Subjects -> JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (Total: 219 journals)
    - JOURNALISM (31 journals)
    - JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (148 journals)
    - NEW AGE PUBLICATIONS (8 journals)
    - PUBLISHING AND BOOK TRADE (32 journals)

JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (148 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
#PerDebate     Open Access  
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Journalism and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
African Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Âncora : Revista Latino-Americana de Jornalismo     Open Access  
Annales françaises d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie et de Pathologie Cervico-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Apparence(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arethusa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Astérion     Open Access  
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Brazilian Journalism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Brookings-Wharton Papers on Financial Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bulletin of the Comediantes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers d'histoire. Revue d'histoire critique     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Cahiers de la Méditerranée     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Communication & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Communication and Media in Asia Pacific (CMAP)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Communication Cultures in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Communication Papers : Media Literacy & Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Comunicação Pública     Open Access  
Comunicación y Ciudadanía     Open Access  
Connections : A Journal of Language, Media and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cuadernos.info     Open Access  
De Arte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Développement durable et territoires     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digital Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access  
E-rea     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
El Argonauta español     Open Access  
Espaço e Tempo Midiáticos     Open Access  
Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études caribéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Science Editing     Open Access  
Frontiers in Research Metrics and Analytics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
General Relativity and Gravitation     Hybrid Journal  
Géocarrefour     Open Access  
Grey Room     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
GRUR International     Full-text available via subscription  
Hipertext.net : Anuario Académico sobre Documentación Digital y Comunicación Interactiva     Open Access  
Improntas     Open Access  
In die Skriflig / In Luce Verbi     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Index on Censorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Information Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
InMedia     Open Access  
International Journal of Bibliometrics in Business and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Entertainment Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Investment Analysts Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
IRIS - Revista de Informação, Memória e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Journal of European Periodical Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Healthcare Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Illustration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Information Privacy and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Investigative and Clinical Dentistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Late Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Latin American Geography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Literacy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Short Story in English     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Thyroid Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transatlantic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of World History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journalism History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journalism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Komunika     Open Access  
L'Espace Politique     Open Access  
L'Homme     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
La corónica : A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
La Presse Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Latin American Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Latin American Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Law, State and Telecommunications Review     Open Access  
Les Cahiers d'Outre-Mer     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media & Jornalismo     Open Access  
Memory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Missionalia : Southern African Journal of Mission Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Museum International Edition Francaise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Natural Language Semantics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Newspaper Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Nordic Journal of Media Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Norsk medietidsskrift     Open Access  
OJS på dansk     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Papers of The Bibliographical Society of Canada     Open Access  
Periodica Mathematica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Physics of the Solid State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pollack Periodica     Full-text available via subscription  
Pozo de Letras     Open Access  
Prometheus : Critical Studies in Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Publishers Weekly     Free   (Followers: 2)
Religion, State and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research Integrity and Peer Review     Open Access  
Revista Observatório     Open Access  
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’économie industrielle     Open Access  
Revue européenne des migrations internationales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RUDN Journal of Studies in Literature and Journalism     Open Access  
Scientometrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Sensorium Journal     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Stellenbosch Theological Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access  
Syntax     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sztuka Edycji     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
TD : The Journal for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa     Open Access  
Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tracés     Open Access  
Transport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Trípodos     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Geesteswetenskappe     Open Access  
Tydskrif vir Letterkunde     Open Access  
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Variants : Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship     Open Access  
Verbum et Ecclesia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Futures: Journal of General Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
British Journal of General Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.906
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0960-1643 - ISSN (Online) 1478-5242
Published by RCGP Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Primary care workforce composition and population, professional, and
           system outcomes: a retrospective cross-sectional analysis

