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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Historical Archaeology
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0440-9213 - ISSN (Online) 2328-1103
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Looking Back to Move Forward: Urban Renewal, Salvage Archaeology, and
           Historical Reckoning in Alexandria, Virginia

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      Abstract: Abstract Dissent over what merits preservation and constitutes progress undergirds Alexandria Archaeology’s establishment. This program is rooted in mid-20th-century urban renewal. In demolishing several blocks and removing people of color and poor whites from the city’s downtown, officials hoped to reinvent this area as a haven for white, middle-class residents and tourists drawn to Alexandria by its historic character. During demolition, a group of concerned citizens noted that bulldozers were removing archaeological resources as well as “blight” in the name of progress. They established an archaeology program dedicated to mitigating these effects. These early archaeological projects privileged some histories, however, focusing on 18th-century, elite, white history instead of on the diverse 19th-century community that had once existed on the blocks. These archaeological collections provide insight into the dissonance of historical interpretation. This article explores how new analyses of older collections give voice to some of these lesser-known histories
      PubDate: 2024-05-22
       
  • The Port Macquarie Settlement, New South Wales, 1821–1847:
           Interconnections within Landscapes of Convict Labor and Industry

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      Abstract: Abstract This article explores the convict-punishment settlement of Port Macquarie on the mid-north coast of New South Wales between 1821 and 1847. Synthesizing previous and new historical and archaeological research, it identifies a range of major and minor sites of labor, accommodation, reform, and punishment within the settlement’s landscape during its period as a restricted convict prison from 1821 to 1830. From this it reconstructs the network of labor provision and infrastructure development, which we argue was not just about making the settlement economically self-sustaining, but also intended to create the framework for a transition to a “free” settlement. To this end this article also examines the ways in which that transformation occurred, with former sites of convict labor and the convicts themselves transitioning from government control to private settlers, until the withdrawal of the government infrastructure for convict management in 1847.
      PubDate: 2024-05-09
       
  • Research Methodology for the Documentation and Analysis Phase of
           Industrial Architectural Heritage Preservation: The Case of “Nueva
           Cerámica de Orio”

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      Abstract: Abstract Notable shortcomings and difficulties can be identified along the cultural-heritage value chain that can result in missed opportunities with respect to vulnerable cultural and architectural heritage, especially in the case of industrial architectural heritage. Shortcomings have been observed in the early documentation stage, which constitutes the foundation for subsequent processes. The objective of this article is to respond to this issue by presenting a research methodology for the documentation and analysis phase and demonstrate its application to an industrial architectural complex: “Nueva Cerámica de Orio.” This article describes the detailed study of the existing documentation through cross-referencing data from various sources. The application of this methodology facilitated the establishment of a general understanding of the heritage asset and its characteristic, providing a solid base for the development of the value chain.
      PubDate: 2024-04-30
       
  • The Archaeological Potential of Artificial Ground in Postindustrial
           Landscapes: A Case Study at the “Lowell of the Pacific Coast,” Oregon
           City, Oregon

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      Abstract: Abstract Historical developments on the flood-prone terraces below Willamette Falls involved deliberate modification of the landscape through construction of artificial ground. Evidence of this practice was found on the north side of the Oregon City Woolen Mill, built in 1864–1865, where at various times a saloon, hotel, and grocery stood before 1890, when the area was encompassed within the mill’s North Addition. A trench excavated within the foundation of the North Addition encountered fill material containing Native American artifacts, indicating that these sediments originated in a nearby former Native American settlement used as a borrow area. Also recovered from the fill were historical artifacts from as many as three different sources: the Hudson’s Bay Company, pre-1890 businesses, and woolen-mill operations. This case study underscores the potential for artificial ground to be a primary depositional context for archaeological evidence associated with historical urban and industrial developments in what today are postindustrial landscapes.
      PubDate: 2024-04-22
       
  • Memorial: Leland Greer Ferguson (1941–2023)

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      PubDate: 2024-04-19
       
  • Daniel G. Roberts Award for Excellence in Public Historical Archaeology:
           Archaeology in the Community

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      PubDate: 2024-04-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00492-w
       
  • J. C. Harrington Medal in Historical Archaeology: David G. Orr

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      PubDate: 2024-03-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00490-y
       
  • Carol V. Ruppé Distinguished Service Award: Teresita Majewski

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      PubDate: 2024-03-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00491-x
       
  • Memorial: Robert W. Paynter (1949–2023)

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      PubDate: 2024-03-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00494-8
       
