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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
Showing 1 - 57 of 57 Journals sorted by number of followers
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Journal of Archaeological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
European Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 65)
World Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Oxford Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Archaeological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Environmental Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Field Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity and Classics     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Archaeological Science : Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Journal of Roman Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Nottingham Medieval Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Maritime Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Industrial Archaeology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the British Archaeological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Papers of the British School at Rome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Post-Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Digital Applications in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Internet Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Radiocarbon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Norwegian Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnoarchaeology : Journal of Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Experimental Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Public Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Palestine Exploration Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Open Archaeology Data     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Scottish Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Wetland Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Neolithic Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Mélanges de l’École française de Rome - Moyen Âge     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Inner Asian Art and Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Rock Art Research: The Journal of the Australian Rock Art Research Association (AURA)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Tel Aviv : Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Iranica Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pacific Archaeology     Free   (Followers: 6)
Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Science and Technology of Archaeological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Yorkshire Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paléo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
North American Archaeologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Time and Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Archaeometry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archaeofauna     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lithic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archaeological Research in Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liber Annuus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Northeast Historical Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Islamic Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Lithic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Danish Institute at Athens     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Iraq     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Celtica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
California Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Karthago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trabajos de Prehistoria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'Égyptologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Zooarchaeology / Zooarchéologie canadienne     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Documenta Praehistorica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Les Cahiers de l’École du Louvre     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Δελτίον Χριστιανικής Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biourbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Archéologique de l’Ouest     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Complutum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ñawpa Pacha : Journal of Andean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Memorias. Revista Digital de Historia y Arqueologia desde el Caribe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Siècles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palaeoindian Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La zaranda de ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SAGVNTVM. Papeles del Laboratorio de Arqueología de Valencia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cane Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Restauro Archeologico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Florentia Iliberritana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’Alsace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Archaeologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Virtual Archaeology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Layers. Archeologia Territorio Contesti     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Glacial Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Nouvelles de l'archéologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Archipel     Open Access  
ROMVLA     Open Access  
SCIRES-IT : SCIentific RESearch and Information Technology     Open Access  
The Midden     Open Access  
Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia     Open Access  
Ausgrabungen und Funde in Westfalen-Lippe     Open Access  
Archäologische Informationen     Open Access  
Revista Atlántica-Mediterránea de Prehistoria y Arqueología Social     Open Access  
Cadernos do LEPAARQ     Open Access  
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Zephyrvs     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
LANX: Rivista della Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia     Open Access  

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Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2520-8217
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • For Our World Without Sound: the Opportunistic Debitage in the Italian
           Context—a Methodological Evaluation of the Lithic Assemblages of Pirro
           Nord, Cà Belvedere di Montepoggiolo, Ciota Ciara Cave and Riparo
           Tagliente

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The informative potential taken on by lithic artefacts has increased over the years. They gradually grew into proxies to detect the most relevant features of human material culture, including cognitive abilities to realise stone tools or, in other words, to track down the delineation of behavioural complexity. Consequently, notions like predetermination, standardisation (morphologically likewise) and hierarchisation have been intensely used in lithic technology as markers of such complexity, leading to ruling out contexts lacking any trace of these traits. Within the present state of the art, the use of the terms expedient and opportunism has characterised, in a negative way, the dichotomy between complex and simple within prehistoric contexts. Even if a requalification of expedient technologies has been recently observed, opportunistic behaviours still connote the complete absence of planning and complexity (even in terms of the mental scheme) within lithic industries. This background often prevented a consideration as relevant, from a technological and methodological perspective, these assemblages, primarily when Lower Palaeolithic contexts were addressed. With the definition and use of the term opportunistic debitage, this work questions the possible methodological implications of assemblages known as complexity- and planning-free and that can be found throughout different chronological and cultural phases.
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
       
  • A Middle Pleistocene Butchery Site at Great Yeldham, Essex, UK:
           Identifying Butchery Strategies and Implications for Mammalian Faunal
           History

