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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies
Number of Followers: 10  
 
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ISSN (Print) 2166-3548 - ISSN (Online) 2166-3556
Published by Penn State University Press Homepage  [34 journals]
  • Some New Evidence Documenting the Involvement of Da’esh in Syria with
           the Illicit Trade in Antiquities

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      Abstract: The involvement of Da’esh with the illegal excavation and sale of antiquities inside Syria is well known, in outline form at least. Yet although there is clear evidence that Da’esh was profiting from antiquities trafficking, there remain unanswered questions about the nature and extent of its involvement—questions relating to the organization and governance of excavating and marketing inside Syria and to the pricing structure of the trade and its profitability. Most of the reporting on these issues appeared between 2014 and 2017 while Da’esh was in control of large areas of Syria, and access was difficult if not impossible. The reporting was of necessity usually secondhand, often speculative, and cannot always be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Materiality of Divinity in an Atypical Flat-Roofed Apsidal Aula Ecclesiae:
           The Lubbēn Large Church as a Case Study from Southern Syria

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      Abstract: During the early period of Christian architecture, builders were establishing the religious material culture of Christianity as a form of symbolic communication by adding certain religious features while eliminating or replacing others. In theory, this occurred because the introduction of Christianity witnessed an opposition between religion and its material culture that is deeply ingrained in the polarization between the “spiritual” and the “material” (Turner 1979 : 157), Urchristentum and Frühchristentum (Finney 1988), and secular and sacred (Yasin 2009). It is the intent of this study to achieve an understanding of the relationships between religion and materiality that draws on the unique late antique examples ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • They Were Here: Graffiti by Tourists in the Ancient City of Jerash, Jordan

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      Abstract: Jerash (Roman Gerasa) is among the best-preserved Roman cities in the Mediterranean region; in Roman antiquity it was counted among the Decapolis cities. The city (48 km to the north of Amman) is a significant tourist attraction in Jordan (Fig. 1). Its Hellenistic-Roman structures being in such good state of preservation, they have drawn tourists since the nineteenth century (Fig. 2). This has also motivated tourism development in the area surrounding the site. This site, however, is threatened by both human actions and environmental impact that could be ameliorated by better site management. For example, the mosaics of churches (e.g., the Church of SS. Cosmas and Damian) are exposed to rain and other weathering ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Revisiting 1177 BCE and the Late Bronze Age Collapse

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      Abstract: In late 2013, long after the final proofs of my book 1177 BC had already been submitted and just weeks before it went on sale, I sent an urgent email to my editor at Princeton University Press, asking if it were possible to temporarily stop the presses long enough to slip into the text a brief discussion of new evidence for drought at the end of the Late Bronze Age in the southern Levant that had just been published by Langgut, Finkelstein, and Litt in the journal Tel Aviv (2013). Fortunately, they were able to do it, and I added in a few paragraphs, being careful not to disturb the pagination at that late date. Had we not done so, the book would already have been out of date even before it appeared.That episode ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Revisiting 1177 BCE and the Late Bronze Age Collapse

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      Abstract: Eric Cline’s 1177 BC (2014, 2021) introduced the world of the Late Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean and its “collapse” to a very wide audience. More than a book about collapse, though, Cline painted a vivid picture of the region as a lively, interconnected world of kingdoms and empires, engaged in trade, diplomacy, and warfare. It has done an excellent job of popularizing the period and bringing good archaeological and historical research into the mainstream.Whilst sticking to a multicausal stance on “the collapse” in the book and Forum essay here, Cline observes that there is growing evidence for climate change ca. 1200 BC, which suggests that drought or megadrought was a key factor in collapse, as was proposed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What Collapsed in 1177'

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      Abstract: Not far from where you live, in the rural counties outside of town, or in a village just over the border, there are people for whom dates and events like the “Fall of the Berlin Wall,” “9/11,” the “Great Recession,” or “January 6, 2021” hold no particular meaning, or meanings quite different from those they hold for you. This is worth keeping in mind when reading the litany of catastrophes that formed a “perfect storm” for the large political and economic hubs of the twelfth century BCE—a litany that is part of our shared upbringing in an archaeology that has always prioritized civilizational cores: their texts and dynastic chronologies; their art and technology.In writing my synthesis of the Levantine Bronze Age ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Comments

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      Abstract: Cline in an NPR interview, cited in his contribution here, stated: “Every society in the history of the world has ultimately collapsed.” Every society' Does the “collapse” of a government (the fall of a dynasty) also mean the end of a cultural tradition' If the term “collapse” is not specifically clarified (see Middleton 2017), it is difficult to analyze different trajectories of change in social and political systems, which may be only loosely linked, and to evaluate changes or lack of changes in cultural institutions, the latter of which might lead to political regeneration (Schwartz and Nichols 2006).In order to consider the events and processes of the twelfth century BCE, which is what Cline studies, one must ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Thoughts on the Collapse: The Perspective of a Philistine

