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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
Showing 201 - 57 of 57 Journals sorted by number of followers
Heritage, Memory and Conflict Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Skyscape Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Ancient West & East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Archaeological Discovery     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Studies in Ancient Art and Civilization     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Heritage and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Die Welt des Orients     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : Techniques, histoire et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta ad archaeologiam et artium historiam pertinentia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Computer Applications in Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Viking : Norsk arkeologisk årbok     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern Christian Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brill Research Perspectives in Ancient History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Asian Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gallia : Archéologie des Gaules     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herança : Revista de História, Património e Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
In Situ Archaeologica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Danish Journal of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings in Archaeology and History of Ancient and Medieval Crimea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Offa's Dyke Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mythos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gaia : Revue interdisciplinaire sur la Grèce archaique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Universitatis Lodziensis : Folia Archaeologica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AP : Online Journal in Public Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archéologie médiévale     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Terrae Septemcastrensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
REUDAR : European Journal of Roman Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anadolu Araştırmaları / Anatolian Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ADLFI. Archéologie de la France - Informations     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Archaeomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kentron     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of African Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription  
Frankokratia     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaternary Science Advances     Open Access  
Archaeologia Adriatica     Open Access  
Otium : Archeologia e Cultura del Mondo Antico     Open Access  
Archaeologia Baltica     Open Access  
Anales de Arqueología y Etnología     Open Access  
Kuml     Open Access  
Arkæologi i Slesvig-Archäologie in Schleswig     Open Access  
Antiquités Africaines     Open Access  
Archaeonautica     Open Access  
Sylloge epigraphica Barcinonensis : SEBarc     Open Access  
Pyrenae     Open Access  
Revista del Instituto de Historia Antigua Oriental     Open Access  
Athar Alrafedain     Open Access  
SPAL : Revista de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access  
Archäologie im Rheinland     Open Access  
Bajo Guadalquivir y Mundos Atlánticos     Open Access  
Index of Texas Archaeology : Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State     Open Access  
Portugalia : Revista de Arqueologia do Departamento de Ciências e Técnicas do Património da FLUP     Open Access  
BSAA Arqueología     Open Access  
Boletín de Arqueología     Open Access  
Damrong Journal of The Faculty of Archaeology Silpakorn University     Open Access  
Built Environment Inquiry Journal     Open Access  
ISIMU. Revista sobre Oriente Próximo y Egipto en la Antigüedad     Open Access  
Patrimoines du Sud     Open Access  
Primitive Tider     Open Access  
Archaeologia Lituana     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Bulletin de l'Institut français d'archéologie orientale     Open Access  
Anatolia Antiqua : Revue internationale d’archéologie anatolienne     Full-text available via subscription  
PHILIA. International Journal of Ancient Mediterranean Studies     Open Access  
Revista Arqueologia Pública     Open Access  
Comechingonia : Revista de Arqueología     Open Access  
Revista Otarq : Otras arqueologías     Open Access  
Gallia Préhistoire     Open Access  
SPAFA Journal     Open Access  
Anales de Arquelogía Cordobesa     Open Access  
Arqueología y Territorio Medieval     Open Access  
Lucentum : Anales de la Universidad de Alicante. Prehistoria, Arqueología e Historia Antigua     Open Access  
Boletín de Arqueología Experimental     Open Access  
Conimbriga     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Arqueología de la Universidad de Navarra     Open Access  
Arqueología     Open Access  
Semitica : Revue publiée par l'Institut d'études sémitiques du Collège de France     Full-text available via subscription  
SAGVNTVM Extra     Open Access  
Berkala Arkeologi     Open Access  
Queensland Archaeological Research     Open Access  

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Asian Archaeology
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2520-8098 - ISSN (Online) 2520-8101
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Bronze casting clay moulds and production sequences: understanding
           knowledge and Organization of the Artisans in Late Shang (14th – 11th
           century BC), China

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      Abstract: Abstract This research extrapolates the knowledge and choices made by the artisans through the bronze vessel casting mould production. Our discussion on the late Shang dynasty often focused on the elites in their burials, elaborate artifacts, and rituals. To comprehend the artisans, we cannot rely on the artifacts used by the elites. Artifacts that the artisans directly influenced are the tools they made and used themselves. The bronze casting moulds were one type of the tools they made and used for the bronze casting, leaving their existence and knowledge within the artifacts. How the artisans made these casting moulds and the way in which they used them is the knowledge and organization commanded by the artisans. From the sequence of production of the casting moulds, this research highlights the different knowledge involved in producing the moulds from raw material processing to firing and casting. From the sequence of production, we offer new insight into how the artisans’ organized their production.
      PubDate: 2022-11-24
       
