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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
Showing 1 - 57 of 57 Journals sorted by number of followers
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Journal of Archaeological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
European Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 65)
World Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Oxford Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Archaeological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Environmental Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Field Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity and Classics     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Archaeological Science : Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Journal of Roman Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Nottingham Medieval Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Maritime Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Industrial Archaeology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the British Archaeological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Papers of the British School at Rome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Post-Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Digital Applications in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Internet Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Radiocarbon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Norwegian Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnoarchaeology : Journal of Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Experimental Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Public Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Palestine Exploration Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Open Archaeology Data     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Scottish Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Wetland Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Neolithic Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Mélanges de l’École française de Rome - Moyen Âge     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Inner Asian Art and Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Rock Art Research: The Journal of the Australian Rock Art Research Association (AURA)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Tel Aviv : Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Iranica Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pacific Archaeology     Free   (Followers: 6)
Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Science and Technology of Archaeological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Yorkshire Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paléo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
North American Archaeologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Time and Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Archaeometry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archaeofauna     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lithic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archaeological Research in Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liber Annuus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Northeast Historical Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Islamic Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Lithic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Danish Institute at Athens     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Iraq     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Celtica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
California Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Karthago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trabajos de Prehistoria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'Égyptologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Zooarchaeology / Zooarchéologie canadienne     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Documenta Praehistorica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Les Cahiers de l’École du Louvre     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Δελτίον Χριστιανικής Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biourbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Archéologique de l’Ouest     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Complutum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ñawpa Pacha : Journal of Andean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Memorias. Revista Digital de Historia y Arqueologia desde el Caribe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Siècles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palaeoindian Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La zaranda de ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SAGVNTVM. Papeles del Laboratorio de Arqueología de Valencia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cane Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Restauro Archeologico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Florentia Iliberritana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’Alsace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Archaeologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Virtual Archaeology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Layers. Archeologia Territorio Contesti     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Glacial Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Nouvelles de l'archéologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Archipel     Open Access  
ROMVLA     Open Access  
SCIRES-IT : SCIentific RESearch and Information Technology     Open Access  
The Midden     Open Access  
Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia     Open Access  
Ausgrabungen und Funde in Westfalen-Lippe     Open Access  
Archäologische Informationen     Open Access  
Revista Atlántica-Mediterránea de Prehistoria y Arqueología Social     Open Access  
Cadernos do LEPAARQ     Open Access  
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Zephyrvs     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
LANX: Rivista della Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.014
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7764 - ISSN (Online) 1072-5369
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • More than Just Clovis: the Broad Impact of Sampling Bias on Archaeological
           Site Distributions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The potential influence of bias long has haunted archaeological practice and discourse. In North America, late Pleistocene fluted-point studies commonly assess the role of sampling, or recovery, bias on site distributions, often with conflicting results. Interestingly, archaeologists rarely examine potential sampling bias on the distributions of later, post-Paleoindian assemblages. In this study, I evaluated how three commonly cited sources of bias in fluted-point research — modern population density, land cover, and research intensity — impacted late Pleistocene through middle Holocene site distributions in the upper Ohio Valley. Results indicate that Paleoindian, Early Archaic, and Late Archaic site locations all positively correlate to areas of dense modern populations, presence of agricultural land, and intensity of research activity. This highlights the conspicuous fact that sampling bias is ubiquitous and affects more than just our oldest assemblages. Since bias is impossible to eliminate entirely from legacy collections, this study proposes two quantitatively simple methods for working with biased datasets: (i) data scaling and (ii) cross-temporal comparison. Data scaling transforms site counts into a ratio to facilitate comparison between analytical units with variable research histories. Cross-temporal comparison relies on the presence of artifacts from one period at find spots to validate the absence of artifacts from additional periods. Application of these approaches reveal several cultural trends, most notably that strong cultural ties existed between the Bluegrass region of the Ohio Valley and the Midsouth during the late Pleistocene with subsequent localization of group interaction during the succeeding Holocene.
      PubDate: 2022-09-24
       