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the evidence relating to an assemblage of Pleistocene bones and teeth discovered in a brick pit at Great Yeldham, Essex, in the late nineteenth century. Surviving elements from this collection, which include a bison foot bone with cut-marks, are now in the British Geological Survey Museum, Keyworth. A re-examination of this collection suggests that humans were present at the site during a temperate period in the earlier part of the late Middle Pleistocene. The cut-marks suggest that the hind foot was detached and discarded as butchery waste at the death site. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of humanly modified bones for understanding aspects of early human behaviour and distribution in Britain, which have hitherto largely centred around the study of stone tools.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
       
  • What Makes the Identity of a Scientific Method' A History of the
           “Structural and Analytical Typology” in the Growth of Evolutionary and
           Digital Archaeology in Southwestern Europe (1950s–2000s)

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      Abstract: Abstract Usual narratives among prehistoric archaeologists consider typological approaches as part of a past and outdated episode in the history of research, subsequently replaced by technological, functional, chemical, and cognitive approaches. From a historical and conceptual perspective, this paper addresses several limits of these narratives, which (1) assume a linear, exclusive, and additive conception of scientific change, neglecting the persistence of typological problems; (2) reduce collective developments to personal work (e.g. the “Bordes’” and “Laplace’s” methods in France); and (3) presuppose the coherence and identity of these “methods” over time. It explores the case of the “Structural and analytical typology” method, developed in France, Spain, and Italy from the 1950s to the 2000s by Georges Laplace and his collaborators for lithic implements. This paper (1) provides a detailed historical account of the evolving content of this collective endeavour over five decades; (2) it addresses the epistemological question of what makes the identity and unity of a scientific method, demonstrating that the core component of the “analytical typology” lies in its particular way to represent real-world phenomena through its notation system; and (3) it reveals how this little known but significant episode of advances in the methods and theory of archaeology, contemporary but independent of the “New Archaeology” trend in English-speaking archaeology, was instrumental in the continuation of evolutionary perspectives in France and in the development of quantitative and formal methods in archaeology in southwestern Europe, foreseeing crucial knowledge representation issues raised today by digital methods in archaeology and data curation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-30
       
  • The Middle Paleolithic at Große Grotte (Blaubeuren, southern Germany).
           New Insights from Lithic Technology and Implication for Assemblage
           Classification

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines the technological concepts applied at Große Grotte, based on detailed studies of the lithic cores and the bifacial objects of the Middle Paleolithic, which have never been analyzed in detail before. Up to now, the site was classified on the basis of Wagner's typological analyses. The present analysis enables comparisons with other assemblages in terms of technological aspects and thus provides an insight into the much-discussed assemblage variability as well as into the use and function of the cave on a layer-by-layer basis. All layers are characterized by a mix of every conceivable lithic technology that can be found in the Middle Paleolithic assemblages of the Swabian Jura. In addition to Levallois and discoid, and occasionally Quina, bifacial technology is present in almost every layer. The generally small sizes of the cores and their high degree of exploitation, the use of predominantly local raw material, and the extensive tool maintenance indicate numerous short-term visits to the cave. From this it is deduced that the surrounding landscape was well known to the people who settled there for short visits. The Late Middle Paleolithic Neanderthals discarded unusable pieces on-site and repaired tools that they subsequently exported. The location high above the valley was the ideal place in this landscape for observing herds of animals, as the animals were not disturbed in this way. Thus based on our analyses, the cave was repeatedly used between the late MIS 5 and early MIS 3 as a transitory, short-term station, where the herds of animals passing by in the valley were observed. In addition to animal observation, the equipment, consisting of very different technologies, was maintained and small meals were prepared. The repeated deposition of different technologies during very short stays makes it almost impossible for the time being to assign the individual assemblages of the site’s layers to a clear typological classification unit.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
       
  • Transport Patterns as Heuristic Testing Variables for the Social Coherence
           of Taxonomic Units at Different Spatial Scales

