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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Britannia
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.111
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0068-113X - ISSN (Online) 1753-5352
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Bowden; Will
      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000430
       
  • BRI volume 54 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 11
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000454
       
  • BRI volume 54 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 7
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000466
       
  • The Use of Celtic Coinage in Early Roman London: A Re-interpretation of
           Bloomberg Wax Tablet 31

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      Authors: Johnson; Tom
      Pages: 3 - 22
      Abstract: The reference to ‘victoriati’ in Bloomberg Wax Tablet 31 has been interpreted as a request for 52 Roman quinarii. This paper argues that quinarii were not available in significant enough quantities to make such a payment and that a more credible alternative is to see these ‘victoriati’ as a reference to local, Celtic coinage, specifically the silver issues of Epaticcus or Cunobelin. This identification, supported by recent metallurgic studies, alongside data from hoards, excavations and the Portable Antiquities Scheme, suggests a more prolonged use of Celtic coinage in Roman London than has previously been appreciated. Supplementary material is available online and provides data supporting the assertions made.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000223
       
  • Roman ‘Grand Strategy’ in Action' Claudius and the
           Annexation of Britain and Thrace

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      Authors: Graafstal; Erik P.
      Pages: 23 - 50
      Abstract: A longstanding debate among ancient historians and students of Roman frontiers concerns the reality and effective reach of Roman imperial policy. Certainly when new military commitments were involved, the slowness of supply and information meant that major moves had to be planned well in advance. This paper focuses on the provincialisation of Britain and Thrace in a.d. 43 and c. 45. The dating evidence provided by tree rings, coins and milestones suggests that logistic preparation for the invasion of Britain started at least two years before the event. This pattern, of a newly installed Emperor immediately initiating a campaign on the northern frontiers, allowing two years for logistic preparation, is seen no fewer than seven times between Caligula and Caracalla.
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000016
       
  • Unit Levies after the Batavian Revolt and the Conquest of Northern
           Britannia

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      Authors: Kreiner; Jared
      Pages: 51 - 74
      Abstract: In the Early Flavian Period over 30 military units were created or transferred for service in Britannia. Paul Holder maintained that these units arrived with Petillius Cerialis for Vespasian's expansionist plans and connected several new levies to the Batavian Revolt. Considering recent scholarship on Roman responses to revolts and Flavian geopolitics, however, this viewpoint requires revision. The author maintains that these units were transferred throughout the 70s c.e. as opportunities developed organically in Britannia. These newly levied units were not created in response to the Batavian Revolt, but due to the extraordinary and complex circumstances within Rome's northern frontiers after the post-Neronian civil wars. This article concludes with updated histories for the auxiliary units involved.
      PubDate: 2023-08-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000211
       
  • Agriculture and Population: Occupation and Burials in the Extramural Area
           of Margidunum on the Fosse Way in Nottinghamshire

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      Authors: Simmonds; Andrew, Allen, Martyn, McIntyre, Lauren, Champness, Carl
      Pages: 75 - 112
      Abstract: This paper presents the results of an excavation that uncovered c. 390 m of roadside plots within the ribbon development alongside the Fosse Way on the south-west periphery of the walled small town of Margidunum in Nottinghamshire. The roadside plots appear to have been used for a combination of domestic occupation and agricultural activity, and to the rear lay 54 inhumation burials in 52 graves (including two double burials) and a single urned cremation burial, whose skeletons bore evidence for the tough working lives of the individuals. These are interpreted as the remains of peasant farmers and as evidence for the agricultural focus of the settlement, and of ‘small towns’ more generally. A contrast is drawn between the apparent poverty of this community and the apparently more high-status occupation within the defended core of the town.
      PubDate: 2023-09-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000235
       
  • Writing in Roman Britain and Continental Europe: A Comparative Analysis of
           Styli Found in London

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      Authors: Colombo; Alessia
      Pages: 113 - 136
      Abstract: This paper investigates Roman writing habits through the evidence of metal styli. An assemblage of more than 400 styli from London constitutes the basis of the analysis, which explores their similarities with examples from other sites in Britain and continental Europe during the Imperial period. The geographical and social distribution of styli suggests that certain types were employed or made in specific locations by different social actors, and that the major political and military centres of the Empire shared a common material culture of writing. The analysis also suggests that styli types of the northern European regions possibly developed from ‘military styli’ brought by soldiers and bureaucrats during the conquest.
      PubDate: 2023-06-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000132
       
  • What's in the pots' Identifying Possible Extensification in Roman Britain
           Through Analysis of Organic Residues in Pottery