  • The Technological Behaviours of Homo antecessor: Core Management and
           Reduction Intensity at Gran Dolina-TD6.2 (Atapuerca, Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract The ability of early hominins to overcome the constraints imposed by the characteristics of raw materials used for stone tool production is a key topic on the discussion about the evolution of hominin cognitive capabilities and technical behaviours. Thus, technological variability has been the centrepiece on this debate. However, the variability of lithic assemblages cannot be correctly interpreted without understanding site occupational models and function and considering that individual tools represent specific discard moments in a continuous reduction process. In Europe, the earliest technological record is represented by the scarce and scattered Mode 1 technologies, often deriving from occasional occupations or restricted activity areas yielding unrepresentative assemblages. In this paper, we approach the technological behaviours exhibited by Lower Palaeolithic hominins from the subunit TD6.2 of the Gran Dolina site (Atapuerca, Burgos) by including the perspective of reduction intensity studies on the analysis of technological variability. Gran Dolina TD6.2 is a unique and extremely significant archaeological context, as it represents the oldest multi-layered unit of domestic hominin occupations in the Early Pleistocene of Europe. We use the Volumetric Reconstruction Method (VRM) to estimate the original volume of the blanks and quantify the reduction intensity of each core individually to characterise the reduction distribution patterns using Weibull probability distribution functions. Our results suggest differential raw material management in terms of reduction intensity, according to the characteristics of each lithology. This could reflect a solid understanding of raw material qualities and a certain degree of planning. Altogether, the continuity between knapping strategies through reduction denotes constant adaptation to raw material constraints as well as particular knapping conditions, rather than specific compartmentalised mental schemes. In conclusion, Homo antecessor toolmakers would have been situational knappers whose technological behaviour would be highly adaptive. This research constitutes the first reduction approach for the European Early Pleistocene assemblages that will lead to a referential framework for other European Early Pleistocene sites.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • Dots on the Map: Issues in the Archaeological Analysis of Site Locations

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      Abstract: Abstract The analysis of site locations is an important component of archaeological research. Recent advances in this topic include the use of ecological models such as the ideal free distribution and its variants, which predict site locations under various conditions in relation to criteria that promote the greatest adaptive success. Such models can face problems in determining such criteria and especially their relative importance. Another approach, which can be used in conjunction with these models, uses the concept of decision trees to infer the relative ranking and the hierarchy of the role of different criteria in the actual locational decisions underlying site placement. Examples from ethnography and European archaeology demonstrate this approach and additionally allow the consideration of another issue, the contexts in which site function and location are likely to be strongly correlated.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • A Journey Begins with a Single Step: How Early Holocene Humans and Wild
           Boar (Sus scrofa) Embarked on the Pathway to Domestication in the Eastern
           Fertile Crescent

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      Abstract: Abstract Analysis of a large assemblage of Sus scrofa remains from Hallan Çemi, an Early Holocene (c. 11,700 BP) site in southeastern Turkey, provides new insights into pre-domestication patterns of human harvesting and management of this important species. Harvest profiles resulting from a range of documented hunting and herding strategies, when combined with new methods for demographic profiling, reveal emergent mutualisms between humans and wild boar that set the stage for active management. As local wild boar populations began taking advantage of increasingly anthropogenically altered environments around Hallan Çemi, humans developed procurement strategies that both increased harvest yields and helped sustain population levels of S. scrofa. The evolution of these strategies into more active management at later sites in the region is also traced. New methods for detecting morphological change in S. scrofa over the c. 300 year occupation of Hallan Çemi show that lower molars underwent size change. Metric data from 18 contemporary and later sites reveals the differential impacts of emergent domestication on different S. scrofa skeletal elements over a 4000-year period. Taxonomic and part distributional data highlight the increasing importance of S. scrofa in feasting activities at Hallan Çemi over time. We conclude that feasting and other community-enhancing activities at Hallan Çemi worked together with increasing engagement in niche modification to promote the level of cohesion and material support needed to sustain a sedentary community over the longue durée and to create the sustained interactions needed for domestication.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • Identifying the Impact of Soil Ingestion on Dental Microwear Textures
           Using a Wild Boar Experimental Model

