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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Historical Archaeology
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0440-9213 - ISSN (Online) 2328-1103
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Social Engineering at the Company Home Hearth: Coal Company Use of
           Architecture to Control Domestic Spaces in the Pennsylvania Anthracite
           Region, 1866–1889

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      Abstract: America’s Gilded Age industries were infamous for their labor abuses; however, new research indicates that companies also attempted to use the architectural layouts of workers’ houses to further manipulate workers and protect corporate interests. Drawing on existing architecture, oral histories, and proposed future floor plans, this article evaluates the potential motivations behind seemingly inconsequential changes between the houses built at Lattimer No. 2 and the proposed houses to be built at Lattimer No. 3 in northeastern Pennsylvania. Although the power structures inherent in company towns afforded the company control over every aspect of their workers’ lives, a review of architectural changes to workers’ houses over time reveals how the manipulation of physical space promoted community surveillance, increased formality, and decreased interaction with neighbors. While subtle, these types of modifications indicate a shift in the relationship between the company and its workers and can provide more insight into the experiences of workers in coal-company towns.
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
       
  • Material Culture and Structural Violence: Reframing Evidence of the Social
           Gradient in Industrial Contexts

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      Abstract: Coal mining is an industry that historically has exposed laborers to a variety of environmental and occupational health hazards that have resulted in injury, illness, and/or physical disability. These health hazards, however, did not impact all laborers involved in coal mining equally. As a coal-mining company town organized with four distinct housing areas that correlate historically with the socioeconomic statuses of the jobs held at the colliery, Eckley Miners’ Village provides a case study to explore how these health disparities were lived with and treated by residents of the industrial company town. Through an analysis of health-related material culture from house lots in two different sections of Eckley Miners’ Village, evidence of the social gradient can be seen in the quality and quantity of medical ephemera present in the archaeological record. By utilizing archaeology, scholars can develop a longitudinal study of health disparities in the coal-mining towns of northeastern Pennsylvania. Examining contemporary health disparities requires tracing the historical foundations of these inequities, providing a critical space for archaeologists to contribute meaningful insights into the implications of social, political, and economic factors on exposure to health hazards and access to treatment materials.
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
       
  • The Human Experience of Constructing Bodies and Persons: A Discussion

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      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • Worker-on-Worker Violence in the Early Industrial Period

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      Abstract: In this article I will examine workplace violence in the 19th century and its causes through the stories of seven workers. In the mid-19th century, seven millworkers in western Finland died from worker-on-worker violence. These cases form a body of data that I use to analyze the reasons for young men’s violent behavior and its connection to the modernization process. The arrival of modern industry shaped new kinds of male roles, with industrial workers being categorized as either skilled or unskilled. The mills were locales in which males were pushed to represent this new kind of industrial masculinity, roles for which few of them were suited. This could lead to their humiliation and emasculation, which, in turn, sometimes resulted in outbursts of violent behavior.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • Tonics, Whiskey Bottles, and Syringes: Clues to Care in a Midwife’s
           Washington, D.C., Household

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      Abstract: The Taliaferros were an African American family who lived in the post-emancipation neighborhood of Barry Farm/Hillsdale in southeast Washington, D.C. Their surviving daughter, Olivia, had a career as a nurse and midwife, but little else is currently known about her life. This article combines documentary sources, a salvage collection, and an archaeological collection to think about Olivia’s career, her labor, and her social connections. I draw on household archaeology and Black-feminist thought to examine the possibilities of Olivia Taliaferro’s lived experience, arguing that the material from her household has the potential to secure recognition of Black women’s omnipresent contributions to the world.
      PubDate: 2022-11-07
       
  • The Smell of the Insane: Disciplining the Olfactory Domain in the
           Nineteenth-Century Asylum

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      Abstract: Nineteenth-century psychiatrists targeted the olfactory domain as an avenue for intervention into the pathologies of the mind. The insane asylum aimed at literally and metaphorically sanitizing the offensive aspects of its patients as a method of “cure.” By virtue of their unpleasant and characteristic odors, which marked them as a deviation from the “fragrant” and “inodorate” elite (Classen 1997), the insane were linked to other categories of difference, such as race, ethnicity, and class. Accordingly, the asylum was nested within parallel and overlapping projects to control deviant populations through their subjection to its “sensorial regime” (Hamilakis 2014). The administrators of the Worcester State Hospital in Massachusetts faced an uphill battle in mastering the olfactory domain of their institution, having failed to anticipate the hygienic challenges posed by the concentration of a large population under a single roof. Throughout the 19th century and into the 20th, the distinctive smell of confinement was identified by patients and staff as one of the most noticeable and memorable features of their experiences at the asylum. While 19th-century psychiatrists tended to attribute this odor to difference—i.e., to the deviant and defective physiology of the insane—I argue in this article that it was the olfactory signature of institutionalization, a tangible representation of the failure to achieve an orderly sensorial regime, which was brought about largely by psychiatrists’ misdirected efforts to localize and target the disease in the individual, rather than in the system.
      PubDate: 2022-11-02
       