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      Authors: Greenwood; C.E., Cramp, L.J.E., Hodos, T.
      Pages: 137 - 165
      Abstract: This study examined absorbed organic residues in pottery to assess differences in subsistence practices in Roman Britain. Through this approach, we investigated foodways at a major urban site and a range of small towns, villas and farmsteads within its hinterland. The study revealed that consumption at Cirencester differed remarkably to consumption at other sites in the surrounding hinterland, with a greater contribution from pigs and/or chickens. Dairy products were a key contributor to the diet at rural sites, including a high-status villa. We contend that both findings are the result of extensification of food production. Thus, we show how reconstructing broad culinary patterns can reveal possible responses of inhabitants to the challenges of feeding the increasing population of Roman Britain.
      PubDate: 2023-09-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000181
       
  • Estimating the ‘Missing’ Houses of Silchester

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      Authors: Ortman; Scott, Hanson, John
      Pages: 167 - 187
      Abstract: Estimating the numbers of residences, and thus the residential densities and populations, of ancient settlements remains a significant problem. This is true even for ‘greenfield’ sites due to the differential visibility of structures made of different materials in aerial and geophysical surveys. In this paper, we take advantage of statistical relationships among elements of the built environments of Roman cities in Britannia and more broadly across the Empire, to estimate the total number of buildings, total population and population density of Silchester. The results indicate that the current site plan dramatically under-represents these values. We also consider the implications of our results for broader discussions of urbanism in Britannia.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000375
       
  • Contextualising Counterfeits: Roman Coin Moulds in Britain and the Channel
           Islands

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      Authors: Hingley; Richard
      Pages: 189 - 225
      Abstract: This paper addresses the archaeological contexts of the clay moulds used to produce copies of Roman coins in third-century Britain. Previous research has focused primarily upon the technology and chronology of the use of moulds to produce coins with the discarded remains of the used moulds considered as ‘waste’ items from an industrial process. This paper focuses attention on the deposition of the moulds. Using the best-recorded finds, it builds upon earlier suggestions that disused moulds were regularly discarded in boundary locations (settlement boundaries, field boundaries, drainage features, shafts/wells, coastal locations and disused structures). It proposes that the magical and ritual associations of production meant that the clay moulds, in addition to the coins that were produced, required careful handling.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000363
       
  • New Perspectives on Child and Infant Burial in Britain (100
           b.c.e.–c.e. 200)

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      Authors: Matthews Boehmer; Thomas
      Pages: 227 - 250
      Abstract: Focusing on a period of social shift, from the Late Iron Age to the early Roman period (100 b.c.e.–c.e. 200), this paper examines how the value of juvenile (under 13-year-old) bodies changed. In exploring the fluctuation in burial numbers alongside the altering forms of juvenile graves, the paper details the ways in which children (1- to 12-year-olds) and infants (younger than 1 year in age) were identified in death, as well as the longevity of these identifications. It is argued that juveniles are less common than they should be in the funerary record. Given that this relative absence of juvenile burial was clearly socially mandated, the emphasis here is on better contextualising and interrogating the sporadic presence and deposition of such burials.
      PubDate: 2023-09-14
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000405
       
  • Imaging Hadrian in Britain between Coinage and Sculpture: A New Digital
           Approach to the Study of Roman Imperial Portraiture

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      Authors: Calomino; D., Bologna, F., Wilson, P.F., Donnelly, M., Williams, M.A.
      Pages: 251 - 274
      Abstract: This paper presents a new approach to an old problem, the provincial reception of the image of Roman emperors. Applying 3D computer modelling, we captured the portrait features of Hadrian as represented on coinage minted for the British province, produced a 3D model from a coin and compared it with the bronze head of Hadrian found in London. The aim was to test the possibility, previously posited by other scholars, that the London portrait might have been produced by an artisan who used coin portraits of the emperor as his main – if not only – model. More generally, the paper examines the dependencies of coinage and sculpture on shared models and applies new technology to Roman portrait studies.
      PubDate: 2023-09-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000387
       
  • The ‘Saxon Shore’ Reconsidered

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      Authors: Drinkwater; John F.
      Pages: 275 - 303
      Abstract: I propose that the usual role of the Notitia Dignitatum's ‘Saxon Shore’ forts was, on both sides of the Channel, to control chronic, ‘everyday’ piracy and to support imperial operations. An exception occurred under Carausius and Allectus when the British forts were augmented to face likely Roman invasion. There was never any integrated cross-Channel system against concerted barbarian seaborne attack, Saxon or otherwise. The ‘Saxon Shore’ was a late fourth-century political expedient, confined to Britain and with minor military significance.
      PubDate: 2023-08-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000193
       
