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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Archaeologies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.224
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1935-3987 - ISSN (Online) 1555-8622
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Re-reading Gendered Space at K‘oa and Household Shrines on Hawai‘i
           Island and O‘ahu

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      Abstract: Abstract This article analyzes paired stone monuments on Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu as gendered. Archaeological and ethnographic contexts are provided. Differing knowledge systems collided from the moment of contact, oversimplifying female space and worship into rigid Western binaries and overlooking the variability of agency. A critical re-reading of the sources demonstrates instead great variability in form and function of religious sites, male and female gods and worship practices, and protocol among chiefs and commoners. The argument is developed that balance is reflected on the Hawaiian built landscape through the variability in the way people designed and used their spaces, diverging from stated ideals but without subverting the system. Similar gender-free agency is reflected in contemporary Hawaiian notions of mana and ea loosely translated as “flowing life forces” and “breath” which fill Hawaiian land/‘āina and wahi kūpuna with life and pulse in their living descendants. The conclusions highlight parallel collaborative projects in other parts of the world to bring to attention that Hawai‘i takes part in a global resurgence of Indigenous knowledge systems.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
       
  • Introduction to Archaeologies Special Issue on Intersectionality Theory
           and Research in Historical Archaeology

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      Abstract: Abstract This special thematic issue includes some of the papers presented in two symposia on intersectionality theory and research that were presented at annual conferences of the Society for Historical Archaeology in 2017 and 2018. This introduction provides the historical context of the development of intersectionality theory, and the development of research and theorizing of intersectional identities and power dynamics in historical archaeology. Articles in this issue provide innovative theorizing and research that go beyond Crenshaw’s intersectionality theory, which analyzes the erasure and invisibility of the identity of Black women by intermeshed racism and sexism in the legal system administering anti-discrimination law.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09442-5
       
  • Empowering Social Justice by Developing a Feminist Intersectionality
           Framework to Increase the Inclusiveness of Historical Markers in Detroit
           and Wayne County, Michigan, USA

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      Abstract: Abstract A form of activist archaeology is undertaken by conducting critical feminist intersectional research to promote social justice in representations of America’s heritage on historical markers in Detroit and surrounding Wayne County, Michigan, USA. This research substantially alters and expands intersectionality theory to analyze androcentrism, racism and ethnocentrism in historical markers. These biases are addressed with more inclusive information about (1) historical power dynamics between social groups and (2) accomplishments of minorities and women. More inclusive information in historical markers provides social justice for people who were marginalized in the past, and may inspire people working to decrease inequalities and oppressions today.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09439-0
       
  • The Galt Family at the Augusta Arsenal: Intersectionality, Motherhood, and
           Childhood in the Antebellum Period of the American South

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      Abstract: Abstract Between 1826 and 1955, the Augusta Arsenal operated on land currently occupied by the Summerville Campus of Augusta University. As a military site, it is often conceptualized as male gendered and war-centric social space. However, most of the artifacts recovered from the Arsenal directly address domestic activities and the presence of the wives and children of the officers and other personnel stationed there. This investigation contextualizes the hidden history of women and children at the Augusta Arsenal during the 19th century through the intersections of age, gender, and religion in the often-contested relationships between mothers and children.
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09438-1
       
  • Archaeology for a New Generation: Exploring Education and
           Intersectionality

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      Abstract: Abstract Archaeology in the Community (AITC) is an urban-based archaeology organization founded with the intent of providing science opportunities to marginalized youth who would not be exposed to archaeology through their formal educational institutions. Through informal education techniques, AITC has sought to educate students that have become victims of unequal education system which benefits small pockets of students. AITC is a pioneer in leveraging unique models of intersectionality that positively impact and resonate with urban, socioeconomically challenged students of color in Washington, DC metropolitan area.
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09440-7
       
  • Invisible but not Forgotten: Freed Black Women in Antebellum and
           Postbellum Madison County, Kentucky

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      Abstract: Abstract Investigation into the lifeways of freedman George White suggest a successful farmer who purchased and kept approximately 600 acres, emancipated his family and built a safe community for them. Documentary research revealed small fragments about the female members of his family. Taking into consideration the multiple layers of social relationships and social constructions over time, how can archaeologists query the material traces of freed Black women' This paper considers how intersectionality and the resultant matrix of domination push for research that does not “yield to closure,” but asks acute questions concerning freed women and their experiences within developing power structures.
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09446-1
       
  • Announcement and News from the World Archaeological Congress on the
           Russian Invasion of Ukraine

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      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09447-0
       
  • Reading Between the Intersecting Lines: Building Intersectionality for a
           Widowed Planter in Mid-18th Century Piedmont Virginia