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      Abstract: Abstract Dental microwear has been widely used to reconstruct mammals’ past diet and to understand their dental evolution. In archaeology, it can help reconstruct anthropogenic herd-feeding systems. However, deciphering the impact of exogenous mineral particles on dental wear is an ongoing challenge since studies have shown that soil ingestion can generates microwear traces that interfere with the dietary signals. To bridge this gap, this study relies on the first large-scale controlled-food experiment on wild boars (Sus scrofa) to test how soil ingestion can affect the dietary signal recorded in dental microwear. It provides the opportunity to investigate the impact of natural soil ingestion over microwear traces by comparing penned boars that were able to root with stalled boars that were not. We performed 3D Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) on 22 controlled-fed boars kept captive either in an indoor stall with no soil ingestion, or in a wooded pen with natural soil ingestion. We analysed shearing and crushing facets on upper and lower first and second molars using standard texture parameters. We also conducted particle size distribution analyses of the ingested soil. In line with previous works, the consumption of exogenous abrasives in rooting boars leads to less rough, less complex and more anisotropic wear surfaces than in stall-fed boars, even though they received the same diet. Thus, we highly recommend studying DMT when investigating ancient pig husbandry systems, particularly local changes in food management. Overall, this study contributes to a better comprehension of how exogenous abrasives impact DMT among mammals.
      PubDate: 2022-09-10
       
  • Water Flows and Water Accumulations on Bedrock as a Structuring Element of
           Rock Art

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper proposes a new method to quantify the flow of water and water accumulation zones on bedrock panels. This can be used to investigate how water influences the placement of rock art. The analysis is based on photogrammetric models on which water flows and accumulations were modelled using a NetLogo simulation and the SAGA hydrology package. To test the hypothesis that water was a structuring element in the creation of rock art, case studies of Bohus-granite panels from south-western Sweden were used. The described approach should be possible to use on most rock art placed on bedrock panels regardless of rock type, its state of cleaning, or present microfauna. The modelling of water flows and accumulations is a powerful tool to compare the image placement and image density in relation to water even on widely separated panels on which such observations cannot be made directly.
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
       
  • Correction to: (Sea)ways of Perception: an Integrated
           Maritime‑Terrestrial Approach to Modelling Prehistoric Seafaring

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Investigating Isotopic Niche Space: Using rKIN for Stable Isotope Studies
           in Archaeology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Archaeological applications of stable isotope data have become increasingly prevalent, and the use of these data continues to expand rapidly. Researchers are starting to find that recovering data for multiple elements provides additional insight and quantitative data for answering questions about past human activities and behaviors. Many stable isotope studies in archaeology, however, rarely move beyond comparisons of descriptive statistics such as mean, median, and standard deviation. Over the last decade, ecologists have formalized the concept of isotopic niche space, and corresponding isotopic niche overlap, to incorporate data from two or more isotopic systems into a single analysis. Additionally, several methods for quantifying isotopic niche space and overlap are now available. Here, I describe the evolution of the isotopic niche space concept and demonstrate the usefulness of it for archaeological research through three case studies using the recently developed rKIN package that allows for a comparison of different methods of isotopic niche space and overlap estimations. Two case studies apply these new measures to previously published studies, while a third case study illustrates its applicability to exploring new hypotheses and research directions. The benefits and limitations of quantifying isotopic niche space and overlap are discussed, as well as suggestions for data reporting and transparency when using these methods. Isotopic niche space and overlap metrics will allow archaeologists to extract more nuanced information from stable isotope datasets in their drive to understand more fully the histories of the human conditions.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Multiproxy Analysis of Adhered and Absorbed Food Residues Associated with
           Pottery

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      Abstract: Abstract The application of multiple lines of evidence is necessary to understand past complex behaviors such as diet and cuisine. This paper advocates for the use of multiple proxies to analyze the compositional content of absorbed and adhered food residues associated with ceramic cooking pots. Foods represented by starches and phytoliths in adhered carbonized residues, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values in adhered residues, and absorbed lipid residues are identified. Patterns of interior carbonized food remains are used to interpret cooking mode or style, and, when considered in context with identified food types, allow for the reconstruction of ancient cooking practices and cuisine. The collective results provide a more holistic picture of ancient cuisine than any individual proxy because of the unique yet complementary data each provides. The efficacy of this approach is demonstrated with a curated pottery assemblage from the Northern Great Lakes in what is today the state of Michigan. However, the multiproxy analysis described is applicable to pottery collections found anywhere in the world.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Urban Open Space and Governance in Ancient Mesoamerica