  • A Scato-sexual Message: The Secundinus Stone with Phallus from Vindolanda

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      Authors: Meyer; Alexander, Mullen, Alex, Vanhala, Joonas
      Pages: 305 - 320
      Abstract: The Secundinus stone, with its combination of carved phallus and text, was found in 2022 in excavations within the stone fort at Vindolanda. We consider comparanda for the imagery from Vindolanda, Britannia and further afield, and textual parallels particularly from Pompeii. We offer several possible interpretations of the object and prefer an analysis which takes the text, SECVNDINVS CACOR, as it is carved. This interpretation would add an otherwise unattested verbal form to the Latin scato-sexual vocabulary.
      PubDate: 2023-09-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X2300020X
       
  • Claudius and the Elephants for Britain (Cassius Dio 60.21.2)

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      Authors: Woods; David
      Pages: 321 - 325
      Abstract: Charles and Singleton have explained why Cassius Dio's claim (60.21.2) that elephants were among the equipment prepared for use in Britain during the Claudian invasion of a.d. 43 is probably untrue, if one assumes that by ‘elephant’ he means the animal of that name. It is argued here that the best explanation of this apparent error is that Dio preserves a reference to a type of military machine, probably a siege-tower, rather than to the animal of this name.
      PubDate: 2023-09-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000399
       
  • Correction to Redfern et al. (2017) ‘Written in Bone’: New Discoveries
           about the Lives of Roman Londoners, Britannia 48, 253–77

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      Authors: Redfern; Rebecca, Anastasiadou, Kyriaki, Silva, Marina Soares Da, Gilardet, Alexandre, Kelly, Monica, Williams, Mia, Booth, Thomas, Skoglund, Pontus
      Pages: 327 - 331
      Abstract: In 2017, ancient DNA analysis of the Harper Road burial from Southwark (London) found that the individual had male chromosomes. Now analysis has discovered that the individual had female chromosomes, data which match the osteological estimation of sex and the interpretation of the grave-goods.
      PubDate: 2023-09-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000417
       
  • I. SITES EXPLORED 1. WALES

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      Authors: Chapman; Evan M.
      Pages: 333 - 339
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000260
       
  • 2. SCOTLAND

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      Authors: Hunter; Fraser
      Pages: 339 - 341
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000272
       
  • ENGLAND 3. HADRIAN'S WALL

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      Authors: Walas; Anna H.
      Pages: 341 - 349
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000284
       
  • 4. NORTHERN ENGLAND

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      Authors: Walas; Anna H.
      Pages: 349 - 360
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000296
       
  • 5. THE MIDLANDS

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      Authors: Wilson; Pete
      Pages: 361 - 372
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000302
       
  • 6. EAST ANGLIA

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      Authors: Wilson; Pete
      Pages: 373 - 381
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000314
       
  • 7. GREATER LONDON

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      Authors: Humphreys; Owen
      Pages: 381 - 383
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000326
       
  • 8. SOUTH-WESTERN COUNTIES

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      Authors: Salvatore; John P.
      Pages: 384 - 389
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000338
       
  • 9.1. SOUTHERN COUNTIES (WEST)

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      Authors: Salvatore; John P.
      Pages: 389 - 391
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X2300034X
       
  • 9.2. SOUTHERN COUNTIES (EAST)

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      Authors: Humphreys; Owen
      Pages: 391 - 394
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000351
       
  • II. FINDS REPORTED UNDER THE PORTABLE ANTIQUITIES SCHEME

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      Authors: Pearce; John, Worrell, Sally
      Pages: 395 - 423
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000259
       
  • III. INSCRIPTIONS

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      Authors: Tomlin; R.S.O.
      Pages: 425 - 454
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000247
       
  • IV. SPOTLIGHT ON NEW RESEARCH

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      Pages: 455 - 462
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000442
       
  • The Hadrian's Wall Military Way: A Frontier Road Explored. By D.
           Armstrong. Armatura Press, Pewsey, 2021. Pp. xiv + 90, illus. Price £15.
           isbn 9781910238202.

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      Authors: Poulter; John
      Pages: 463 - 463
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000107
       
  • Life in Roman and Medieval Leicester. Excavations in the Town's North-east
           Quarter, 1958–2006. By R. Buckley, N.J. Cooper and M. Morris. Leicester
           Archaeology monograph 26. University of Leicester, Bristol, 2021. Pp. xxx
           + 608, illus. Price £49.95. isbn 9780957479265.

