A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Cambridge Archaeological Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.121
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 88  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0959-7743 - ISSN (Online) 1474-0540
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • CAJ volume 32 issue 3 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S095977432200018X
       
  • CAJ volume 32 issue 3 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774322000191
       
  • Turning Art into Hammers: A Complex Biography of Palaeolithic Portable Art
           from Coímbre Cave (Asturias, Spain)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: López-Calle; Paula, Ibero, Álvaro, García-Diez, Marcos, Ochoa, Blanca, de Andrés-Herrero, María, Álvarez-Alonso, David, Yravedra, José
      Pages: 431 - 444
      Abstract: Palaeolithic representations can be approached from different perspectives. Studying the creative processes, we can glimpse the decisions that the Palaeolithic artists made and the actions they carried out to materialize an idea. Additionally, the combined study of both graphic and functional actions performed on an object provides a comprehensive approach and understanding of the evidence: in the first place, it allows us to hypothesize about the presence or absence of symbolic purpose of the representations; secondly, it makes the potential choice of eliminating such symbolism discernible for us. The monographic study of a Magdalenian pebble from Coímbre Cave (Asturias, Spain) engraved between 15,680 and 14,230 cal. bp shows that a mistake was made during the engraving process; subsequently an attempt was made to eliminate the representations, and finally the pebble was used as a hammerstone. This paper provides argumentation to reconstruct a complex biography of an object of Palaeolithic portable art, discussing intentional loss of symbolic value of both the decoration and the object and the latter's reuse (as raw material) for an economic or domestic purpose.
      PubDate: 2022-05-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000500
       
  • Connecting Architectures across the Landscape: A Visibility and Network
           Analysis in the Island of Mallorca during the Late Bronze Age and Early
           Iron Age

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Galmés-Alba; Alejandra, Calvo-Trias, Manuel
      Pages: 467 - 487
      Abstract: Architecture has been one of the key features in studying the first millennium bc in the Balearic Islands. The primary goal of this research is to analyse how monumental communal architecture enabled the construction of enduring social spaces and how the role of these spaces within the community can be understood through the relations that conform across the landscape. To do so we will focus on the Late Bronze Age (1100–850 bc) and the Talayotic period (c. 850–650 bc), the first moment when cyclopean dry-stone architecture is used in communal spaces, such as talayots or stepped turriforms, making them stand out across the landscape. To understand how these architectures are connected, we analysed the visual connections between them through intervisibility and network analysis, as well as through Individual Distance Viewsheds. Through the analysis of visual connections, we seek to understand how the architecture created a network across the entire landscape, and how the characteristics and properties of this network are key in understanding the relationship between Talayotic communities and their landscape. Our aim is to explore how architecture shaped and gave meaning to the landscape and how we cannot understand the buildings by themselves, but as part of a network.
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000627
       
  • The Metalworker as Social Agent: A longue durée Approach from
           Northwestern Iberia Atlantic Façade (Ninth–First Centuries bce)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nión-Álvarez; Samuel
      Pages: 489 - 506
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to analyse the role of the metalworker in the northwest Iberian Iron Age. By adopting a holistic and diachronic perspective, a broad review of the influence of metalworking and its agents on the social structuring of the communities of the Atlantic seaboard is presented. With the aim of exploring the implications of metallurgy and the blacksmith's activity, a new perspective of metalworking is suggested. Thus, an exploration of perspectives beyond the technical aspects will be addressed, considering the ‘technological dimension’ as part of all the elements that define this activity. The objective of the work is to present a narrative that allows analysis of the role of the metalworker throughout different historical periods, focusing on the social, technical and symbolic dynamics that have shaped its development.
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000615
       
  • Neolithization and Population Replacement in Britain: An Alternative View

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas; Julian
      Pages: 507 - 525
      Abstract: Investigation of British Mesolithic and Neolithic genomes suggests discontinuity between the two and has been interpreted as indicating a significant migration of continental farmers, displacing the indigenous population. These incomers had already acquired some hunter-gatherer genetic heritage before their arrival, and this increased little in Britain. However, the proportion of hunter-gatherer genetic ancestry in British Neolithic genomes is generally greater than for most contemporary examples on the continent, particularly in emerging evidence from northern France, while the ultimate origin of British Neolithic populations in Iberia is open to question. Both the date calculated for the arrival of new people in Britain and their westerly origin are at odds with other aspects of the existing evidence. Here, a two-phase model of Neolithization is proposed. The first appearance of Neolithic things and practices significantly predated a more substantial transfer of population, creating the conditions under which new communities could be brought into being. The rather later establishment of a major migration stream coincided with an acceleration in the spread of Neolithic artefacts and activities, as well as an enrichment of the Neolithic material assemblage.
      PubDate: 2022-02-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000639
       
  • Exotica, Fashion and Immortality: The New Use of Gold in Han Dynasty China
           (206 bce–ce 220)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wang; Shengyu
      Pages: 345 - 360
      Abstract: This article explores the use of gold in the elite tombs of Han dynasty China, the popular use of which originated outside the Chinese cultural milieu, and its integration into the Han portfolio of materials representing people's expectations for the afterlife, such as immortality and well-being. In contrast to jade, which had a long history of use in China, gold was in itself a ‘new’ element of Chinese culture. This article outlines the introduction of gold objects from Europe and Central Asia via the Eurasian Steppe and borderland of China from around the eighth century bce. The unprecedented use of gold in the Han-specific jade suits, and the process by which foreign types of zoomorphic motifs were adopted and connected with local motifs, are explored. In light of the political change from multiple competing states before the first unification in Chinese history in the third century bce, and the development in ideology and concept of an ideal and eternal afterlife, this article explains the reasons and meanings of the new use of gold in Han dynasty China and the composite system of motifs, materials and objects.
      PubDate: 2021-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000482
       