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      Authors: Jon Gibson; Igor Francetic, Sharon Spooner, Kath Checkland, Matt Sutton
      Abstract: BackgroundThe diversification of types of staff delivering primary care may affect professional, population, and system outcomes.AimTo estimate associations between workforce composition and outcomes.Design and settingCross-sectional analysis of 6210 GP practices from a range of geographical settings across England in 2019.MethodA multivariable regression analysis was undertaken, relating numbers of staff in four groups — GPs, nurses, healthcare professionals, and health associate professionals — to patient access and satisfaction, quality of clinical care and prescribing, use of hospital services, GP working conditions (subsample of practices), and costs to the NHS. Data were obtained from the GP Patient Survey 2019, Quality and Outcomes Framework, prescribing data, the Hospital Episode Statistics database, the NHS Payments to General Practice 2019/2020, and the Tenth National GP Worklife Survey 2019.ResultsHaving additional GPs was associated with higher levels of satisfaction for the GPs themselves and for patients, whereas additional staff of other types had opposite associations with these outcomes. Having additional nurses and health associate professionals was associated with lower costs per prescription but more prescribing activity than having additional staff from the other two groups. Having more GPs was associated with higher costs per prescription and lower use of narrow-spectrum antibiotics compared with the other staff groups. Except for health associate professionals, greater staff numbers were associated with more hospital activity.ConclusionProfessional, population, and system outcomes showed a variety of associations with primary care workforce composition. Having additional nurses was associated with lower quality in some aspects, and higher costs and activity. The association between additional healthcare professionals or health associate professionals and higher costs was less than that for additional GPs, but was also linked to lower patient and GP satisfaction.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0593
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Prevalence of burnout among GPs: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Christo Karuna; Victoria Palmer, Anthony Scott, Jane Gunn
      Abstract: BackgroundBurnout is a work-related syndrome documented to have negative consequences for GPs and their patients.AimTo review the existing literature concerning studies published up to December 2020 on the prevalence of burnout among GPs in general practice, and to determine GP burnout estimates worldwide.Design and settingSystematic literature search and meta-analysis.MethodSearches of CINAHL Plus, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Scopus were conducted to identify published peer-reviewed quantitative empirical studies in English up to December 2020 that have used the Maslach Burnout Inventory — Human Services Survey to establish the prevalence of burnout in practising GPs (that is, excluding GPs in training). A random-effects model was employed.ResultsWide-ranging prevalence estimates (6% to 33%) across different dimensions of burnout were reported for 22 177 GPs across 29 countries were reported for 60 studies included in this review. Mean burnout estimates were: 16.43 for emotional exhaustion; 6.74 for depersonalisation; and 29.28 for personal accomplishment. Subgroup and meta-analyses documented that country-specific factors may be important determinants of the variation in GP burnout estimates. Moderate overall burnout cut-offs were found to be determinants of the variation in moderate overall burnout estimates.ConclusionModerate to high GP burnout exists worldwide. However, substantial variations in how burnout is characterised and operationalised has resulted in considerable heterogeneity in GP burnout prevalence estimates. This highlights the challenge of developing a uniform approach, and the importance of considering GPs' work context to better characterise burnout.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0441
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • GP wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review