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      Abstract: Abstract Taxonomic units in archaeology strongly convey the assumption of a social connection between the people having left the sites attributed to these units. The (implicit) assumption is that people whose sites are attributed to the same unit had closer social relations among one another than they had to people whose sites are attributed to other taxonomic units, and that such social proximity is reflected in similarities in their material culture. It is often difficult to be sure about the processes behind the emergence of similarities and dissimilarities. Therefore, taxonomic units relying on this criterion require additional testing in order to be meaningful components of studies on social relations. Dynamic objects, whose location of origin is known in addition to their place of discard, provide means for such testing, because they reflect the movement or contact patterns of people, potentially providing information on social boundaries or links on different spatial scales. Social coherence—the degree of connectedness between the people having left the sites attributed to these units—is sensitive to phenomena of spatial and temporal scale. However, there is no coherent terminology that would match scale levels of taxonomic units to those of social units. This paper proposes a hierarchical systematics for taxonomic units and their social equivalents applicable to both hunter-(fisher-)gatherer and farming societies to facilitate discussions on this topic. Based on this systematics, we propose an approach to test the coherence of taxonomic units regarding different social scale levels based on transport patterns of dynamic objects. Knowledge on the mode of acquisition (direct/embedded procurement, exchange, trade) of the dynamic objects is not a prerequisite. Three case studies from the Late Upper Paleolithic in Central Europe, the Late Paleolithic in Bavaria, and the Early Neolithic in Norway will be discussed to evaluate the potential and limits of the approach.
      PubDate: 2022-08-10
       
  • Beyond Shapes: Core Reduction Strategies in the Magdalenian of Cova Gran
           de Santa Linya (NE Iberia)

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      Abstract: Abstract Core reduction provides insight into the technical actions involved in knapping sequences, one of the central elements in technological analysis. By examining reduction phases, cognitive and operational aspects of the management of lithic resources can be explored, and the technical behaviours of human groups reconstructed. This paper presents a technological and morphometric analysis of cores from the Magdalenian sequence of the Cova Gran de Santa Linya (SE Pyrenees), which ranges from 23 to 16 k cal BP. The knapping strategies suggest two types of lithic exploitation: one on nodules using semi-circumferential methods and the other on thick flakes using burin-core methods. Five knapping modalities were identified through the study of reduction sequences and the analysis of technical attributes, which highlights the technical diversity of lithic production systems. The data collected are supported by statistical analysis and reveal significant differences at the diachronic level and among the lithic assemblages. This study aims to suggest a reference model with which to characterise Magdalenian cores in technological terms. This model can broaden our understanding of the diversity of technical behaviours that appear from the beginning of LGM-b to the end of MIS 2 in the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula.
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
       
  • The Late Middle Palaeolithic Occupation of Abri du Maras (Layer 1,
           Neronian, Southeast France): Integrating Lithic Analyses, ZooMS and
           Radiocarbon Dating to Reconstruct Neanderthal Hunting Behaviour

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      Abstract: Abstract The exact strategies and technologies underlying Neanderthal hunting events remain open for debate with lithic points being sparse across the European Middle Palaeolithic. An exception is the Neronian entity in southeast France, defined by ventrally retouched Soyons points. This study contextualises one of the largest Neronian assemblages, layer 1 at Abri du Maras. Our lithic analyses focussed on attributes described as indicative of projectile use or hafting to contextualise the morphometric and technological characteristics of the pointed implements at an assemblage level. We found that retouched points were made on a variety of blank types (including Levallois, laminar and discoidal flaking techniques) and ventral retouch is present across different artefact types (including points, scrapers and denticulates). Next, these lithic data were compared to similar typo-technological data recorded on a sample from the recently excavated and well-contextualised point-rich layer 4.1 of Abri du Maras (MIS-3). Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) was applied to 280 faunal remains from layer 1 and indicated significant proportions of equids, bovids, cervids and reindeer. Carnivore remains and carnivore modifications are absent, while human bone surface modifications are present across a variety of species. Five bones had sufficient collagen for radiocarbon dating but returned dates younger than expected (ca. 41–31 ka cal BP). Finally, we place Abri du Maras layer 1 in its broader regional context and discuss its relation to other Neronian assemblages and more general problematics inherent to studying material from old excavations.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Agia Marina and Peristereònas: Two New Epipalaeolithic Sites on the
           Island of Lemnos (Greece)