  • American Health and Wellness in Archaeology and History

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      PubDate: 2022-10-18
       
  • Neither Snake Oils nor Miracle Cures: Interpreting Nineteenth-Century
           Patent Medicines

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      Abstract: Archaeologists frequently discover 19th-century patent- and proprietary-medicine bottles at sites across the U.S. The unregulated medical mixtures once contained in these vessels were immensely popular. Interpreting how and why people used them is challenging, however, and complicated by assumptions that they were lesser alternatives to physicians’ prescriptions and consumers used them as directed in advertisements. This article questions these assumptions by considering patent medicines within the context of their time. It also examines consumers’ perspectives and how culture, local context, needs, and material qualities of medicines affect health-related decisions. Patent medicines found in association with Irish-immigrant residences at the Five Points in Manhattan form a case study with broader implications. This article proposes that studies of 19th-century patent medicines would benefit from beginning with the premises that they were reasonable medical options that consumers used in ways that resonated with their own cultural perspectives and addressed their specific health concerns.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
       
  • Investigating Black Women’s Mental Health in Progressive Era New York
           City: A Bioarchaeological Study of Slow Violence and Landscapes of
           Impunity

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      Abstract: Engaging with the concepts of slow violence and landscapes of impunity, this article traces the United States’ long history of state-sanctioned violence against Black women that affects both their physical and mental health. The extent of this abuse is revealed by examining the skeletal and archival remains of Black women who died during the Progressive Era in New York City. The same methods of marginalization and punishment have consistently been repeated and repurposed throughout the country’s history. This violence is perpetrated not only by the state, but also by scientists who would argue for racial and gender inferiority, therefore bolstering false assumptions. Examining this history is a crucial step in denaturalizing structures that harm Black women’s health and safety.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • “Cures after Doctors Fail”: Marketing Pain Relief in 1900s
           Washington, D.C.

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      Abstract: The turn of the century was a pivotal moment in American medicine advertising, at the confluence of the beginnings of governmental regulation of medicine, the development of mass production, and increasing social pressures against alcohol and other drugs that led to nationwide prohibition. Patent medicines, non-doctor-prescribed remedies whose ingredients were unlisted and often highly alcoholic, led the rush to brand and market medicinal products. In this article, I examine two products sold as pain relievers, McElree’s Wine of Cardui and Mexican Mustang Liniment. I incorporate the concepts of multimodality and language materiality from linguistic anthropology to understand the ways imagery, text, bottles, and bottle contents worked together as a material commodity tied to a brand identity and an associated set of semiotic referents, encouraging consumer trust in the product. I argue that the physical properties of these bottles are tied to a particular brand identity that brought together icons, material objects, and texts that generated a set of associations with the product. Analyzing these products and their associated advertising materials provides insights into idealized narratives of health and healing, and practices of racialized and gendered marketing, which began to develop during that era.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • A Conversation with Marcel Moussette

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      PubDate: 2022-09-26
       
  • Correction: Native Providence: Memory, Community, and Survivance in the
           Northeast

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      PubDate: 2022-09-20
       
  • Introduction: Conflict-Event Theory––a Proposed Paradigm

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      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00363-2
       
  • Girl Archaeologist: Sisterhood in a Sexist Profession

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      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00373-0
       
  • Memorial: Mary C. Beaudry (1950–2020)

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      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00349-0
       
  • Native Providence: Memory, Community, and Survivance in the Northeast

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      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00353-4
       
  • John L. Cotter Award in Historical Archaeology: Alexandra Jones

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      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00358-z
       
  • Memorial: Edward B. Jelks (1922–2021)

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      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00350-7
       
  • Carol V. Ruppé Distinguished Service Award: William B. Lees

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      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00356-1
       
  • Detroit Remains: Archaeology and Community Histories of Six Legendary
           Places

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      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-022-00354-3
       
 
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