  • Towards a temporal assessment of Angkor Thom’s Theravada “Buddhist
           Terrace” archaeology

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      Abstract: Abstract The population of the Cambodian Angkorian Empire (802–1431 CE) and its namesake capital underwent a collective, gradual religious transition from Brahmano-Buddhism (Hindu and Mahayana practice) to Theravada Buddhism beginning in the mid/late-13th century CE. Marked by a material shift from temple-mountains to smaller prayer halls ((preah vihear or “Buddhist Terraces”) as the primary focal points of politico-religious organization, the initial “Theravadization” of Angkorian society primarily took place within the confines of the 12th century walled civic-ceremonial center of Angkor Thom. Within which, upwards of seventy Buddhist Terraces have thus far been identified, representing one of the most significant yet undocumented religious building programs in Angkorian history. Our study synthesizes the results of three field seasons (2017–2019) of Buddhist Terrace survey and excavation within Angkor Thom, and through radiometric and stratigraphic analysis we suggest that the dissemination of preah vihear began in earnest at Angkor during the 14th century. We also assess the structure and placement of Buddhist Terraces across Angkor Thom in relation to identified urban-spatial patterns and emerging sequences of site occupation, and contextualize this era of Theravada monastic dissemination within existing studies of Brahmano-Buddhist temple conversion at Angkor, the geopolitical decline of Angkor, and its aftermath.
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00056-y
       
  • The lower Yangtze River and Aegean Sea in the third millennium BC:
           parallel cradles of civilizations

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      Abstract: Abstract A critical assessment of the heterogeneous prehistoric societies of Liangzhu in China and Cyclades in Greece, forged by differing geographical, ecological, topographical, demographic, and historical conditions, is proposed. Through juxtaposition, the obtained contrasting image reveals the textures of cultures and leads to-mutual understanding. For the farmers of the Yangtze River delta and the islanders of the central Aegean Sea waterborne travel encouraged a culture of exchange, long-distance relationships, and maritime or riverine navigation. Despite structural similarities, both communities would have been perplexed at the alienness of the populous settlement of Liangzhu within the lush evergreen surroundings, the masterful jade craftsmanship, the network of Cycladic villages surrounded by meagre land from which a living was eked out and hard rocks mined for rare minerals, and the intrepid sailing of dangerous Aegean waters for trade, community, marriage, and war. Activities and mentalities of distant cultures are classified as parallel items. The prehistoric inhabitants of the Yangtze delta's habitat and the deep blue of the Aegean Sea left us with unique a cultural heritage that promotes its investigation, interpretation, and dissemination using modern technology. Cultural tourism and ecological protection with interpretation and integration in the context of tangible and intangible cultural heritage are linked to sustainable development goals Yangtze River delta and the Cycladic islands act as heritage regions. When properly valued, they are assets for societal cohesion, education, development, and understanding of the past, give reason to the present, and aid for the future.
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00055-z
       
  • Targeted production and altered functions: Chinese ceramics exported to
           Southeast Asia during the Five Dynasties and Northern Song period (AD
           907–1127)

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper aims to explore whether there were any Chinese ceramic vessel forms and decorations during the Five Dynasties and Northern Song period specially produced for the Southeast Asian markets and whether the functions of some exported Chinese ceramics became altered in local societies. Through comparative study between shipwreck cargo and finds within China, it is argued that at the Yue kiln complex, particularly at the Bijiashan and Xicun kiln sites, some vessels were produced to cater to the aesthetic standards and needs of the Southeast Asian markets. For wares that were commonly seen in China, how they were used after export might also differ significantly from their original functions, which is illustrated by interpretation of relevant scenes in bas-reliefs at Southeast Asian temples and the function of similar local earthenware and ascertained through some reference to ethnographic and historical records.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00054-0
       
  • Waistcloths excavated from the Bronze Age Xiaohe cemetery, Lop Nur,
           Xinjiang

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      Abstract: Abstract Found in the Xiaohe cemetery, Lop Nur, Xinjiang, a waistcloth is a woolen cloth tied around the waist used to protect the midsection of the body. Waistcloths are used by both males and females, but their form varies by gender. The male waistcloth is in the form of a loincloth, while those used by females are string skirts. Colors include white, yellow–brown, and brown, and these probably originate in the natural colors of the wool. Some motifs can be seen in the waistcloths, such as stripes and a ladder-shaped motif. Textiles excavated from the Xiaohe cemetery are relatively simple, and their common structures are plain, tabby, and tapestry. Distinctions in the waistcloths not only indicate gender, but also identity, position, etc.
      PubDate: 2022-06-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00053-1
       
