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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Journal of Maritime Archaeology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1557-2293 - ISSN (Online) 1557-2285
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Innes McCartney: Echoes from the Deep: Inventorising Shipwrecks at the
           National Scale by the Application of Marine Geophysics and the Historical
           Text

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      PubDate: 2022-11-28
       
  • Traditional Shipbuilding Communities: An Urgent and Neglected Research
           Topic in Maritime Anthropology

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      Abstract: Abstract Equating maritime anthropology to the ethnography of fishing communities has driven researchers to neglect certain subjects (and objects) such as traditional shipbuilding communities. It has also limited the array of sources of information. Few anthropological studies have focused on traditional boat building, while these practices are heading toward extinction, given the wide distribution, increasing reliability, and decreasing prices of synthetic materials for ship and boat construction. While fiberglass boats are replacing wooden vessels, many artisan shipbuilding traditions around the world have managed to survive, but most of them have remained in the shadows. This paper provides a seminal state of the art and points out sources of information to solve questions on traditional shipbuilding. It attempts to propose a methodology based in a set of questions that anthropologists should ask when recording traditional shipbuilding practices. We argue that the information gathered by following the set of questions is valuable for its own sake in order to maintain vanishing maritime traditions, but the surviving ethnographical record is also priceless as it is the only way to fill gaps in the archaeological and historical record. Finally, it contains a short reflection on the difficulties of building a typology of traditionally built vessels.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • Scott S. Williams and Roberto Junco, Editors: The Archaeology of Manila
           Galleons in the American Continent: The Wrecks of Baja California, San
           Agustín, and Santo Cristo de Burgos (Oregon)

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      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • Four Rare Ring-Shaped Artifacts from Antalya and Mediterranean Diver
           Weights of Antiquity

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      Abstract: Abstract Four rare discoveries from the coast of Antalya provide evidence that divers were active in the area during the Hellenistic-Roman Periods as has been indicated in many different sites of the Mediterranean basin in the same period. The first discovery was a stone tool found off the ancient Cilicia Region on Alanya-Antalya coastline of Southern Turkey in 2011. The second find was discovered in 2019, off the coast of ancient Lycia region, alongside the shores of the Three-Islands of Kemer-Antalya. This second artifact is a more familiar ring-shaped object made of lead. It is similar to objects found off the coast of Israel and identified as “salvage rings.” These two objects were found as lone objects, neither associated with a shipwreck nor within a specific context. These were followed by two other ring-shaped objects found in 2021, again off the ancient Lycia region, one in Kaş and the other one on the Kekova coastline. Both of these objects are marble weights and akin to the one which had been found on the coast of Caesarea, Israel and named as a “salvaging ring” in the literature. These two marble rings have been found near shipwrecks. One surmises they were possibly used by divers to retrieve some sunken cargo. All four finds could be examples of diver weights that were used by ancient divers for reaching the desired depths faster for salvage operations or other diving activities such as harvesting sponges and oysters. Artifacts of these sorts found on the seabed are extremely rare. Along the entire 640 km Antalya coastline, over a time span of two decades, these are the only four recovered objects. In searching for the history of these artifacts and their originally intended purposes, a study is conducted with similar objects from different sites of the Mediterranean. This paper concludes with a recent experiment to test whether the artifacts could have been diver weights.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
       
  • Anne Haour and Annalisa Christie, Editors: Archaeological Investigations
           of the Maldives in the Medieval Islamic Period: Ibn Battuta’s Island

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      PubDate: 2022-10-28
       
  • Two Odd Ones Out: Mediterranean Ballast Stones and Italian Maritime
           Connections in the Medieval Bruges’ Harbor System