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      Abstract: Abstract The surveys carried out along the coasts of the island of Lemnos (Greece) have led to the discovery of new Late Epipalaeolithic sites at Agia Marina and Peristereònas. Peristereònas yielded a knapped stone assemblage that is strictly comparable with that from Ouriakos, a site located along the south-eastern coast of the same island, while the artefacts from Agia Marina are more problematic to interpret because they are probably to be attributed to a slightly different period. However, the most characteristic artefacts recovered from the sites are represented by microlithic geometrics obtained by abrupt, bipolar, or direct retouch, end scrapers, and different types of exhausted cores and technical pieces, which help us reconstruct the operational sequence employed for the manufacture of the armatures. The aim of the paper is to contribute to the interpretation of the characteristics of the Late Epipalaeolithic assemblages discovered on the island and to frame them into the general picture of the end of the Pleistocene in this part of the Aegean. The artefacts from the sites show unique characteristics, without parallels to the knapped stone assemblages of the same period so far recovered along the coasts of the Aegean Sea, the eastern Mediterranean, the Levant, and the Black Sea.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-022-00118-8
       
  • Correction to: The Initial Upper Paleolithic and Its Place Within the
           Middle-to-Upper Paleolithic Transition of Southwest Asia: What Hides
           Behind the Curtain of Taxonomies'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-07-11
       
  • Break to Rebuild — the First European Evidence of a Fragmented Chaine
           Opératoire for Handaxe Production (OIS 14, Caune de l’Arago, France)

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      Abstract: Abstract The presence of bifacial tools for more than 1.5 Ma in African and Eurasian archaeological assemblages raises questions as to why this was so successful. One of the explanations often put forward is the ability to resharpen or recycle these voluminous tools, allowing them to be used over a long period of time. An additional argument is that techno-economic analyses show that these tools are mobile within territories. However, if the mobility of bifaces seems to be a fairly global (but not systematic) behaviour from 1.5 Ma, the maintenance or recycling of these tools seems to be mainly expressed in northern Europe and in southwest Asia, on flint tools, from MIS 12. The petrographic and technological analysis of the bifacial shaping processes (chaines opératoires) of the archaeostratigraphic unit Q1 of the Arago Cave reveals the appearance of the mobility/maintenance or recycling of bifaces as early as MIS 14 in southern Europe. These behaviours are applied not only on flint shaped items, but also on quartz and quartzite bifaces. These results have implications for the understanding of how bifaces appeared or spread in western Europe. It also gives new insights on our perception of the management of the environment and the cognitive capacities of pre-Neanderthal populations in this area.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-022-00116-w
       
  • The Initial Upper Paleolithic and Its Place Within the Middle-to-Upper
           Paleolithic Transition of Southwest Asia: What Hides Behind the Curtain of
           Taxonomies'

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      Abstract: Abstract Classification of the Paleolithic into Lower, Middle, and Upper has both chronological and cultural meanings serving as a framework for reconstructing cultural evolution and interpreting behavioral processes. Traditionally, the Middle-to-Upper Paleolithic transition in Eurasia is regarded as a bio-cultural turning point, in which local Neanderthals were replaced by incoming Homo sapiens populations, carrying with them a novel technological repertoire. As such, the basic classification of archeological data into broad spatially and temporally coherent blocks is not neutral and disconnected from the paradigmatic view of a “transition” as a developmental event. Initially, the Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) was introduced to describe the first cultural stage within the Upper Paleolithic and was later modified to define the cultural transition from the Middle to the Upper Paleolithic. In the last 20 years, the IUP has increasingly been used as a chronological-biological taxonomic unit to describe modern human dispersals into Eurasia, overriding its use within a cultural taxonomic system. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of the term as a taxonomic unit. The construction of a chronicle and histories, based on well-documented and published data from the late Middle Paleolithic through to the earliest Upper Paleolithic sites across southwest Asia, are used to evaluate the applicability of the term Initial Upper Paleolithic as a taxonomic unit. Within this perspective, the Middle-to-Upper Paleolithic transition is viewed as a social and demographic process that is manifested differently in each of the sub-regions of southwest Asia: the Levant, Southern Caucasus, Armenian Highlands, and the Zagros.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-022-00112-0
       