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      Abstract: As I’ve been actively researching the Philistines—and excavating a major Philistine site—for more than 25 years (e.g., Maeir 2012, 2017, 2018; Maeir and Uziel 2020), I think I can qualify, at least metaphorically, as a Philistine. And needless to say, this gives me a unique perspective to join in on the fascinating discussion in the current issue of JEMAHS,1 revolving around Eric Cline’s views on the Late Bronze Age collapse.I would like to start by expressing my admiration and gratitude to Eric for the excellent manner in which he has presented to the public an up-to-date and highly accessible discussion of the background and events relating to the transition between the Late Bronze and Iron Ages in the eastern ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “There Really Are 50 Eskimo Words For ‘Snow’”: 1177, Big Data, and
           the Perfect Storm of Collapse

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      Abstract: My title refers to the observation that when something is important in a culture, we find many words for it.1 It could also allude to our contemporary fascination with the collapse of the Bronze Age and the numerous works that have tried to account for the mechanisms underpinning it. However, the importance of Eric Cline’s 1177 BC (Cline 2014, 2021) does not simply lie in its treatment of the Bronze Age collapse.I was lucky to read an advance copy of 1177 BC prior to its 2014 publication, and what I liked most about it was that it provided a historical and archaeological overview of many of the cultures of the Mediterranean and Near East. I loved the book, and thought others would either also love it or possibly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Brief Response

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      Abstract: I’d like to begin my very brief response by thanking the editors of the journal and all of the respondents, especially those whose comments went beyond the article and addressed the book as a whole.After reading through the thoughtful responses, and noting many of the overlapping points, what came first to my mind is something that Norman Yoffee said about a decade ago, when he and Patricia McAnany compared studying societal collapse to viewing a low-resolution digital photograph: “It’s fine when small, compact, and viewed at a distance but dissolves into disconnected parts when examined up close” (McAnany and Yoffee 2010: 5) I would agree but prefer to use the analogy of looking at an Impressionist painting when ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wine Jars and Jar Makers of Cyprus: The Ethnoarchaeology of Pitharia by
           Gloria London (review)

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      Abstract: In her study Wine Jars and Jar Makers of Cyprus, Gloria London sets out to evaluate the diaries of a Danish UN police officer by the name of Knud Jensen. London conducts an in-depth examination of Jensen’s six diaries and one postscript and tries to present the information obtained in a framework that uses as systematic and scientific an outline as possible. After reading Jensen’s diaries, London examined ceramics and ceramic production in Cyprian villages for a period of six months. The author, who has specialized in Cyprian ceramic production and female potters for more than 30 years, focused her studies on villages in the mountains of Agios Demetrios and the Troodos. The book’s principal object of investigation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Byblos in the Late Bronze Age: Interactions between the Levantine and
           Egyptian Worlds by Marwan Kilani (review)

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      Abstract: Marwan Kilani, in the introduction to the volume, explains the structure of the book (a separate foreword was not included). He states that the book is divided into two main parts, namely the archaeological and the written sources. The archaeological sources are described first because, according to the author, “[they yield] information about the structures of the city and the dynamics characterizing its history, while the written sources focus more on specific events and well-defined interactions” (2). The archaeological sources, however, concern only objects of clear Egyptian origin found in the Levant, while the written sources considered include “Egyptian written sources, Amarna Letters, documents from Ugarit ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The City Gate in Ancient Israel and Her Neighbors: The Form, Function, and
           Symbolism of the Civic Forum in the Southern Levant by Daniel A. Frese
           (review)

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      Abstract: City gates have long fascinated Near Eastern archaeologists, not only for the intrinsic complexity of their defensive architecture but also as the embodiment of a physical and symbolic border that marked the people living within its boundaries as part of a specific community. The importance of Iron Age city gates as symbolic and often propagandistic tools has been central to the academic discourse around Iron Age urban development in the ancient Near East, often stressing how city gates embodied a dichotomy by functioning both as defensive military architecture and public spaces for communities (Mazzoni 1997; Pucci 2008).Frese’s new book touches on all of these different aspects to offer a compelling and integrated ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Under the Mediterranean I: Studies in Maritime Archaeology ed. by Stella
           Demesticha and Lucy Blue (review)

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      Abstract: This is the first volume in the Honor Frost Foundation (HFF) Research Series, which will publish themed sessions from the foundation’s Under the Mediterranean conference program, as well as monographs, theses, and edited volumes, all peer reviewed. The foundation also supports a non-peer-reviewed General Series that will present collections of articles from seminars or round tables, reprints of Honor Frost’s articles, and other works relevant to archaeology underwater. Online versions of both these series can be read for free on the publisher’s website (www.sidestone.com). The volume under review is a collection of 19 articles in three sections reporting on recent research concerning the archaeology of shipwrecks ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From The Editors

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      Abstract: The editors are pleased to present this issue to our readers. It contains timely information on endangered cultural heritage sites including the latest facts about the use of antiquities to finance terrorism in Syria, a comprehensive architectural study of one of the forgotten churches of southern Syria, a methodical examination of modern graffiti at the splendid site of Jerash in Jordan, and a fascinating Forum section on the Late Bronze Age collapse in the ancient Near East.Presenting new evidence on the continuing destruction, looting, and illicit trading in Syrian antiquities, authors Isber Sabrine, Ristam Abdo, and Neil Brodie extensively document the involvement of Da’esh in these destructive practices. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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