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      Abstract: Abstract Our investigations into President James Madison’s Grandmother, Frances Taylor Madison, found few records, which is typical for women in 18th-century society. Widowed in 1732, she ran the Montpelier plantation for the first thirty years of its existence. Using a combination of archaeological evidence, a scattering of court records, and information on her oldest son (James Madison, Sr.), we build a case for her intersectional identity through gender, sexuality, generational deference, and race within paternalistic society.
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09437-2
       
  • Dress and Labor: An Intersectional Interpretation of Clothing and
           Adornment Artifacts Recovered from the Levi Jordan Plantation

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      Abstract: Abstract Through an examination of clothing, adornment, and hygiene artifacts recovered from the Quarters area of the Levi Jordan Plantation, this article examines how racial, gendered, and classed operations of power and oppression shaped African American women’s sartorial practices, as an aspect of identity formation, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Texas. Through a Black feminist framework, this article focuses on the ways African American women dressed their bodies for the types of labor they performed to discuss how they negotiated ideologies of race, gender, and class, that shaped hegemonic notions of femininity during the post-emancipation era.
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09443-4
       
  • The Intersections of Structural Violence and Social Agency in Plantation
           Geographies

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the intersections between the structural oppressions and violence of slavery and the social agency of captive people in the US South. In a collaborative partnership of descendant community members, institutional community partners, and archaeologists, this investigation focuses on the oral histories, historical documents, and archaeological material culture of Black women, men, and children associated with the Fanny Dickins plantation. This antebellum plantation is located in the modern 18,000-acre Ames land base near Memphis, Tennessee. Through an intersectional inquiry and praxis, variations in the everyday violence and material humanity associated with plantation geographies are unearthed, helping to reconstruct the historical continuation and influence of slavery from the past to the present.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09444-3
       
  • At the Crossroads: Intersections at Colonization

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      Abstract: Abstract Intersectionality arose as a strategy to understand how oppression operates simultaneously on multiple aspects of a person’s identity. As such, it provides a useful framework to recognize how gendered performances, racialized identities, and religious adherence shaped relationships between Europeans and Indigenous communities along with the enduring ramifications arising from initial contacts through today. Interrogating how Indigenous leaders, particularly of Caddo communities, interacted with Roman Catholic missionaries of New Spain offers an opportunity to understand broader relationships to power situated in intercultural negotiations of intersectional identities. These relationships are integral to archeological interpretations of the use and meaning of cultural materials.
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-022-09441-6
       
  • Global Congresses and Global Crises

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09435-w
       
  • Debating the Swahili: Archaeology Since 1990 and into the Future

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      Abstract: Abstract The Swahili are arguably the most studied society in ancient Sub-Saharan Africa. The Swahili are of African in origin but balance their character between continental Africa and influences from the Indian Ocean, including Islam. City-states and towns along the eastern coast of Africa attest that the Swahili built coral monuments and commercial networks with broad connectivity. Colonial archaeologists claimed foreign origins and cast the Swahili as transplants, false representations evident by 1990 through the contributions of African and other archaeologists and interdisciplinary scholarship. Other aspects of the Swahili continue to be debated, and gaps and shortcomings present impediments to resolution. In this article, we characterize the Swahili and note early trends in the region’s archaeology relevant to contextualize Swahili archaeology post-1990. The article then discusses aspects of Swahili archaeology from 1990 to 2015 and current practices. We note trends, substantive achievements, and lapses in substance and practice during 30 years. Finally, we make observations and suggestions to advance archaeology the region’s archaeology. Archaeology in the Global South can learn from the case of the Swahili and the affirmations, critiques, and suggestions offered here, which we intend to promote future archaeological practice in East Africa.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09434-x
       
  • Spiritual and Spatial Significance of Choedrak Monastery in the Cultural
           Geography of Bhutan

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      Abstract: Abstract Ancient monasteries in Bhutan are an immense asset to the country both in terms of tangible architecture and intangible cultural and religious values. Initially, they were built owing to the interconnected spatial and spiritual significance of the particular place and its concerned divine master. These monasteries have prolifically aided in the propagation of Buddhism as well as defining the very architecture of Bhutan. However, due to the unavailability of rigorous research about it, many monasteries are off the radar of government and scholars with some of them in dire need of restoration. The paper attempts to document and highlight the spatial and spiritual significance of Tharpaling, particularly the Choedrak monastery, which is located in Chumey village under Bumthang district, Bhutan. Having been impregnated sacredness by the visit of Guru Rinpoche (precious master), the subsequent visit of Gyalwa Lorepa reassured the impetus for the transformation of a mere cave into a monastery complex. In conjunction with it, Choedrak is revered as one of the four sacred Drak (cliff) temples of Guru Rinpoche and attracts tourists as well as locals to receive blessings and for extended retreat purposes. Architecturally, the main temple of the Choedrak is a resemblance of a typical monastery architecture of Bhutan incorporating traditional features such as whitewashed tapering stone wall adorned with wooden windows, floating-like roof, and colorful elegance of the interiors. The current study is intended to further signify its place in the cultural heritage dictionary of Bhutan and consequently harness opportunities from the relevant agencies such as the Division for Conservation of Heritage Sites for appropriate and sound solutions for the preservation of the monastery.
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09432-z
       
