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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
Showing 1 - 57 of 57 Journals sorted by number of followers
Cambridge Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Journal of Archaeological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
European Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
American Journal of Archaeology     Partially Free   (Followers: 65)
World Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Oxford Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Archaeological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Bryn Mawr Classical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Social Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Environmental Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Field Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of World Prehistory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Quaternary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity and Classics     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Archaeology, Ethnology and Anthropology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Ancient Near Eastern Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Archaeological Science : Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Nautical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Acta Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Journal of Roman Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ancient Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Nottingham Medieval Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Maritime Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Economic Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Industrial Archaeology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Geoarchaeology: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of the British Archaeological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Anthropology & Archeology of Eurasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Papers of the British School at Rome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Post-Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Digital Applications in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Conflict Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Internet Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Radiocarbon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Norwegian Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethnoarchaeology : Journal of Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Experimental Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Public Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anatolica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
E&G Quaternary Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australian Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Paleopathology     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Palestine Exploration Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Open Archaeology Data     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Scottish Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Wetland Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Antiquaries Journal, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
ArcheoSciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Neolithic Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Egyptian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Antiqua     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Mélanges de l’École française de Rome - Moyen Âge     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Inner Asian Art and Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Rock Art Research: The Journal of the Australian Rock Art Research Association (AURA)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
ArcheoArte. Rivista Elettronica di Archeologia e Arte     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Tel Aviv : Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Heritage in the Digital Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Iranica Antiqua     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pacific Archaeology     Free   (Followers: 6)
Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Afrique : Archéologie & Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Science and Technology of Archaeological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Heritage Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Yorkshire Archaeological Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Paléo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
North American Archaeologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Time and Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Archaeometry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archaeofauna     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Lithic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archaeological Research in Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Contemporary Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liber Annuus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Northeast Historical Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Islamic Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Lithic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Quaternaire     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antipoda : Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hispania Epigraphica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Danish Institute at Athens     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dotawo : A Journal of Nubian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BABesch - Bulletin Antieke Beschaving     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Iraq     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Celtica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Speleology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
California Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arqueología de la Arquitectura     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
PaleoAmerica : A Journal of Early Human Migration and Dispersal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Karthago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trabajos de Prehistoria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'Égyptologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Zooarchaeology / Zooarchéologie canadienne     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Documenta Praehistorica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Les Cahiers de l’École du Louvre     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Δελτίον Χριστιανικής Αρχαιολογικής Εταιρείας     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Catalan Historical Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biourbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Archéologique de l’Ouest     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Complutum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ñawpa Pacha : Journal of Andean Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Southeastern Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Memorias. Revista Digital de Historia y Arqueologia desde el Caribe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Siècles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivo Español de Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palaeoindian Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La zaranda de ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SAGVNTVM. Papeles del Laboratorio de Arqueología de Valencia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cane Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Restauro Archeologico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Florentia Iliberritana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Historical Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d’Alsace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Dissertationes Archaeologicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Virtual Archaeology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Layers. Archeologia Territorio Contesti     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Glacial Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geochronometria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Museo de Antropología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les Nouvelles de l'archéologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archaeologiai Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Archipel     Open Access  
ROMVLA     Open Access  
SCIRES-IT : SCIentific RESearch and Information Technology     Open Access  
The Midden     Open Access  
Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia     Open Access  
Ausgrabungen und Funde in Westfalen-Lippe     Open Access  
Archäologische Informationen     Open Access  
Revista Atlántica-Mediterránea de Prehistoria y Arqueología Social     Open Access  
Cadernos do LEPAARQ     Open Access  
Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Zephyrvs     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Chronique des activités archéologiques de l'École française de Rome     Open Access  
Scripta Ethnologica     Open Access  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
LANX: Rivista della Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Annual of the British School at Athens
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.177
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0068-2454 - ISSN (Online) 2045-2403
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • ATH volume 116 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 6
      PubDate: 2021-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000113
       
  • ATH volume 116 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2021-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000125
       
