization of structurally distinct organic compounds using high-dimensional IR and Raman spectroscopy data. Single quality selection (SQI) forms a subset of the ensemble by selecting the highest quality ensemble members. The Single Quality Selection (SQI) method is used with various quality indices to select subsets by including the highest quality ensemble members. The Bagging method, usually applied in supervised learning, ranks ensemble members by calculating the normalized mutual information (NMI) between ensemble members and consensus solutions generated from a randomly sampled subset of the full ensemble. The hierarchical cluster and select method (HCAS-SQI) uses the diversity matrix of ensemble members to select a diverse set of ensemble members with the highest quality. Furthermore, a combining strategy can be used to combine subsets selected using multiple quality indices (HCAS-MQI) for the refinement of clustering solutions in the ensemble. The IR + Raman hybrid ensemble library is created by merging two complementary “views” of the organic compounds. This inherently more diverse library gives the best full ensemble consensus results. Overall, the Bagging method is recommended because it provides the most robust results that are better than or comparable to the full ensemble consensus solutions.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00488-9
       
  • Comprehensive evaluation of end-point free energy techniques in
           carboxylated-pillar[6]arene host–guest binding: II. regression and
           dielectric constant

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      Abstract: Abstract End-point free energy calculations as a powerful tool have been widely applied in protein–ligand and protein–protein interactions. It is often recognized that these end-point techniques serve as an option of intermediate accuracy and computational cost compared with more rigorous statistical mechanic models (e.g., alchemical transformation) and coarser molecular docking. However, it is observed that this intermediate level of accuracy does not hold in relatively simple and prototypical host–guest systems. Specifically, in our previous work investigating a set of carboxylated-pillar[6]arene host–guest complexes, end-point methods provide free energy estimates deviating significantly from the experimental reference, and the rank of binding affinities is also incorrectly computed. These observations suggest the unsuitability and inapplicability of standard end-point free energy techniques in host–guest systems, and alteration and development are required to make them practically usable. In this work, we consider two ways to improve the performance of end-point techniques. The first one is the PBSA_E regression that varies the weights of different free energy terms in the end-point calculation procedure, while the second one is considering the interior dielectric constant as an additional variable in the end-point equation. By detailed investigation of the calculation procedure and the simulation outcome, we prove that these two treatments (i.e., regression and dielectric constant) are manipulating the end-point equation in a somehow similar way, i.e., weakening the electrostatic contribution and strengthening the non-polar terms, although there are still many detailed differences between these two methods. With the trained end-point scheme, the RMSE of the computed affinities is improved from the standard ~ 12 kcal/mol to ~ 2.4 kcal/mol, which is comparable to another altered end-point method (ELIE) trained with system-specific data. By tuning PBSA_E weighting factors with the host-specific data, it is possible to further decrease the prediction error to ~ 2.1 kcal/mol. These observations along with the extremely efficient optimized-structure computation procedure suggest the regression (i.e., PBSA_E as well as its GBSA_E extension) as a practically applicable solution that brings end-point methods back into the library of usable tools for host–guest binding. However, the dielectric-constant-variable scheme cannot effectively minimize the experiment-calculation discrepancy for absolute binding affinities, but is able to improve the calculation of affinity ranks. This phenomenon is somehow different from the protein–ligand case and suggests the difference between host–guest and biomacromolecular (protein–ligand and protein–protein) systems. Therefore, the spectrum of tools usable for protein–ligand complexes could be unsuitable for host–guest binding, and numerical validations are necessary to screen out really workable solutions in these ‘prototypical’ situations.
      PubDate: 2022-11-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00487-w
       
  • Reliable gas-phase tautomer equilibria of drug-like molecule scaffolds and
           the issue of continuum solvation

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      Abstract: Abstract Accurate calculation of relative tautomer energies in different environments is a prerequisite to many parameters of relevance in drug discovery. This work provides a thorough benchmark of the semiempirical methods AM1, PM3 and GFN2-xTB, the force-field OPLS4, Hartree–Fock and HF-3c, the density functionals PBEh-3c, B97-3c, r2SCAN-3c, PBE, PBE0, TPSS, r2SCAN, ω-B97X-V, M06-2X, B3LYP, B2PLYP, and second-order perturbation theory MP2 versus the gold-standard coupled-cluster DLPNO-CCSD(T) using the def2-QZVPP basis set. The outperforming method identified is M06-2X, whereas r2SCAN-3c is the best-perfoming one in the set of cost-optimized methods. Application of the two methods on a challenging subset from the SAMPL2 challenge provides evidence that deviations from experiment are caused by deficiencies of current continuum solvation methods.
      PubDate: 2022-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00480-3
       
