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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Archaeologies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.224
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1935-3987 - ISSN (Online) 1555-8622
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Connecting Past to Present: Enacting Indigenous Data Governance Principles
           in Westbank First Nation’s Archaeology and Digital Heritage

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper, we describe a collaboration between the Westbank First Nation Archaeology Office and UBC Okanagan that aims to create digital maps to enable engagement with syilx digital heritage and build capacity in digital tools and technologies. We examine what data governance frameworks mean for digital heritage and how they articulate with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) and the First Nations Information Governance Centre’s OCAP® principles. We propose digital tools such as open-source and mobile-ready storymaps to showcase digital heritage that is appropriate for public sharing, practices that can promote and enhance community decision-making, and create training opportunities in digital methods in Westbank First Nation. Opening a conversation around digital tools is one way that archaeologists can begin to enact Indigenous data governance as a step towards dismantling colonial structures and practice in archaeology and digital heritage.
      PubDate: 2022-11-24
       
  • Exploring the Nature of Authority Over, and Ownership of Data Generated by
           Archaeological Lidar Projects in Latin America

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      Abstract: Abstract Data ownership and accessibility are critical issues across academia, but especially in fields that touch upon digital heritage that relates to pre-colonial/colonial societies. Who can access spatial datasets about pre-colonial landscapes, who is writing about these topics, and who, by extension, is considered an authority on these topics' This paper explores data ownership, gender, and local affiliation by examining publications on archaeological lidar in Latin America between 2011 and 2021. For over 10 years, archaeological remote sensing derived from lidar has transformed research in Latin America and especially in Mesoamerica, yet there are numerous issues related to data ownership and authoritative voice that remain unresolved. This study shows that publication authorship, including first and co-authorship, is dominated by male researchers at US institutions while women and individuals associated with institutions in Latin America are poorly represented. The limited representation of authors with local or community affiliations suggests that local authoritative voices are largely muted in archaeological lidar research in the region. We discuss working toward more collaborative lidar research in Latin America.
      PubDate: 2022-11-19
       
  • Being Seen, Being Heard: Ownership of Archaeology and Digital Heritage

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      PubDate: 2022-11-16
       
  • Gamification of Digital Heritage as an Approach to Improving Museum and
           Art Gallery Engagement for Blind and Partially Sighted Visitors

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      Abstract: Abstract Digitization of heritage in art gallery and museum contexts raises ethical concerns around ownership, consent, and use. It also highlights fundamental issues of access and engagement for blind and partially sighted (BPS) visitors, especially elders. Gamification, which refers to the use of game elements and game design techniques, such as user feedback and additive levels of progress in non-game contexts, has been used to improve heritage pedagogy, accessibility for and engagement with museum and art gallery visitors. This paper examines collaborative efforts in digital heritage that engage with BPS visitors from historically excluded communities, thereby addressing their traditional exclusion from experiential learning in museum and art gallery settings. In this ethical framework, we use 3D printed models to demonstrate how gamification can play an essential role in providing BPS visitors in museum and art galleries an incentive to engage with the digital and physical archives, guiding them in experiential learning, and enabling new insights into their heritage. Fulsome implementation of 3D models as gamified objects can improve viewership, sharing, learning, and open discussion on redress for BPS members of historically excluded groups when it comes to their heritage. Gamification of digital heritage can enable a more diverse group of visitors to fully participate in the museum and art gallery experience.
      PubDate: 2022-11-15
       
  • Oral History Records and Their Contribution to the Question of Identity:
           The Case of the Arab American Community in the United States

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper discusses the topic of hyphenated identity as it pertains to the Arab American community in central Ohio, U.S.A. It aims at highlighting the experiences of this minority group and bringing them to the forefront as knowledge creators. The paper focuses on creating and carefully analyzing a digital cultural record of Arab American voices. The paper uses the methodology of digital oral history to answer the following questions: (1) how digital oral history projects can help us understand individuals with hyphenated identities; (2) what factors shape the Arab American identity, and (3) what common practices are used by this group to balance preserving their identity and heritage, while integrating within White American culture.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
       
  • Transborder Knowledge-Making: Accessing, Reclaiming, and Creating Digital
           Archives

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      Abstract: Abstract This article brings attention to challenges faced by stakeholders in Mexico-United States border cultural heritage, from community access to material to the reclaiming of a transborder history. Focusing on print culture, in this case newspapers in physical, microfilm and digital formats, this analysis sheds light on how classification schemes, infrastructures, and their governance raise inequities within archival material housed in governmental institutions, universities, and commercial platforms located in both Mexico and the United States. Finally, this work proposes binational-transnational ethical practices and digital initiatives that allow and facilitate the creation of transborder knowledge by integrating border cultural heritage with digital humanities.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
       
