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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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International Journal of Historical Archaeology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.427
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 41  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7748 - ISSN (Online) 1092-7697
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Colonial Ruination and Capitalist Abandonment: An Analysis in Fragments

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      Abstract: Abstract Many archaeological projects of the contemporary past examine sites of abandonment, ruination, decay, and devastation. This contribution takes a step back, looking at the historical trajectories that have created the conditions for abandonment, ruination, and so on, in the first place. Before a site can become abandoned, it needs to be occupied, a practice that is inherently violent in capitalist contexts. Taking inspiration from family history, I offer a visual rendering of a nineteenth-century explorer’s (failed) attempt to navigate the Northwest Passage, which eventually led him to occupy a small Arctic Archipelago that is today a Russian military outpost. In the fragmentary comments accompanying my artwork, I propose an archaeological engagement with the hauntings of this Arctic landscape that does not only expose how imperial encounters are embedded within capitalist exploits but inspire us to imagine a radically different political past and future.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Cracks and Fugitive Geographies: Agrarian Capitalism and Rural Landscapes
           in Central Veracruz, Mexico, Nineteenth-Twentyth Centuries

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      Abstract: This article reflects on the spatial history of agrarian capitalism in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, through the lens of a French farming colony on the Nautla river. While, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this region’s rural landscapes were ostensibly redesigned at the hand of liberal state programs and capitalist desires, a closer look shows a more checkered reality. Using textual and geographic archives, my analysis examines the tensions and “cracks” that emerged in this process of economic “modernization,” with an eye for the fugitive histories fashioned by French colonists in the face of capitalist abstraction.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • You May Destroy This Village, But You Cannot Destroy the Power Which
           Created It

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      Abstract: Abstract To develop a historical archaeology of hope, post-medieval European archaeology should shift the focus beyond dark heritage to sites and events opposed to daily destruction and alienation. This case study of an antinuclear protest camp in 1980s Germany shows that cracks in capitalism formed when people protested for something; as they experimented with alternative lifeways and envisioned an alternative future. Archaeological intervention can help to reveal these fault lines in capitalism as we remember these heritage sites of hope, but intervention also reveals a cautionary tale of how these blurry pictures of an alternative future can so easily be concealed.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Cracking the Capitalist Code: Archaeology, Resistance and the Historical
           Present in Ecuador

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      Abstract: Abstract The CONIAE (Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador) continuously critiques the global capitalist neoliberal structure. Similarly, this Indigenous critique is embodied in the projects studying the past in the Ecuadorian territory, particularly in the research of the gendered/sexual relations of the Enchaquirados during the pre-Hispanic period. This article builds upon this ethnohistorical research to show how these noncapitalist forms of economic, political, and gendered/sexual relationships continued to develop and evolve alternative forms of agency, livelihood and resistance. In Engabao (one of Ecuador’s many rural coastal communities), like in the CONAIE’S discourse, these cultural alternatives to the capitalist system tie this historical past to an agent-filled resistant Indigenous political present.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Looking at Landscape’s Political-Economic Fissures to Understand
           Social Radicals

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      Abstract: Abstract When thinking about ways to explore the American past with the goal of developing radical progressive modes of moving forward into our own histories, the specific perspectives we use and the people we study matter. In my interrogations of the lives of Maroons and Indigenous Americans of the Great Dismal Swamp (VA and NC), and transient hobos in Delta, PA, I have explored social worlds created by people who acted through a living critique of the wider capitalistic world. A central part of that critique was recognizing the parts of the American geographic landscape that we would later call “underdeveloped” or “undeveloped” areas effectively, “cracks” in the spatial world of capital. Using examples from my work, I discuss why these people do matter to our contemporary discussions on fomenting radical social transformations today.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • ‘Working as Though For Their Self’: Coalwood, Class Struggle and
           Capitalism’s Cracks

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      Abstract: Much of the archaeology and history of labor is based on organized labor, unions, and strikes, and the common rhetoric emphasizes the success or failure of union strike activities. This frames labor activism with clear winners and losers and inadvertently adopts the vantage point of capital. Given the modern world where union membership is plummeting, “success” seems even more unlikely. In this paper, I use the case of the Coalwood lumber camp to argue that labor’s “success” was much more complicated than simply winning strikes. Recognizing the difference between concrete and abstract labor provides a way to think about worker’s decisions to structure their lives based more on concrete than alienated labor that gives them more autonomy over their lives.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Theorizing Capitalism’s Cracks

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      Abstract: Abstract It is commonly said that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Alternatives, framed as a simplistic dualism of capitalism vs communism, make it difficult to envision any alternative. Instead, the “sprouts” of communism lie concealed in capitalism, inherent in its contradictory logic and the twofold nature of labor. We present this theoretical framing so that our archaeological work can focus on people’s ‘other doing’ and suggest that it will always be difficult to envision alternatives to our capitalist present until we reclaim the inspiration that exists internal to capitalism itself.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Abandonment: The Two Sides of Industrial Decay in Mill Creek Ravine