  • A rock-cut tomb of the Mongol period in the Ilkhanid capital of Maraghe

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      Abstract: Abstract By the time of Kublai’s death, the Mongol Empire had fractured into four separate khanates or empires including the Golden Horde [Kipchak] in the northwest, the Chagatai Khanate in Central Asia, the Ilkhanate, based in modern-day Iran, and the Yuan Dynasty in the east. Although the burial architecture of the Yuan Dynasty and their funeral ritual have been the foci of the archaeologist, there have been no convincing conclusions about the other branches of the Mongol Empire. According to historical literature, all of the Ilkhanid Khans before Ghazan (1271–1304 CE) were buried in unknown places after their death. Archaeologically, not only we have no clue to trace the royal tombs of the pre-Ghazan period, even the identifiable tombs of the royal family members of the Ilkhanid Iran and high-ranking Mongol nobles have not discovered. Taking Maraghe, in Northwest Iran, as the first Ilkhanid capital (1256–1265 CE), the aim of this paper is to study the archaeological remains of the enigmatic rock-cut complex in the village of Varōy [Varjavy] to provide a more detailed description of the current remains. The results show that, while reassessment of the possible functions regarding this site suggest and outright contradict to the traditional views of scholars as a mithraeum, the architectural layout of this building is deeply intertwined with Mongol funeral sites and has much to tell about the relationship between rock-cut complexes and Ilkhanid cemeteries.
      PubDate: 2022-06-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00049-x
       
  • Morphological standardization, ceramic specialization and dynamic
           political intervention: a case study from the Taosi site, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Ceramic specialization is frequently associated with implications of social complexity, particularly in a stratified society, where the elite actively intervenes in ceramic consumption and production to achieve political goals. In previous studies, standardization was used as evidence for ceramic specialization and elite control, but the specific links are often oversimplified. This study has chosen the jars and dou excavated from the site of Taosi (2300–1900BC) to explore the possible link between elite intervention and ceramic production. This research investigates pottery standardization by analyzing shape variables with geometric morphometric analysis and size measurements by calculating the CV (coefficient of variation); by doing so, this study compares the degree of variation provided by elliptical Fourier analysis and shows how the morphological variation shows more standardization in elite ceramics, and differs from ceramics used by commoners during the increase of political power, whereas the jars have the opposite tendency, implying elite control. This result shows that the elite in Taosi society has combined different methods to control ceramic production: attached, specialized production and household tributes, contributing to a diverse and dynamic acknowledgement of the link between elite control and ceramic production in a stratified society.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00050-4
       
  • The origins of multi-cropping agriculture in Southwestern China:
           Archaeobotanical insights from third to first millennium B.C. Yunnan

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      Abstract: Abstract Yunnan’s location at the crossroad of temperate China, Northeast India and tropical mainland Southeast Asia makes it a pivotal area for the understanding of early cultural contacts and agricultural spread between these ecologically diverse regions. This paper evaluates current evidence relating to the emergence of the first agricultural systems in Yunnan. It also reviews previous theories on agricultural dispersal to Yunnan, including whether Austroasiatic speakers were responsible for the spread of rice from Yunnan to mainland Southeast Asia, and builds a new framework that allows to tie agricultural development in the region into broader patterns of early migration and exchange networks. Archaeobotanical remains attest to an initial spread of rice and millet from Central China into Yunnan in the third millennium B.C. and the establishment of a mixed-crop economy; the introduction of wheat and barley in the second millennium B.C. allowed for increased diversification of the agricultural system, with a two-season intensification trend in the late first millennium B.C. Differences in early rice cultivation ecologies between Yunnan and mainland Southeast Asia suggest that Yunnan rice farmers may not have had a primary role in the southern dispersal of rice, however, more data is needed to fully clarify the source and development of dryland cultivation of rice in mainland Southeast Asia.
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00052-2
       
  • Preliminary results of the first lithic raw material survey in the
           piedmont zones of Kazakhstan

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      Abstract: Abstract The study of raw materials was comprehensively studied in European and African Palaeolithic. However, systematic research of raw material sourcing has not been undertaken for the Palaeolithic of Kazakhstan, such surveys being embedded in reconnaissance works aimed at discovering new Palaeolithic sites. Our work presents preliminary results of the first lithic raw material survey in Kazakhstan. This study distinguishes the geographic patterns of land-use and their correlation with the stone tools from stratified sites. We describe primary and secondary sources of raw materials and compare macroscopically with the lithic assemblages. The survey results show a heterogeneous distribution of raw materials throughout the study regions. Macroscopic observations of lithic assemblages, and data extracted from literature suggest that hominins primarily selected local raw materials. Regional differences in the utilisation of a particular type of raw material which can be observed through the macroscopic examination of the lithic collections are confirmed by survey results.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00051-3
       