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      Authors: Laura Jefferson; Su Golder, Claire Heathcote, Ana Castro Avila, Veronica Dale, Holly Essex, Christina van der Feltz Cornelis, Elizabeth McHugh, Thirimon Moe-Byrne, Karen Bloor
      Abstract: BackgroundDoctors’ organisations in the UK have reported worrying levels of work-related stress and burnout in the GP workforce for some time, and the COVID-19 pandemic has presented clear new challenges.AimTo synthesise international evidence exploring the impact of COVID-19 on primary care doctors’ mental health and wellbeing, and identify risk factors associated with their psychological wellbeing during this time.Design and settingMixed-methods systematic review.MethodSix bibliographic databases, Google Scholar, and MedRxiv were searched on 19 November 2020 and 3 June 2021 to identify studies of GP psychological wellbeing during the pandemic. Reference checking was also conducted. Two reviewers selected studies, extracted data, and assessed the quality of studies using standardised tools. Heterogeneity in outcomes, setting, and design prohibited statistical pooling; studies were combined using a convergent integrated thematic synthesis.ResultsThirty-one studies were included. Multiple sources of stress were identified including changed working practices; risk, exposure, and inadequate personal protective equipment (PPE); information overload; pandemic preparedness; and cohesion across sectors. Studies demonstrated an impact on psychological wellbeing, with some GPs experiencing stress, burnout, anxiety, depression, fear of COVID-19, lower job satisfaction, and physical symptoms. Studies reported gender and age differences: women GPs had poorer psychological outcomes across all domains, and older GPs reported greater stress and burnout. Use of outcome measures and reporting practice varied greatly.ConclusionThis review of international evidence demonstrates that the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected GPs’ wellbeing around the world. Further research could explore gender and age differences, identifying interventions targeted to these groups.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0680
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Resident and early-career family physicians’ focused practice choices in
           Canada: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Monisha Kabir; Ellen Randall, Goldis Mitra, M Ruth Lavergne, Ian Scott, David Snadden, Lori Jones, Laurie J Goldsmith, Emily G Marshall, Agnes Grudniewicz
      Abstract: BackgroundFocused practice within family medicine may be increasing globally, but there is limited research on the factors contributing to decisions to focus practice.AimTo examine the factors influencing resident and early-career family physician choices of focused practice across three Canadian provinces.Design and settingA subset of qualitative interview data were analysed from a study across British Columbia, Ontario, and Nova Scotia, Canada.MethodIncluded in the analysis were a total of 22 resident family physicians and 38 early-career family physicians in their first 10 years of practice who intend to or currently practise in a focused area. Comparisons were made for participant types, provinces, and the degree of focused practice, while identifying themes related to factors influencing the pursuit of focused practice.ResultsThree key themes were identified of factors contributing to choices of focused practice: self-preservation within the current structure of the healthcare system; support from colleagues; and training experiences in medical school and/or residency. Minor themes included: alignment of practice with skills, personal values, or ability to derive professional satisfaction; personal lived experiences; and having many attractive opportunities for focused practice.ConclusionBoth groups of participants unanimously viewed focused practice as a way to circumvent the burnout or exhaustion they associated with comprehensive practice in the current structure of the healthcare system. This finding, in addition to other influential factors, was consistent across the three provinces. More research is needed to understand the implications of resident and early-career family physician choices of focused practice within the physician workforce.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0512
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Accessing primary care and the importance of 'human fit’: a qualitative
           participatory case study

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      Authors: Jennifer Voorhees; Simon Bailey, Heather Waterman, Kath Checkland
      Abstract: BackgroundGood access to primary care is an important determinant of population health. While the academic literature on access to care emphasises its complexity, policies aimed at improving access to general practice in the UK have tended to focus on measurable aspects, such as timeliness or number of appointments.AimTo fill the gap between the complex understanding of primary care access in the literature and the narrow definition of access assumed in UK policies.Design and settingQualitative, community-based participatory case study within the geographic footprint of a clinical commissioning group in the north west of England. Data collection took place from October 2015 to October 2016. Purposive sampling and snowball approaches were used to achieve maximum variation among service users and providers across general practice settings.MethodLevesque et al’s conceptual framework of patient-centred access was applied and the study used multiple qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups, and observation). Analysis was ongoing, iterative, inductive, and abductive with the theory.ResultsThe comprehensiveness of Levesque et al’s access theory resonated with diverse participant experiences. However, while its strength was to highlight the importance of people’s abilities to access care, this study’s data suggest equal importance of healthcare workforce abilities to make care accessible. Thus, the authors present a definition of access as the ‘human fit’ between the needs and abilities of people in the population and the abilities and capacity of people in the healthcare workforce, and provide a modified conceptual framework reflecting these insights.ConclusionAn understanding of access as ‘human fit’ has the potential to address longstanding problems of access within general practice, focusing attention on the need for staff training and support, and emphasising the importance of continuity of care.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0375
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Why do GPs rarely do video consultations' qualitative study in UK
           general practice