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      Abstract: Using the example of an industrial site in Edmonton, Alberta, this paper argues that industrial ruins represent instantiations of abstract abandonment, a kind of real abstraction that directly articulates to the logic of capital. Drawing from excavations of the industrial ruins of Mill Creek Ravine, one of the first industrial areas in Edmonton, this paper reveals how sites of abstract abandonment congeal critical histories of both abandonment and its afterlives. The history of these ruins, and the communities that emerged after they were abandoned materialize the failures of capitalist fantasies, as well as the sprouts that grow in its cracks.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • We Are Displaced, But We Are More Than That: Using Anarchist Principles to
           Materialize Capitalism’s Cracks at Sites of Contemporary Forced
           Displacement in Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract This article charts the development of The Made in Migration Collective, a coalition of displaced people, academics, and creative professionals that was developed during a recently completed British Academy postdoctoral fellowship. Following discussion of how archaeology and heritage are under attack globally from far-right nationalism and specifically within the UK, I provide examples of how community archaeology can highlight fissures in capitalism. I follow others in interpreting anarchism as a potential form of care. Two public heritage exhibitions – one digital, one “live”—which were collaboratively produced by The Made in Migration Collective are reflected upon.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • “The Song of Love”: An Archaeology of Radio History and
           Surveillance Capitalism

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      Abstract: Abstract The mass distribution of advertising and information via radio propelled capitalism into a new logic of accumulation, penetrating private spaces with the collection and distribution of commodified information. Archaeological, ethnographic, and archival evidence about the heterogenous ways radio has been deployed, received, resisted, and adopted reveals that our system of monopolized mass media and surveillance capitalism is not an inevitable extension of technological advancement. Rather it is a choice, accommodation, and contingency brokered by hegemonic forces and diverse publics. Examples of radio usage from throughout history, however, demonstrates that cracks in the capitalist disimagination machine have been present since the beginning.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Envisioning Logging Camps as Sites of Social Antagonism in Capitalism: An
           Anishinaabe Example from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan

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      Abstract: This article presents an archaeological case study that explores a residential logging camp as a site of social antagonism between the relations of abstract and living labor. Within such settings, living labor overtly works to resist their full subsumption to the logic, relations, and rhythms of capitalist production. I explore this antagonistic relationship through the archaeological record of an early twentieth-century logging camp operated by an Anishinaabe family in the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I argue that the logging camp context was integral to a larger Anishinaabe social strategy for pursuing the practices and teachings of bimaadiziwin, or “the good life,” while actively participating in industrial logging as timber workers. The way the Moses family structured their everyday life reflects the antagonism between living and abstract labor and helps to illuminate capitalism’s cracks.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The City and the City: Tent Camps and Luxury Development in the NoMA
           Business Improvement District (BID) in Washington, D.C.

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      Abstract: Abstract The NoMA Business Improvement District (BID) is one of Washington DC’s fastest developing areas and has one of the city’s largest concentrations of unhoused tent camps, many of which are located in underpasses that provide bits of protection and privacy. These underpasses were created during DC’s City Beautiful Movement and have been the site of neoliberal antihomeless strategies. In this paper I explore the production of space in the NoMA area and how property owners, business associations, and government actors sanitized public space for wealthy newcomers while excluding poor and unhoused residents.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Communities of Hope: Sharing Economies and the Production of Material
           Worlds

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      Abstract: Abstract How do we learn to share' As contemporary Western folks, what do we share, under what conditions, and with whom' Through two personal “material stories,” our paper explores how archaeologists can think beyond capitalism when interpreting material worlds. We consider the dynamics (and limits) of sharing economies as an emerging form of collective production. Starting from the blunt force “consolidation” of a leading British archaeology department, we trace the subsequent fissures and spaces of opportunity created by this disruptive moment of neoliberal closure. We tell stories about the collective production of a replica lithic assemblage, and the construction of a community chicken hutch, to explore the intricacies of everyday sharing as an intentional means of resource creation. Through these two disparate case studies, we aim to not only demonstrate the complex social networks and object meanings generated by sharing (versus capitalist) economies, but also consider wider implications (both benefits and conflicts) generated through collective resource production.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Words as Archaeological Objects: A Study of Marine Lifeways, Seascapes,
           and Coastal Environmental Knowledge in the Yagan-English Dictionary

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      Abstract: Abstract Reverend Thomas Bridges’ Yagan-English dictionary (1879) has hitherto been little explored outside of linguistics but is highly valuable as a complementary source to archaeological, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic records in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina and Chile). The dictionary contains 22,800 entries and yields rich information concerning the marine lifeways of the Yagan and their and intimate knowledge about Fuegian seascapes. The idea behind this paper is that environments have strong bearings on linguistic vocabularies. Treating words as archaeological objects that map onto landscapes, we identify important landforms for Yagan marine foragers and Norwegian fisher-farmers in a comparative study of word frequencies in Bridges’ dictionary and Ivar Aasen’s Norwegian dictionary (1850). Moreover, we explore in detail how marine lifestyles and Fuegian seascapes emerge in Bridges’ dictionary and discuss the dictionary’s relevance for historical archaeology in Tierra del Fuego.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21
       
