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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Historical Archaeology
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0440-9213 - ISSN (Online) 2328-1103
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • The Sound of Silence: Indigenous Perspectives on the Historical
           Archaeology of Colonialism

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      PubDate: 2024-02-12
       
  • The “Other” Dixwells: Commerce and Conscience in an American
           Family

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      PubDate: 2024-02-07
       
  • Walling in and Walling out: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide
           Us'

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      PubDate: 2024-02-07
       
  • The Colonial Landscape of the British Caribbean

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      PubDate: 2024-02-02
       
  • Valencian Tin-Glazed Earthenware and Technological Change: A Mediterranean
           Industry

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      Abstract: Abstract Tin-glaze technology was introduced early in the Iberian Peninsula and developed further in the Valencian region. Manises lusterware on tin-glazed wares became, from the 14th century onward, a widely exported and socially recognized prestige product, although it declined in later centuries and was replaced by other productions, such as polychrome earthenwares from Alcora or Valencian tilework, that enjoyed a worldwide distribution. The aim of this article is to review the long evolution of this Eastern technology, introduced almost simultaneously with its development in the Middle East, analyzing how the technique and the ceramics produced with it were adapted to changing societies and to the aesthetic keys of each historical moment through to the 18th century. This first occurred because of the admiration it generated in European feudal society when the technique was transferred by the integration of the Muslim population in the expanding kingdoms in the Iberian Peninsula, and then by crossing oceans and reaching America.
      PubDate: 2023-12-07
       
  • Finding Fort Roberdeau

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      Abstract: Abstract Fort Roberdeau was a lead mine in central Pennsylvania during the period of the American Revolution. Scant information exists on the original position of the fort, the location of mining activity in the area during the period of the Revolution, or artifacts from this period. Subsequent farming, mining exploration, and the placement of the current replica fort (erected 1976) obscure the landform and hinder identification of Revolutionary-period mining activities. As a means of locating where the mining activities occurred and the original position of the fort, this study integrates historical, geological, geophysical, geochemical, geomorphological, and archaeological data. Geological mapping identified potential areas of past mining, and geophysical resistivity surveys verified at least one Revolutionary-period mine, since the location and dimensions of the subsurface anomaly match historical records. The positions of period metallic artifacts in conjunction with a road and corner of the original fort (identified with LiDAR and thermal imagery) place the original fort near the current replica.
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
       
  • An Archaeology of Structural Violence: Life in a Twentieth-Century Coal
           Town

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      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Reflections on the American Experience in Archaeological Perspective Book
           Series

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      Abstract: Abstract For over five decades historical archaeologists conducting research in the United States have produced important scholarship detailing how the material products and precedents of interactions among people from a multitude of cultural backgrounds created a distinctive plural American society. The American Experience in Archaeological Perspective (AEAP) book series was launched by the University Press of Florida in the early 2000s with the aim of focusing attention on the materiality of the United States as it is differentiated from other nation-states by circumstances of migration, race, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, and other sociohistorical phenomena. A major goal of the series is to reveal how archaeology can interrogate formative aspects of American history and culture—events, institutions, places, practices, and processes—and evaluate their legacies with respect to the country’s present-day social and political circumstances. This essay reflects on the AEAP series and the scholarship produced by its authors over the past two decades. As examples drawn from more than two dozen volumes in the series illustrate, archaeological investigations of the detritus and landscapes associated with core American values and activities—in all their diversity—provide insights into the foundations of the American experience and what it means to be an American. These studies also provide broad comparisons with historical and anthropological inquiries into lifeways, identity, and national character throughout the world. We conclude with a discussion of the directions the series editors plan to take in publishing the next generation of scholarship in American historical archaeology.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • The Mediterranean, Braudel, and Historical Archaeology

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      Abstract: Abstract The region bordering the Mediterranean Sea offers historical archaeologists unique opportunities for developing in-depth interpretations of global/local connections. Archaeologists can learn from reading Fernand Braudel’s study of the Mediterranean and from thinking specifically about the role of intercultural trade in the region. Shipwrecks, when combined with terrestrial information, provide a particularly rich environment for study. Italian maiolica adds another dimension to the examination.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Taxonomy and Nomenclature for the Stone Domain in New England

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      Abstract: Abstract The European settlement of rural New England created an agro-ecosystem of fenced fields and pastures linked to human settlements and hydropowered village industry. The most salient archaeological result was the “stone domain,” a massive, sprawling constellation of stone features surviving as mainly undocumented ruins within reforested, closed-canopy woodlands. We present a rigorous taxonomy for this stone domain based on objective field criteria that is rendered user-friendly by correlating it to vernacular typologies and functional interpretations. The domain’s most salient class of features are stone walls, here defined as objects meeting five inclusive criteria: material, granularity, elongation, continuity, and height. We also offer a nomenclature and descriptive protocol for archaeological field documentation of wall stones (size, shape, arrangement, lithology) and wall structures (courses, lines, tiers, segments, contacts, terminations, and junctions). Our methodological tools complement recent computationally intensive mapping tools of light ranging and detection (LiDAR), drone-imaging, and machine learning.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Remains of the Invisible: Reconstructing Nineteenth-Century Plantation
           Life through the Biohistories of an Eastern North Carolina Family

