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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Ancient Near Eastern Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.116
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1378-4641 - ISSN (Online) 1783-1326
Published by Peeters Publishers Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Book Reviews

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Book reviews
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:54:38 +000
       
  • The Lost Tombs of Ancient Egypt as a Model for Engagement and Employment
           post COVID-19

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Review article of Chris Naunton, <i>Searching for the Lost Tombs of Egypt</i>, London, 2018.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:54:14 +000
       
  • The Metallurgical Fundament of the Near East Religions

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: The association of copper metallurgy in Bronze Age Near East societies with cosmic forces, holiness, vitality, healing, death and the afterlife reveals a religious dimension to this craft. The affinities of copper metallurgy with the serpent symbol confirm its centrality in the development of Bronze Age religious concepts. The reason for this involvement, however, remains obscure. Since iron metallurgy did not enjoy the same religious prestige in the ancient Near East, its comparison with copper metallurgy is exploited here to elucidate why the latter became a main religious fundament. It is then concluded that the elevated status of copper metallurgy results from the interpretation of its production from ore as an act of creation of matter and of recycling corroded copper in a furnace as a process of rejuvenation and revitalisation. This representation fits especially well with the conditions of the emergence of copper metallurgy in the Southern Levant in the fifth millennium BCE, suggesting that the earliest expression of this religious dimension originated in that homeland.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:52:52 +000
       
  • Procurement, Least-Cost Path Analysis and Technological Studies on
           Obsidian Assemblages from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age at Mentesh
           Tepe (Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan)

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Mentesh Tepe, in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan, hosts a regionally unique series of Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age cultural deposits. The site was occupied during three main periods. The earliest, Mentesh Tepe I, goes back to the Neolithic period (c. 5880-5536 cal. BC). Two separate phases, Mentesh II (4800-4500 cal. BC) and III (4300-4050 cal. BC), belonging to the Chalcolithic period, were identified. Finally, during the Early Bronze Age, Mentesh IV was also divided into two different horizons, one related to the Kura-Araxes I phase (3500-2900 cal. BC) and the other to the Martkopi phase of the Early Kurgan Culture (around the mid-third millennium BC). In all periods, obsidian was the most commonly used lithic material. In the present paper, we use provenance and the least-cost path analyses to examine the obsidian supply and technological analysis to define the production methods of artefacts. A large number of distinct sources were identified, as well as evidence for drastic change in the raw material procurement during the Chalcolithic period. By contrast, the production practices and the specific skills required for knapping obsidian blades using the pressure technique testify to continuity between the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods. This technology disappeared in the Early Bronze Age, marked by flake productions with less technical input.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:51:14 +000
       
  • Gender Variance in the Ancient World

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: This paper seeks to explore the relationship between the Near East and the Aegean, particularly the dynamic exchange of ritual tradition that can be traced from Mesopotamia to Minoan and then Mycenean Crete. Through an analysis of Mesopotamian art and poetry, the contested presence of castrated attendants and the tradition of castration itself is established. The tenuous relationship between castration and homosexuality is challenged to underscore a fluidity in Mesopotamian conceptions of gender. The evident fluidity exhibited by both Mesopotamian and Aegean artworks points to a broader understanding of the function of gender and gender transformation in both cultures. This paper offers a reanalysis of the singers apparent on the obverse of the Harvester Vase as well as the phorminx bard depicted on the Hagia Triada sarcophagus. These Aegean examples form the primary basis of analysis, demonstrating that the Aegean artists may have borrowed Mesopotamian conventions surrounding the depiction of castrated individuals, suggesting continuity with Mesopotamian ritual-musical castration practices.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:48:55 +000
       
  • Robbery, Veneration and Destruction

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Reuse manifests itself in the archaeological record in many different forms, including the displacement or absence of (parts of) skeletons and grave goods, the addition of human bodies and objects and the destruction of the built environment of the tomb. This paper investigates the archaeological evidence for reuse at Early Bronze Age tombs in Syria, specifically, the resumption of activities after a period of interruption. By re-examining data from 1014 tombs, it will be demonstrated that such activities, albeit encountered rarely in the archaeological record, are unlikely to be explained by grave robbery for most of the occurrences. It will be further argued that while later activities at elite tombs might be explained by acts of ancestor veneration or destruction of mnemonic reference of the (formerly) ruling powers, such explanations do not easily work for non-elite tombs, and thus alternative interpretations are needed.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:46:53 +000
       