  • Unravelling Hominin Activities in the Zooarchaeological Assemblage of
           Barranco León (Orce, Granada, Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract Little is known about the subsistence practices of the first European settlers, mainly due to the shortage of archaeological sites in Europe older than a million years. This article contributes to the knowledge of the subsistence of the first Europeans with new zooarchaeology and taphonomic data from the Palaeolithic site of Barranco León (Orce, Granada, Spain). We present the results of the analysis of the faunal assemblages retrieved in the context of new excavations undertaken between 2016 and 2020. We have followed a standard methodology for the identification and quantification of species, mortality profiles, skeletal representation and taphonomic analysis. With regard to the taphonomic evidence, we have documented the extent of rounding, abrasion and other alterations. Finally, we examined traces from the activities of carnivores and hominins that led to the accumulation and alteration of the bone assemblages. Results indicate that the archaeo-paleontological deposits from Barranco León present a dual-patterned mixed taphonomic origin. The first phase primarily involved waterborne processes (BL-D1), which led to the accumulation of lithic raw materials, a few archaeological stone tools, and some faunal remains with percussion and cutmarks. The second phase (BL-D2) contains several stone tools associated with faunal remains with more anthropogenic alterations, such as cutmarks and percussion marks. After analysing the Barranco León zooarchaeological assemblage, the present study concludes that hominins had access to the meat and within-bone nutrients of animals of diverse sizes. However, the specific carcass acquisition mechanisms that hominins followed are less certain because the presence of tooth marks suggests that carnivores also played a role in the accumulation and modification of the Barranco León faunal assemblage.
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-022-00111-1
       
  • A Critical Review of the Stratigraphic Context of the MSA I and II at
           Klasies River Main Site, South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Klasies River Main site, on South Africa’s southern Cape coast, has contributed significantly to understanding Late Pleistocene human evolution. Excavations across this complex of caves and rock shelters have uncovered important assemblages of human fossils, faunal remains and lithic artefacts which have allowed interpretations of human anatomy and behaviour, and the palaeoenvironmental context of human occupations. The stratigraphy of the site is complicated, and the deposits have been recorded and published at varying degrees of resolution and detail over three phases of fieldwork. This paper is the first detailed review of the stratigraphy of any part of the sequence, and considers the different stratigraphic approaches used at Klasies and the published data and interpretations for the basal deposits. These units have been assigned to the Light Brown Sand, Rubble Brown Sand and Shell and Sand Members, and have yielded MSA I and MSA II lithic assemblages and most of the human fossils. We argue that some of the published stratigraphic interpretations need to be reconsidered, that a purely lithostratigraphic approach to the deposits at Klasies is not currently viable and that further field description and micromorphological work is needed. More broadly, this review demonstrates potential complications for stratigraphic correlation during the reinvestigation of previously excavated sites. These include the importance of understanding site formation processes in a lithostratigraphic system, and the need to think about how, why and at what resolution we make correlations between different stratigraphic systems or different areas within a site or site complex.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-022-00110-2
       
  • Predetermined Refinement: the Earliest Levallois of the Kapthurin
           Formation