  • Specialization of pottery production in Middle Neolithic Western Liaoning

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the specialization of pottery production during the Middle Neolithic period in Western Liaoning based on the excavations of the Zhaobaogou, Silengshan, and Shangjifangyingzi sites. Through the analysis of direct and indirect evidence, we believe that a “household industry” and an “individual workshop industry” are the modes of pottery production in this period. Because these modes are similar, it is difficult to distinguish them through differences in archaeological remains, so these modes can be collectively referred to as the “household specialized industry.” During this period, it is possible that the main organizational mode of pottery production changed from a “household industry” to an “individual workshop industry.” In addition, there was a diachronic evolution of the social background of production and the identity of the producers. However, this diachronic process consistently maintained a low-intensity, partially due to the fact that these modes of production are small-scale and part-time.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00048-y
       
  • A preliminary study of zhi jia cooking stands in Neolithic sites of
           Northeast China

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      Abstract: Abstract Data concerning zhi jia cooking stands in Neolithic sites of Northeast show that they are mainly distributed in the Second Songhua River Basin, the East Liaohe River Basin, and the West Liaohe River Basin, and date 4500–3000 BC, with similar shapes and characteristics found across their distribution area. From the situational observation of the unearthed position, morphological characteristics, utensils analogy, and analysis of associated utensils, it is inferred that the zhi jia were mainly used to support oblique-shaped pottery: this combination of objects could be used to dry and bake food. When these implements were used for cooking, two zhi jia would be placed on both sides of the hearth, and then the oblique pottery was placed on top, resulting in a larger surface for achieving better heat transference and improving the efficiency of cooking. In addition, some of these artifacts may be related to sacrificial rites.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00047-z
       
  • An archaeological survey of the Assam stone jar sites

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      Abstract: Abstract Stone jars are a unique archaeological phenomenon in Assam, India, with similar features also present in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Indonesia. Sites in Assam were first noted in the early twentieth century, with systematic recording not commencing until 2014 by a collaborative effort from the North-Eastern Hill University, Nagaland University and the Archaeological Survey of India. In a continuation of this effort, this paper presents the results of a 2020 survey across Dima Hasao Province, Assam, India which led to the documentation of four previously unreported megalithic jar sites, growing the number from seven to eleven known jar sites, with ten geolocated. In addition, a general discussion of the known jar sites to date is conducted regarding distribution and jar characteristics.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00043-3
       
  • Reading the archaeometallurgical findings of Yodhawewa site, Sri Lanka:
           contextualizing with South Asian metal history

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to provide a chronological interpretation of the Yodhawewa settlement and interpret metalworking activities based on artifacts representing metallurgical technology in Sri Lanka and South Asia. The research data was based on a field survey, two vertical excavations, and six profile observations conducted in 2018. The radiocarbon (carbon 14) chronological results of the Yodhawewa research represented the first millennium (1st, 4th, and 8th centuries) AD. Archaeological material on iron ore extraction, crucible steel, and copper-related productions was revealed during the study. This Yodhawewa research was the first to discover an ancient crucible-shaped (lower half-spherical typed) steel furnace in the northwestern dry zone of Sri Lanka. Besides, this study led to the first archaeological discovery that the "Bellow method" activated an ancient steel furnace in Sri Lanka. In addition to the metalwork, this site reflects significant archaeological materials on the global cultural relations associated with the Yodhawewa study area.
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00046-0
       
  • Investigation of when the capital of the Bohai state was relocated to
           Shangjing City: Evidence from a neglected chronological pottery sherd

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      Abstract: Abstract The Bohai state (AD 698-926AD) moved its capital four times, but determining the specific timing of the relocation to the second capital has become a controversial historical issue. Recent archaeological discoveries such as the Yanbian border walls indicate that the earliest capital of the Bohai state should be located in the Yanji Basin. Built in the early years of the Bohai state, the Yanbian border walls were erected to defend against the unconquered northern Sumomohe people. These walls were gradually abandoned after the capital was moved to Shangjing City. Pottery sherds marked with the gan zhi year of “Bing-Shen” found in a site similar to the beacon tower on the border walls of Yanbian, as well as the historical background of Bohai state, allow us to speculate that the movement to the Shangjing City capital was in AD 756.
      PubDate: 2022-01-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00045-1
       