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      Abstract: Abstract Excavations in the Bruges’ Medieval outer ports of Hoeke and Monnikerede, located along the Zwin tidal inlet, revealed numerous rounded cobbles of exotic geological provenance among which were two specimens of remarkable mineralogical composition. An interdisciplinary study combining archeological, geological, petrographic-geochemical, and historical research has demonstrated their Mediterranean, i.e., Italian, provenance. A first stone is identified as Carrara marble originating from the alluvial fans of the Apuan Alps, deposited along the Versilian coast near the Renaissance towns of Lucca, Pisa, and Genoa. The second cobble is determined as a bioclastic calcarenite limestone from the Apulian shores. Both finds are interpreted as part of the non-saleable ballast once put in the holds of Italian carracks and galleys that touched the Flemish ports during the late thirteenth to fifteenth centuries. As such, both seemingly ordinary objects constitute a rare material and lithological testimony of an important late Medieval commercial network between the Mediterranean and North Sea coasts. Furthermore, the very rare occurrence of these Mediterranean cobbles compared to thousands of Scando-Baltic and Anglo-Scottish ballast stones in the whole of the Bruges outer harbor area can be related to differences in maritime traffic frequency and sheer commercial volumes. Also, the nature of the ballast itself and the ballasting procedures are important, the whole making Mediterranean ballast stones considerably less detectable in the Bruges’ harbors than their North-European equivalents.
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
       
  • Sara A. Rich: Shipwreck Hauntography: Underwater Ruins and the Uncanny

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      PubDate: 2022-10-17
       
  • Coastal Landscapes, Environmental Change, and Maritime Cultural Heritage
           Resources in Morocco: The Case Study of Essaouira

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      Abstract: Abstract Maritime cultural heritage (MCH) resources are non-renewable; research frameworks and mitigation plans to study and address the threats to these are essential, particularly throughout the coastal Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. In Morocco, frameworks and plans addressing and incorporating MCH in the coastal zone have been recently established. To assist in their continued development, this article presents the case study of the Moroccan Atlantic coastal city of Essaouira, examined by the Maritime Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa Project (MarEA). The aim is to demonstrate the potential in a multi-faceted methodology to identify changes in coastal landscapes and their impact on MCH, based on environmental and archaeological data, supplemented by historic and satellite imagery. The data are collected through desk-based analyses (DBA) that are then ground-truthed. The case study demonstrates an effective and efficient approach that provides high-resolution data from which specific processes and threats can be identified. This analysis can serve as a basis for recommendations and future heritage management practices and research strategies, not only at Essaouira, but for MCH resources within rich coastal landscapes regionally and nationally.
      PubDate: 2022-09-26
       
  • Changing Urban Environments and the Impact on Coastal Cultural Heritage at
           Marsa Matruh, Egypt

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines the impact of urban expansion on coastal heritage in and around the port-city of Marsa Matruh on the northwest coast of Egypt. The city is located along a series of lagoons that have offered safe harbor for ships since antiquity. Over the last 80 years Marsa Matruh has developed from a small settlement of a few houses into a large port city that sprawls along the lagoons and further inland. The continuous growth has damaged or destroyed many of the remains of previous human occupation, including ancient harbor facilities. Evidence suggests that people have lived around these lagoons since at least the Bronze Age and a port town developed in the classical period on this important crossroad for transport and trade. Based on previous publications, historical aerial photographs and satellite imagery, this illustrates the range of heritage that once was present, from the ancient settlement, harbor, and rock cut tombs to remains from the two World Wars. It demonstrates how urban expansion has affected those sites and discusses the threats to coastal heritage to the west of Marsa Matruh, where new construction projects have recently emerged.
      PubDate: 2022-09-26
       
  • Exploring the Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Oman’s Maritime Cultural
           Heritage Through the Lens of Al-Baleed, Salalah (Dhofar Governorate)