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      Abstract: Abstract Analyzing the nature of governance of early states and cities is a major challenge for archaeology today. Blanton and Fargher’s (Blanton and Fargher, 2008) influential model of early state governance has proven difficult to operationalize using archaeological data. In this paper, we explore a possible material correlate of collective and autocratic governance: the amount of formal open space in a capital city. We use a sample of premodern Mesoamerican cities to evaluate whether or not these spaces functioned as public goods provided by collective governments. Our assumption is that a positive relationship between the amount of public space and the size of cities indicates that plazas functioned as public goods. In our sample of Mesoamerican cities, we find that the plaza-city size relationship does indeed imply that plazas were public goods. This finding is inconsistent with prior analysis of an expanded cross-cultural sample where no such relationship existed, suggesting that the relationship between the formal public space and the form of governance may be culturally specific to Mesoamerica. These results reflect the complexity of the dynamics of early cities and their governance and suggest that the classification of public goods must be attentive to cross-cultural variation.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Provisioning an Early City: Spatial Equilibrium in the Agricultural
           Economy at Angkor, Cambodia

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      Abstract: Abstract A dominant view in economic anthropology is that farmers must overcome decreasing marginal returns in the process of intensification. However, it is difficult to reconcile this view with the emergence of urban systems, which require substantial increases in labor productivity to support a growing non-farming population. This quandary is starkly posed by the rise of Angkor (Cambodia, 9th–fourteenth centuries CE), one of the most extensive preindustrial cities yet documented through archaeology. Here, we leverage extensive documentation of the Greater Angkor Region to illustrate how the social and spatial organization of agricultural production contributed to its food system. First, we find evidence for supra-household-level organization that generated increasing returns to farming labor. Second, we find spatial patterns which indicate that land-use choices took transportation costs to the urban core into account. These patterns suggest agricultural production at Angkor was organized in ways that are more similar to other forms of urban production than to a smallholder system.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Comparative Analysis of Three Analytical Methodologies for Polychrome
           Design: Ceramic Typology, Design Elements/Styles, and Design Symmetries on
           Chihuahuan Polychromes

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      Abstract: Abstract The analysis of pattern design on ceramics, textiles, tile and other plane surfaces remains dominated by typological, design element and stylistic approaches. In this paper, I compare these approaches with a classification system that describes patterns by the geometric symmetries that combine and repeat the pattern parts. I argue that these standard plane pattern symmetry classes enable systematic, objective descriptions of decorated material. I use an analysis of the symmetric structures and colors of designs on whole and partial Chihuahuan polychrome vessels from the Pueblo IV period site of Paquimé (Casas Grandes), Chihuahua, Mexico, to illustrate how a standardized classification system that focuses on the structure of pattern parts rather than on the pattern parts themselves reveals a number of new insights on a body of well-studied material.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Crafting Social Networks: the Production of Obsidian Stemmed Tools in the
           Willaumez Peninsula, Papua New Guinea

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      Abstract: Abstract Widely held assumptions about static societies during the early-middle Holocene (c. 10,000–3300 BP) in the Willaumez Peninsula, Papua New Guinea are challenged by a hypothetical reconstruction of social negotiations that we propose were embedded within the manufacture of large obsidian stemmed tools that circulated as cultural valuables. Made by skilled knappers, these artefacts were manufactured in stages (quarrying, preform production, shaping, hafting, and re-hafting) often segregated in discrete and possibly restricted locations. The successful completion of a large obsidian stemmed tool may have required effective management to negotiate multiple social networks, thereby enhancing the status of those who directed the process. Social connections forged and re-inforced to support the production process may also have been enhanced by ritual practices. Through the social links created and strengthened by the process of its crafting and the subsequent ceremonies and exchanges in which it circulated, a stemmed tool contributed to a vibrant social life that persisted over several millennia.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Self-Organized Cultural Cycles and the Uncertainty of Archaeological
           Thought

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      Abstract: Abstract Contributing to the issue of complex relationship between social and cultural evolution, this paper aims to analyze repetitive patterns, or cycles, in the development of material culture. Our analysis focuses on culture change associated with sociopolitical and economic stasis. The proposed toy model describes the cyclical character of the quantitative and qualitative composition of archaeological assemblages, which include hierarchically organized cultural traits. Cycles sequentially process the stages of unification, diversity, and return to unification. This complex dynamic behavior is caused by the ratio between cultural traits’ replication rate and the proportion of traits of the higher taxonomic order’s related unit. Our approach identifies a shift from conformist to anti-conformist transmission, corresponding with open and closed phases in cultural evolution in respect to the introduction of innovations. The model also describes the dependence of a probability for horizontal transmission upon orders of taxonomic hierarchy during open phases. The obtained results are indicative for gradual cultural evolution at the low orders of taxonomic hierarchy and punctuated evolution at its high orders. The similarity of the model outcomes to the patters of material culture change reflecting societal transformations enables discussions around the uncertainty of explanation in archaeology and anthropology.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • (Sea)ways of Perception: an Integrated Maritime-Terrestrial Approach to
           Modelling Prehistoric Seafaring