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      Authors: Trisha Greenhalgh; Emma Ladds, Gemma Hughes, Lucy Moore, Joseph Wherton, Sara E Shaw, Chrysanthi Papoutsi, Sietse Wieringa, Rebecca Rosen, Alexander Rushforth, Sarah Rybczynska-Bunt
      Abstract: BackgroundFewer than 1% of UK general practice consultations occur by video.AimTo explain why video consultations are not more widely used in general practice.Design and settingAnalysis of a sub-sample of data from three mixed-method case studies of remote consultation services in various UK settings from 2019–2021.MethodThe dataset included interviews and focus groups with 121 participants from primary care (33 patients, 55 GPs, 11 other clinicians, nine managers, four support staff, four national policymakers, five technology industry). Data were transcribed, coded thematically, and then analysed using the Planning and Evaluating Remote Consultation Services (PERCS) framework.ResultsWith few exceptions, video consultations were either never adopted or soon abandoned in general practice despite a strong policy push, short-term removal of regulatory and financial barriers, and advances in functionality, dependability, and usability of video technologies (though some products remained ‘fiddly’ and unreliable). The relative advantage of video was perceived as minimal for most of the caseload of general practice, since many presenting problems could be sorted adequately and safely by telephone and in-person assessment was considered necessary for the remainder. Some patients found video appointments convenient, appropriate, and reassuring but others found a therapeutic presence was only achieved in person. Video sometimes added value for out-of-hours and nursing home consultations and statutory functions (for example, death certification).ConclusionEfforts to introduce video consultations in general practice should focus on situations where this modality has a clear relative advantage (for example, strong patient or clinician preference, remote localities, out-of-hours services, nursing homes).
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0658
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Intra-abdominal cancer risk with abdominal pain: a prospective cohort
           primary care study

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      Authors: Sarah J Price; Niamh Gibson, William T Hamilton, Angela King, Elizabeth A Shephard
      Abstract: BackgroundQuantifying cancer risk in primary care patients with abdominal pain informs diagnostic strategies.AimTo quantify oesophagogastric, colorectal, liver, pancreatic, ovarian, uterine, kidney, and bladder cancer risks associated with newly reported abdominal pain with or without other symptoms, signs, or abnormal blood tests (that is, features) indicative of possible cancer.Design and settingThis was an observational prospective cohort study using Clinical Practice Research Datalink records with English cancer registry linkage.MethodThe authors studied 125 793 patients aged ≥40 years with newly reported abdominal pain in primary care between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. The 1-year cumulative incidence of cancer, and the composite 1-year cumulative incidence of cancers with shared additional features, stratified by age and sex are reported.ResultsWith abdominal pain, overall risk was greater in men and increased with age, reaching 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.0 to 3.7, predominantly colorectal cancer 1.9%, 95% CI = 1.6 to 2.1) in men ≥70 years, compared with their expected incidence of 0.88% (95% CI = 0.87 to 0.89). Additional features increased cancer risk; for example, for men, colorectal or pancreatic cancer risk with abdominal pain plus diarrhoea at 60–69 years of age was 3.1% (95% CI = 1.9 to 4.9) predominantly colorectal cancer (2.2%, 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.8).ConclusionAbdominal pain increases intra-abdominal cancer risk nearly fourfold in men aged ≥70 years, exceeding the 3% threshold warranting investigation. This threshold is surpassed for the>60 years age group only with additional features. These results will help direct appropriate referral and testing strategies for patients based on their demographic profile and reporting features. The authors suggest non-invasive strategies first, such as faecal immunochemical testing, with safety-netting in a shared decision-making framework.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0552
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Low-value pharmaceutical care among Dutch GPs: a retrospective cohort
           study