  • Indigenous Archaeology, Community Archaeology, and Decolonial Archaeology:
           What are we Talking About' A Look at the Current Archaeological Theory
           in South America with Examples

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, I review the various forms of political commitment in the field of archaeology in South America over recent decades using three cases: one from Argentina and two from Colombia. The several types of political engagements that can be categorized involve multiple levels of work, from the use of archaeological excavation in projects with indigenous peoples to the rejection of the application of archaeology within the purposes of the indigenous social movement; in between those two options, we distinguish practices such as multiculturalism and its reification of culture. At this level, past, heritage, and history become merchandise for cultural markets.
      PubDate: 2021-08-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09433-y
       
  • Buahit Serit; A Newly Documented and Endangered Pastoral Rock Art Site in
           East Gojjam, Northwestern Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Abstract This archaeological study reveals previously undocumented rock art along the Blue Nile on the walls of the Buahit Serit gorge in the East Gojjam Zone of the Amhara Regional State in Northwestern Ethiopia. Although Ethiopia has the largest number of documented rock art sites in the Horn of Africa, Buahit Serit is the first published rock art site in the Amhara Regional State. The Buahit Serit rock art is tentatively dated to the late Holocene (1000 BCE–1000 CE) based on comparison of the content and style of its paintings. The rock paintings are composed of hunting, herding, and geometric representations. This study introduces the idea that some of the geometric designs may represent stylized headrest, which may connect the rock art to cultural continuity with living pastoralists. Today the Buahit Serit rock paintings, like many Ethiopian rock art sites, are endangered due to anthropogenic and natural causes.
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09431-0
       
  • Correction to: Recording Unmarked Graves in a Remote Aboriginal Community:
           The Challenge of Cultural Heritage Driving Sustainable Development

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      Abstract: A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11759-021-09429-8
      PubDate: 2021-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09429-8
       
  • WAC Virtual Inter-Congress Archaeology on the Global Stage

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      PubDate: 2021-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09430-1
       
  • Step by Step: How to Investigate Medieval Footwear

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      Abstract: Abstract The selection of research methods depends on many factors, including a number of finds, their state of preservation, and research problems discussed. In the archaeological studies of the medieval leather objects each stage of the research process is important: from recovering a source from cultural layers, securing and conserving a find, to analysing formal features and preparing detailed typologies, what ultimately leads to an attempt to recreate selected historical issues. In this article it is presenting a method for studying medieval archaeological finds made of leather (mainly footwear). It is an attempt to find research methods for presenting the development line of the medieval shoemaking in the period from the turn of the eighth century and the beginning of the ninth century until the end of the fifteenth century. In the case of large assemblages consisting of hundreds, or even thousands of objects, obviously finished items and their components come to the fore. In such cases, the rest of objects referred to as ‘fragments’, ‘pieces of leather’, ‘unidentified objects’ are usually marginalised. In the studies of economic phenomena, however, products cannot be perceived as less important, because each of them might be a valuable source of information, depending on questions asked. The hierarchy of importance of items (or only their features) should change with the research progress and with the issues examined.
      PubDate: 2021-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09427-w
       
  • Touched by the Past' Re-Articulating the Longxing Temple Sites as
           Community Heritage at Qingzhou County, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Community heritage usually reveals bottom-up celebrations of multi-dimensions of social life, which negotiate meaning to certain places, sites, or even monuments under practices of heritage. In 1996, excavations and restorations of the Longxing Buddhist temple at Qingzhou County, hundreds of precious Buddhist statues, gained attention from the general public and all Buddhist communities. With the rebuild of the new Longxing Buddhist temple at Qingzhou County, actually motivated by Xia Jingshan, an eminent Buddhist figure painter, the religious and local community collaborated to express their voices in heritage discourse. A number of factors influence the reinterpretation of Longxing Temple sites: the desire to advocate Qingzhou County as an important city in ancient China, to depict Qingzhou County as having a rich cultural and religious diversity, and to attract tourists and religious communities to visit Qingzhou.
      PubDate: 2021-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11759-021-09425-y
       
 
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