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      Abstract: Abstract Tropical cyclones are among the most detrimental hazards to the environment, societies, and economies, each year affecting millions of people and resulting in substantial casualties and material destructions in coastal communities. In this context, maritime cultural heritage, encompassing material evidence for the engagement of people with the sea, both on land and under water, is particularly vulnerable. Despite the significant number of archaeological sites exposed to tropical cyclones and other extreme sea-level events, maritime cultural heritage in the MENA region is rarely included in coastal vulnerability indices or incorporated in mitigation strategies, disaster management, sustainability, and resilience policies. In this study we examine the impact of tropical cyclones on the maritime archaeology of Oman with emphasis on the Dhofar region. This paper builds on existing coastal research in the Dhofar region—an area identified as the most cyclone-prone administrative region in Oman, but also an area that contains substantial archaeological remains. Central among Dhofar’s maritime cultural heritage is Al-Baleed, a Medieval seaport with unparalleled evidence of engagement with international trade networks.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Documenting, Protecting and Managing Endangered Maritime Cultural Heritage
           in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region

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      Abstract: Abstract For millennia, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has been a culturally dynamic zone, bounded by maritime societies dependent on the sea for communication, trade and livelihoods. The archaeological evidence of these past societies represents an extraordinary physical legacy of human endeavour and presence across this region, contributing to senses of place, identity and belonging amongst contemporary coastal communities. However, the coastal landscapes and marine environment of the MENA region are undergoing a period of profound change, associated with large-scale human development and climate change. In order to assess this change and the level of impact on the resource, the Maritime Endangered Archaeology project (MarEA) was established in 2019 to document cultural heritage sites and landscapes across the coastal and near-shore zones of the survey region. This paper introduces the work of the project and outlines a series of case studies presented in this volume that are representative of the variety and depth of work being undertaken within the project.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • From the Coast to the High Mountains: A Remote Sensing Survey of
           Disturbances and Threats to the Archaeology and Heritage of South Sinai

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      Abstract: Abstract The archaeology and heritage of South Sinai is rich and varied. Most research to date has focused on the High Mountains, specifically the area around the famous St Catherine’s Monastery, placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2002 (Saint Catherine Area, World Heritage Site 954). Recently, the Sinai Peninsula Research and the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa projects have focused on the landscape surrounding the St Catherine’s Monastery. These projects highlighted the wealth of archaeological and heritage sites spanning the prehistoric to modern periods, including sites that are still in use by local communities today, as well as the environmental and anthropogenic factors that threaten their survival, such as climate change, tourism, and the impact of infrastructure developments. By contrast, the archaeology and heritage of the coastal areas was never surveyed systematically until the research presented in this paper. Remote sensing work by the Maritime Endangered Archaeology project revealed a coastal landscape that is likewise rich in archaeological and heritage sites. As in the High Mountains, many of the coastal sites are under significant threat, but they do not enjoy the same level of recognition and protection. This paper compares the coastal sites to those in the High Mountains, including their disturbances and threats, and demonstrates the need for a locally specific heritage management and protection strategy for different parts of South Sinai.
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • D. Bernal-Casasola, D. Malfitana, A. Mazzaglia, J.J. Díaz: Le cetariae
           ellenistiche e romane di Portopalo (Sicilia). Primi resultati da ricerche
           interdisciplinari / Las cetariae helenísticas y romanas de Portopalo
           (Sicilia). Primeros apuntes interdisciplinares

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      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09340-5
       
  • The Cyrenaica Coastal Survey Project: Documenting Endangered Maritime
           Heritage in Libya

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper introduces the Cyrenaica Coastal Survey (CCS), a collaborative project between the Maritime Endangered Archaeology project and the Department of Antiquities (DoA) Cyrenaica in partnership with the Universities of Al Bayda and Benghazi in Libya. Since the Arab Spring in 2011 and the subsequent civil unrest in Libya, heritage professionals, the DoA, and various individuals interested in heritage have struggled to safeguard heritage sites across the country, as policies and laws that protected archaeological sites were no longer reinforced and adhered to in the wake of the revolution. This lack of finances, capacity, and governmental support led to an unprecedented loss of archaeological sites since 2011. The CCS survey records the current condition of maritime sites along the Cyrenaican coast. The project focuses on the smaller, lesser known, coastal heritage sites that are not as well studied as the much larger classical period port towns of Apollonia, Tocra, or Ptolemais. This article will focus on the results of the first phase of the project between ancient Phycus (modern Zawiet el-Hamama) and Kainopolis (modern Al-Ogla). The results of the first stage of the Cyrenaica Coastal Survey provides a snapshot of the damages and threats that coastal heritage faces in Libya, most notably (often unregulated) building activities, clearance, sand mining, and coastal erosion. Furthermore, this article highlights the importance of remote collaboration between UK institutions, in-country partners, and heritage authorities, especially in countries where the discipline of maritime archaeology has been established more recently.
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09336-1
       