  • John L. Cotter Award in Historical Archaeology: Alicia D. Odewale

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      PubDate: 2024-03-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00488-6
       
  • The Archaeology of Human–Animal Relations in Nineteenth- to
           Mid-Twentieth-Century Finland: Horse Burials and Cemeteries in Agrarian
           Landscapes

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      Abstract: Abstract One of the most crucial issues in the study of human–animal relations is the power of humans over animal death and how it has been processed culturally by the ways animal carcasses have been treated. In this article, the post-domestic phase in human–animal relations is entered by investigating the burial of working horses in the Finnish countryside during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Toward that end, 115 horse burials, 134 cemeteries, and 61 death places or kill sites were examined through interviews with local people, and a search of literature and place names. Six burial sites were excavated and several sites surveyed in the field. The locations of all sites were analyzed with historical maps. As a result, we consider that animal graves form a significant group of historical monuments that show great variability and are associated with past land use and human–animal relations.
      PubDate: 2024-03-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00487-7
       
  • Historical Sex Work: New Contributions from History and Archaeology

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      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The Royal Workshops of the Alhambra: Industrial Activity in Early Modern
           Granada

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      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • World War II in Western Massachusetts: Contemporary Archaeology of a Plane
           Crash

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      Abstract: Abstract Mount Holyoke, a mountain in western Massachusetts, is the site of 10 World War II casualties. This contemporary archaeological study explores the ways in which the physical remains of a 1944 plane crash on Mount Holyoke exist in the present and actively shape the lived experiences of residents and visitors. The mountain is a place rich with material and ideological manifestations of the past that intervene in the present. This article weaves together strands of evidence from ethnography and physical remains, sketching recollections and understandings of the plane crash. These multitemporal and tangled stories reveal how people in the present relate to a nonabsent past and a landscape of war on the mountain. While a commemorative memorial to the disaster threatens to institutionalize and crystallize a single narrative and collective memory, individuals and families resist this process through their engagement with the site and their creative and imaginative nostalgic practices.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Blood Red: Political Use of Transfer-Print Ware in Argentina
           (1810–1860)

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      Abstract: Abstract The authors analyze the connection between the local preference for a particular color of transfer-print ceramics and the political group in power in postrevolutionary Argentina during three periods ranging from 1810 to the 1860s. The first period begins with the establishment of the first national government. The following two periods correspond to the governments of Juan Manuel de Rosas and Justo José de Urquiza. There is a crossover between written sources and the archaeological record of the city of Buenos Aires, particularly in the light of recent findings at Juan Manuel de Rosas’s residence and his seat of government. Searches at that site led to the recovery of important ceramics decorated with the emblems of his political faction.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The Stonemasons’ Marks in the Cathedral of Santo Domingo, the First
           Cathedral of the New World

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      Abstract: Abstract In the Middle Ages and early modern period, masons inscribed symbols on dressed stonework and ashlars to identify the work of the individual or team that quarried or dressed the stone or of the workshop of origin. Other marks on stonework can provide instructions, such as the way to place the ashlar. Many of these marks still survive on the fabric of cathedrals, churches, palaces, important houses, castles, and other structures throughout Europe and beyond. This tradition journeyed from Europe to the New World with the stonemasons, although in the Americas very few have been reported. One of the buildings with masons’ marks is the Cathedral of Santo Domingo (1521–1541) in the Dominican Republic on Hispaniola Island. In this study, 28 masons’ marks were identified in 18 places inside and outside the cathedral: these included crosses, letters, geometric forms, and other symmetrical figures. All the marks are in discrete places, and most of them are difficult to find. So far, no scholars have reported stonemasons’ marks on any building in the Caribbean. In the 16th century, the knowledge of construction techniques was a secret and transmitted from builder to builder through the guild or workshop. Therefore, these patterns serve as a tool to identify builders, their place of origin, construction methods, construction phases, and construction dates, among other things. For this reason, the aim of this research is to draw attention to masons’ marks in the New World context as an aid to architectural history and archaeology, creating a database that will help to identify the masons who worked in the Americas in the 16th century, the dates of the construction phases, and the construction techniques they used.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The Sound of Silence: Indigenous Perspectives on the Historical
           Archaeology of Colonialism

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      PubDate: 2024-02-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00484-w
       
  • The “Other” Dixwells: Commerce and Conscience in an American
           Family

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      PubDate: 2024-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00485-9
       
  • Walling in and Walling out: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide
           Us'

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      PubDate: 2024-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00483-x
       
  • The Colonial Landscape of the British Caribbean

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      PubDate: 2024-02-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41636-024-00486-8
       
 
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