  • The FMO2 analysis of the ligand-receptor binding energy: the
           Biscarbene-Gold(I)/DNA G-Quadruplex case study

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      Abstract: Abstract In this work, the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method was applied to calculate and analyze the binding energy of two biscarbene-Au(I) derivatives, [Au(9-methylcaffein-8-ylidene)2]+ and [Au(1,3-dimethylbenzimidazol-2-ylidene)2]+, to the DNA G-Quadruplex structure. The FMO2 binding energy considers the ligand-receptor complex as well as the isolated forms of energy-minimum state of ligand and receptor, providing a better description of ligand-receptor affinity compared with simple pair interaction energies (PIE). Our results highlight important features of the binding process of biscarbene-Au(I) derivatives to DNA G-Quadruplex, indicating that the total deformation-polarization energy and desolvation penalty of the ligands are the main terms destabilizing the binding. The pair interaction energy decomposition analysis (PIEDA) between ligand and nucleobases suggest that the main interaction terms are electrostatic and charge-transfer energies supporting the hypothesis that Au(I) ion can be involved in π-cation interactions further stabilizing the ligand-receptor complex. Moreover, the presence of polar groups on the carbene ring, as C = O, can improve the charge-transfer interaction with K+ ion. These findings can be employed to design new powerful biscarbene-Au(I) DNA-G quadruplex binders as promising anticancer drugs. The procedure described in this work can be applied to investigate any ligand-receptor system and is particularly useful when the binding process is strongly characterized by polarization, charge-transfer and dispersion interactions, properly evaluated by ab initio methods.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00484-z
       
  • From oncoproteins to spike proteins: the evaluation of intramolecular
           stability using hydropathic force field

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      Abstract: Abstract Evaluation of the intramolecular stability of proteins plays a key role in the comprehension of their biological behavior and mechanism of action. Small structural alterations such as mutations induced by single nucleotide polymorphism can impact biological activity and pharmacological modulation. Covid-19 mutations, that affect viral replication and the susceptibility to antibody neutralization, and the action of antiviral drugs, are just one example. In this work, the intramolecular stability of mutated proteins, like Spike glycoprotein and its complexes with the human target, is evaluated through hydropathic intramolecular energy scoring originally conceived by Abraham and Kellogg based on the “Extension of the fragment method to calculate amino acid zwitterion and side-chain partition coefficients” by Abraham and Leo in Proteins: Struct. Funct. Genet. 1987, 2:130 − 52. HINT is proposed as a fast and reliable tool for the stability evaluation of any mutated system. This work has been written in honor of Prof. Donald J. Abraham (1936–2021).
      PubDate: 2022-10-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00477-y
       
  • Physicochemical QSAR analysis of hERG inhibition revisited: towards a
           quantitative potency prediction

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      Abstract: Abstract In an earlier study (Didziapetris R & Lanevskij K (2016). J Comput Aided Mol Des. 30:1175–1188) we collected a database of publicly available hERG inhibition data for almost 6700 drug-like molecules and built a probabilistic Gradient Boosting classifier with a minimal set of physicochemical descriptors (log P, pKa, molecular size and topology parameters). This approach favored interpretability over statistical performance but still achieved an overall classification accuracy of 75%. In the current follow-up work we expanded the database (provided in Supplementary Information) to almost 9400 molecules and performed temporal validation of the model on a set of novel chemicals from recently published lead optimization projects. Validation results showed almost no performance degradation compared to the original study. Additionally, we rebuilt the model using AFT (Accelerated Failure Time) learning objective in XGBoost, which accepts both quantitative and censored data often reported in protein inhibition studies. The new model achieved a similar level of accuracy of discerning hERG blockers from non-blockers at 10 µM threshold, which can be conceived as close to the performance ceiling for methods aiming to describe only non-specific ligand interactions with hERG. Yet, this model outputs quantitative potency values (IC50) and is not tied to a particular classification cut-off. pIC50 from patch-clamp measurements can be predicted with R2 ≈ 0.4 and MAE < 0.5, which enables ligand ranking according to their expected potency levels. The employed approach can be valuable for quantitative modeling of various ADME and drug safety endpoints with a high prevalence of censored data.
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00483-0
       