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      Authors: Joris LJM Muskens; Simone A van Dulmen, Tȷerk Wiersma, Jako S Burgers, Karin Hek, Gert P Westert, Rudolf B Kool
      Abstract: BackgroundLow-value pharmaceutical care exists in general practice. However, the extent among Dutch GPs remains unknown.AimTo assess the prevalence of low-value pharmaceutical care among Dutch GPs.Design and settingRetrospective cohort study using data from patient records.MethodThe prevalence of three types of pharmaceutical care prescribed by GPs between 2016 and 2019 were examined: topical antibiotics for conjunctivitis, benzodiazepines for non-specific lower back pain, and chronic acid-reducing medication (ARM) prescriptions. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed to assess prescribing variation and the influence of patient characteristics on receiving a low-value prescription.ResultsLarge variation in prevalence as well as practice variation was observed among the types of low-value pharmaceutical GP care examined. Between 53% and 61% of patients received an inappropriate antibiotics prescription for conjunctivitis, around 3% of patients with lower back pain received an inappropriate benzodiazepine prescription, and 88% received an inappropriate chronic ARM prescription during the years examined. The odds of receiving an inappropriate antibiotic or benzodiazepine prescription increased with age (P
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2021.0625
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Truth to Power: Calling for Another Collings

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      Authors: Euan Lawson
      Pages: 203 - 203
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719201
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • The workforce crisis in general practice

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      Authors: Martin Marshall; Margaret Ikpoh
      Pages: 204 - 205
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719213
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • GP workforce crisis: what can we do now'

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      Authors: Laura Jefferson; Mike Holmes
      Pages: 206 - 207
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719225
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Continuity of GP care: using personal lists in general practice

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      Authors: Denis Pereira Gray; Kate Sidaway-Lee, Philip Evans
      Pages: 208 - 209
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719237
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Creating space for gut feelings in the diagnosis of cancer in primary care

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      Authors: Claire Friedemann Smith; Brian D Nicholson
      Pages: 210 - 211
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719249
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • 2020 vision' A retrospective study of time-bound curative claims in
           British and Irish newspapers

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      Authors: Douglas GJ McKechnie; M Ahmed Rashid, Margaret McCartney
      Pages: 213 - 214
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719261
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • GPs’ understanding of the wider workforce in primary care

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      Authors: Emer Forde; Katie Collins
      Pages: 214 - 214
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719273
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Verschlimmbesserung

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      Authors: Hilary A Lavender
      Pages: 214 - 214
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719465
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Correction

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      Pages: 214 - 214
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719285
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Editorial note

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      Pages: 214 - 214
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719297
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • They should: workforce, politics, and GP survival

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      Authors: Andrew Papanikitas
      Pages: 224 - 224
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719309
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Southgate’s sign

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      Authors: Peter Toon
      Pages: 225 - 225
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719321
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Ethics and toxic high-workload work environments

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      Authors: Martyn Hewett
      Pages: 226 - 227
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719333
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Where is the sales pitch for NHS primary care careers'

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      Authors: Joel Brown
      Pages: 228 - 228
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719345
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
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      Pages: 229 - 229
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719357
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Women at the heart of general practice: the exhibition curator’s
           view

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      Authors: Briony Hudson
      Pages: 230 - 231
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719369
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Yonder: Anticipatory medications, food insecurity, childhood vaccination,
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      Authors: Ahmed Rashid
      Pages: 232 - 232
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719381
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Television: This Is Going to Hurt

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      Authors: Giles Dawnay
      Pages: 233 - 233
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719393
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • General practice not general perfect

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      Authors: Tim Senior
      Pages: 234 - 234
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719405
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • How to improve practice by means of the Audit Project Odense method

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      Authors: Malene Pleȷdrup Hansen; Jesper Lykkegaard, Jens Sondergaard, Anders Munck, Carl Llor
      Pages: 235 - 236
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      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719417
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • Prevention in practice: why is it neglected and what can we do'

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      Pages: 237 - 238
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719429
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
  • NICE chronic primary pain guidelines: what the busy GP needs to know

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      Pages: 240 - 241
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      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
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      Authors: Samuel Finnikin; James P Sheppard
      Pages: 242 - 243
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T16:05:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.3399/bjgp22X719441
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 718 (2022)
       
 
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