  • Who Owns the Heritage' Power and Politics of Heritage Site Management
           in Tourism, Hampi, India

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      Abstract: Abstract Tourism in heritage sites pushes back on the criticism of whether or not globalization should be understood as a conflict between creation, civil rights, and the ecosystem, normative ideas often characteristic of specific grounded communities. Tourism in ancient heritage sites has been a popular form for decades and remains so. Therefore, many studies address sustainability issues in these locations by focusing on their economic and environmental aspects. By comparison, fewer studies address social sustainability in historical sites, particularly in the context of developing economies. Given the scarcity of such research, this study explores social-sustainability concerns in Hampi, India. The application of a qualitative methodology with triangulation techniques identified the objective of this study. Reflective thematic analysis identified three main themes: power, politics, and the ongoing tug of war between local people and authorities; heritage tourism development challenges in Hampi; and “what is real,” ie., the concerns of authenticity.
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
       
  • To Burn the Blanket for a Flea: A Philosophical Response to
           Object-Oriented Archaeologies

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      Abstract: Abstract A growing literature in archaeological theory has embraced the “material turn,” especially what is branded as “Object-Oriented Ontology” (OOO). Some archaeologists view this as an opportunity for the discipline which is, by definition, a practice of knowing objects. Others argue that the material turn may open up hitherto-unexplored ways of looking at historical processes. While this all sounds very exciting for a new generation of archaeologists, we see a genuine need to be cautious about the implications of subscribing to OOO-inspired archaeologies. These new theoretical developments have a direct impact on how archaeologists narrate, conceptualize, and interpret the past, present and future. In this article, we scrutinize the philosophical pathway behind this perspective and discuss its relation to archaeological theory. We advocate a modest, responsive version of new materialist archaeologies that can engage more thoughtfully with the past and Anthropocene social crises of systemic injustice and inequality.
      PubDate: 2022-09-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09454-1
       
  • Building Bridges Between Education and Archaeology: Orphan Objects, Senses
           and Interactive Engagements

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      Abstract: Abstract One of the main goals of public archaeology is to facilitate the public access to the past. This paper constitutes an attempt to address this challenge and tackle one of the most significant, and burgeoning, problems for museums (the saturation of deposit spaces). We conducted a pedagogical experience that, seeking to entice young audiences, resulted in a successful interaction between school students and archaeological materials. Our methods are informed by the guidelines of Participatory Action Research and highlight the importance of stimulating an active engagement, through sensorial and practical approaches to orphan archaeological objects. The meaningful engagement that results from interactions, we argue, opens room not only to provide a closer appreciation of the materiality of these objects but primarily a reflection of a ‘distant past’ as something not so distant. This is particularly relevant in the context where we unfold our work because of its deep archaeological past and culturally diverse and indigenous background, which, nonetheless, are commonly thought as disassociated from the current population. We conclude that these interactive engagements foster the emergence of new spaces of debate in which the past is not closed and becomes a field of reflection and public action.
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09453-2
       
  • Gathering in the Heart of Prague for WAC-9 amid Conflict and Pandemic

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      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09455-0
       
  • Second WAC Statement on the invasion of Ukraine by the armed forces of the
           Russian Federation as ordered by President Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin

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      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09457-y
       
  • Emek Shaveh

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      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09456-z
       
  • The Voice of the WAC-9 Region

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      PubDate: 2022-08-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09458-x
       
  • An Archaeological Perspective of Alcoholic Beverages in the Song Dynasty
           (960–1279)

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      Abstract: Abstract China’s Song Dynasty (960–1279 ad) was a prosperous period of economic development and cultural exchange. The economic and cultural prosperity also promoted the development of the brewing industry, and alcohol consumption became a fad. Based on the archeological materials related to the alcohol culture of the Song Dynasty (including image materials, such as tomb murals, temple murals, grotto statues and surviving paintings, and excavated drinking vessels), the type, texture, and decorative pattern of drinking vessels have characteristics that are unique for the time, and the purpose and methods of alcohol consumption and brewing in the Song Dynasty are unprecedentedly diverse. Alcohol trade, drinking customs, and the banquet culture at that time reflect the influence of the alcohol culture and its penetration into every household, further manifesting as cultural integration with other ethnic groups (the Khitan and Jurchen). By exploring a distant ancient society through alcohol from an archeological perspective, this paper focuses on the utensils, patterns, functions, customs, and accompanying cultural exchange phenomena associated with alcoholic beverages in the Song Dynasty in China.
      PubDate: 2022-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09452-3
       