  • On chi wei beast roof ridge decorations of the Bohai state

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      Abstract: Abstract Chi wei (a general term for beast decorations on roof ridges in ancient Chinese architecture) in the Bohai state can be divided into two types: Type A (having no beast masks on the head) and Type B (having beast masks on the head). Type A prevailed in the early to mid-period of the Bohai state, while Type B prevailed in the mid-to-late period. The application of chi wei in the Bohai state thus witnesses a transformation from Type A to B, which is synchronic with the transformation from chi wei to chi wen (the term given to later decorations that are similar to chi wei) in the Central Plains region of the Tang Dynasty. This gives historical witness that the Bohai state closely followed and received cultural influence from the Tang Dynasty.
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-022-00044-2
       
  • Demystification of Qin arms production

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      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-021-00042-w
       
  • Karakorum, the first capital of the Mongol world empire: an imperial city
           in a non-urban society

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      Abstract: Abstract Cities within a steppe environment and in societies based on pastoral nomadism are an often overlooked theme in the anthropological literature. Yet, with Karakorum, the first capital of the Mongol Empire (AD 1206–1368), we have a supreme example of such a city in the central landscape of the Orkhon valley in Mongolia. In this paper, we ask, what is the city in the steppes' Taking Karakorum as our starting point and case of reference and to attain a better comprehension of the characteristics of urbanism in the steppe, we apply a list of urban attributes compiled by Michael E. Smith (2016) to provide a thick description of Karakorum. The discussion not only comprises comparisons to other contemporary sites in Russia and Mongolia, but also addresses in detail the question of city–hinterland relations as a fundamental necessity for the survival of the city in an anti-urban environment. The analysis shows that during the Mongol period we can identify urbanism but no urbanization: there is no process of independent, natural growth of cities carried out by the population, but cities are “political” in the sense that they are deeply intertwined with the authority and have therefore much to tell about the relation between power and authority on the one hand and the ruled on the other.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-020-00039-x
       
  • The later prehistory of Southeast Asia and southern China: the impact of
           exchange, farming and metallurgy

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper integrates the later prehistory of mainland Southeast Asia with that of the extensive and varied lands north to the Yangtze River and beyond. Five millennia ago, rice cultivation had long been established in the Yangtze catchment, sustaining the early state centered at Liangzhu. This presents a sharp contrast to the complex hunter-gatherer communities then occupying favorable coastal and riverine habitats in Southeast Asia. Thereafter, numerous contacts are identifiable. These involved the movement south of rice and millet farmers, via the coast and strategic river courses that led to integration with long-established hunter-gatherers, as well as the introduction of a wide range of material skills. The exchange of desirable prestige items in jade and shell spanned considerable distances. The reach of the powerful early states of the Central Plains of the Yellow River and Sichuan involved prospecting for copper and tin ores, and progressive adoption of copper-base technologies into Southeast Asia. Having reviewed these broad patterns of interaction, I focus on describing and evaluating the fine details of the social changes that are illuminated by new Bayesian chronologies and extensive excavations in key sites.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-021-00040-y
       
  • The Majiayao to Qijia transition: exploring the intersection of
           technological and social continuity and change

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      Abstract: Abstract The transition between the Majiayao (5300–4000 BP) and Qijia (4200–3500 BP) “cultures” in what is now northwestern China’s Gansu Province has typically been defined by major technological changes in pottery forms, subsistence practices, and site locations. These changes are thought to have been driven by a combination of climate change induced cooling and drying as well as human migration into the region from areas further east. Based on our review of literature on the topic, as well as recent fieldwork in the northern Tao River Valley, we suggest that the picture is significantly more complex, with some new technologies slowly being experimented with, adopted, or rejected, while many other aspects of production and social organization persisted over hundreds of years. We hypothesize that these changes reflect the active agency of the inhabitants of southern Gansu during the fifth and fourth millennia BP balancing long-standing cultural traditions with influxes of new technologies. Unlike some societies in other regions at this time, however, increasing technological specialization does not appear to have resulted in growing social inequality, but the archaeological material instead reflects increasingly complex heterarchical organization.
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-021-00041-x
       
  • Joyce C. white and Elizabeth G. Hamilton, editors 2018. Ban Chiang,
           Northeast Thailand, Vol. 2B: Metals and Related Evidence from Ban Chiang,
           Ban Tong, Ban Phak Top, and Don Klang

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2020-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s41826-020-00034-2
       
 
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