  • ‘A PATH LESS TRAVELLED’' A CASE STUDY OF CROSS-REGIONAL
           CONNECTIVITY IN THE THIRD MILLENNIUM BC FROM THE MADRA RIVER DELTA ON THE
           COASTLINE OF NORTH-WEST ANATOLIA

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      Authors: Röcklinger; Maria, Horejs, Barbara, Lambrianides, Kyriacos, Spencer, Nigel
      Pages: 1 - 41
      Abstract: Assumptions are always made about the levels and directions of cultural connections across regions in western Anatolia and the eastern Aegean in the Early Bronze Age (EBA). However, a lack of primary fieldwork data still inhibits clear conclusions and an understanding of the subtleties and variations in such patterns. In particular, primary data is still lacking from the critical coastal ‘touch-point’ of these two regions where material evidence is usually obscured by significant geomorphological change. This article looks at this complex issue of variations in regional connectivity in the EBA through a case study of unpublished primary fieldwork material from the Madra River Delta, a coastal region of north-west Anatolia. Material from the excavation and surface survey of two EBA mound sites in the delta, carried out as part of the interdisciplinary research project, gives a rare opportunity to explore ‘connectivity’ on this coastal area through elements of its EBA material culture, ranging from ceramic and textile production to figurines. The article highlights not only the complex, and unexpected, nature of the inter-regional cultural ‘pathways’ visible in the delta itself, but also the implications – and further questions – which this raises for the cultural connections with the neighbouring region of the north-east Aegean.
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245420000167
       
  • WHAT IS THE ‘ARCHANES FORMULA’' DECONSTRUCTING AND RECONSTRUCTING
           THE EARLIEST ATTESTATION OF WRITING IN THE AEGEAN

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      Authors: Ferrara; Silvia, Montecchi, Barbara, Valério, Miguel
      Pages: 43 - 62
      Abstract: This article examines the earliest attestations of writing on Crete at the beginning of the second millennium bce, the so-called ‘Archanes formula’. The aim is to reassess its origin, purpose, significance and ‘reading’ through a multi-step analysis taking in details of palaeography, correlations with iconographic seal motifs, and material culture. Key issues are considered, namely the extent to which is it comparable with the Linear A ‘libation formula’ a-sa-sa-ra-me, or, conversely, whether it should be singled out as a separate writing tradition. To address these questions, the ‘Archanes formula’ is brought under close scrutiny, vis-à-vis the graphic repertoires of Cretan Hieroglyphic and, in parallel, Linear A. Our conclusions point towards a strong connection with the Cretan Hieroglyphic milieu, in terms of sign shapes and direct links to seal imagery. In this light, the earliest writing in the Aegean is revisited not so much as a script in itself, nor as a prequel to Linear A religious sequences, but as a direct manifestation of the iconic glyptic practices of the Hieroglyphic tradition.
      PubDate: 2021-06-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245420000155
       
  • IMAGINING CRETAN SCRIPTS: THE INFLUENCE OF VISUAL MOTIFS ON THE CREATION
           OF SCRIPT-SIGNS IN BRONZE AGE CRETE

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      Authors: Salgarella; Ester
      Pages: 63 - 94
      Abstract: What's in a sign' What is there to be ‘seen’ in a sign' This paper sets out to explore the sources and processes of sign creation in the scripts of the Bronze Age Aegean, namely Cretan Hieroglyphic and Linear A, in use on Crete from c. 1900–1600 bce (Middle Minoan IB/II–Middle Minoan III) and c. 1800–1450 bce (Middle Minoan IIA–Late Minoan IB) respectively. Linear B, developed out of Linear A to write Greek (c. 1450–1190 bce), will also be touched upon where relevant. By investigating contemporary iconographic production and putting forward a methodological framework for the analysis and interpretation of visual motifs, a theory will be tentatively proposed for understanding the process(es) of selection of sign shapes, their incorporation into a script as script-signs and their transmission from one script onto a graphically related one. The underlying research questions leading this enquiry are the following: how did ‘images’ find their way into script(s) to become ‘signs’ in the Aegean context' Are we able to reconstruct such a process to shed light on the origin of script-signs'
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000034
       