  • Improved prediction and characterization of blood-brain barrier
           penetrating peptides using estimated propensity scores of dipeptides

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      Abstract: Abstract The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the primary barrier with a highly selective semipermeable border between blood vascular endothelial cells and the central nervous system. Since BBB can prevent drugs circulating in the blood from crossing into the interstitial fluid of the brain where neurons reside, many researchers are working hard on developing drug delivery systems to penetrate the BBB which currently poses a challenge. Thus, blood-brain barrier penetrating peptides (B3PPs) are an alternative neurotherapeutic for brain-related disorder since they can facilitate drug delivery into the brain. In the meanwhile, developing computational methods that are effective for both the identification and characterization of B3PPs in a cost-effective manner plays an important role for basic reach and in the pharmaceutical industry. Even though few computational methods for B3PP identification have been developed, their performance might fail in terms of generalization ability and interpretability. In this study, a novel and efficient scoring card method-based predictor (termed SCMB3PP) is presented for improving B3PP identification and characterization. To overcome the limitation of black-box computational approaches, the SCMB3PP predictor can automatically estimate amino acid and dipeptide propensities to be B3PPs. Both cross-validation and independent tests indicate that SCMB3PP can achieve impressive performance and outperform various popular machine learning-based methods and the existing methods on multiple independent test datasets. Furthermore, SCMB3PP-derived amino acid propensities were utilized to identify informative biophysical and biochemical properties for characterizing B3PPs. Finally, an online user-friendly web server (http://pmlabstack.pythonanywhere.com/SCMB3PP) is established to identify novel and potential B3PP cost-effectively. This novel computational approach is anticipated to facilitate the large-scale identification of high potential B3PP candidates for follow-up experimental validation.
      PubDate: 2022-10-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00476-z
       
  • Enabling data-limited chemical bioactivity predictions through deep neural
           network transfer learning

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      Abstract: The main limitation in developing deep neural network (DNN) models to predict bioactivity properties of chemicals is the lack of sufficient assay data to train the network’s classification layers. Focusing on feedforward DNNs that use atom- and bond-based structural fingerprints as input, we examined whether layers of a fully trained DNN based on large amounts of data to predict one property could be used to develop DNNs to predict other related or unrelated properties based on limited amounts of data. Hence, we assessed if and under what conditions the dense layers of a pre-trained DNN could be transferred and used for the development of another DNN associated with limited training data. We carried out a quantitative study employing more than 400 pairs of assay datasets, where we used fully trained layers from a large dataset to augment the training of a small dataset. We found that the higher the correlation r between two assay datasets, the more efficient the transfer learning is in reducing prediction errors associated with the smaller dataset DNN predictions. The reduction in mean squared prediction errors ranged from 10 to 20% for every 0.1 increase in r2 between the datasets, with the bulk of the error reductions associated with transfers of the first dense layer. Transfer of other dense layers did not result in additional benefits, suggesting that deeper, dense layers conveyed more specialized and assay-specific information. Importantly, depending on the dataset correlation, training sample size could be reduced by up to tenfold without any loss of prediction accuracy. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-10-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00486-x
       
  • Protocol for iterative optimization of modified peptides bound to protein
           targets

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      Abstract: Abstract Peptides are commonly used as therapeutic agents. However, they suffer from easy degradation and instability. Replacing natural by non-natural amino acids can avoid these problems, and potentially improve the affinity towards the target protein. Here, we present a computational pipeline to optimize peptides based on adding non-natural amino acids while improving their binding affinity. The workflow is an iterative computational evolution algorithm, inspired by the PARCE protocol, that performs single-point mutations on the peptide sequence using modules from the Rosetta framework. The modifications can be guided based on the structural properties or previous knowledge of the biological system. At each mutation step, the affinity to the protein is estimated by sampling the complex conformations and applying a consensus metric using various open protein-ligand scoring functions. The mutations are accepted based on the score differences, allowing for an iterative optimization of the initial peptide. The sampling/scoring scheme was benchmarked with a set of protein-peptide complexes where experimental affinity values have been reported. In addition, a basic application using a known protein-peptide complex is also provided. The structure- and dynamic-based approach allows users to optimize bound peptides, with the option to personalize the code for further applications. The protocol, called mPARCE, is available at: https://github.com/rochoa85/mPARCE/.
      PubDate: 2022-10-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00482-1
       