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      Abstract: Abstract The seaways have played a significant role in the movement of people, goods and ideologies since prehistory; yet, the ephemerality of movement combined with the paucity of direct evidence for prehistoric seafaring has challenged more refined understandings of the role of early seafaring in anthropogeny. Advances in digital methodologies within archaeology, such as least-cost approaches, allow more nuanced models of movement to be generated but suffer from dichotomous approaches to land and sea. These disentangled land-sea perspectives have long been criticised as ineffectual for understanding past maritime cultures, and previous discussions of prehistoric seafaring more specifically have advocated the consideration of the unique character of maritime space in order to more closely actuate a seafarer’s perspective. Drawing on these ideas, this paper argues that more nuanced approaches to past seafaring are not only necessary but also achievable through holistic perspectives, heuristic methods and scaled-down resolutions, which allow for a more contextualised understanding of the spatiality and temporality—i.e. the human-scale—of maritime movement. This will be demonstrated through an integrated land-sea least-cost method to model Neolithic seafaring around the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. It is not the intention of this paper to advocate solely for the methodology outlined here but rather to demonstrate the need to consider and understand the unique character of maritime space and its many influences on the practices being studied. Only through such contextualised cognition can the perspectives and ideologies of past seafarers and the role of seafaring in anthropogeny truly be understood.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Stringing Together Cowrie Shells in the African Archaeological Record with
           Special Reference to Southern Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Archaeological explorations of the meaning of ‘trade objects’, such as glass beads and cowrie shells, remain hampered by theoretical and methodological limitations in both their analyses and interpretations. In this paper, we develop a methodology for critically engaging in multi-scalar questions of the circulation, exchange, and value of cowrie shells in African archaeological contexts. Species, size, dorsal modifications, and depositional contexts were compared across five sites from South Africa dating between 750 and 1350 CE. These results were positioned within a review of cowries from archaeological sites in the region and compared to the documented distribution of cowries from wider African archaeological contexts. Monetaria annulus were the prevalent cowrie species in southern African archaeological contexts over the last 2000 years, with a notable absence of Monetaria moneta, prevalent at contemporaneous sites in West Africa, as well as a variety of endemic southern African species. Breakage patterns on the dorsal surface correspond to different modification techniques, such as chipping and grinding. Combined analyses of modification, use-wear, and depositional patterns show variation, revealing a diversity in the biographies of individual cowries. While a comparison of the distribution of cowries across the continent confirms the circulation of cowries through known trade routes, such as the trans-Saharan trade network and the European mercantile network, they also reveal new pathways for exchange that highlight the need for further exploration of intra African networks. Finally, the breadth of the results of this study demonstrates the value of a focus on a specific artefact to address a wide range of themes, from exchange to the archaeology of everyday life.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Tracking Hunter-Gatherer Impact on Vegetation in Last Interglacial and
           Holocene Europe: Proxies and Challenges

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      Abstract: Abstract We review palaeoenvironmental proxies and combinations of these relevant for understanding hunter-gatherer niche construction activities in pre-agricultural Europe. Our approach consists of two steps: (1) identify the possible range of hunter-gatherer impacts on landscapes based on ethnographic studies; (2) evaluate proxies possibly reflecting these impacts for both the Eemian (Last Interglacial, Middle Palaeolithic) and the Early–Middle Holocene (Mesolithic). We found these paleoenvironmental proxies were not able to unequivocally establish clear-cut differences between specific anthropogenic, climatic and megafaunal impacts for either time period in this area. We discuss case studies for both periods and show that published evidence for Mesolithic manipulation of landscapes is based on the interpretation of comparable data as available for the Last Interglacial. If one applies the ‘Mesolithic’ interpretation schemes to the Neanderthal record, three common niche construction activities can be hypothesised: vegetation burning, plant manipulation and impact on animal species presence and abundance. Our review suggests that as strong a case can be made for a Neanderthal impact on landscapes as for anthropogenic landscape changes during the Mesolithic, even though the Neanderthal evidence comes from only one high-resolution site complex. Further research should include attempts (e.g. by means of modelling studies) to establish whether hunter-gatherer impact on landscapes played out at a local level only versus at a larger scale during both time periods, while we also need to obtain comparative data on the population sizes of Last Interglacial and Holocene hunter-gatherers, as these are usually inferred to have differed significantly.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • The Ornaments of the Arma Veirana Early Mesolithic Infant Burial