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      Abstract: Abstract Levallois technology characterizes the Middle Stone Age/Middle Palaeolithic, but one of its earliest manifestations is from the preceding Acheulean of the Kapthurin Formation, in the Rift Valley of east Africa. Here, ~ 400 ka, hominins were creating large flake blank handaxes and cleavers through Levallois knapping. Comparing these tools with other Rift Valley Acheulean assemblages made on large flakes shows those of the Kapthurin Formation are distinguished by their thinness. This was achieved through symmetrical centripetal preparation of gentle upper surface convexities on the Levallois cores, the creation of a protruding facetted platform, and proximal bevelling of the upper surface. A large elongate flake blank was struck from the facetted platform, then finished with marginal trimming to create the symmetrical and regular edge of the handaxe or cleaver. As they were used for the creation of handaxes and cleavers, the Kapthurin Acheulean Levallois cores and flakes are much larger than that of the Middle Stone Age, with overshot flakes from excessive force a more frequent error. The Acheulean Levallois is further distinguished from those of the Middle Stone Age by the lack of recurrent flaking, with cores apparently producing only a single preferential flake without any repreparation of the main flaking surface, despite the cores being big enough for further large blank removals, and even if the preferential removal overshot and was abandoned. The key advantage offered by Levallois in general is large thin elongate flakes. In its Kapthurin Acheulean manifestation, Levallois was used to create an individual tool, but in the Middle Stone Age it was often used to make toolkits.
      PubDate: 2022-02-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00109-1
       
  • Soft-Hammer Percussion During the Acheulean: Barking Up the Wrong Tree of
           Technical Change'

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      Abstract: Abstract Lithic productions are the main source of information on human groups from early periods of the Palaeolithic. From the time of the first discoveries, prehistorians have probed these remains to try to understand how and why they were made. Percussion techniques have also been a central preoccupation, despite tenuous archaeological references. With the help of experimentation, several chaînes opératoires have been reconstructed, sketching the outlines of the technical evolution of the first human groups. Our work focuses on a major change in lithic technology, the invention of organic soft-hammer percussion. This is attested on the Isenya site (Kenya) around -960 ka, based on an experimental work. This invention represents an innovation and indicates a rupture with the technical environment known until then in which lithic technology and percussion techniques were confined solely to the mineral world. We propose to examine this rupture from another point of view, also using experimental work, based on the principle that the mineral domain offers a wide range of hardness for hammers and that the gesture plays at least an equivalent role to that of the raw material of the hammer. Without supplanting the use of soft organic hammers in bifacial shaping, we demonstrate the possibility of the use of not very tough mineral hammers with tangential motions. These results imply that the technical change that took place during the Acheulean was probably less abrupt than previously thought, and more consistent with previously mastered know-how.
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00104-6
       
  • Intra-Site Structure of the Early Ahmarian Site of Al-Ansab 1, AH 1
           (Jordan)

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      Abstract: Abstract The Early Ahmarian represents an Early Upper Palaeolithic cultural unit, which spans throughout the Levant to the Sinai Peninsula. At least 40 sites belong to this unit. Both open-air and cave sites provide different amounts of archaeological material at various spatial resolutions. The team of the Collaborative Research Centre 806 “Our Way to Europe” excavated the site of Al-Ansab 1, Wadi Sabra, since 2009. The site provides one of the largest lithic assemblages of the Early Ahmarian. Analysis of intra-site distributions and patterns has been conducted for a small number of sites, providing scarce information on the spatial makeup of Early Ahmarian occupation layers. The internal structure testifies to repeated settlement without task specialisation. While this has been described for the sites on the Sinai Peninsula, the situation has been unclear for locations placed in the escarpments of the Transjordanian Highlands. At Al-Ansab 1, we can observe the repeated, relatively ephemeral occupation of a specific location in the Wadi Sabra for the execution of various tasks such as processing of faunal elements and raw material exploitation. Our results correlate to a pattern of mobility observable at other Early Ahmarian sites such as Abu Noshra II. These sites are usually attributed to relatively small and highly mobile bands of hunter-gatherers. Analysing these patterns of intra-site and regional spatial behaviour in the context of environmental patterning highlights potential external drivers to the expression of human occupation at sites such as Al-Ansab 1, archaeological horizon 1.
      PubDate: 2022-01-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00103-7
       
  • Lithic Technology and Chronology of Initial Upper Paleolithic Assemblages
           at Tor Fawaz, Southern Jordan