  • Domestic Architecture and Household Structure at Late Bronze Age Tell
           Billa

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: The southwestern citadel of Tell Billa in the Late Bronze Age provides a rare example of a fully excavated functioning neighbourhood showing multiple varying types of household formation, emphasising multi-scalar levels of household members, production, and ownership. This article presents excavation data from the 1932-1933 field season at Tell Billa focused in the southwestern corner of the mound. The domestic architecture revealed there as part of Strata II and IA shows a neighbourhood of extended households, with several likely serving as larger residences integrated into the settlement due to the administrative duties of their occupants. A combination of the architectural remains, small finds, textual evidence, and domestic burials reveals an emphasis on the extended family, including members of possibly different ethnic or social origins. These households and their members functioned as the fundamental entity of social, economic, and political organisation.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:45:27 +000
       
  • On the Urartian Weight System

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: not available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:44:01 +000
       
  • New Ancient North Arabian Inscriptions from Wadi al-Qattafi

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: This paper reports on a study of two new Safaitic inscriptions found during a recent survey conducted at Wadi al-Qattafi in al-Harrah region of the northeastern Badia of Jordan. The inscriptions present new linguistic phenomena that have not been reported on previously in Safaitic texts. The inscriptions were engraved using the square or monumental script.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:43:10 +000
       
  • The Damascus Document

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: not available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:42:17 +000
       
  • What is '''' of '''' in Qumran Hebrew'

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: In a substantial quantity of non-biblical Qumran texts classified as <i>pesher</i> literature, the Hebrew word '''' is the key word. Here we are not concerned with a purely lexical, semantic question: what does the substantive, ''''''', mean' Our interest is in aspects of its syntax and syntagmatics: this latter represents an interface between syntax and lexicography. We shall look at these aspects under two headings. Under A) we deal with patterns in which a substantive appears with no conjunctive pronoun or possessive suffix attached, but in the st. cst., and under B) we deal with patterns in which a substantive has a 3ms suffix, '-, attached, thus in the form of &#1508;&#1513;&#1512;&#1493;.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:41:39 +000
       
  • Incised for Eternity

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:35:32 +000
       
  • The First Season of Excavation at Baba Kamal Tappeh, Tuyserkan, Western
           Iran

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Baba Kamal Tappeh is an important multi-period site in the eastern part of western Iran (Central Zagros). Surface findings indicated different cultural periods, with ambiguities related to cultural sequences and levels. The authors therefore began an excavation project to better define the area. Stratigraphically, Baba Kamal revealed eight cultural periods: Middle and Late Chalcolithic, Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age, Iron III and Median, Parthian and Islamic.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:34:42 +000
       
  • Shah Tepe/Islam Tepe

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: This article describes and discusses an important archaeological site located on the southern side of Lake Orumiyeh, Iran. The site has been little studied and is characterised by a series of highly distinctive rock-cut architectural features generally attributed to the first millennium BCE, such as a rock-cut tunnel and an area that has been interpreted as an ancient quarry. These rock-cut features have been attributed to the Middle Iron Age, to the times of Urartu or Mannea, two of the most important actors in the complex and dynamic political situation during the Iron III in Iran. More recently, a later date has been proposed, perhaps in the Late Iron Age/Iron IV (or indeed later still). This article gives a general analysis of the site, and its possible chronology is also discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:33:23 +000
       
  • Notes on the Achaemenid and Partho-Sassanian Periods at Yanik Tepe,
           Northwestern Iran, Excavated by Charles Burney

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Excavations at Yanik Tepe in the Urmia Basin, northwest Iran, were conducted by Charles Burney in the 1960s. This paper considers aspects of the Achaemenid-era occupation, including an addition to previously published accounts of the pottery. The date of the defensive ditch around the summit of the mound is discussed and a detailed account of the small but massively built structure on the summit of the mound, probably dating to the Partho-Sassanian period, is given together with an attempt at architectural reconstruction.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:32:04 +000
       
  • In memoriam Clifford Leslie Ogleby

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Obituary
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:02:11 +000
       
  • An Obituary for Frank Anderson

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      Authors: poj@peeters-leuven.be
      Abstract: Obituary
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 07:02:03 +000
       
 
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