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  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
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Archaeological Dialogues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.898
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1380-2038 - ISSN (Online) 1478-2294
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • ARD volume 29 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000216
       
  • ARD volume 29 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000356
       
  • Humanness as performance

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      Authors: Barrett; John C.
      Pages: 109 - 119
      Abstract: If archaeology is the examination of historical conditions with reference to a surviving material residue, then one way in which these conditions might be characterized is as the different ways they had enabled the development of different forms of humanness. The historical construction of this diversity is discussed here as the ways that the relationships between humans and things had been performed. This means that the practice of archaeology must question the recent desire to adopt a flat ontology that defines archaeology as the ‘discipline of things’. It is argued that it was by means of the performances established between humans and their various objects of concern that different forms of human life were able to define themselves. The implications of this argument for the practice of archaeology are explored.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000289
       
  • For the record

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      Authors: Govier; Eloise
      Pages: 120 - 122
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000290
       
  • Comments on ‘Humanness as performance’ by John C. Barrett

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      Authors: Kim; Jongil
      Pages: 122 - 125
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000307
       
  • Archaeologists, it is time to listen!

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      Authors: McFadyen; Lesley
      Pages: 125 - 127
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000319
       
  • À la recherche de l’homme perdu

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      Authors: Nilsson Stutz; Liv
      Pages: 127 - 130
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000320
       
  • The implications of Indigenous conceptual frameworks and methods for
           rethinking humanness as performance

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      Authors: Smith; Claire, Pollard, Kellie
      Pages: 130 - 132
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000332
       
  • Reply

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      Authors: Barrett; John C.
      Pages: 132 - 137
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000344
       
  • Rainey and the Russians: Arctic archaeology, ‘Eskimology’ and Cold War
           cultural diplomacy

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      Authors: Meskell; Lynn
      Pages: 138 - 154
      Abstract: This article recounts an untold chapter in the life of archaeologist Froelich Rainey, specifically his ambition to collaborate with Soviet scholars and deploy his personal networks to foster mutual understanding across the Iron Curtain during the height of the Cold War. The picaresque and implausible life of Rainey, who entered wartime Vienna in the turret of a B-52 bomber and was a State Department consultant with CIA connections, frantic anti-communist and advisor to Henry Kissinger, reveals just what was at stake for research in the frozen north. Here, I uncover Rainey’s work on ice—from his archaeological explorations in Alaska and his vision for a network of Arctic archaeologists to his internationalist aspirations for world peace. Without doubt, Rainey was a fascinating character, but he also occupied a position from which a wide range of values can be excavated—about politics, security, race and global order in mid-century transitions.
      PubDate: 2022-06-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000228
       
  • Post-conflict ethics, archaeology and archaeological heritage: a call for
           discussion

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      Authors: Newson; Paul, Young, Ruth
      Pages: 155 - 171
      Abstract: Ethics are fundamentally important to all forms of archaeological theory and practice and are embedded within many professional codes of conduct. The ethics of archaeological engagement with conflicts around the world have also been subject to scrutiny and debate. While archaeology and archaeological heritage are increasingly viewed as significant elements of post-conflict work, with much to contribute to rebuilding stable and secure societies, there has been limited acknowledgement and debate of post-conflict ethical issues and challenges for archaeologists. This paper is intended to stimulate discussion around major ethical issues, the problems and possible ways forward for post-conflict archaeology and archaeological heritage.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000253
       
  • New institutional economics in Viking studies. Visualising immaterial
           culture

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      Authors: Ögren; Anders, Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte, Ljungkvist, John, Raffield, Ben, Price, Neil
      Pages: 172 - 187
      Abstract: In this paper, we argue that closer engagement with the field of new institutional economics (NIE) has the potential to provide researchers with a new theoretical toolbox that can be used to study economic and social practices that are not readily traceable in material culture. NIE assumes that individual actions are based on bounded rationality and that the existence of rules (institutions) and their enforcement – the institutional framework – influences agents’ actions by providing different incentives and probabilities for different choices. Within this theoretical framework, we identify a number of concepts, such as collective identity and mobile jurisdictions, that seem to fit what we know of Viking age economic systems. In applying these models to the available archaeological and textual data, we outline the ways in which further research could provide a new understanding of economic interaction within a rapidly evolving context of diaspora and change.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S138020382200023X
       
  • Pre-critical archaeology. Speculative realism and symmetrical archaeology

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      Authors: Govier; Eloise
      Pages: 188 - 199
      Abstract: The rise of Symmetrical Archaeology has subtly recast archaeology as the study of things and not the study of the past or past peoples. This new description of the archaeological endeavour is often met with criticism. This paper continues in the critical vein but embraces a different strategy of engagement. Here, second-wave Symmetrical Archaeology is brought to the fore: its historical development explored, its methodology outlined, its current theoretical basis assessed. Part critique, part defence, I consider the logical underpinning of the second-wave, focusing on ontology and agency. Utilizing Levi Bryant’s ontic principle, I attend to these two issues and frame this style of archaeology as Pre-critical Archaeology. A caveat seems necessary: whilst I spend time with Symmetrical Archaeology in this paper, that does not mean I am a convert. Rather, my ambition here is to see things from the point of view of a Symmetrical archaeologist.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000241
       
  • List of contributors

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      Pages: 200 - 201
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1017/S1380203822000368
       
 
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