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      Abstract: Abstract The Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) is a key chrono-cultural concept in our understanding of the cultural and population dynamics at the transition from the Middle Paleolithic to Upper Paleolithic period. This paper presents technological and chronological analyses of lithic assemblages from a rockshelter site at Tor Fawaz in the Jebel Qalkha area, southern Jordan, to provide accurate dating and detailed recognition of the IUP variability in the Levant. We present integrated micromorphological, phytolith, and dung spherulite analyses to evaluate formation and postdepositional processes of archaeological remains through high-resolution micro-contextual studies. As a result, the Tor Fawaz assemblages show general similarity to those of Boker Tachtit Level 4, Tor Sadaf A–B, and Wadi Aghar C–D1 that represent the late phase of the IUP in the southern Levant. Based on the detailed recognition of site-formation processes, we suggest ca. 45–36 ka as the age of IUP occupations at Tor Fawaz. More specifically, the IUP occupations at Tor Fawaz and Wadi Aghar, a nearby IUP site in the same area, may represent slightly different phases that show a lithic technological trend paralleling the IUP sequence at Tor Sadaf in southern Jordan, and possibly post-date Boker Tachtit Level 4. We also discuss the issue of partial chronological overlap between the late IUP and the Ahmarian and also argue for the geographically different trends in cultural changes from the late IUP to the Ahmarian.
      PubDate: 2021-12-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00107-3
       
  • Revisiting the Acheulian Large Cutting Tools of ‘Ubeidiya, Israel

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      Abstract: Abstract The site of ‘Ubeidiya is one of the earliest and best-known manifestations of the Acheulian Technocomplex outside Africa. Through the archaeological remains excavated in its numerous layers, it provides a wealth of information about the technological tradition and behavior of its occupants. This study applies a morpho-technological methodological approach, combining 3D geometric morphometric and traditional technological analyses to the large cutting tools component sampled from two assemblages at the site. Our results reflect high morphological and technological variability and shed light on the manner in which the morphological patterns are related to technological decisions and preferences of the ancient knappers. The results support the notion that while the final form of the large cutting tools was substantially affected by the morphological characteristics of the selected raw materials, it was not deterministically dictated by environmental factors, but purposefully chosen by the knappers during raw material selection. This notion reflects the advanced planning capacities of the Early Acheulian hominins at the site. Furthermore, it demonstrates how a division of the large cutting tools category into two morphotypes through a decision taken at an early stage of production was already established at ‘Ubeidiya. This appears to be one of the earliest expressions of this behavioral pattern, typical of substantially later Acheulian assemblages.
      PubDate: 2021-11-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00108-2
       
  • Correction to: Cultural Taxonomies in Eastern South America: Historical
           Review and Perspectives

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      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00106-4
       
  • The Techno-typological and 3D-GM Analysis of Hatis-1: a Late Acheulian
           Open-Air Site on the Hrazdan-Kotayk Plateau, Armenia

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      Abstract: Abstract Hatis-1 is a Lower Paleolithic open-air site on the Hrazdan-Kotayk Plateau of central Armenia. Although the site was tested in the 1980s, little has been published regarding the material. Consequently, we reinvestigated the site by expanding the original test pit to better understand the stratigraphy and recover a new sample of artifacts. As a result, more than 300 obsidian artifacts were recovered from colluvial deposits found close to primary obsidian outcrops, which sourcing data show to be the exclusive areas of toolstone procurement used by the inhabitants. The recovered assemblages are Late Acheulian in character and are largely homogenous across strata in terms of techno-typology. Hatis-1 records the use of large flakes for production of cores and tools indicative of the Large Flake Acheulian, but also contains limited evidence for simple prepared cores and the recycling of bifaces as cores, suggesting expansion of the technological repertoire of hominins in this region during the Late Acheulian. The in-depth study of large cutting tools presented here reveals that differences in the shape and typology of these tools are largely determined by different production strategies. While samples suitable for direct chronometric dates were not recovered, constraining geological factors suggest this material was deposited after c.700/480 ka. This study expands our understanding of the Late Acheulian and further contextualizes the later Lower–Middle Paleolithic technological transition in the region. In a broader sense, our interpretation of the techno-typological patterns at Hatis-1 expands the current understanding of geographical and chronological variation in the Acheulian record.
      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s41982-021-00105-5
       
 
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