  • Encounters, Affects and Intra-actions: Difracting the Theban Tomb 123

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      Abstract: Abstract In archaeology, the methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation, at least in the most traditional and hegemonic currents, are marked by the idea that the world is composed of individual entities, each one with specific and separated properties. In order to question this model, I will use the concept of Diffraction proposed by Haraway and Barad, to understand how different encounters over time actualized Theban Tomb 123, located in the plain of Sheikh Abdel Qurna, in Luxor, Egypt. The first encounter to be analysed is the encounter between Amenemhet with TT123 in the Pharaonic period (1479–1425 BC). The second involves encounters between TT123 with Qurnawis, a community that between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries used the pharaonic tombs on the West Bank of Luxor as housing. Finally, I will analyse the encounters between archaeologists with TT123. Thinking about these different encounters shows us that this space that archaeologists call TT 123, rather than being a fixed materiality, is a transitory materiality and meeting point of different ontologies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09451-4
       
  • From Long Barrows to Ancestral Shrines: Bell Beaker Monuments and
           Cosmology in Central Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract After development over two millennia of Neolithic monumental architecture (enclosures & long barrows) in Central Europe, the 3rd Millennium BC seems to bring a hiatus in the creation of such monuments. The cult and worship moved to natural shrines (Corded Ware) and became invisible in the archaeological record. However, in the last decade, some new forms of Bell Beaker ritual constructions were discovered in Bohemia and Moravia. Two such features were discovered during large scale excavations at Hostivice, west of Prague in 2011 and 2013. The first consisted of a rectangular setting of large postholes with a large internal pit containing scatters of cremated (animal') bones and fragments of decorated beakers. The second structure consisted of large circular postholes surrounding a pit which contained a votive offering of four stone wristguards carefully set in a square arrangement. In 2015, unprecedented evidence of a Bell Beaker ritual site was discovered at Brodek in Central Moravia. An unusual long rectangular passage structure defined by alignments of postholes and a ‘shrine’ consisting of four grave-like pits containing a variety of votive offerings, but no visible indications of human burial, were discovered. The sacrificial deposits were probably inserted into the features during a series of successive offering events. These previously unknown types of monument suggest a greater complexity of funerary and ritual construction in the region of non-megalithic territory.
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09450-5
       
  • A Comparative Study of Painted Pottery Culture of China and Ukraine from
           the Perspective of Art Archaeology

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of the study is to compare the structural and semantic elements of the two ancient cultures of painted pottery—Yangshao and Trypillia. A comparative and analytical method was used. The study has established the similarity of these two cultures. The number of similarities between the two cultures cannot be explained exclusively by the similarity of the worldviews of ancient grain growers, but also by the cultural exchange between geographically distant territories. These data can serve as a basis for further comparisons of different cultures and help a wide range of experts: historians, archaeologists, geographers, and culturologists.
      PubDate: 2022-07-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09449-y
       
  • Correction to: Re-reading Gendered Space at Ko`a and Household Shrines on
           Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu

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      PubDate: 2022-06-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09448-z
       
  • Re-reading Gendered Space at K‘oa and Household Shrines on Hawai‘i
           Island and O‘ahu

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      Abstract: Abstract This article analyzes paired stone monuments on Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu as gendered. Archaeological and ethnographic contexts are provided. Differing knowledge systems collided from the moment of contact, oversimplifying female space and worship into rigid Western binaries and overlooking the variability of agency. A critical re-reading of the sources demonstrates instead great variability in form and function of religious sites, male and female gods and worship practices, and protocol among chiefs and commoners. The argument is developed that balance is reflected on the Hawaiian built landscape through the variability in the way people designed and used their spaces, diverging from stated ideals but without subverting the system. Similar gender-free agency is reflected in contemporary Hawaiian notions of mana and ea loosely translated as “flowing life forces” and “breath” which fill Hawaiian land/‘āina and wahi kūpuna with life and pulse in their living descendants. The conclusions highlight parallel collaborative projects in other parts of the world to bring to attention that Hawai‘i takes part in a global resurgence of Indigenous knowledge systems.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09445-2
       
  • Announcement and News from the World Archaeological Congress on the
           Russian Invasion of Ukraine

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      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09447-0
       
 
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