  • An overview of the SAMPL8 host–guest binding challenge

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      Abstract: Abstract The SAMPL series of challenges aim to focus the community on specific modeling challenges, while testing and hopefully driving progress of computational methods to help guide pharmaceutical drug discovery. In this study, we report on the results of the SAMPL8 host–guest blind challenge for predicting absolute binding affinities. SAMPL8 focused on two host–guest datasets, one involving the cucurbituril CB8 (with a series of common drugs of abuse) and another involving two different Gibb deep-cavity cavitands. The latter dataset involved a previously featured deep cavity cavitand (TEMOA) as well as a new variant (TEETOA), both binding to a series of relatively rigid fragment-like guests. Challenge participants employed a reasonably wide variety of methods, though many of these were based on molecular simulations, and predictive accuracy was mixed. As in some previous SAMPL iterations (SAMPL6 and SAMPL7), we found that one approach to achieve greater accuracy was to apply empirical corrections to the binding free energy predictions, taking advantage of prior data on binding to these hosts. Another approach which performed well was a hybrid MD-based approach with reweighting to a force matched QM potential. In the cavitand challenge, an alchemical method using the AMOEBA-polarizable force field achieved the best success with RMSE less than 1 kcal/mol, while another alchemical approach (ATM/GAFF2-AM1BCC/TIP3P/HREM) had RMSE less than 1.75 kcal/mol. The work discussed here also highlights several important lessons; for example, retrospective studies of reference calculations demonstrate the sensitivity of predicted binding free energies to ethyl group sampling and/or guest starting pose, providing guidance to help improve future studies on these systems.
      PubDate: 2022-10-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00462-5
       
  • Enhancing sampling of water rehydration upon ligand binding using variants
           of grand canonical Monte Carlo

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      Abstract: Abstract Water plays an important role in mediating protein-ligand interactions. Water rearrangement upon a ligand binding or modification can be very slow and beyond typical timescales used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thus, inadequate sampling of slow water motions in MD simulations often impairs the accuracy of the accuracy of ligand binding free energy calculations. Previous studies suggest grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) outperforms normal MD simulations for water sampling, thus GCMC has been applied to help improve the accuracy of ligand binding free energy calculations. However, in prior work we observed protein and/or ligand motions impaired how well GCMC performs at water rehydration, suggesting more work is needed to improve this method to handle water sampling. In this work, we applied GCMC in 21 protein-ligand systems to assess the performance of GCMC for rehydrating buried water sites. While our results show that GCMC can rapidly rehydrate all selected water sites for most systems, it fails in five systems. In most failed systems, we observe protein/ligand motions, which occur in the absence of water, combine to close water sites and block instantaneous GCMC water insertion moves. For these five failed systems, we both extended our GCMC simulations and tested a new technique named grand canonical nonequilibrium candidate Monte Carlo (GCNCMC). GCNCMC combines GCMC with the nonequilibrium candidate Monte Carlo (NCMC) sampling technique to improve the probability of a successful water insertion/deletion. Our results show that GCNCMC and extended GCMC can rehydrate all target water sites for three of the five problematic systems and GCNCMC is more efficient than GCMC in two out of the three systems. In one system, only GCNCMC can rehydrate all target water sites, while GCMC fails. Both GCNCMC and GCMC fail in one system. This work suggests this new GCNCMC method is promising for water rehydration especially when protein/ligand motions may block water insertion/removal.
      PubDate: 2022-10-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00479-w
       
  • A high quality, industrial data set for binding affinity prediction:
           performance comparison in different early drug discovery scenarios

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      Abstract: We release a new, high quality data set of 1162 PDE10A inhibitors with experimentally determined binding affinities together with 77 PDE10A X-ray co-crystal structures from a Roche legacy project. This data set is used to compare the performance of different 2D- and 3D-machine learning (ML) as well as empirical scoring functions for predicting binding affinities with high throughput. We simulate use cases that are relevant in the lead optimization phase of early drug discovery. ML methods perform well at interpolation, but poorly in extrapolation scenarios—which are most relevant to a real-world application. Moreover, we find that investing into the docking workflow for binding pose generation using multi-template docking is rewarded with an improved scoring performance. A combination of 2D-ML and 3D scoring using a modified piecewise linear potential shows best overall performance, combining information on the protein environment with learning from existing SAR data. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-09-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s10822-022-00478-x
       
 
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