  • CHARIOT KRATERS AND HORSE–HUMAN RELATIONS IN LATE BRONZE AGE GREECE
           AND CYPRUS

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      Authors: Recht; Laerke, Morris, Christine E.
      Pages: 95 - 132
      Abstract: This paper offers a new comprehensive catalogue and discussion of Late Helladic III chariot kraters, and explores what they reveal about horse–human relations in Greece and Cyprus in the Late Bronze Age. The nearly 400 known examples of chariot kraters were produced in mainland Greece and exported to Cyprus and the Levant. Although the vessels were surely adapted to local contexts, the motif of horses and chariot was part of the ‘international’ spirit of the Late Bronze Age and was meaningful throughout the eastern Mediterranean. Following a discussion of the chronological and geographical distribution of the kraters, alongside notes regarding changes in shape, we examine each of the elements of the characteristic horses-and-chariot motif in depth. This close analysis, supplemented by evidence from faunal remains, Linear B and other visual media, and combined with modern equine knowledge, allows us to understand some of the complexities of horse–human relations in ancient Greece and Cyprus. Through this, we see a co-becoming and mutual training of horse and human in the endeavour to become a successful chariot team; we can also recognise elements of ancient acknowledgement of equine agency and personhood. Horses and humans acted and reacted to each other, thereby living and learning together. The images on the chariot kraters reflect both ancient observation and knowledge of horses and caballine behaviour and artistic conventions and developments. Finally, horses were expensive animals to breed, keep and train (with accompanying expensive gear), and direct physical contact would have been for the fortunate few. The chariot kraters allowed a broader segment of the population to engage with horses and chariots, albeit indirectly.
      PubDate: 2021-04-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000022
       
  • NEW DATA ON SOUTHERN EUBOEAN LANDSCAPES: RESULTS OF THE NORWEGIAN
           ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY IN THE KARYSTIA

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      Authors: Tankosić; Žarko, Laftsidis, Alexandros, Psoma, Aikaterini, Seifried, Rebecca M., Garyfallopoulos, Apostolos
      Pages: 133 - 165
      Abstract: We present the results of a diachronic survey of the Katsaronio plain in the Karystia, southern Euboea, Greece. The project was organised under the aegis of the Norwegian Institute at Athens with a permit from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture under the official name of the Norwegian Archaeological Survey in the Karystia. Five years of fieldwork (2012–16) covered an area of 20km2 in a large agricultural plain located about 5km north-west of the town of Karystos. The survey identified 99 new findspots with a range of dates spanning from the Final Neolithic to Early Modern times. Here we present the collected prehistoric through Roman data, which represent the bulk of the acquired evidence. One of the notable features of the assemblage is the vast quantity of lithics that were recovered, numbering over 9000 and consisting mainly of obsidian. Certain periods were absent from the evidence, such as post-Early Bronze Age prehistoric and Geometric, while others were represented with varying intensity. We offer an initial interpretation of the patterns observable in the evidence in an attempt to reconstruct the past use and habitation of this part of Euboea.
      PubDate: 2021-04-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245420000179
       
  • PHILOSOPHERS’ PATH OR CULT ROAD' THE PERIPATOS ON THE SLOPES OF THE
           AKROPOLIS AND LYKOURGOS’ POLICY OF RENEWAL

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      Authors: Rubel; Alexander
      Pages: 167 - 178
      Abstract: The Peripatos, the pathway that encircles the slopes of the Athenian Akropolis, was renovated in the late fourth century bc under Lykourgos. The crucial question concerning this somewhat neglected but important path is whether it was simply a walkway, perhaps built for philosophers of the school of Aristotle, who taught their lessons while walking, or whether this pathway had a specific cultic function. This paper gathers arguments for a cultic interpretation of the Peripatos. On this view, the pathway and its renovation were important because only the Peripatos offered access to several minor sanctuaries on the slopes of the Akropolis as well as the Aglaureion, the sanctuary where the ephebes swore their oath, a crucial institution for Lykourgos’ reforms.
      PubDate: 2021-04-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000010
       