  • Zimbabwe Ruins in Botswana: Settlement Hierarchies, Political Boundaries
           and Symbolic Statements

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Huffman; Thomas N., Main, Mike
      Pages: 361 - 388
      Abstract: At its peak in the sixteenth century, the Zimbabwe Culture encompassed an area the size of France. The greater Tuli area in east-central Botswana formed the western extent of this culture area. Here many dzimbahwe mark the residences of sacred leaders in the later Khami period (1400–1840 ad). These stone-walled headquarters formed a pyramid of political importance, with district chiefs (Level 4) and petty chiefs (Level 3) at the top and headmen (Level 2) and commoners (Level 1) at the base. Commoners and their headmen lived near arable land, while petty chiefs placed their administrative centres at the boundaries of their small chiefdoms. In death, sacred leaders rested in dzimbahwe on special hills, while ordinary villagers were buried in their homesteads. During the Khami period in Botswana, these various settlements were part of only one Level 4 district: Level 5 and Level 6 capitals were located elsewhere. After the collapse of the powerful Torwa state at Khami, decorative symbols changed from emphasizing the majesty of kingship (Khami) to the responsibilities of sacred leaders (Zinjanja), and then back again to kingship in the Rozvi state (Danangombe). The powerful Rozvi state did not extend to the Tuli area, probably because it was too dry.
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000470
       
  • Making a Mark: Process, Pattern and Change in the British and Irish
           Neolithic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jones; Andrew Meirion, Díaz-Guardamino, Marta
      Pages: 389 - 407
      Abstract: This paper presents key results of the Making a Mark project (2014–2016), which aimed to provide a contextual framework for the analysis of mark making on portable artefacts in the British and Irish Neolithic by comparing them with other mark-making practices, including rock art and passage tomb art. The project used digital imaging techniques, including Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), and improved radiocarbon chronologies, to develop a new understanding of the character of mark making in the British and Irish Neolithic. Rather than considering this tradition in representational terms, as expression of human ideas, we focus on two kinds of relational material practices, the processes of marking and the production of skeuomorphs, and their emergent properties. We draw on Karen Barad's concept of ‘intra-action’ and Gilles Deleuze's notion of differentiation to understand the evolution and development of mark-making traditions and how they relate to other kinds of social practices over the course of the Neolithic.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000512
       
  • A Nuclear Generator of Clouds: Accidents and Radioactive Contamination
           Identified on Declassified Satellite Photographs in the Mayak Chemical
           Combine, Southern Urals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kiarszys; Grzegorz
      Pages: 409 - 429
      Abstract: The Mayak Chemical Combine was one of the most secretive places in the Soviet Union. It was built in the southern Urals, close to Kyshtym. The facility produced weapons-grade plutonium and other radioactive isotopes for the Soviet nuclear military programme. Fugitives from behind the Iron Curtain mentioned the site, usually due to accidents and peculiar, unexplained observations. Such reports were often treated in the West as exaggerated or fictional, as they spoke of large-scale disasters, deportations and vast landscape transformations. This paper aims to present the research potential of declassified Cold War intelligence records for archaeological landscape studies of off-limits military sites. To outline a somewhat broader perspective, I will combine those sources with contemporary historical knowledge and modern remote sensing data. The analysis will be focused on the Central Intelligence Agency [CIA] satellite imagery (CORONA and GAMBIT) from the 1960s to the beginning of the 1970s. The discussed sources recorded outcomes of nuclear disasters, hundreds of square kilometres of uninhabited wasteland, abandoned villages, disappearing lakes, dying forests, diverted rivers, and other features related to this clandestine plutonium facility.
      PubDate: 2021-09-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000494
       
  • Cultural Metallurgy—A Key Factor in the Transition from the Chalcolithic
           to Bronze Age in the Southern Levant

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amzallag; Nissim
      Pages: 445 - 465
      Abstract: The causes of the disappearance of Late Chalcolithic society (Ghassulian) in the early fourth millennium bc remain obscure. This study identifies the collapse as the consequence of a change in the approach to metallurgy from cosmological fundament (Late Chalcolithic) to a practical craft (EB1). This endogenous transition accounts for the cultural recession characterizing the transitional period (EB1A) and the discontinuity in ritual practices. The new practical approach in metallurgy is firstly observed in the southern margin of the Ghassulian culture, which produced copper for distribution in the Nile valley rather than the southern Levant. Nevertheless, the Ghassulian cultural markers visible in the newly emerging areas of copper working (southern coastal plain, Nile valley) denote the survival of the old cosmological traditions among metalworkers of the EB1 culture. Their religious expression unveils the extension of the Ghassulian beliefs attached to metallurgy and their metamorphosis into the esoteric fundaments of the Bronze Age religions.
      PubDate: 2021-12-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0959774321000524
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.210.237.158
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-