  • Maritime Cultural Heritage, Coastal Change and Threat Assessment in Syria

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      Abstract: Abstract Syria’s coastal and nearshore zone contains a significant, but under-researched, record of maritime cultural heritage (MCH) ranging from prehistory to the present. This is exemplified by a lack of underwater investigations, but also limited investigation of key onshore maritime sites such as ports and harbours. There is also a lack of specialist in-country management regarding maritime cultural heritage research and protection. This situation has been worsened by the ongoing conflict (since 2011), which has reduced (already limited) field investigation. To assist in the advancement of Syrian maritime archaeology, this paper presents a baseline assessment which makes use of a geospatial database generated from satellite imagery as well as both published and grey literature. This assessment reviews past coastal environment changes affecting the Syrian littoral, and then highlights past disturbances and potential future threats impacting the MCH. This is done through analysis of all coastal/nearshore sites documented to date and showcased in more detail using two case studies: Tabbat al-Hammam and Ras Ibn Hani. This enables discussion of the current state of Syrian maritime archaeology and suggests ways forward for its future management and investigation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09339-y
       
  • Ses Fontanelles Shipwreck (Mallorca, Balearic Islands): An Exceptional
           Late Roman Vessel and Its Cargo

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      Abstract: Abstract This article summarises the results of the underwater rescue excavation of the shipwreck of Ses Fontanelles (Mallorca, Balearic Islands). The excavation documented the remains of a vessel, 12 m long and 5 m beam, loaded with two tiers of amphorae, which had set sail from the south-eastern Iberian Peninsula. The cargo includes numerous amphorae which were still sealed and bearing tituli picti, allowing for the analysis of their content. There is little doubt that the shipwreck of Ses Fontanelles is a key site for our understanding of third–fourth-century trade in the Western Mediterranean.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09331-6
       
  • The Construction of an Historical Boat in South Sulawesi (Indonesia): The
           Padewakang

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      Abstract: Abstract Padewakang was a type of long-distance sailing vessels that, since at least the early eighteenth century, was mainly built in South Sulawesi and used throughout the Malay Archipelago and beyond for blue-water trading and fishing ventures. In 2019, the Abu Hanifa Institute in Sydney commissioned the construction of such a boat, Nur Al-Marege, for a documentary film at a shipyard in Tana Beru, a village in the district of Bontobahari (South Sulawesi, Indonesia), that in 2017 was inscribed into the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity for its historic tradition of an extensive wooden boat industry. This was the occasion for a team of scholars, both independent and from the Universitas Indonesia and Università di Napoli “L’Orientale” to analyze iconographic sources and historical documents relating to the padewakang and to document a contemporary process of wooden boat construction by interviewing people involved in this activity. The article aims to summarize previous and current studies on shipbuilding activities in Tana Beru, to present the iconographic study which led to the reconstruction of the padewakang, and present a description of the conception and actual execution of the Nur Al-Marege construction and its representation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09332-5
       
  • Connie Kelleher: The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic Piracy in
           the Early Seventeenth Century

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      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09329-0
       
  • Chunming Wu and Barry Vladimir Rolett, Editors: Prehistoric Maritime
           Cultures and Seafaring in East Asia, Volume 1

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      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09327-2
       
  • Islands of Salt: Historical Archaeology of Seafarers and Things in the
           Venezuelan Caribbean 1624–1880

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      PubDate: 2022-02-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11457-022-09325-4
       
 
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