  • THE HELLENISTIC TOPOGRAPHY OF NEA KRANE, KEPHALLONIA

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      Authors: Milani; Gian Piero C.G.
      Pages: 179 - 194
      Abstract: This paper approaches the Hellenistic topography of the polis of Krane (Kephallonia), for the first time incorporating data from aerial imagery from the Allied aerial photographs of the British School at Athens, predating the earthquakes of 1953 and subsequent afforestation. The study presents a synthesis of the traces relating to the incomplete orthogonal development of the city, named by Klavs Randsborg ‘Nea Krane’. The reconstructed area of the planned city is almost doubled, rising from 19.8 ha to 36.96 ha, and thus shedding new light on the scale of a majestic project which now counts 90 blocks, with a ratio of 1:3. The incomplete development is read in the framework of the settlement history of the polis of Krane, and of the development of urbanism in the region, to ascertain if the project could be ascribed to a failed synoecism or an external imposition.
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S006824542100006X
       
  • THE KAUSIA BOY FIGURINES FROM DEMETRIAS: A REASSESSMENT

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      Authors: Ieremias; Stelios
      Pages: 195 - 234
      Abstract: Demetrias has yielded the largest number of terracotta figurines of a popular iconographic type of the Hellenistic period: the ‘kausia boy’, shown standing, dressed in the chiton, chlamys, kausia and krepides. The rediscovery of the material from A.S. Arvanitopoulos’ excavations at Demetrias in the early twentieth century has provided an opportunity to reassess the significance of this iconographic type in the city and in the wider Hellenistic world. Combining and comparing the material from Arvanitopoulos’ excavations with that from other excavations in the city by the German Archaeological Institute and the Ephorate of Antiquities of Magnesia, it is now clear that the kausia boy figurines from Demetrias were discovered in various contexts, including sanctuaries, graves and the foundations of the royal palace (Anaktoron); the largest number was found in the sanctuary of Pasikrata. It has been possible to identify more than ten technical types, confirming the importance of these figures in the coroplastic production of the city. This paper also discusses the iconographic types of the ‘shepherds’, kausia-wearing boys holding the syrinx and the lagobolon, as well as the animal-carrying boys, since they too are wearing the same attire, and are mechanically related to the simple kausia boy types. The study of Demetrias’ specimens, combined with the study of the distribution of these iconographic types in the Hellenistic world and the relevant iconographic, literary and epigraphic evidence enable its reinterpretation.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000046
       
  • THE LATE HELLENISTIC WINE PRESS EXCAVATIONS FROM KNOSSOS: THE EARLY IRON
           AGE, HELLENISTIC AND EARLY ROMAN CONTEXTS

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      Authors: Trainor; Conor P.
      Pages: 235 - 290
      Abstract: The remains of an exceptionally well-preserved Hellenistic wine press were uncovered during a rescue excavation at Knossos in 1977. The architecture, stratigraphy and faunal remains from this campaign were published in BSA 89 (1994) by J. Carington Smith (the excavator) and S. Wall. The artefact assemblages from this excavation, however, have remained unstudied and unpublished until now. The current article presents the artefact assemblages from the wine press excavation and considers them within their urban context at Knossos. The key findings from this excavation relate to the Late Hellenistic wine press and its associated material, which enables us to consider both the ancient winemaking process at Knossos and the economic topography of the city in the decades around the Roman conquest of the island in 67 bc. In addition to the Late Hellenistic phase, material of Minoan, Early Iron Age–Early Archaic, earlier Hellenistic and Early Roman dates is also presented and discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-10-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000095
       
  • PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY OF CERAMIC OIL LAMPS IN HELLENISTIC AND EARLY ROMAN
           NEA PAPHOS, CYPRUS: INTEGRATED TYPOLOGICAL, CHRONOLOGICAL AND PROVENANCE
           STUDIES

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      Authors: Kajzer; Małgorzata, Marzec, Edyta, Kiriatzi, Evangelia, Müller, Noémi S.
      Pages: 291 - 357
      Abstract: This paper presents the results of a multipronged approach to the study of the Hellenistic and Early Roman ceramic oil lamps excavated at the Agora of Nea Paphos in Cyprus. The assemblage was studied macroscopically, and selected samples were analysed through WD-XRF spectroscopy and thin section petrography, combined with refiring tests. The integrated results revealed that local production changed through time in terms of lamp shapes, manufacturing techniques and clay recipes, while imported lamps originated from a range of sources. The transformations seen in the local production correlate with changes in the origin of imported lamp supply and the impact of other centres on the local lamp manufacture. These patterns in production and supply could be most likely associated with political transformations and urban development.
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000071
       
  • THE FOUNDERS OF WESTERN PONTIC CITIES

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      Authors: Nawotka; Krzysztof
      Pages: 359 - 375
      Abstract: The Greek cities of the western coast of the Black Sea knew both foundation myths and the phenomenon of the second foundation, associated with the rebuilding of civic life after the invasion of Burebista, the king of the Getae and Dacian tribes from 82 bce to 44 bce. In most foundation stories the ktistes is either a god (in the case of the city of Dionysopolis) or a hero (in the cases of the cities of Kallatis, Tomis and Anchialos), and the stories date mostly to the Antonine age. The story of Tomos of Tomis stands out owing to its wide acceptance among the local elite, while that of Melsas of Mesambria may have never gained official acceptance: it was created in the late Hellenistic age, probably reviving a Thracian tale of Melsas, perhaps a hero, known from early-third century bce coins. The Melsas story is a prime example of cultural transfers from the native population to Greek-majority Mesambria in the Hellenistic and early Roman ages.
      PubDate: 2021-10-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000083
       
  • THE PROCURATOR CAMPANIAE AND THE ‘LANDS OF CAPUA’ ON CRETE

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      Authors: España-Chamorro; Sergio
      Pages: 377 - 397
      Abstract: This paper presents a new edition of a boundary stone between Capua (on Crete) and Knossos. I identify the post of Publius Messius Campanus as procurator Campaniae rather than procurator Caesaris. The appearance of the procurator Campaniae on Crete is linked to a dispute between the colony of Capua and a private citizen called Plotius Plebeius. This new reading has several important historical consequences: first, it is the earliest attestation of a procurator Campaniae (and the first outside Italy); second, it offers a new interpretation of the juridical category of Knossian lands as part of the ager vectigalis of the Italian colony of Capua in the form of a praefectura Campana or Capuensis; third, it proposes a reinterpretation of the process of arbitration between a public entity (Capua) and a private owner.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000058
       
  • SINCLAIR HOOD (1917–2021)

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      Authors: Cadogan; Gerald
      Pages: 399 - 415
      Abstract: Sinclair Hood (1917–2021) was one of the two leading archaeologists of Minoan Crete of the second generation after Sir Arthur Evans, the other being Nikolaos Platon (1909–92). He spent much of his life researching the history of Knossos, including a major programme of excavations during his Directorship of the British School at Athens (1954–62) to test Evans’ chronological system for Knossos and Crete in the Bronze Age. He also directed excavations at prehistoric Emporio in Chios, and was versed in the archaeology of Central Europe and the Near East, as well as every aspect of Aegean prehistory, on which he wrote profusely. In Greece he revolutionised methods for British archaeologists and trained many students who later became project directors. His monumental study The Masons’ Marks of Minoan Knossos crowned his career. It was published in 2020, when he was 103.
      PubDate: 2021-11-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0068245421000101
       
 
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