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      Authors: Fulford; Michael
      Pages: 464 - 465
      PubDate: 2023-06-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X2300017X
       
  • Bridge over Troubled Water: The Roman Finds from the River Tees at
           Piercebridge in Context. By H. Eckardt and P.J. Walton. Britannia
           Monograph 34. Roman Society, London, 2021. Pp. xii + 316, illus. Price
           £30. isbn 9780907764489 (print); https://doi.org/10.5284/1085344 (ebook).
           

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      Authors: Cool; H.E.M.
      Pages: 465 - 466
      PubDate: 2023-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000041
       
  • Chedworth Roman Villa. Excavations and Re-imaginings from the Nineteenth
           to the Twenty-first Centuries. By S. Esmonde Cleary, J. Wood and E.
           Durham. Britannia Monograph 35. Roman Society, London, 2022. Pp. xxviii +
           580, illus. (many colour), maps, plans (some fold-out). Price £100. isbn
           9780907764496.

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      Authors: King; Anthony C.
      Pages: 466 - 467
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000065
       
  • The Material Fall of Roman Britain 300–525 CE. By R. Fleming. University
           of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2021. Pp. 303, illus. Price £36.00.
           isbn 9780812252446.

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      Authors: Bowden; Will
      Pages: 468 - 469
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X2300003X
       
  • Silchester Revealed. The Iron Age and Roman Town of Calleva. By M.
           Fulford. Windgather Press, Oxford and Philadelphia, 2021. Pp. xviii + 206,
           illus. Price £16.99 (pbk); £34.99 (hbk). isbn 9781911188834 (pbk);
           9781914427084 (hbk).

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      Authors: Pearce; John
      Pages: 469 - 470
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000090
       
  • Conquering the Ocean. By Richard Hingley. Oxford University Press, Oxford,
           2022. Pp. ix + 312, illus. Price £22.99. isbn 9780190937416.

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      Authors: Millington; Claire
      Pages: 470 - 471
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000156
       
  • The Roman Baths at Wallsend. By N. Hodgson. Arbeia Society Roman
           Archaeological Studies 2. Arbeia Society and Tyne and Wear Archives and
           Museums, South Shields, 2020. Pp. x + 91, illus. Price £18. isbn
           9781527257696.

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      Authors: Wilmott; Tony
      Pages: 471 - 472
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000120
       
  • Roman County Durham: The Eastern Hinterland of Hadrian's Wall. By D.J.P.
           Mason. Durham County Council, Durham, 2021. Pp. 557, illus. Price £30.
           isbn 9781907445712.

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      Authors: Mountain; Katie
      Pages: 472 - 473
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000089
       
  • Visitor Experiences and Audiences for the Roman Frontiers: Developing Good
           Practice in Presenting World Heritage. Edited by N. Mills. BAR
           International Series S3066. BAR Publishing, Oxford, 2021. Pp. ix + 188,
           illus. Price £50.00. isbn 9781407359007 (print); 9781407359014 (ebook).

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      Authors: Alberti; Marta
      Pages: 473 - 474
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000028
       
  • A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age Oppidum of
           Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979–2017). By T. Moore. Archaeopress,
           Oxford, 2020. Pp. xxv + 667, illus. Price £85. isbn 9781789695342.

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      Authors: Russell; Miles
      Pages: 474 - 476
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000119
       
  • London in the Roman World. By D. Perring. Oxford University Press, Oxford,
           2022. Pp. xix + 573, illus. Price £40. isbn 9780198789000.

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      Authors: Marsden; Peter
      Pages: 476 - 477
      PubDate: 2023-08-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000077
       
  • Dying Young. A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Child Health in Roman
           Britain. By A. Rohnbogner. BAR Publishing, Oxford, 2022. Pp. xvii + 174,
           illus. Price £50. isbn 9781407359595

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      Authors: Roth; Ulrike
      Pages: 477 - 479
      PubDate: 2023-04-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000144
       
  • The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent. By N.
           Stoodley and S. Cosh. Archaeopress, Oxford, 2021. Pp. 260, illus. Price
           £45. isbn 9781789695878.

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      Authors: Gerrard; James
      Pages: 479 - 480
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000053
       
  • Chedworth Roman Villa. Excavations and Re-imaginings from the Nineteenth
           to the Twenty-first Centuries. By S. Esmonde Cleary, J. Wood and E.
           Durham. Britannia Monograph 35. Roman Society, London, 2022. Pp. xxviii +
           580, illus. (many colour), maps, plans (some fold-out). Price £100. ISBN
           9780907764496 - CORRIGENDUM

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      Authors: King; Anthony
      Pages: 481 - 481
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000429
       
  • Proceedings of the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies
           2022–2023

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      Pages: 483 - 486
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X23000478
       
 
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