  • Olof Svart's Two Manors: Career and Ostentation in Early Sixteenth-Century
           Sweden and Finland

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper focuses on two manors, Kumo in Finland and Duvnäs in Sweden, through early sixteenth-century written sources and material remains. Both were, one after the other, in the custody of Olof Svart (obiit 1547), who was one of Gustav I’s earliest administrators. Through a combination of historical and archaeological methods, including map studies, a successful career in the service of Sweden’s first Early Modern king is traced and placed in the cultural landscape.
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
       
  • At the Edge of Space: the Archaeology of Boundaries within a Landscape for
           Young Convicts

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      Abstract: Abstract Within a landscape, boundaries are the physically or socially defined lines that mark the limits of spaces. They can appear static and binary, and therefore analytically restricted. Yet it is argued here that while space is often analyzed in archaeology to inform social, economic, or institutional interpretations of a landscape, the analysis of boundaries is a complimentary method that captures movement, control, and prohibition mechanisms. Analyzing boundaries is shown to reveal aspects of change – sometimes diachronic and sometimes ephemeral – and a malleability that is often linked to materiality. The examination of the early nineteenth-century historical boundaries of Point Puer, a juvenile convict prison (1834–49) located in lutruwita/Tasmania, Australia, is used as a case study to illustrate their common archaeological forms. It is reasoned that the analysis of boundaries contributes dynamic interpretations of historical landscapes by theorizing boundaries as spatial frameworks to examine social and experiential elements of space.
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
       
  • Archaeological Insights into Asymmetrical Warfare on the Queensland
           Frontier

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      Abstract: Abstract Historiographic debate in Australia over whether or not the asymmetrical conflicts between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in the colonial period can be characterized as “war” remains unresolved, largely because most such events did not involve the traditional military. In this regard the situation in Queensland merits special attention, since much of the conflict in that colony from 1848 onward was conducted by a particular government paramilitary organization: the Queensland Native Mounted Police (NMP). In trying to understand the operations of this force, we adopt KOCOA terrain analysis, coupled with the forensic analysis of firing pin impressions on discharged Snider cartridge primers, to visualize how features around NMP camps affected and contributed to the use of firearms within these spaces. Given the well-recognized nexus between tactics of hunting and warfare, we argue that it is through the lens of training (both as hunters and soldiers) that we can best understand the Indigenous troopers of the NMP, as well as the strategies and tactics applied by the Queensland NMP in the context of the asymmetrical violence that characterized the Australian frontier.
      PubDate: 2024-02-17
       
  • On Defining the Identity of Vessels: an Interim Report and Critical
           Approach to the Deltebre I (1813) Site, Spain

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      Abstract: Abstract Determining a ship’s identity is usually based on a critical and integral analysis of several approaches and lines of evidence. Based on Harpster's seminal work, an insight into this endeavour is developed here for the Deltebre I site. The archaeological information obtained since 2008 from the remains of the cargo, hull structure, equipment, and personal possessions, combined with documentary data, helped to address the dating, type, function, and provenance of the vessel. More specifically, we discuss its links with the British ordnance ships Southampton and Magnum Bonum, lost in 1813 at the mouth of the Ebro river, Spain.
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
       
  • The Challenges and Future of Environmental Archaeology in Mauritius

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper considers the value of past and prospective applications of key environmental archaeological and earth science fields relating to the historical ecology of Mauritius and the Mascarene islands more broadly: palaeoecology, geoarchaeology, zooarchaeology and climate studies. The contribution of each subfield is outlined with the aim of demonstrating the potential value of an integrated environmental archaeological approach for developing a long-term understanding of the human ecology of Mauritius and its associated islands. The paper considers the potential and limitations of existing approaches and data, as well as future challenges. Beyond solely reconstructing the nuances of anthropogenic impact on the environment in relation to the island’s history of settlement, we argue that environmental archaeology can contribute to an understanding of “biocultural diversity” as an integral element of Mauritian heritage, bridging the divide between cultural and natural heritage.
      PubDate: 2024-01-29
       
  • Exploring Archaeological Sites and the Transformative Power of Local
           Practices of Heritage in the Caribbean: A Haitian Case

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      Abstract: Abstract This article combines ethnographic and anthropological research with archaeology to explore the significance of archaeological sites as historical elements and their continuous reinterpretation in Haiti. By examining the connection of people with traces of colonial plantations, caves, and Indigenous rock art, this study contextualizes archaeology and heritage within the current social context. The research reveals archaeological sites are characterized by contemporary traces of uses by individuals today. These traces are associated with stories tied to renegotiations of meaning to places, and their contestation, construction of belonging, and memories are among the elements that make sense of heritage-making. The study emphasizes the importance of place meaning and heritage, offering valuable perspectives for future archaeological investigations and contributing to broader discourses on material history in the Caribbean.
      PubDate: 2024-01-16
       
 
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