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      Abstract: Abstract Planned restoration of a 19th-century burial vault in Jones County, North Carolina, associated with the Foscue family, led to its excavation in 2010. Family lore and related documents identify only three family members buried in the vault, but nine individuals are represented by the remains. Possible identities of the unnamed individuals are explored using biological data, family documents, and family lore. The invisibility of some individuals in the historical record reflects a period of shifting family structures, high female and infant mortality, and the effects of social status on documentation and remembrance.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • A Struggle for Heritage: Archaeology and Civil Rights in a Long Island
           Community

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      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Death in the Time of Pandemic: A Tuscan Cholera Cemetery at Benabbio
           (1855)

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      Abstract: Abstract Cholera was one of the great killers of the 19th century. The pandemic waves that took place between 1823 and 1899 caused hundreds of thousands of deaths in the Mediterranean region and across Europe. However, the excavation of cholera cemeteries is very rare. This article presents the results of excavations at the cholera cemetery of Benabbio, a mountain village near Lucca (northwest Tuscany) in which cholera broke out in the late summer–early autumn of 1855, causing 46 deaths in a population of around 900 inhabitants. The excavation made it possible to detect for the first time the material characteristics of a cholera cemetery. The findings provide a new source for anthropologically reading the reaction of a community facing the mortality crisis, which fluctuated between acceptance of regulations imposed by the authorities and local strategies of resistance.
      PubDate: 2023-11-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00437-9
       
  • Practicing and Publishing Post-1500 Mediterranean Archaeology in Italy,
           Spain, and France

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      Abstract: Abstract Post-1500 archaeology has undergone many changes in western Mediterranean Europe over the last three decades. This article explores how these changes have developed by focusing on the publishing of post-1500 archaeology in Italy, Spain, and France. Taking Italy as the primary example, it demonstrates that the path taken is intertwined with that of Northern Europe, but that it also deviates in its beginnings, its place in law, and its current place in academic and professional archaeology.
      PubDate: 2023-11-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00472-6
       
  • Introduction: Historical Archaeology and the Mediterranean

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      PubDate: 2023-11-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00444-w
       
  • The Archaeology of the Bedouin: An Assessment from the Negev, Israel

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      Abstract: Abstract This analysis reviews the state of archaeological research on the Negev Bedouin. It includes an overview of historical sources that describe and illustrate Bedouin life in the southern Levant, a description of several issues that have impeded archaeological research, and a summary of seven types of Bedouin archaeological sites that the author has identified based on the published literature. Associated material culture is divided into two categories: items made by the Bedouin and artifacts that they purchased. Many Bedouin had the means to acquire the latter from itinerant merchants and towns because they were involved in agriculture. Bedouin barley was exported from Gaza to destinations in the Mediterranean basin and Western Europe. Archaeological research on these tribes generates data that are often not provided by Bedouin interlocuters and Westerners.
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00464-6
       
  • “Here Be Dragons”: Historical and Contemporary Archaeology and
           Heritage in the Aegean Sea

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      Abstract: Abstract Postmedieval, modern, and contemporary remains are ubiquitous, yet their study and curatorship are uncommon in the Aegean geographic context. In this article I discuss the materiality of these uncared-for ruins, drawing from rural and urban remains in the Aegean, contrasted with other littoral sites in the Mediterranean. I focus on their social and cultural impact and their role in contemporary communities, along with the state provisions organized to protect and manage them in Greece and Turkey. I propose a present and socially engaged archaeological praxis and emphasize the need for historical/contemporary archaeology to be more politically involved, raising awareness and broadening the representation of marginalized communities.
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00439-7
       
  • A Conversation with Robert L. Schuyler

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      PubDate: 2023-10-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00467-3
       
  • Maritimity in Stone: An Archaeology of Early Modern and Modern Ship
           Graffiti in the Maltese Islands (ca. 1530–1945)

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      Abstract: Abstract Ship graffiti in Malta can be understood as an archaeological manifestation of a Mediterranean island’s maritime identity. The profusion and distribution of graffiti must be contextualized within local histories, naval powers, and maritime industry, and the ways these shaped the demographic and religious landscapes in the early modern period. Ship graffiti has the capacity to fill gaps in scholarship as well as raise important historical and archaeological questions. Technological advancements continue to revolutionize the documentation, study, and communication of graffiti sites. Systematic methodologies demonstrate the value of interpreting ship graffiti through an archaeological lens.
      PubDate: 2023-10-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00443-x
       
  • Robert L. Schuyler (1941–2023): In Memoriam

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      PubDate: 2023-10-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-023-00466-4
       
 
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