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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Asian Perspectives
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.376
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0066-8435 - ISSN (Online) 1535-8283
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Editors' Note

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      Abstract: Welcome to the second issue assembled by the journal's new editorial team. Volume 61, Issue 2 of Asian Perspectives offers readers the latest in archaeological research in Asia. Beyond presenting findings and interpretations from across Central, East, and Southeast Asia, the issue invites scholars to reflect on the discipline's approaches and practices, including the need for thoughtful and engaged collaboration with local archaeologists. True to its tradition, Asian Perspectives aims to publish the results of research guided by original approaches, including those that harness the power of new analytic methods. We hope that readers will also appreciate several topics tackled by the book reviewers, including early ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Diverse Ceramic Technologies in Neolithic Southern Vietnam: The Case of
           Rach Nui

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      Abstract: The earliest evidence of Neolithic settlement in southern Vietnam has been recorded at the sites of An Son and Loc Giang on the Vam Co Dong River dating to ca. 4200–4000 cal. b.p. (Bellwood et al. 2011; Piper et al. 2017).1 These sites produced evidence of early agriculture, domesticated animals, and the appearance of a variety of new forms of material culture including fine incised and impressed pottery, ground stone technologies, and shell and bone ornaments.The current research focuses on Rach Nui, a coastal settlement site located in the low-lying nipah (Nypa fruticans) and mangrove swamp forests close to the confluence of the Vam Co Dong, Dong Nai, and Vam Co Tay rivers in Long An province (Fig. 1). Rach Nui ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Unique Burial of the Fourth Millennium b.c.e. and the Earliest Burial
           Traditions in Mongolia

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      Abstract: The transition of the Palaeolithic economy of Hunter-Gatherer-Fisher (HGF in the following) to the mobile pastoral way of life of the Bronze Age is currently one of the most studied fields of research and remains an unresolved question in the archaeological research of Mongolia. Especially from the era before the onset of the widespread burial custom of marking the graves on the surface with stones, only a few graves are known from this area. To date, the only and earliest evidence of modern humans in Mongolia comes from Salkhit, in the Norovlin sum (district) of Khentiĭ Aĭmag (province) and is about 35,000 years old (Devièse et al. 2019; Tseveendorzh et al. 2005) (Fig. 1). The following periods are characterized ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • When is a Qin Tomb not a Qin Tomb' Cultural (De)construction in the
           Middle Han River Valley

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      Abstract: This article grapples with an important methodological issue that has arisen in the study of Early China as a result of the tremendous amount of archaeological fieldwork currently being done in the middle Han River region of Hubei province. This region has drawn scholarly attention in recent years due to the discovery of several very important burial grounds, specifically the tomb of Marquis Yi of the Zeng State and its associated burials in 1972 (Hubei 1989) and the more recent discovery of Zeng State royal cemeteries in 2012 (Fang and Wu 2015; Hubei 2013). These discoveries raise important questions about the region's role as a crucial political, military, and economic crossroads between the Central Plains and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Recent Rock Art Sites from West Sumatra, Indonesia

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      Abstract: The eastern part of Indonesia is well known to the public for its rock art sites, but many new rock art complexes have been found over the last three decades in western Indonesia (Fig. 1). Sulawesi, which produced rock art as early as 40,000 years ago in the Maros Caves (Aubert et al. 2014) is no longer the western boundary of rock art in Indonesia. Since the 1990s, many rock art sites have been discovered west of Sulawesi in Kalimantan. Interestingly, uranium-series dating obtained from East Kalimantan have revealed even earlier dates than Maros, with the first appearing between 52,000 and 40,000 years ago (Aubert et al. 2018).The discovery of rock art in Gua Harimau in South Sumatra in 2008 added to the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Ceramic and Plant and Parasite Microfossil Record from Andarayan,
           Cagayan Valley, Philippines Reveals Cultigens and Human Helminthiases
           Spanning the Last ca. 2080 Years

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      Abstract: Research of the timing and nature of ancient agricultural development in the Philippines includes some countering viewpoints. Some workers have suggested that Austronesian speaking people migrated from their homeland in Taiwan to the Philippines and Indo-Malaysia, bringing agriculture, particularly involving wet-field rice (Oryza sativa) cultivation, to the possibly largely hunter-gatherer people ca. 4500–4000 years ago (Bellwood 2006). Some others, however, have considered that there is a general lack of archaeological evidence regarding the emergence of agriculture in Island Southeast Asia and suggested that indigenous peoples have been farming since the mid-Holocene (Cochrane et al. 2021; Denham 2012). Others ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bioarchaeology in Central Asia: Growing from Legacies to Enhance Future
           Research

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      Abstract: The centrality of Central Asia to questions of interaction in the prehistory and history of broader Eurasia has made it a focal point for studies on the origins and movements of ideas, objects, people, and diseases. For close to two centuries, research on these themes has included the study of human remains. In this article, we review the historical trajectory of this scholarship in Central Asia from the nineteenth century. We highlight the ebb and flow of influence from Imperial and Soviet Russia on concepts of nationalism and ancestry and the establishment of localized Central Asian scholarship. Our discussion is centered on the legacies of this history including how the split between archaeology and biological ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Returning Southeast Asia's Past: Objects, Museums, and Restitution ed. by
           Louise Tythacott and Panggah Ardiyansyah (review)

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      Abstract: The media regularly report news concerning the restitution of cultural treasures by museums, with current topics including the transfer in the near future of the Benin bronzes that are held in the British Museum to Nigeria and the return of art works of questionable provenance by the National Gallery of Australia to India. These relatively recent instances were preceded by high profile cases concerning the return by various countries, museums, and individuals of items looted by the Nazis; some of these restitutions occurred after the adoption of Principles on Nazi-Confiscated Art at the Washington Conference of 1998. These principles were notable in recommending national processes for the implementation of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Compensations of Plunder: How China Lost Its Treasures by Justin M.
           Jacobs (review)

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      Abstract: The sub-subtitle to Justin Jacobs' compelling new book on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century removal of antiquities from northwestern China could have been In a Thoroughly Gentlemanly Manner and to Everyone's Satisfaction. Jacobs, a historian of modern China, carefully examines the details surrounding the major archaeological expeditions in Xinjiang and Gansu led by Western scholars (especially, but not exclusively, those overseen by Aurel Stein and Paul Pelliot). In short, Jacobs convincingly shows that, until there emerged modern nationalist sentiment in China and a corresponding group of Chinese scholars modeled on Western ones, most workers, local elite, and even national Chinese officials ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Materialising Ancestral Madang: Pottery Production and Subsistence Trading
           on the Northeast Coast of New Guinea by Dylan Gaffney (review)

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      Abstract: This publication from the University of Otago Studies in Archaeology series is an exemplary piece of work in terms of content, layout, and production. It is a version of Dylan Gaffney's M.A. dissertation completed at the University of Otago in 2016, which was based on fieldwork conducted in 2014 and many detailed analyses over some years. It comprises the main text (290 pages); Appendix A (119 pages), a catalogue of archaeological rim forms and decoration; and Appendix B (253 pages), SEM studies of clays and tempers of contemporary and archaeological pottery. The appendices complete a very finely detailed study and provide a substantial reference for comparison with previous and future research in this and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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