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      Abstract: Abstract Personal ornaments are widely viewed as indicators of social identity and personhood. Ornaments are ubiquitous from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene, but they are most often found as isolated objects within archaeological assemblages without direct evidence on how they were displayed. This article presents a detailed record of the ornaments found in direct association with an Early Mesolithic buried female infant discovered in 2017 at the site of Arma Veirana (Liguria, Italy). It uses microscopic, 3D, and positional analyses of the ornaments as well as a preliminary perforation experiment to document how they were perforated, used, and what led to their deposit as part of the infant’s grave goods. This study provides important information on the use of beads in the Early Mesolithic, in general, as well as the relationship between beads and young subadults, in particular. The results of the study suggest that the beads were worn by members of the infant’s community for a considerable period before they were sewn onto a sling, possibly used to keep the infant close to the parents while allowing their mobility, as seen in some modern forager groups. The baby was then likely buried in this sling to avoid reusing the beads that had failed to protect her or simply to create a lasting connection between the deceased infant and her community.
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
       
  • Race, Gender, and Intersectionality in the Bioarchaeology of the African
           Diaspora: Perspectives from Colonial Peru

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      Abstract: Abstract Over the past three decades, there has been a growing body of research examining the history of African slavery in colonial Peru. These studies have contributed new information about the origins, roles, and experiences of enslaved peoples of African descent in colonial society. However, despite these advances, relatively few studies exist that directly examine the lives of enslaved women of African descent. This article responds to these concerns by using bioarchaeological evidence to examine the lives of enslaved women in conditions of plantation slavery in central Peru. As a case study, it focuses on recent bioarchaeological research at Hacienda La Quebrada, a former sugar estate located in the coastal region of Cañete, Peru. Research findings reveal the disproportionate impacts of conditions of plantation slavery on young women, many of whom perished by their twenties—an average of 10 years younger than enslaved men. Skeletal indicators of work offer further insights into these patterns, suggesting that enslaved women endured additional labor burdens while facing limited access to resources and care. These findings counter traditional narratives of enslavement in Peru that often center on the labor of adult men, instead illuminating the roles of women in the colonial economy and early Afro-Peruvian life. In doing so, this project offers a model of an intersectional approach to the study of African slavery in colonial Peru and to bioarchaeological studies of the African diaspora more broadly.
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
       
  • A Multivariate Approach to Investigate Metallurgical Technology: The Case
           of the Chinese Ritual Bronzes

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      Abstract: Abstract Research into ancient Chinese metallurgy has flourished over recent years with the accumulation of analytical data reflecting the needs of so many archaeological finds. However, the relationship between technology and society is unlikely to be revealed simply by analysing more artefacts. This is particularly evident in the debates over the sources of metals used to manufacture the Chinese ritual bronzes of the Shang (c. 1500-1046 BCE), Western Zhou (c. 1046–771 BCE) and Eastern Zhou (c. 771–256 BCE) dynasties. This article recognises that approaches to analytical data often fail to provide robust platforms from which to investigate metallurgical technology within its wider social and cultural contexts. To address this issue, a recently developed multivariate approach is applied to over 300 Chinese ritual bronzes from legacy data sets and nearly 100 unearthed copper-based objects from Anyang and Hanzhong. Unlike previous investigations that have relied predominantly on interpreting lead isotope signatures, the compositional analyses presented here indicate that copper and lead used to manufacture the bronzes are derived from mining progressively deeper ores in the same deposits rather than seeking out new sources. It is proposed that interpretations of social, cultural and technological change predicated on the acquisition of metals from disparate regions during the Chinese Bronze Age may need to be revised.
      PubDate: 2022-08-27
       
 
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